GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: vandermolen on February 23, 2008, 01:32:40 AM

Title: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on February 23, 2008, 01:32:40 AM
Naxos has a whole series devoted to the music of Japanese composers. Highlights for me have been the lyrical Symphony No 1(1940) and Symphonic Suite "Heavenly Maiden and Fisherman"(1933) by Hashimoto, Humiwo Hayasaka's moving and eloquent Piano Concerto (1948), in memory of his brother and victims of war and Saburo Moroi's Third Symphony (1944). Chandos have their own composer Yoshimatsu (born 1953), whose Second Symphony (1991-92) is worth exploring although his music has generally met with critical disapproval.

Any views?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: springrite on February 23, 2008, 01:41:27 AM
My exposure of Japanese composers begin with Takemitsu and I have yet to find another Japanese composer who exceeded him.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Harry on February 23, 2008, 01:46:33 AM
The view I have is, that I bought most of Naxos Japanese releases so far, and I was seldom disappointed.
These are a few of the latest yet to be heard.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Symphonien on February 23, 2008, 01:57:28 AM
My exposure of Japanese composers begin with Takemitsu and I have yet to find another Japanese composer who exceeded him.

Same with me.

As for the Naxos Japanese Classics series, I have so far heard and enjoyed this one:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31uigNbPnZL._AA240_.jpg)

I've also read good things about Alsop's recording of some orchestral music:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z7XQWBDTL._AA240_.jpg)

I haven't seen any reviews of this disc with piano works yet, though - but I will definitely buy it if I see it around:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/319BGPnNBcL._AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on February 23, 2008, 07:05:22 AM
My exposure of Japanese composers begin with Takemitsu and I have yet to find another Japanese composer who exceeded him.
same here. I'm familiar with Mayuzumi, who I really like, and I've heard some Yoshimatsu, but that's about it.

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on February 23, 2008, 07:08:24 AM
The view I have is, that I bought most of Naxos Japanese releases so far, and I was seldom disappointed.
These are a few of the latest yet to be heard.
Sugata and Abe..... i'll have to take a listen sometime, after all it's on Naxos.  :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Guido on February 23, 2008, 07:10:57 AM
I still haven't heard any Takemitsu. I very much like Yoshimatsu's music - the Chandos series has displayed his work to be emminently listenable, well crafted, witty, intelligent music, often extremely beautiful. Some people might not respond to its post modern leaning and use of 'low art' in a 'high art' context but he knows exactly what he is doing and the sentimentality is clearly a desired effect. I like it!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Lethevich on February 23, 2008, 07:24:38 AM
This disc by Akutagawa (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Akutagawa-Ellora-Symphony-Trinita-Sinfonica/dp/B0008JEKB8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1203780171&sr=1-1) is very strong. The Ellora Symphony is brilliant, as is the Rhapsody. The Trinita Sinfonica is an earlier work, but is in an appealingly melodic neoclassical style.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/310YiaVvvPL._AA240_.jpg)

Edit: Listen to the last track on the disc using Amazon's samples - lots of fun. Shockingly bad audio compression, but it gets the point across. This guy really really liked a few well-known Russian composers at the beginning of his career :P
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Ephemerid on February 23, 2008, 07:25:44 AM
Takemitsu is awesome!  Oliver Knussen's/London Sinfonietta/Peter Crossley/Peter Serkin's CD Quotation of Dream is a a real treat.  Very lush music, absolutely gorgeous!  Oliver Knussen recorded another CD of chamber orchestra music (Waterways, I believe) which sadly is out of print (last I checked).  It has Tree Line on that CD which is one of his best pieces IMO.  His late orchestral music is where he is at his best.  A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden is another good intro to Takemitsu.

He's heavily influenced by Debussy and Messiaen, but he's got a unique "language" that is easily recognisable.  His music is often dissonant but in this very gentle and disarming way-- very haunting, unforgettable music.  I highly recommend him!  8)

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on February 23, 2008, 11:18:59 AM
http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.selections.com/images/products/picture1zoom/Y940.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.selections.com/Y940/japanese-orchestral-favourites/&h=700&w=674&sz=248&hl=en&start=1&um=1&tbnid=LYUm8uLNTcyldM:&tbnh=140&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3Djapanese%2Borchestral%2Bfavourites%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26ie%3DUTF-8

This is a good starting point.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on February 23, 2008, 06:02:35 PM
you know, I just realized I don't know any Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, Malaysian, Vietnamese, Laotian, Thai, Burmese, or Bangladeshian composers....... am I missing out?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: gomro on February 23, 2008, 06:06:46 PM
you know, I just realized I don't know any Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, Malaysian, Vietnamese, Laotian, Thai, Burmese, or Bangladeshian composers....... am I missing out?

Isang Yun was Korean; I only recently discovered him through this disc:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/612JDPD0E1L._AA240_.jpg)

but it's some very fine work. Highly recommended.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on February 23, 2008, 06:09:58 PM
Isang Yun was Korean; I only recently discovered him through this disc:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/612JDPD0E1L._AA240_.jpg)

but it's some very fine work. Highly recommended.
good. Isang Yun. Now I got a name.

and look! Rosa Parks is his harpist! That's like a bonus, too, even before i listen.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on February 23, 2008, 06:27:33 PM
Thanks for starting this thread, vandermolen!! I had not bought any of these Naxos CDs of music by Japanese composers and did not know where to start...if at all!

Now I do and shall definitely investigate the composers you recommend.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on February 24, 2008, 03:28:43 AM
Thanks for starting this thread, vandermolen!! I had not bought any of these Naxos CDs of music by Japanese composers and did not know where to start...if at all!

Now I do and shall definitely investigate the composers you recommend.

 :) You are very welcome. Hayasaka's Piano Concerto or the Moroi or Hashimoto discs are good strarting points, as is the sampler mentioned above. I hope that you enjoy exploring this repertoire.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: gomro on February 24, 2008, 11:29:56 AM
Thanks for starting this thread, vandermolen!! I had not bought any of these Naxos CDs of music by Japanese composers and did not know where to start...if at all!

Now I do and shall definitely investigate the composers you recommend.

be sure to try the Akutagawa disc on Naxos; it was one of my great discoveries last year.  The earliest pieces have got a strong Shostakovich element, but then things really get strange -- Akutagawan! -- but still very listenable, powerful and interesting throughout.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: violinconcerto on February 25, 2008, 12:34:18 PM
I very much enjoy the violin concertos by Yoji Yuasa, Yuzo Toyama, Kaoru Koyama, Koichi Kishi, Maki Ishii and of course by Akira Ifukube.
The Ifukube is rhythimcal and driving "popcorn music", pure joy.
The Ishii is rhythmically more complex and much more serious.
The Kishi dates from 1933 and sounds like that, very western-like. Kishi studied in Berlin, if I am remember correctly.
Yuasa, Toyama and Koyama are much more introverted and melancolic works, but with a original ideas.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on February 25, 2008, 05:51:19 PM
Ok, I have got the Hashimoto Symphony No.1/Symphonic Suite "Heavenly Maiden and Fisherman"(Naxos 8.555881), the Hayasaka Piano Concerto(8.557819), the Moroi Symphony No.3(8.557162), the Abe Symphony No.1(8.557987) and the Akutagawa Ellora Symphony(8.555975) marked down for exploration!

Anyone heard the Hisato Ohzawa Symphony No.3 "Symphony of the Founding of Japan"/Piano Concerto No.3 "Kamikaze", the Koscak Yamada Symphony "Triumph and Peace" or the Akio Yashiro Symphony/Piano Concerto-all on Naxos?

Might as well go for broke after resisting getting into Japanese music up to now!! (Resisting out of total ignorance of what any of it was like, that is.) :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Brian on February 25, 2008, 07:01:15 PM
Here's my favorite:

(http://www.naxosdirect.com/templates/shared/images/titles/largest/747313298723.jpg)

Terrific music! He studied under Mahler and conducted a complete Mahler cycle in his youth.

Dundonnell, the Yamada CD hardly sounds Japanese at all! It's very much in the cheery romantic mode, almost wholly western. I played it for my parents and asked them to guess the composer; they suggested a figure from the early 1800s without emotional oomph. (Yamada learned composition from Bruch.) Now, the last two pieces on the program, symphonic poems, are different indeed, reflecting Strauss and much more of the twentieth century - and very enjoyable in their way.

(http://www.naxosdirect.com/templates/shared/images/titles/largest/747313535026.jpg)

Here's a disc by the same composer that seems more interesting, since it employs traditional Japanese instruments and styles along with the orchestra:

(http://www.naxosdirect.com/templates/shared/images/titles/largest/747313297122.jpg)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on February 26, 2008, 06:45:33 AM
Right...I have ordered the Abe Symphony No.1, the Hashimoto Symphony No.1, the Hayasaka Piano Concerto, the Moroi Symphony No.3,
the Yamada 'Naguata Symphony' and the Akutagawa 'Ellora Symphony' from Amazon on the recommendations of members.

In for a penny in for a pound(well about £30 actually!). If I like what I hear I will try the other Yamada symphony, the Ohzawa, the Yashiro and the Okhi Symphony No.5 'Hiroshima'.

I will certainly post my impressions in due course! Thanks everyone!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Harry on February 26, 2008, 07:07:23 AM
This is certainly a good mix.! :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on February 26, 2008, 07:25:19 AM

Terrific music! He studied under Mahler and conducted a complete Mahler cycle in his youth.

i was wondering about this when i read from here:

http://www.naxos.com/composerinfo/bio17985.htm


Quote
Abe played in the Music School's orchestra under conductor/composer Klaus Pringsheim who he admired. Pringsheim, appointed professor at the Tokyo Music School in 1931, had been a pupil of Gustav Mahler and had conducted operas in Geneva, Prague and Bremen in the 1910s, and a cycle of Mahler's symphonies with the Berlin Philharmonic. Abe began to study German-style harmony and counterpoint with him, and decided he wanted to become a composer, not a cellist. Abe was strongly influenced by this teacher's view and knowledge of the late romanticism period represented by Mahler and Richard Strauss, and neo-classicism by Hindemith and Kurt Weill.

anyways, I'm turning it on right now!  :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Brian on February 26, 2008, 02:18:54 PM
i was wondering about this when i read from here:

http://www.naxos.com/composerinfo/bio17985.htm


Ooops, misread it. I don't hear much Mahler in Abe anyways - fantastic compositions though  :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: gomro on February 26, 2008, 03:31:38 PM
Right...I have ordered the Abe Symphony No.1, the Hashimoto Symphony No.1, the Hayasaka Piano Concerto, the Moroi Symphony No.3,
the Yamada 'Naguata Symphony' and the Akutagawa 'Ellora Symphony' from Amazon on the recommendations of members.

In for a penny in for a pound(well about £30 actually!). If I like what I hear I will try the other Yamada symphony, the Ohzawa, the Yashiro and the Okhi Symphony No.5 'Hiroshima'.

I will certainly post my impressions in due course! Thanks everyone!

Ah, the Yashiro disc! I forgot about that one, exquisite...definitely influenced by Messiaen, but not nearly the "carbon copy" some critics have made his work out to be. Very fine. The Moroi is good, too, but very much of the European "Classical" mold -- I felt as if he was disregarding everything that had happened in music since Beethoven, but turning out delicious work for all that.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on February 27, 2008, 01:36:40 AM
Thanks for all the replies. I will certainly order the Abe disc.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: techniquest on March 04, 2008, 12:23:26 AM
I am in the process of discovering music from Asia - and what a fun process it is. My favourite thus far is Yoshimatsu; I have his 1st and 5th symphonies on Chandos. I have also recently found an interesting Chandos disc of Japanese composers inlcduing 2 premier recordings: Fantasy for Organ & Orchestra by Atsutada Otaka and Memory of the Sea (Hiroshima Symphony) by Toshio Hosokawa.
I also have the complete Isang Yun symphines set of CPO, and some downloads by Chinese composer Wang Xi-Lin. However I am keen to find others. A recent trip to Bangkok found no Thai classical composers (CD's which are filed under Thai Classical music but actually mean Thai 'traditional' music); indeed the closest I have got is a CD of orchestral music by Dej Bulsuk called 'Kingdom of Smiles' but it's kind of Ketelby meets Mantovani...There must be Thai, Lao, Cambodian etc symphonies out there somewhere....
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: violinconcerto on March 04, 2008, 04:41:39 AM
I have a 2-CD-set from the Korean Society of Contemporary Music with some "real" classical music. For example Chan-hae Lees "Flame" for violin and orchestra. Maybe you try that way too!
And if you are interested in Asia, you can try the classical compositions by Indian Lokshumara Subramaniam. Nice works.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Morigan on March 09, 2008, 10:36:47 AM
Oh, I thought this thread was going to be about the likes of Nobuo Uematsu or Yasunori Mitsuda... :(
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Lethevich on March 09, 2008, 04:40:20 PM
Oh, I thought this thread was going to be about the likes of Nobuo Uematsu or Yasunori Mitsuda... :(

You should be pleasantly surprised that it is so much better! ;D :P (I like the FFVII soundtrack, and others, though)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on March 12, 2008, 07:30:00 PM
My 6 Naxos CDs of Japanese composers have arrived and I have just finished listening to the Hayasaka Piano Concerto which was so highly recommended by vandermolen.

What a strange work! vandermolen described its first movement as "epic, memorable and moving"(as I recall) and that description fits it perfectly. I read the comparisons with Rachmaninov(one of my least favourite composers) but the movement is a good deal less saccharine than(I find) the Russian composer's music. Impressive stuff in a conservative idiom. I cannot, however, reconcile myself to such a sombre, epic movement being followed by a second movement so skittish in a idiom which recalls Milhaud(or even, at times, Gershwin). The two movements just don't seem to me to fit together at all. Still, I am certainly impressed by that first movement.

There is also on the same CD a cheerful, jolly marchlike Overture in D which sounds like an oriental version of the Vaughan Williams
March of the Kitchen Utensils from 'The Wasps'. Great fun!!

Now to sample the Abe, Hashimoto, Moroi, Yamada, Akutagawa!!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on March 13, 2008, 02:47:01 AM
My 6 Naxos CDs of Japanese composers have arrived and I have just finished listening to the Hayasaka Piano Concerto which was so highly recommended by vandermolen.

What a strange work! vandermolen described its first movement as "epic, memorable and moving"(as I recall) and that description fits it perfectly. I read the comparisons with Rachmaninov(one of my least favourite composers) but the movement is a good deal less saccharine than(I find) the Russian composer's music. Impressive stuff in a conservative idiom. I cannot, however, reconcile myself to such a sombre, epic movement being followed by a second movement so skittish in a idiom which recalls Milhaud(or even, at times, Gershwin). The two movements just don't seem to me to fit together at all. Still, I am certainly impressed by that first movement.

There is also on the same CD a cheerful, jolly marchlike Overture in D which sounds like an oriental version of the Vaughan Williams
March of the Kitchen Utensils from 'The Wasps'. Great fun!!

Now to sample the Abe, Hashimoto, Moroi, Yamada, Akutagawa!!

Very interesting feedback. Thanks :) Glad you liked the extended opening movement of Hayasaka. I totally agree about the bizarre juxtaposition of the Milhaud/Francaix type second movement and have to confess that I often just play the, very moving, opening movement on its own.

Hope you enjoy the Moroi and Hashimoto. Have to say that I was a bit disappointed by the Abe Symphony but need to give it another go.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Symphonien on March 18, 2008, 12:35:27 AM
Just discovered a new young Japanese composer today called Hikari Kiyama, via this very intense piano piece:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LIw8ykSmGU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LIw8ykSmGU)

:o Sounds like he was hyperactive or something when he wrote it. ;D
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on March 18, 2008, 06:38:28 AM
Just discovered a new young Japanese composer today called Hikari Kiyama, via this very intense piano piece:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LIw8ykSmGU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LIw8ykSmGU)

:o Sounds like he was hyperactive or something when he wrote it. ;D
oh my god...........
i have to get the score to that.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on March 18, 2008, 06:43:08 AM
that is some seriously inventive stuff though.......
especially the warrior screams and the floor stomps at the end.
Looks like he has a bunch of videos on youtube, along with a few other composers at the same recital.
Totally avant-garde, uncompromising music.




Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on March 18, 2008, 09:39:37 AM
Otomo Yoshihide:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XjkcKm2jb4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XjkcKm2jb4)

Keiji Haino (and friends!):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDUAfKuGTcY&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDUAfKuGTcY&feature=related)

Kazuhisa Uchihashi:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x8ZLSmmwfI
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x8ZLSmmwfI)

This last one is from a show I attended. I should have recorded this. My camera is better!!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on March 18, 2008, 09:46:31 AM
Let it out, Haino!



(actually, that's sometimes how i play)  8)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 11, 2008, 03:38:46 PM
Just to report back on my explorations of the Japanese repertoire recently purchased-

I was least impressed by the rather dull and characterless Abe Symphony No.1, Sinfonietta and Alto saxophone Divertimento-all a bit diluted Kabalevsky, I thought.

The Hashimoto Symphony No.1 sounded the most authentically Japanese of the works I sampled-interesting but not especially memorable.

The Yamada Symphony 'Triumph and Peace' sounded as if it could have been written by Schumann or, at least, Max Bruch! The two symphonic poems with which it is coupled were more interesting with clear Straussian/Scriabinesque influences.

I was most impressed by the Moroi Symphony No.3 and Two Symphonic Movements which are darkly gripping.

The Akutagawa Ellora Symphony is rather too 'advanced' for my tastes but I did like the other two works on that CD-the Trinita Sinfonica and Rapsodia for Orchestra.

Still to sample the Ohzawa Symphony No.3 and Yamada's Naguata Symphony.

So...best music encountered? The Moroi and (at least) the first movement of the Hayasaka Piano concerto.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2008, 12:09:00 AM
Just to report back on my explorations of the Japanese repertoire recently purchased-

I was least impressed by the rather dull and characterless Abe Symphony No.1, Sinfonietta and Alto saxophone Divertimento-all a bit diluted Kabalevsky, I thought.

The Hashimoto Symphony No.1 sounded the most authentically Japanese of the works I sampled-interesting but not especially memorable.

The Yamada Symphony 'Triumph and Peace' sounded as if it could have been written by Schumann or, at least, Max Bruch! The two symphonic poems with which it is coupled were more interesting with clear Straussian/Scriabinesque influences.

I was most impressed by the Moroi Symphony No.3 and Two Symphonic Movements which are darkly gripping.

The Akutagawa Ellora Symphony is rather too 'advanced' for my tastes but I did like the other two works on that CD-the Trinita Sinfonica and Rapsodia for Orchestra.

Still to sample the Ohzawa Symphony No.3 and Yamada's Naguata Symphony.

So...best music encountered? The Moroi and (at least) the first movement of the Hayasaka Piano concerto.

Thanks Colin for the interesting feedback.  We are basically in agreement. I too was disappointed by the Abe and my favourite is the Hayasaka piano Concerto (1st movement). The Moroi which is darkly moving but maybe I have enjoyed the Hashimoto more than you.  your post has inspired me to put Masao Ohki's Symphony 5 "Hiroshima" on to the CD player. As the blurb says, it alternates dissonant harmonies with tranquil and solemn music.  Certainly it is a verey powerful and dark score. The earlier Japanese Rhapsody on the same disc is a lively and enjoyable score but I will probably stick with the Moroi and Hayasaka.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Renfield on April 12, 2008, 12:18:22 AM
You should be pleasantly surprised that it is so much better! ;D :P (I like the FFVII soundtrack, and others, though)

Indeed. Fascinating thread, I'd no idea all these composers existed! Although yes, Uematsu is an interesting soundtrack composer, when his music doesn't sound like rehashed Sibelius; or even when it does, perhaps. ;)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2008, 12:57:03 AM
Indeed. Fascinating thread, I'd no idea all these composers existed! Although yes, Uematsu is an interesting soundtrack composer, when his music doesn't sound like rehashed Sibelius; or even when it does, perhaps. ;)

Try the deeply moving first movement of the Hayasaka Piano Concerto (Naxos) if you don't know it.

This is a v good introduction to Japanese composers:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/images/B000063TS2/sr=1-1/qid=1208011132/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=229816&s=music&qid=1208011132&sr=1-1
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 12, 2008, 06:04:23 PM
Thanks Colin for the interesting feedback.  We are basically in agreement. I too was disappointed by the Abe and my favourite is the Hayasaka piano Concerto (1st movement). The Moroi which is darly moving but maybe I have enjoyed the Hashimoto more than you.  your post has inspired me to put Masao Ohki's Symphony 5 "Hiroshima" on to the CD player. As the blurb says, it alternates dissonant harmonies with tranquil and solemn music.  Certainly it is a verey powerful and dark score. The earlier Japanese Rhapsody on the same disc is a lively and enjoyable score but I will probably stick with the Moroi and Hayasaka.

Thanks for your comments, Jeffrey! I shall give the Hashimoto another go! I have just ordered Ohzawa's 2nd symphony and a disc of music by Sugata so we shall see what they bring!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 12, 2008, 11:54:43 PM
Colin,

What did you make of Ohzawa's "Kamikaze Symphony"? I guess you must have liked it otherwise you wouldn't be hunting down his Symphony 2!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 13, 2008, 07:05:03 AM
Colin,

What did you make of Ohzawa's "Kamikaze Symphony"? I guess you must have liked it otherwise you wouldn't be hunting down his Symphony 2!

It is the Piano Concerto No.3 which is subtitled "Kamikaze"; the 3rd Symphony is subtitled "Symphony of the Founding of Japan".

Excluding Yamada(born 1886 and clearly the early pioneer of Japanese music) there seems to have been a generation of composers working around the same time-

Moroi(born 1903)
Hashimoto(born 1904)
Ohzawa(born 1907)
Abe(born 1911)
Hayasaka(born 1914)

Three of these studied abroad in the Thirties-Moroi in Germany 1932-34, Hashimoto mainly in Austria with Wellesz 1934-37, and Ohzawa. Ohzawa was abroad for the longest period(1930-36) and had the broadest education, first in the USA with Sessions and Schoenberg and then in France with Nadia Boulanger and Paul Dukas. He also associated with Roussel, Schmitt, Tansman and was encouraged by Ibert and Honegger. These influences certainly make the music I have heard the most 'cosmopolitan' and, probably, the most difficult for Japanese audiences of the time to absorb. Ohzawa seems to have been heavily influenced by Bartok, Hindemith, Honegger, Roussel and Prokofiev. There are jazzy influences, driving motoric passages in the Piano Concerto.

Very interesting composer indeed! Well worth hearing if you have not already. Perhaps I still marginally prefer the Moroi but Ohzawa is worth further exploration.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 13, 2008, 09:15:05 AM
It is the Piano Concerto No.3 which is subtitled "Kamikaze"; the 3rd Symphony is subtitled "Symphony of the Founding of Japan".

Excluding Yamada(born 1886 and clearly the early pioneer of Japanese music) there seems to have been a generation of composers working around the same time-

Moroi(born 1903)
Hashimoto(born 1904)
Ohzawa(born 1907)
Abe(born 1911)
Hayasaka(born 1914)

Three of these studied abroad in the Thirties-Moroi in Germany 1932-34, Hashimoto mainly in Austria with Wellesz 1934-37, and Ohzawa. Ohzawa was abroad for the longest period(1930-36) and had the broadest education, first in the USA with Sessions and Schoenberg and then in France with Nadia Boulanger and Paul Dukas. He also associated with Roussel, Schmitt, Tansman and was encouraged by Ibert and Honegger. These influences certainly make the music I have heard the most 'cosmopolitan' and, probably, the most difficult for Japanese audiences of the time to absorb. Ohzawa seems to have been heavily influenced by Bartok, Hindemith, Honegger, Roussel and Prokofiev. There are jazzy influences, driving motoric passages in the Piano Concerto.

Very interesting composer indeed! Well worth hearing if you have not already. Perhaps I still marginally prefer the Moroi but Ohzawa is worth further exploration.

Thanks Colin,

I do have it somewhere on my shelves and will look it out. I listened to the Moroi again today; a darkly moving score (Symphony 3). I think that it is the best symphony I have yet heard in the Naxos series. Let us know what Ohzawa's Second Symphony is like.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 28, 2008, 05:06:55 AM
Ohzawa's Second Symphony and Second Piano Concerto confirm the impressions made by his Third Symphony and Third Piano Concerto.
I am not at all surprised that Japanese audiences found them hard to handle at their first performances. They are very much under the influence of the kind of music Ohzawa must have heard in Paris in the early 1930s. His friendship with composers like Honegger, Ibert, Roussel, Tansman etc are mirrored in the neo-classicism and jazzy sounds of both works.

I don't rate either as highly as the 3rd symphony and 3rd piano concerto but there is no doubt that Ohzawa sounds more 'modern' than his contemporaries.

Oh, and I was quite impressed by the Ohguri Violin Concerto! Thanks, Jeffrey!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on April 28, 2008, 02:36:46 PM
here's a wild one:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=3ZrBfP6LuNc&feature=related
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 28, 2008, 02:52:12 PM
here's a wild one:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=3ZrBfP6LuNc&feature=related

Yeh...right!

If you like that sort of thing you will like that sort of thing!

I have a very old-fashioned notion of what music is and what it is not.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on April 28, 2008, 03:12:13 PM
Thanks GGGGRRREEG, that was very cool.

And very nice to be able to follow along in the score. That's always fun. And funny how formally traditional the piece is, too, as you can see if you follow it all the way through.

Anyway, it was good. Thanks again for the clip.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Ugh! on November 24, 2008, 03:41:41 AM
Browsing through this thread I could find no mention of my old favorite Masaru Sato anywhere. But since I always refer to him in these non-western composer threads, I would rather discuss Isao Tomita. Just came across his synthesizer rearrangements of Debusssy's works (Snowflakes are Falling). That falls neatly into the Switched-on-Bach category, but I personally find Tomitas rearrangements tasteful. However, his own compositions are interesting, and I like the way he experiments with everything from traditional japanese instruments to synthesizers.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on January 07, 2009, 02:40:00 PM
Thought I'd bump up this thread for no other reason than to plug this great Piano Concerto which I really love (or, to be precise, the extended first movement - out of two, which I usually play on its own). Dedicated to Hayasaka's brother and the victims of war, it is a great piece, which I find very moving. Hayasaka died quite young in 1955. He wrote the scores for Seven Samurai and Rashomon.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on January 07, 2009, 06:58:33 PM
Hayasaka died quite young in 1955. He wrote the scores for Seven Samurai and Rashomon.
Aw, what a surprise at the end there! And here I was thinking I've never heard any music at all by this guy......
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Ugh! on January 07, 2009, 11:41:06 PM
Hayasaka died quite young in 1955. He wrote the scores for Seven Samurai and Rashomon.

Remind me: which Sibelius piece did he steal for the Seven Samurai score?

Anyway, last year I discovered Mayuzumi's Nirvana Symphony, which was a great little treasure. Having experimented with electronic timbres, Mayuzumi, like Ligeti, brought this new knowledge into conventional instrumentation. Influenced by Buddhist prayer bowls and chants, the orchestral timbres in the Nirvana Symphony are wonderful.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: pjme on January 08, 2009, 01:52:28 PM
If only it was available on CD!
You can try his Mandala symphony ( on Naxos) - purely orchestral , impressive.

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classRev/2006/Apr06/MAYUZUMI_8557693.jpg)

Peter
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on January 08, 2009, 02:07:12 PM
And don't forget Yasunao Tone and Masami Akita.

(You were forgetting them, weren't you? And Toshimaru Nakamura. Point being that Naxos is only going to give you some Japanese "classical" composers, definitely not people like Yoshihide and Haino and the ones I just mentioned that you were forgetting. ;))

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Ugh! on January 09, 2009, 01:14:44 AM
And don't forget Yasunao Tone and Masami Akita.

(You were forgetting them, weren't you? And Toshimaru Nakamura. Point being that Naxos is only going to give you some Japanese "classical" composers, definitely not people like Yoshihide and Haino and the ones I just mentioned that you were forgetting. ;))



And on the other end of that spectrum, remaining contemporary: Yuichiro Fujimoto. http://www.yuichirofujimoto.com/ (http://www.yuichirofujimoto.com/)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on January 10, 2009, 07:32:05 PM
And speaking of forgetting, I was myself forgetting Takahiro Yamamoto and Katsura Mouri, who constitute the incredible BusRatch. (I just received Time Magic City, an album by BusRatch and Otomo Yoshihide. Highly recommended.)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: techniquest on January 11, 2009, 04:05:07 AM
Quote
...I would rather discuss Isao Tomita. Just came across his synthesizer rearrangements of Debusssy's works (Snowflakes are Falling). That falls neatly into the Switched-on-Bach category, but I personally find Tomitas rearrangements tasteful. However, his own compositions are interesting, and I like the way he experiments with everything from traditional japanese instruments to synthesizers.

Tomitas arrangements of familiar classical music were far far better during his analogue years. Once he moved on to digital in the early '80s, the arrangements were too full of echo and had an unconvincing flatness about them. His 'Ravel' album was the last of the analogue recordings, and the difference between this and the subsequent 'Grand Canyon' album is huge. BTW, the Debussy album title is 'Snowflakes are Dancing' not 'Falling'.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Ugh! on January 19, 2009, 05:44:07 AM
Tomitas arrangements of familiar classical music were far far better during his analogue years. Once he moved on to digital in the early '80s, the arrangements were too full of echo and had an unconvincing flatness about them. His 'Ravel' album was the last of the analogue recordings, and the difference between this and the subsequent 'Grand Canyon' album is huge.

Quite, but there inbetween were The Planets and Firebird (with Night on Bare Mountain and Prelude  which were both wonderfully analogue ;)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on April 25, 2009, 02:41:17 PM
No one has mentioned Somei Satoh. This guy really lays on the "cosmic nostalgia" that a lot, it seems, of Japanese composers gravitate towards: perfectly melancoly melodies bathed in a cosmic Debussian twilight. Takemitsu and Feldman we friendly, no?

Yoshimatsu seems popular at Chandos at least!

I have about 7 Takemitsu cds. Though they "all" pretty much sound the same no matter what the forces (a la Feldman or Xenakis), if I need to relax, no other composer comes close to Takemitsu's repose.
Honestly, just about any cd you get...very addictive. The double concerto Gemeaux on Denon, or Arc/Green (on some small label) represent Takemitsu's more avant style (as will his more 1960s works). The Knussen chamber cd on Virgin is a standout, but so are Iwaki on ABC, the John Williams/Sony, or the Knussen/DG.

No one has really gone into what I thought Japanese composers were all about: post-50s serial scary, totally objective, most hard-nuts-to-crack high modernists. Miyoshi, Ichiyanagi, Ishii, Hosokawa, Nishimura, Yuasa, Taira, Ikebe, Nodaira, Y.Takahashi...yea, I not gonna claim I know that much, but these are the names.
There's an old LP box, I believe, of avant Japanese piano music played by Takahashi.

The SQs Prelude (1960) by Mayuzumi and Landscape (1961) by Takemitsu are the first shots I know of, and Miyoshi's SQ No.2 (1967) is one I've been itching to hear, but most of the stuff I know comes from the 80s or later.

Hosokawa is well represented on cd. Though many of these composers have their "Japanese" moments, Hosokawa to me seems one of the most Western sounding, if by that I mean Ligeti, Xenakis, Berio et al. He, too, likes to call pieces Landscape and Fragment. The Arditti disc I have of chamber works is one of my go to cds if I need general around high modernism, and I mean that in the good way!

Nishimura I have represented by the Arditti, and this guy goes a whole lot further than Hosokawa, getting into Holliger/Globokar/Xenakis territory. His 3 SQs, all pretty different, are all VERY...well, you know...great!....and especially No.3 "Avian" which is one of the most unique SQs to my ears in the sounds that he asks Arditti to produce. This bird is no "Lark" I assure you.

Arditti had a Fontec cd of 4-5 Japanese SQs. If you have it, I want it...NOW!!!

Ichiyanagi, though I haven't heard a lick, promises to be the dean of high modernist Japanese composers.

Verdict? Japanese composers are another rabbit hole where you will see many $$$ fly out of your hands! ;D
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 25, 2009, 02:52:53 PM
Fortunately....for my wallet, that is........I have no interest in Japanese modernist composers ;D
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on April 25, 2009, 07:04:41 PM
Well, thanks for sharing, Dundonnell. I guess.

Now I want to share, too. There's a great series of CDs of some really interesting and outrageous Japanese music on Edition OMEGA POINT called Experimental Music of Japan. Fills in some of the gaps of new music activity there from 1950 on. Very diverse series so far (I have only a handful of these--and they're recent acquisitions, so some of them I've only heard once). Some very lovely noise to be sure. Instrumental, electroacoustic, live improv--it's a fantastic world out there, if you've got the ears for it.

(Remember what Ives said about your ears, now, boys and girls!)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 25, 2009, 11:39:41 PM
I'd be very interested to hear more of Hayasaka, whose Piano Concerto (or at least the extended first movement) is one of my best Naxos discoveries.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Ugh! on April 26, 2009, 10:05:09 AM
Well, thanks for sharing, Dundonnell. I guess.

Now I want to share, too. There's a great series of CDs of some really interesting and outrageous Japanese music on Edition OMEGA POINT called Experimental Music of Japan. Fills in some of the gaps of new music activity there from 1950 on. Very diverse series so far (I have only a handful of these--and they're recent acquisitions, so some of them I've only heard once). Some very lovely noise to be sure. Instrumental, electroacoustic, live improv--it's a fantastic world out there, if you've got the ears for it.

(Remember what Ives said about your ears, now, boys and girls!)

Are you familiar with the 10 cd box set called "Improvised Music From Japan", from the label of the same name? It includes the electronic experiments of Toshimaru Nakamura and Yoshihide Otomo, etc but also the quieter shamisen experiments of Yumiko Tanaka, various japanese free jazz and a great variation of approaches.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 26, 2009, 12:04:39 PM
Well, thanks for sharing, Dundonnell. I guess.

Now I want to share, too. There's a great series of CDs of some really interesting and outrageous Japanese music on Edition OMEGA POINT called Experimental Music of Japan. Fills in some of the gaps of new music activity there from 1950 on. Very diverse series so far (I have only a handful of these--and they're recent acquisitions, so some of them I've only heard once). Some very lovely noise to be sure. Instrumental, electroacoustic, live improv--it's a fantastic world out there, if you've got the ears for it.

(Remember what Ives said about your ears, now, boys and girls!)

I thought that might 'irk' you ;D As I have posted a lot of times in this thread about my own discoveries of Japanese composers and their music I cannot be accused of not exploring what was a totally new field to me. Yes, I will concede that my explorations and my discoveries have been limited to the sort of composers whose music appeals to me-and that means that they are a pretty 'conservative' lot :)

I wish that I had the time, the money...and, yes, I admit it, the inclination.. to explore further and more deeply and I have nothing but admiration for those whose musical tastes are so much broader than mine to encompass a much wider range of musical idioms and styles. If I could love Beethoven and Xenakis, Brahms and Boulez, Sibelius and Berio my musical appreciation would be, no doubt, richer and better informed. Sadly, for me, that is not however the case. I shall, however, survive ;D
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on April 26, 2009, 12:37:29 PM
Dun,

It's just that "I have no interest in..." is such a pointless remark, no matter what it's about. The assumption is, is it not, that your tastes are so interesting, and so normative, that your report of non-interest means that those things are worthless. Yes, I know that you say that that's not the case, but still there's this nagging suspicion.... By the way, I do love Beethoven and Xenakis, Brahms and Boulez, Sibelius and Berio. I don't know if that's desirable (I think it is), but it's certainly possible!! (Maybe I should find a Butterworth thread somewhere and pronounce my lack of interest!!)

Eugene,

I had a nagging sense that there was another series. And you are right, there is! And I think I have some of those, too, but I'm too lazy to go check (haha). I'll have them all, eventually!!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 26, 2009, 01:49:20 PM
Dun,

It's just that "I have no interest in..." is such a pointless remark, no matter what it's about. The assumption is, is it not, that your tastes are so interesting, and so normative, that your report of non-interest means that those things are worthless. Yes, I know that you say that that's not the case, but still there's this nagging suspicion.... By the way, I do love Beethoven and Xenakis, Brahms and Boulez, Sibelius and Berio. I don't know if that's desirable (I think it is), but it's certainly possible!! (Maybe I should find a Butterworth thread somewhere and pronounce my lack of interest!!)

Eugene,

I had a nagging sense that there was another series. And you are right, there is! And I think I have some of those, too, but I'm too lazy to go check (haha). I'll have them all, eventually!!

You are right-an expression of 'no interest' is a pointless remark. It was made in jest but I regret it. My tastes in music are shared by some on this board and not by others. That is obvious and I fully accept the fact. I will say-once again and, believe me, in all sincerity-that my tastes are in no way superior to those of others, nor is the music I prefer necessarily, 'better' than music to which I am not attuned. It is clearly both possible and desirable to love the music of the diverse composers whose names I originally listened. If I cannot do so then that is my loss :( I have admitted that. I can add nothing further.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: some guy on April 26, 2009, 08:40:24 PM
Dundonnell, you are a most princely gentleman; may your listening always give you as much pleasure as mine gives me!!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: pjme on April 26, 2009, 10:29:25 PM
I ordered 3 CD's with Japanese music at HMV Japan.  On the KING label. They are all ( most?) live recordings with the NHK OPrchestra/ Hiroyuki Iwaki is among the conductors. Most recordings date from the late 1960-ies - early 1980-ies.
Music by : Akira Miyoshi, Yoshio Mamiya, Akio Yashiro, Toru Takemitsu etc.

It took me a whole lot of e mails to understand what is on the CD's ( I was looking specifically for Miyoshi's Concerto for orchestra - a kind of "Short ride in a fast & wild machine"...ca 1960). HMV's website is quite clear to use - many items are only in Japanese....I got great help from an organisation in NY that promotes Japanese music.

Comments later.

Peter



Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dundonnell on April 27, 2009, 02:23:57 AM
Dundonnell, you are a most princely gentleman; may your listening always give you as much pleasure as mine gives me!!


 :) Thank you :) Reciprocated.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: jowcol on April 28, 2009, 05:38:56 AM
Just to chime on on Tomita.  I was a big fan of his albums in the 70s-- but sometimes I think I liked the choice of music he adapted.  Some of his textures were really nice, but other gimmicky aspects got in the way.  His arrangement of Prokofiev's first violin concerto was nice on the "Bermuda Triangle" album, and as I recall the Ravel album worked pretty well.  Some of the gimmicky things (like the humming/vocal stuff during the Old Castle on his Pictures at an Exhibition album wore thin.)


And, at the risk of running off topic-- some people on this thread were asking about other Asian composers.  I've met one of them, a Thai composer  who was also a Sci-Fi writer while staying in the US.  One thing he used to do is sit down at the Piano and play the "Star Wars" theme in the style of different composers-- as I recall, the Bach and Stravinsky (le Sacre) versions were my favorite.

FwIW-- I've copied some material from his website.  Beyond hearing him goofing around on the piano (when he was in is "musical burnout" mode), I am not familiar with is music.   Have any of you?

(One other tangent-- the King of Thailand was a composer and swing era Jazz musician who had a standing offer to join Benny Goodman's band.....)



Somtow Sucharitkul - Artistic Director

Called by the International Herald Tribune ?the most well-known expatriate Thai in the world,? Somtow Sucharitkul (S.P. Somtow) is a composer, author and media personality whose talents have entertained fans the world over.

Born in Thailand, Somtow grew up in several European countries and was educated at Eton and Cambridge. His first career was in music. His 1975 composition ?Views from the Golden Mountain? was the first to combine Thai and Western instruments into new sonorities. In the 1970s, Somtow established himself as a prominent Southeast Asian avant-garde composer, causing considerable controversy in his native country as artistic director of the Asian Composers Expo 78. He founded the Thai Composers? Association, and was the permanent representative of Thailand to the International Music Council of UNESCO.

A severe case of musical burnout caused Somtow to turn to writing in the early 1980s, and he soon produced a succession of over forty books in several genres under the pen name S.P. Somtow, winning numerous awards for such novels as ?Vampire Junction? (Gollancz), today considered a classic of gothic literature and taught in ?gothic lit? courses around the U.S.A. His semi-autobiographical memoir ?Jasmine Nights,? published by Hamish Hamilton, prompted George Axelrod, Oscar-winning writer of ?Breakfast at Tiffany?s?, to refer to him as ?the J.D. Salinger of Siam.? He has just finished a stint as president of the Horror Writers? Association. His most recent books are ?Tagging the Moon ? Fairy Tales of Los Angeles? and ?Dragon?s Fin Soup.? His novels have been translated into about a dozen languages. He also dabbled in filmmaking, directing a couple of low-budget films during his years in Los Angeles.

In the 1990s, he began to turn back to music, rejecting his previous embrace of the musical fashions of the 60s and 70s and reinventing himself as a neo-Romantic composer. His recent works include the ballet ?Kaki? and the ?Mahajanaka Symphony? composed for the King of Thailand?s 72nd birthday.

In 1999, he was commissioned to compose what turned out to be the first opera by a Thai composer ever to be premiered, ?Madana?, inspired by a fairytale-like play written by King Rama VI of Siam and dedicated to his wife, Queen Indrasaksachi, who was also the composer?s great-aunt. For this opera, he has chosen to compose in the late-Romantic idiom that would have been familiar to his great-aunt and her royal spouse, with a liberal garnish of Southeast Asian sonorities. The opera premiered in February 2001 in Bangkok in what was called, by Opera Now magazine, ?one of the operatic events of the year.?

Somtow?s second opera on a Thai theme, Mae Naak, opened on January 6, 2003 in Bangkok. He has just won the World Fantasy Award, the most coveted writing award in the field of fantasy literature, for his short story ?The Bird Catcher.? He commutes between his two homes in Los Angeles and Bangkok.

In the second half of 2003, Somtow conducted the Thailand premiere of the Brahms Requiem as part of a 100-concert-worldwide memorial to Daniel Pearl, and presented an evening of Wagner in honour of Wolfgang Wagner. He also directed a production of ?The Turn of the Screw.? Japanese director Takashi Miike is adapting his award-nominated story ?Dragon?s Fin Soup? into a French-produced feature film and hid novel, Vampire Junction, is being adapted into an opera by French composer Fr�d�ric Chaslin.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on May 15, 2009, 01:20:10 AM
There is a new Apex cd called "Landscape" by the Lotus SQ, with works by Yashiro, Takemitsu, Hosokawa, Miyoshi, and Nishimura.

I saw Akio Yashiro's name pop up twice in this thread (a cd on Naxos), but no one seems to have bought it yet (Dun? $:)). Apparently his 1957 SQ is pretty "famous."??? Maybe it's the first "great" Japanese SQ? It's in four mvmts. with Italian headings, and I saw a "something misterioso" for the slow mvmt. (and a "something fantastico" in his Piano Trio). So my impression might be that Yashiro is the Japanese Hindemith (meaning "traditional" mid-century composer)? Perhaps he is the bridge between the earlier generation (1930s) and the one that was soon to come? Hmmm...anyone?

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: gomro on May 16, 2009, 06:41:33 PM
There is a new Apex cd called "Landscape" by the Lotus SQ, with works by Yashiro, Takemitsu, Hosokawa, Miyoshi, and Nishimura.

I saw Akio Yashiro's name pop up twice in this thread (a cd on Naxos), but no one seems to have bought it yet (Dun? $:)). Apparently his 1957 SQ is pretty "famous."??? Maybe it's the first "great" Japanese SQ? It's in four mvmts. with Italian headings, and I saw a "something misterioso" for the slow mvmt. (and a "something fantastico" in his Piano Trio). So my impression might be that Yashiro is the Japanese Hindemith (meaning "traditional" mid-century composer)? Perhaps he is the bridge between the earlier generation (1930s) and the one that was soon to come? Hmmm...anyone?



Yashiro is a LOT more like Messiaen than Hindemith.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on May 16, 2009, 11:47:05 PM
Yashiro is a LOT more like Messiaen than Hindemith.

Interesting. Can you elaborate?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 21, 2009, 07:39:04 AM
What a great thread!

Japanese composers are of particular interest to me.

I am pleased to see that amount of enthusiasm here for the Japanese Classics series on Naxos. I've been following that series ever since it started and some real gems have come from the sereis.

The Hayasaka Piano Concerto is indeed fabulous. I've chuckled seeing some of the...frustration...in here over the (perhaps) jarring juxtaposition of the heavy first movement with the light romp of a second movement. I admit it is indeed unconventional, but it is really what one should expect from Hayasaka. He (and his composer friend) Ifukube were real admirateurs of the French music of the time, so the hints of Françaix, Ibert, etc. are not by accident!

By the way, I am the webmaster of AKIRAIFUKUBE.ORG (www.akiraifukube.org). This is the official English language website on Akira Ifukube and is sanctioned as such by the composer's family. Ifukube has been a study of mine for a while and the website is the representation of most of my work. I invite y'all to check it out.

I also love the Moroi disc. Akutagawa is also amazing.

Some of the discs in the series I am less impressed with are the Masao Oki and the two Ozawa discs. The Oki lacks any substantial drama and sounds very monochrome in a very uninteresting way. Ozawa's music just meanders way to much to keep my interest afloat, though there are moments of genius that appear but fade away much too quickly.

I look forward to keeping this discussion alive!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Brewski on July 21, 2009, 07:48:02 AM
By the way, I am the webmaster of AKIRAIFUKUBE.ORG (www.akiraifukube.org). This is the official English language website on Akira Ifukube and is sanctioned as such by the composer's family. Ifukube has been a study of mine for a while and the website is the representation of most of my work. I invite y'all to check it out.

Hi Tapkaara, and welcome.  Nice website on Ifukube, there.  (PS, are you Erik?)  You will find a number of people here who are interested in his work as well as other Japanese and 20th-century composers.  

Enjoy yourself...lots of fine people here.  

--Bruce
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 21, 2009, 07:52:23 AM
Hi Tapkaara, and welcome.  Nice website on Ifukube, there.  (PS, are you Erik?)  You will find a number of people here who are interested in his work as well as other Japanese and 20th-century composers.  

Enjoy yourself...lots of fine people here.  

--Bruce

I am indeed Erik. Erik...spelled with the very Nordic K. Named after my great-great grandfather who was from Sweden...!

Japan is a very musical country. But a very overlooked one, as well. The Naxos series is an incredibly valuable and relevant undertaking, and I am very proud of Naxos for taking the risk of producing discs of such unknown repertoire. (But I suppose that is their MO.)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on July 21, 2009, 01:14:47 PM
I am indeed Erik. Erik...spelled with the very Nordic K. Named after my great-great grandfather who was from Sweden...!

Japan is a very musical country. But a very overlooked one, as well. The Naxos series is an incredibly valuable and relevant undertaking, and I am very proud of Naxos for taking the risk of producing discs of such unknown repertoire. (But I suppose that is their MO.)

Welcome indeed Erik,

I have played the Piano Concerto by Hayasaka (or at least the first movement!) over and over again - the end bit of the first movement is overwhelming - a wonderful moment.

What do you think of the music of Yoshimatsu?

Jeffrey
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 21, 2009, 01:21:50 PM
Welcome indeed Erik,

I have played the Piano Concerto by Hayasaka (or at least the first movement!) over and over again - the end bit of the first movement is overwhelming - a wonderful moment.

What do you think of the music of Yoshimatsu?

Jeffrey

I must admit that I am only familiar with his Threnody to Toki. I am not a big fan of the musical avant-garde, at least not for the most part, and thus I find this work hard to get into. he does create some interesting sonorities in the work, but byond that, I am not a commited listener of this composer.

You see, me being a fan of Ifukube may have a lot to do with this. Ifukube would have been unimpressed by such a work as well as he was a very traditional composer, at least in the face of the avant-garde. Ifukube and Takemitsu, arguably the two best known Japanese composers, were perfect polar opposites. The two even had a friendly rivalry and would often comment (negatively) on each others works. I think the two knew that they represented opposite ends of the musical spectrum and fed off of that, to some degree.

Interegstingly, Hayasaka was one of Ifukube's best friends growing up, but Hayasaka went on to mentor Takemitsu. If you hear early Hayasaka, you hear a late romantic/nationalist idiom that is much closer to Ifukube. As Hayasaka progressed, his works became more modernist. His last major orchestral work, Yukara, is a serialist piece. I'm sure Ifukube would have been very dissapointed with Hayasaka for going down that route.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on July 21, 2009, 03:41:41 PM
I must admit that I am only familiar with his Threnody to Toki. I am not a big fan of the musical avant-garde, at least not for the most part, and thus I find this work hard to get into. he does create some interesting sonorities in the work, but byond that, I am not a commited listener of this composer.

You see, me being a fan of Ifukube may have a lot to do with this. Ifukube would have been unimpressed by such a work as well as he was a very traditional composer, at least in the face of the avant-garde. Ifukube and Takemitsu, arguably the two best known Japanese composers, were perfect polar opposites. The two even had a friendly rivalry and would often comment (negatively) on each others works. I think the two knew that they represented opposite ends of the musical spectrum and fed off of that, to some degree.

Interegstingly, Hayasaka was one of Ifukube's best friends growing up, but Hayasaka went on to mentor Takemitsu. If you hear early Hayasaka, you hear a late romantic/nationalist idiom that is much closer to Ifukube. As Hayasaka progressed, his works became more modernist. His last major orchestral work, Yukara, is a serialist piece. I'm sure Ifukube would have been very dissapointed with Hayasaka for going down that route.

Yes, I'm sure you are right (re Hayasaka). You might like to try Yoshimatsu Symphony No 2 or No 1 - these are my favourites - very enjoyable if, perhaps, lacking in depth.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on July 21, 2009, 10:31:15 PM
I just saw "The Burmese Harp". Was that an Ifukube score?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 21, 2009, 10:46:17 PM
I just saw "The Burmese Harp". Was that an Ifukube score?

Yes indeed it was. That film was nominated for the Academy Award for best foreign film in the year it was produced, 1956. Unfortunately, it lost.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 22, 2009, 10:45:28 AM
Has anyone in here heard the Naxos Ifukube disc?

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: gomro on July 23, 2009, 04:36:01 AM
Has anyone in here heard the Naxos Ifukube disc?

It's very crisply played, well recorded, and QUITE representative of Ifukube.  That Symphonic Fantasia #1 (is there a #2?) is a hoot, too, hearing all those Godzilla cues; listen to Ifukube and imagine miniature cities being stomped by men in rubber lizard suits. Gz. I guess the old definition of an "intellectual" applies: "One who can hear the William Tell Overture and NOT think of the Lone Ranger."
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 23, 2009, 07:36:45 AM
It's very crisply played, well recorded, and QUITE representative of Ifukube.  That Symphonic Fantasia #1 (is there a #2?) is a hoot, too, hearing all those Godzilla cues; listen to Ifukube and imagine miniature cities being stomped by men in rubber lizard suits. Gz. I guess the old definition of an "intellectual" applies: "One who can hear the William Tell Overture and NOT think of the Lone Ranger."

There are actually three Symphonic Fantasias. They were all written at the same in 1983 and all contain cues from the various Godzilla/sci fi scores from the composer's career. Symphonic Fantasia no. 1 is by far the most recorded of the three.

Ifukube for years refused to have any of his film music performed in the concert hall. He believed the music could not work effectively outside of the context of the films. But the public kept demanding it, and even his students at the time persuaded him. He gave in and the three fantasias (in particular, the 1st) are among his most popular works!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: gomro on July 25, 2009, 12:50:36 PM
There are actually three Symphonic Fantasias. They were all written at the same in 1983 and all contain cues from the various Godzilla/sci fi scores from the composer's career. Symphonic Fantasia no. 1 is by far the most recorded of the three.

Ifukube for years refused to have any of his film music performed in the concert hall. He believed the music could not work effectively outside of the context of the films. But the public kept demanding it, and even his students at the time persuaded him. He gave in and the three fantasias (in particular, the 1st) are among his most popular works!

I gotta seek out the other two, then!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 26, 2009, 10:33:29 AM
I gotta seek out the other two, then!

The other two Symphonic Fantasias are available on a disc called The Artistry of Akira Ifukube 4 which is available from the site www.hmv.co.jp. Choose to view the site in English and you should be able to find it.

Yes, they ship to the US, but shipping is usually around $12, I think. But they ship very quicky.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: monafam on July 30, 2009, 05:41:49 PM
I purchased a Somei Satoh album online:  Toward the Night, which has "Ruika 1990", "Toward the Night 1991", and "Homa 1988".  I found it pretty interesting.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 30, 2009, 06:05:16 PM
I purchased a Somei Satoh album online:  Toward the Night, which has "Ruika 1990", "Toward the Night 1991", and "Homa 1988".  I found it pretty interesting.

I admit I am not aware of this composer. What can you tell me about his sound?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: monafam on July 30, 2009, 06:42:37 PM
I admit I am not aware of this composer. What can you tell me about his sound?

My overall musical ignorance may shine through here -- these works are slow and haunting; minimalist in scope it appears.  The music sort of floats there together and it can be quite pretty.  (I posted a review I saw below and I would agree that it comes across more "Western" -- not an obvious "Eastern" influence from the limited things I've heard.

Here is a site with a little more description -- http://newalbion.com/NA056/index.htm

I glanced at Amazon's review--
Satoh (b. 1947) is a Japanese composer of unusual power and inventivenss; he may very well be Töru Takemitsu's successor. In Satoh's case, however, the music is more traditionally Western than Eastern. Ruika (1990) is a work in the tradition of Miserere, by Michel-Richard Delalande (1657-1726), for cello and string orchestra. Toward the Night (1991) is for strings only, meant to describe dusk--of both the sunset and the sunset of humankind. It's still beautiful. Homa (1988) is for soprano and strings. This entire disc is a stunner. If you like Rautavaara or Takemitsu, Pärt or Schnittke, then Satoh is for you. --Paul Cook
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 31, 2009, 08:02:04 AM
私は大きな興味を持ってこのスレッドがある!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: greg on July 31, 2009, 03:32:19 PM
私は大きな興味を持ってこのスレッドがある!
僕もこのスレッドが面白いと思っている。  ;)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on July 31, 2009, 04:40:29 PM
Again, I have to express my lack of enthusiasm for the Ozawa discs in this series. His works seem to meander much too much. I have tried on many occasions to sit down and take them in, but to no avail. His idiom just seems to lack a certain type of coherence that is abundantly available in Moroi, Akutagawa, Hayasaka, etc...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on October 09, 2012, 04:31:53 PM
Some favorite Japanese composers:

Akira Ifukube -

(http://www.starscolor.com/images/akira-ifukube-01.jpg)

Fumio Hayasaka -

(http://www.starscolor.com/images/fumio-hayasaka-04.jpg)

Yasushi Akutagawa -

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/2238882/Yasushi+Akutagawa.gif)

Toshiro Mayuzumi -

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/17046217/Toshiro+Mayuzumi+mayuzumi.jpg)

These are my favorites right now, but I have many more composers to discover through Naxos' wonderful Japanese Classics series.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 12, 2012, 04:16:31 AM
Some favorite Japanese composers:

Akira Ifukube -

(http://www.starscolor.com/images/akira-ifukube-01.jpg)

Fumio Hayasaka -

(http://www.starscolor.com/images/fumio-hayasaka-04.jpg)

Yasushi Akutagawa -

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/2238882/Yasushi+Akutagawa.gif)

Toshiro Mayuzumi -

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/17046217/Toshiro+Mayuzumi+mayuzumi.jpg)

These are my favorites right now, but I have many more composers to discover through Naxos' wonderful Japanese Classics series.

Hayasaka's Piano Concerto (Naxos), is a wonderful  work - especially the long opening movement - a kind of threnody for his brother and the victims of war - a wonderful piece which I play over and over again, although I often give the incongruous second movement a miss!

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on October 12, 2012, 06:29:14 AM
Hayasaka's Piano Concerto (Naxos), is a wonderful  work - especially the long opening movement - a kind of threnody for his brother and the victims of war - a wonderful piece which I play over and over again, although I often give the incongruous second movement a miss!



That movement alone is worth the price of admission IMHO.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on October 12, 2012, 07:07:15 AM
As much as I like Ifukube, I have to say my admiration for Akutagawa may be even greater. His musical language seemed much more Modern and he wasn't afraid to throw in the occasional thorn-filled musical passage. :) One of the things I look for in music is contrasts. Almost all of my favorite composers work in contrasts or have composed works that rely heavily on them. A good example would be RVW's Symphony No. 4.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 12, 2012, 10:09:08 AM
That movement alone is worth the price of admission IMHO.

Oh, absolutely - I find it incredibly moving.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on June 17, 2013, 08:53:00 PM
The Hayasaka concerto is one of the best kept secrets in 20th century piano concerto repertoire. Naxos did a HUGE service by recording it. In fact, I think it may be a world premiere recording. If it is, what a shame that it was only recorded "recently." But we have it, and for that we should be thankful.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: kyjo on August 08, 2013, 09:14:46 AM
Since this thread has been "bumped", I thought I'd comment on my admiration for Naxos' Japanese Classics series. Many volumes in the series have received negative reviews because the reviewers were expecting more explicitly "Japanese-sounding" music. I think that is an unfair criticism and I believe listeners should approach this music with an open mind. My favorite volumes in the series are the Akutagawa, Bekku (I had to order this from Japan ::)), both Hashimoto, Hayasaka, Ifukube, Moroi, Ohki and Yamada (the one with the Nagauta Symphony) discs. Akutagawa's thrillingly rhythmic Trinita sinfonica, Hayasaka's Rachmaninovian in the first movement/Poulencian in the second PC and Moroi's powerful, rather Mahlerian Symphony no. 3 were real finds for me, especially. One Japanese composer whose music Naxos has neglected is Ikuma Dan, whose six symphonies I was sent by a Japanese friend. I was highly impressed by this accessible yet captivating music. Unfortunately, like Naxos' other nationality series, their Japanese one seems to be losing steam :(
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: kyjo on August 08, 2013, 09:22:02 AM
Agree 100%.

 :)

What are your favorite volumes in the series, sanantonio?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: kyjo on August 08, 2013, 09:38:43 AM
I haven't heard many of those recordings, and do not have a favorite, but was agreeing with the sentiment that the kind of criticism you cited was unfair.

 :)

Oh, I was just wondering if you had heard any of those recordings. :) Please do investigate them if you get a chance!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: dyn on August 08, 2013, 12:51:32 PM
Hosokawa is a compelling composer, but for me his works are uneven in terms of inspiration and originality. There is a lot (as there inevitably is in the works of composers who studied in Germany during a certain period) that sounds like second- or third-pressing Lachenmann—not surprising, even Lachenmann himself sometimes sounds like that—and does not stick long in the memory. However there are also many more engaging works; i particularly find myself returning to his music for shō (japanese mouth organ) and other traditional instruments with regularity.

Both approaches (either assimilating into mainstream musical culture or becoming a "cultural tourism guide") used by "outsiders" to break into the Western classical tradition*—overwhelmingly dominated by white Judeo-Christian European males—have been harshly criticised. Hosokawa's music occasionally escapes or transcends these pitfalls, but for another Japanese composer whose music avoids either easy categorisation or Orientalisation i will unreservedly recommend the music of Jo Kondo, who is well served by ALM Records (also on NML and elsewhere) and whose music is beautiful without being "easy" or "accessible"** (example (http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/32084883/03%20Three%20Songs%20of%20the%20Elderberry%20Tree%20copy.mp4))

* classical music privilege drinking game: drink every time you see phrases like "a synthesis of Western classical music and the traditions of the composer's native ______" in reviews, CD liner notes, etc when referring to composers born outside America/Europe

** adj., a buzzword whose approximate meaning is "something we think will allow the president of IMG Artists to buy another Lamborghini"
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on August 09, 2013, 12:09:05 PM
Nice to see some interest here. The Hayasaka Piano Concerto on Naxos was one of my best discoveries in recent years. I have probably played that CD more than any other Naxos CD in my over-sized collection. Moroi's Third Symphony was the other fine discovery - a moving, powerful and eloquent work.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: kyjo on August 09, 2013, 12:18:33 PM
Nice to see some interest here. The Hayasaka Piano Concerto on Naxos was one of my best discoveries in recent years. I have probably played that CD more than any other Naxos CD in my over-sized collection. Moroi's Third Symphony was the other fine discovery - a moving, powerful and eloquent work.

I agree; those are two very fine works :) Do you know the Akutagawa disc, Jeffrey? His Trinita sinfonica is an exciting, immensely appealing work. The other works on the disc are a bit more "difficult", but no less powerful.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on August 09, 2013, 12:22:08 PM
I agree; those are two very fine works :) Do you know the Akutagawa disc, Jeffrey? His Trinita sinfonica is an exciting, immensely appealing work. The other works on the disc are a bit more "difficult", but no less powerful.

I probably do have it somewhere in my collection Kyle. I'll look it out when I return to the UK next week.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Johnll on August 10, 2013, 02:44:01 PM
Nice to see some interest here. The Hayasaka Piano Concerto on Naxos was one of my best discoveries in recent years. I have probably played that CD more than any other Naxos CD in my over-sized collection. Moroi's Third Symphony was the other fine discovery - a moving, powerful and eloquent work.
One of the great reason to look into GMG is that someone (thank you Vandermolen) will guide you to music like this.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on August 10, 2013, 10:29:01 PM
One of the great reason to look into GMG is that someone (thank you Vandermolen) will guide you to music like this.

Thank you John. Also, both these CDs are on Naxos, so that they can be picked up inexpensively.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on August 12, 2013, 04:31:12 PM
Glad to see this thread has gotten bumped!

The Naxos Akutagawa disc seems to be (practically) universally praised. This makes me feel good because it's proof that music by Japanese composers...at least one...has the type of appeal that can make so many people feel lucky to have found it. Actually, there are many Japanese composers, I feel, that have similar appeal and they are there, "hiding" in plain sight. Not because the composers want to remain hidden...but rather...because the music world at large, for whatever bizarre reason, has elected to ignore them.

One would think Takemitsu is the ONLY composer Japan ever produced. Yes, he has by far the most international renown, but I think it could be argued whether or not he's the best Japan has to offer. I suppose he was an avant-gardist when the avant-garde was, for all intents and purposes, the only acceptable music idiom of its day. That was helpful. The praise he got from Stravinsky was helpful too. Also, the championing he received from Seiji Ozawa, himself the best known Japanese conductor or his day, couldn't have hurt.

And thus arises an issue I take with Maestro Ozawa. Seiji-san had a very unique and powerful platform from which to support the other composers from his native Japan but totally neglected (as far as I know) everyone of them aside from Takemitsu. I think this is a gross infraction against the Japanese music world during Ozawa's high-profile years. True, Ozawa thought that Takemitsu was the BEST Japanese composer...which is fine...but surely there must have been others that were worthy of being heard aside from Takemitsu, even if they weren't quite as good in his estimation.

Ozawa could have done so much to further the cause of Japanese music in general but elected not to in complete deference to Takemitsu. This is shameful at best and seditious at worst! (OK, maybe that last bit is exaggerated!)

Having said all of that, massive kudos to Naxos for their efforts in the Japanese Classics series. Yeah, looks like it's run out of steam, but here's to hoping things pick up again at some point.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: kyjo on August 12, 2013, 04:40:42 PM
I agree with every word in your post, Tapkaara :) I recall the Ifukube work that is your username is a really fun and exciting piece; I'll have to revisit it. Have you heard any of Shin-Ichiro Ikebe's music, by any chance? I've been looking into getting some recordings of his symphonies and other orchestral works on the Camerata label, but I'm not sure what to expect.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on August 12, 2013, 06:46:03 PM
I agree with every word in your post, Tapkaara :) I recall the Ifukube work that is your username is a really fun and exciting piece; I'll have to revisit it. Have you heard any of Shin-Ichiro Ikebe's music, by any chance? I've been looking into getting some recordings of his symphonies and other orchestral works on the Camerata label, but I'm not sure what to expect.

Indeed! My name is taken from Ifukube's one and only symphony, Sinfonia Tapkaara.

Ikebe? No, I do not know that name. I know the Camerata label well, though. What do you know about him?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: kyjo on August 12, 2013, 07:12:23 PM
Indeed! My name is taken from Ifukube's one and only symphony, Sinfonia Tapkaara.

Ikebe? No, I do not know that name. I know the Camerata label well, though. What do you know about him?

I don't know much about Ikebe, but I just saw some Camerata discs of his orchestral music on Amazon and my interest was piqued. His Symphonies 3 and 5 are on YouTube, so I think I'll give them a listen before emptying my wallet on those Camerata CDs. Here's his Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin-ichiro_Ikebe
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on August 13, 2013, 06:32:51 PM
I don't know much about Ikebe, but I just saw some Camerata discs of his orchestral music on Amazon and my interest was piqued. His Symphonies 3 and 5 are on YouTube, so I think I'll give them a listen before emptying my wallet on those Camerata CDs. Here's his Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin-ichiro_Ikebe

Thanks! I shall check him out on YouTube and Wikipedia.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 14, 2013, 05:52:40 AM
Lovely to see this discussion - Japanese composers hugely under-rated in the west, to my mind.

Can I point anyone remotely interested to the Channel of Shishamo66161 on YT. Listening now to a single upload, best part of 2hrs. long, of Akutagawa's orchestral works. One of many great uploads here !
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on August 14, 2013, 06:58:33 PM
I guess I have heard Ikebe's music, albeit unknowingly.

I have heard his music in the context of a few Kurosawa films, namely, Kagemusha and Madadayo. I will admit, though, I do not remember any of the themes or anything from these films, but that is not because they were not good...it's simply that I saw these films a long time ago and, well, my memory fails me!

I need to look him up on YouTube now.

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on August 18, 2013, 07:04:39 PM
I much prefered the Shinohara piece to the Hosokawa. Hosokawa I knew of previously, Shinohara I did not. I am now curious to learn more about Shinohara.

Looks like he was born in 1931 and he's still alive. His music sounds like it could have come from a later generation. Fascinating.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: pjme on August 21, 2013, 12:19:37 AM
I just discovered that Toshiro Mayuzumi' "Nirvana symphony" can now be seen (complete) on YT. ! Maurice Béjart used ( parts?) of it in his ballet "Kabuki".

 http://youtube.com/v/IUnAHyZD_d4

Mesmerizing!

P.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: lescamil on August 21, 2013, 02:09:19 PM
Akira Miyoshi's works for me are a real revelation, especially these early works from the early 1960s. Sure, they are rooted in expressionism, but there is a real vitality that is present here, and it is a real pleasure to listen to. Listen for yourself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9go1D6E9MQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQUnlSjSvW0
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: pjme on August 21, 2013, 11:13:24 PM
Miyoshi's music is indeed very vital . I love the Concerto for orchestra - in less than 10 minutes it just ...explodes ! Would love to see & hear  it live. It used to available on CBS LP's ( ca 1970-1975?)

(http://thumbs2.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mV1zjjdUieTgyI7AhtfK4oA.jpg)

Another favorite (once available on the Camerata label) : Teruyuki Noda's Pianoconcerto.

http://youtube.com/v/dmMhbH2JHEE

P.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Tapkaara on August 23, 2013, 08:18:28 PM
It's always fun when "lost" music emerges from the mists of obscurity.

In 1950, Ifukube wrote a ballet called Fire of Prometheus. Since at least 1955, the orchestral score was thought lost though a reduction for two pianos was extant.

Well, fairly recently, portions of the original orchestral score were rediscovered along with some scratchy recordings (maybe a rehearsal) of the original orchestral score. So, with the two-piano version, recordings and the tidbits of the orchestral score, a Japanese composer, Shigeyuki Imai, was able to reconstruct the entire score.

The score was performed for the first time (probably not since 1955) on May 31 of this past year and, just last week, NHK radio broadcast the performance. One portion of the score has appeared on YouTube...and here it is! The Joy for Fire segment from Ifukube's Fire of Prometheus:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjfCcW6UFv8
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: The new erato on February 05, 2014, 07:16:47 AM
Samuragochi:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/05/japan-beethoven-mamoru-samagochi-composer-deaf (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/05/japan-beethoven-mamoru-samagochi-composer-deaf)

Gives an interesting twist to the Hiroshimna Symphony!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on February 05, 2014, 09:45:19 AM
Samuragochi:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/05/japan-beethoven-mamoru-samagochi-composer-deaf (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/05/japan-beethoven-mamoru-samagochi-composer-deaf)

Gives an interesting twist to the Hiroshimna Symphony!

How extraordinary! I have the Hiroshima Symphony myself. Thank you for posting this. Reminds me of the Joyce Hatto recordings fraud.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: cjvinthechair on February 05, 2014, 10:54:53 AM
Wow !! Still love the work, though - will the real composer please stand up ?!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Christo on February 05, 2014, 01:40:46 PM
Wow !! Still love the work, though - will the real composer please stand up ?!

According to the BBC, a music teacher called Takashi Niigaki claims to be the composer.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-26039226
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: cjvinthechair on February 06, 2014, 03:19:47 AM
Dai Fujikura (http://www.daifujikura.com/)

http://www.youtube.com/v/LimYhhgrDoE

Yep - can certainly listen to that - thank you !
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on February 06, 2014, 08:01:15 AM
http://www.youtube.com/v/d5ePOeQTXMQ

Akira Nishimura, born September 8, 1953.

Nishimura studied composition and musical theory on a graduate course at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. He also studied Asiatic traditional music, religion, aesthetics, cosmology and the heterophonic concepts, all of which had a lasting influence on his music.

Nishimura is definitely one of the Xenakian type Japanese Composers. That Arditti disc is really good. I liked the last SQ on the disc, with the cello action at the beginning. But that whole disc is substantial. Like to check out more.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: amw on February 06, 2014, 03:22:57 PM
According to the BBC, a music teacher called Takashi Niigaki claims to be the composer.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-26039226
He also claims Samu...whatever isn't deaf either.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/07/arts/music/renowned-japanese-composer-mamoru-samuragochi-admits-fraud.html?hp

Kinda silly when you get down to it. I wonder how much of his marketing machine was in on the secret.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on February 07, 2014, 09:18:55 AM
Asked how the two worked together, Niigaki said he would compose pieces and sometimes play them for Samuragochi, who would then choose which he liked.

Yes, I could understand why Niigaki wonders whether Samuragochi is actually deaf, under those circs....
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: torut on March 08, 2014, 06:51:04 PM
Takuya Imahori (*1978)

String Quartet with electronics (2012) by Takuya Imahori on SoundCloud (https://soundcloud.com/takuya-imahori/string-quartet-with)

Takuya Imahori was a disciple of Yoshihisa Taira (posted above by sanantonio) at École Normale de Musique de Paris, and studied at IRCAM during 2005-2006. He was famous at a Japanese blog site sharing his experience at IRCAM. That was the reason I learned his name, but have not heard his music at all until I found this soundcloud page. I was surprised by that he has been very active recently (there are many works on the site composed since 2012.) The music is interesting for me.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: torut on March 19, 2014, 11:26:31 PM
Recently Dai Fujikura uploaded a lot of his works on youtube with scores. http://www.youtube.com/user/fujikuramusic/feed (http://www.youtube.com/user/fujikuramusic/feed)

Dai Fujikura - String Quartet No.2 FLARE
performed by Arditti Quartet
http://www.youtube.com/v/QX1ENsZrhVc
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: torut on March 28, 2014, 11:18:15 AM
Neos (https://neos-music.com/) will release new CD of Misato Mochizuki on March 31, 2014.

(https://neos-music.com/images/covers-large/NEOS_11403_Mochizuki.jpg)

anonymous
[01] Banshikicho no choshi (before 10th century)
[02] Sojo no choshi (before 10th century)
Misato Mochizuki - Etheric Blueprint Trilogy (2002–2006)
[03] 4D for 9 players (2003)
[04] Wise Water for 9 players (2002)
[05] Etheric Blueprint for 9 players and electronics (2005–2006)

Mayumi Miyata shô [01 & 02]
Christophe Mazzella electronics [05]
mdi ensemble
Yoichi Sugiyama conductor

I am looking forward to this because her Kairos album was good. It would have been great if she composed shô works, but the first two tracks in this CD are traditional music composed before 10th century. Mayumi Miyata is a popular shô player in contemporary music world. I like her recordings of Jon Cage's One9 and Two4 on Mode.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: torut on April 12, 2014, 09:19:50 PM
Akira Miyoshi's works for me are a real revelation, especially these early works from the early 1960s. Sure, they are rooted in expressionism, but there is a real vitality that is present here, and it is a real pleasure to listen to. Listen for yourself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9go1D6E9MQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQUnlSjSvW0
I am getting more and more interested in his music. These chamber/piano works are also good. They are very western to my ears. He studied at the Paris Conservatory and was influenced by Henri Dutilleux. (Wikipedia/Oxford)

Piano Sonata (1958)
https://www.youtube.com/v/6qyZo4uG0Zw

Nocturne (1973)
https://www.youtube.com/v/t7s1o6GPKBw

En vers (1980)
https://www.youtube.com/v/OTUYBVuD8bw

String Quartet No.3 "Constellation in Black" (1992)
https://www.youtube.com/v/Gl1XERULxI4

He also composed this lovely song. :) (for an animation adapted from the novel, Anne of Green Gables, by Lucy Maud Montgomery)
https://www.youtube.com/v/5ATHGQHV60o
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: torut on May 12, 2014, 07:10:07 PM
I recently purchase some CDs of Miyoshi's music (6 discs + 1 SQ compilation). I am enjoying his 3 SQs, orchestral works, concertos, songs, etc. His compositions are very well crafted, I think.

These are some works of a Miyoshi's pupil, Takashi Niigaki (born 1970).

G.P. Telemann (1681-1767) - Quartett in g TWV 43 g4
Noriko Koide (born 1982) - Gonin de Manimani 2:30~
Takashi Niigaki - "Invention or Inversion" No. 2 (2010) 9:40~
https://www.youtube.com/v/CIajDEjY1EY

Takashi Niigaki - Suburb (2002)
https://www.youtube.com/v/q5Gn1n0ZzQ8
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Jaakko Keskinen on May 15, 2014, 06:30:32 AM
Nobuo Uematsu!!!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on May 15, 2014, 06:41:52 AM
Varan the Unbelievable

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1l3e8P5OGhA
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: ibanezmonster on March 29, 2015, 05:50:36 PM
Nobuo Uematsu!!!
Yesssssss!!!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Rons_talking on March 29, 2015, 09:34:18 PM
I believe Takemitsu has been a huge influence among younger composers worldwide, with his ravishing colors and mystic gestures. I have heard many of his orchestral works but their names escape me now. I downloaded Okhi's 5th (Hiroshima) Symphony which I'd been impressed with when I heard a broadcast, but I've yet to hear a work from Japanese composers that I'd consider a favorite. Perhaps some earlier works...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on March 29, 2015, 09:39:35 PM
I believe Takemitsu has been a huge influence among younger composers worldwide, with his ravishing colors and mystic gestures. I have heard many of his orchestral works but their names escape me now. I downloaded Okhi's 5th (Hiroshima) Symphony which I'd been impressed with when I heard a broadcast, but I've yet to hear a work from Japanese composers that I'd consider a favorite. Perhaps some earlier works...

Of all the music I've heard from Japanese composers, Takemitsu's A String Around Autumn may be my favorite. Lovely work.

https://www.youtube.com/v/cOsdYtLQhv8
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on March 30, 2015, 11:36:51 PM
A big recommendation from me for Hayasaka's very moving Piano Concerto on Naxos. Have just ordered Yoshimatsu's 6th Symphony. Listened to his Third and Saxophone Concerto yesterday. There are elements of Mike Oldfield about this music but I find it very enjoyable.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 02, 2015, 06:41:49 AM
Currently enjoying this. Undemanding but thoroughly entertaining music. So far I have picked up quotes from Sibelius's 6th Symphony and Tchaikovsky's 'Pathetique'.


Pity the notes are all in Japanese  ::)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: ibanezmonster on April 02, 2015, 07:32:20 AM
Pity the notes are all in Japanese  ::)
If you screenshot them, I could translate.  ;)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 03, 2015, 01:46:10 AM
If you screenshot them, I could translate.  ;)
How very kind! Do you mean send you a scan of them? I don't know what is meant by screenshot. It would be a lot of work and I am reluctant to do that as I am sure that I can find some info online. Thanks so much for the very kind offer.  :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: ibanezmonster on April 03, 2015, 06:36:03 AM
How very kind! Do you mean send you a scan of them? I don't know what is meant by screenshot. It would be a lot of work and I am reluctant to do that as I am sure that I can find some info online. Thanks so much for the very kind offer.  :)
You're right, scan is what I meant. Hope you find the info. But if not and you change your mind, I'll still do it. It would be good practice.  8)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 03, 2015, 08:45:04 AM
You're right, scan is what I meant. Hope you find the info. But if not and you change your mind, I'll still do it. It would be good practice.  8)
VMT (very many thanks).  :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Jaakko Keskinen on April 04, 2015, 02:28:05 AM
Some Koji Kondo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZqOc0SJ6sM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZqOc0SJ6sM)

And Yoshitaka Azuma.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1qQ-CXIB-4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1qQ-CXIB-4)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers RECOMMENDS BEYOND TORU
Post by: snyprrr on October 29, 2016, 09:05:52 AM
Ichiyanagi
Nishimura
Taira

Yoshimatsu
Satoh

M. Ishii


Can someone pleeease direct me to the more AvantGarde of this Thread (not limited to the above)?  I thought it was the first three above. I believe the more Conservative ones are:

Yashiro
both of the "Matsudaira Matsumuru Matsa... I get them confused)
Mayuzumi
Ikebe
Ifukube

along with Yoshimatsu and Satoh, though, like Takemitsu, they are still "Modern"...



I seem to like Ishii and Nishimura... wondering about Ichiyanagi...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mahlerian on October 29, 2016, 09:13:16 AM
Toshio Hosokawa is on the avant-garde side as well, and there have been a few discs of his released on Naxos.  The chamber works I've heard by him are better, though.  I find Yoshimatsu's music irritatingly cloying.

I don't understand any way in which Takemitsu's music is not modernist, unlike Ifukube or Yoshimatsu...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Spineur on October 29, 2016, 09:32:42 AM
Hikaru Hayashi Highly recommended

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikaru_Hayashi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikaru_Hayashi)

I have this recording of his viola concerto (a beauty)

The last composer on this CD Tan Dun, is a (skippable ?) chinese composer

Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Spineur on October 29, 2016, 10:09:48 AM
Hikaru Hayashi composed nearly 30 operas.  His most performed one are

    • Opera Gauche the Cellist (based on the novel by Kenji Miyazawa)
    • Opera Dvenadtsat' mesyatsev (based on the novel by Samuil Marshak)
    • Opera Metamorphosis (based on the novel by Franz Kafka)
    • Opera I Am a Cat (based on the novel by Soseki Natsume)
    • Opera Three Sisters (based on the novel by Anton P. Chekhov)
    • Opera Inu no Adauchi (based on the novel by Hisashi Inoue)
    • Opera Last Adventure of Don Quixote (based on the novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra)
    • Opera Romeo and Juliet (based on the novel by William Shakespeare)

Unfortunately, I have not seen a single one.  Gauche the Cellist, is an opera for children was performed at the Avignon festival and received several awards.  There is apparently a Denon CD (DENON COCO 78565b) although I havent seen it anywhere.  There is an NHK recording of Esugata Nyobo.  No idea how one could get a hold of it.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: snyprrr on October 29, 2016, 04:28:50 PM
I don't understand any way in which Takemitsu's music is not modernist, unlike Ifukube or Yoshimatsu...

I like some Hosokawa, but I'm "done with him" for the moment, that's why he wasn't on the list. Yea, I was sampling some Yoshimatsu (I remember when he first "came out" with that very first Chandos release, and we were all like, meh.

Yes, I don't know why i said that comment above

Hikaru Hayashi Highly recommended

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikaru_Hayashi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikaru_Hayashi)

I have this recording of his viola concerto (a beauty)

The last composer on this CD Tan Dun, is a (skippable ?) chinese composer



Tan Dun, yes. I like to skip him now.

Thanks for the recommend
Title: Re: Japanese Composers RECOMMENDS BEYOND TORU
Post by: nathanb on October 29, 2016, 07:24:03 PM
Ichiyanagi
Nishimura
Taira

Yoshimatsu
Satoh

M. Ishii


Can someone pleeease direct me to the more AvantGarde of this Thread (not limited to the above)?  I thought it was the first three above. I believe the more Conservative ones are:

Yashiro
both of the "Matsudaira Matsumuru Matsa... I get them confused)
Mayuzumi
Ikebe
Ifukube

along with Yoshimatsu and Satoh, though, like Takemitsu, they are still "Modern"...



I seem to like Ishii and Nishimura... wondering about Ichiyanagi...

Keep trying with Ishii, Nishimura, and Ichiyanagi.

Add Yuasa, Fujikura, Mochizuki, and Harada at the least.

I suppose it's best not to go down the debatable rabbit hole of Onkyo.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: ComposerOfAvantGarde on October 29, 2016, 07:50:34 PM
Keep trying with Ishii, Nishimura, and Ichiyanagi.

Add Yuasa, Fujikura, Mochizuki, and Harada at the least.

I suppose it's best not to go down the debatable rabbit hole of Onkyo.
Yeah Fujikura is great and seems really really active with heaps of brilliant stuff uploaded to his YouTube channel, I have only heard some Mochizuki once enjoyed what I heard............I should revisit once I am over my Mahler 7 phase as well as check the others out.

Title: Re: Japanese Composers RECOMMENDS BEYOND TORU
Post by: snyprrr on October 30, 2016, 09:43:34 AM
Keep trying with Ishii, Nishimura, and Ichiyanagi.

Add Yuasa, Fujikura, Mochizuki, and Harada at the least.

I suppose it's best not to go down the debatable rabbit hole of Onkyo.

Do you have the Ishii on Denon with his 'Afro-Concerto'? 

Anyhow, yea, thanks for the confirmations. Does Ichiyanagi have a "big piece" to start with? Nishimura seems to be the current choice for mind blowing- all I have is that very good Arditti disc, but he has quite a bit on Camerata, wouldn't know where to begin.

what's Onkyo?

and I guess we're not gonna bring Merzbow into the discussion- at least I don't need him to be brought into THIS discussion...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers RECOMMENDS BEYOND TORU
Post by: nathanb on October 30, 2016, 07:33:28 PM
Do you have the Ishii on Denon with his 'Afro-Concerto'? 

Anyhow, yea, thanks for the confirmations. Does Ichiyanagi have a "big piece" to start with? Nishimura seems to be the current choice for mind blowing- all I have is that very good Arditti disc, but he has quite a bit on Camerata, wouldn't know where to begin.

what's Onkyo?

and I guess we're not gonna bring Merzbow into the discussion- at least I don't need him to be brought into THIS discussion...

If you don't want to bring up Merzbow, then you won't want to bring up Onkyo ;) It's essentially a subgenre nickname for Japan's legendary found sound / EAI scene. Otomo Yoshihide, Sachiko M, Toshimaru Nakamura, Taku Sugimoto, and so on. The kind of stuff you'd expect from a 21st century AMM.

I guess the Ichiyanagi pieces I see most are his piano pieces associated with David Tudor. Some cool extended techniques there. And Extended Voices and electroacoustic stuff like that.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Leggiero on November 25, 2016, 05:07:42 AM
My ramblings-on about Ohki’s Hiroshima Symphony can be found here: https://leggierosite.wordpress.com/2016/11/07/modernism-by-necessity-depicting-the-unimaginable/ (https://leggierosite.wordpress.com/2016/11/07/modernism-by-necessity-depicting-the-unimaginable/)

[For anyone who may have happened across a near-identical post to this on another forum, yes, I’m shamelessly repeating myself in the hope of generating further discussion!]
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on November 27, 2016, 06:39:30 AM
My ramblings-on about Ohki’s Hiroshima Symphony can be found here: https://leggierosite.wordpress.com/2016/11/07/modernism-by-necessity-depicting-the-unimaginable/ (https://leggierosite.wordpress.com/2016/11/07/modernism-by-necessity-depicting-the-unimaginable/)

[For anyone who may have happened across a near-identical post to this on another forum, yes, I’m shamelessly repeating myself in the hope of generating further discussion!]

I need to re-listen to that Ohki work. I recall liking his Hiroshima Symphony. In fact, I'm extremely grateful for that Naxos Japanese series to begin with. So much from that series I had never heard previously.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: milk on November 27, 2016, 07:24:53 AM
(http://s0.limitedrun.com/images/1086766/pinna-2-cover-664.jpg)
(https://img.discogs.com/egf2fzUqkAghzjs5QvnfzaHhptY=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-1165185-1222891035.jpeg.jpg)
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/070/MI0000070860.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Someone must have posted these before? Good stuff!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Leggiero on November 27, 2016, 11:46:05 AM
I need to re-listen to that Ohki work. I recall liking his Hiroshima Symphony. In fact, I'm extremely grateful for that Naxos Japanese series to begin with. So much from that series I had never heard previously.

It truly is a remarkable work, which makes me yearn to hear more Ohki (although you're right, even to have what we do is wonderful)!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on November 27, 2016, 12:23:57 PM
It truly is a remarkable work, which makes me yearn to hear more Ohki (although you're right, even to have what we do is wonderful)!

Indeed. I wish Naxos would continue this series and record more works from these composers like Ohki and, for that matter, Mayuzumi and Akutagawa as well.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: SymphonicAddict on August 13, 2019, 05:07:41 PM
Just I was playing the Prima Sinfonia by Yasushi Akutagawa. I had never heard a note from this composer till now. My impressions about it are more than positive. I wasn't prepared for such an overwhelming work. Russian influences are clearly perceived, and there is a strikingly similar passage in the beginning of the 4th movement that will surely bring to your mind a very famous Russian symphony. It's featured by dramatic episodes full of tension and epic struggle. I felt it especially gripping in the 3rd movement (Chorale). Suspense aplenty. I can't recommend it enough. A very powerful work with a fierce ending.

Granted, it may be a bit derivative, but it shouldn't be an impediment to enjoy such a blaze of a piece. Terrific discovery. Here it is the recording I listened to. It was conducted by the composer himself. The atmosphere of the recording makes it even more special.

http://www.youtube.com/v/G84bQfQQ-WM&t=31s
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on August 13, 2019, 10:24:27 PM
Just I was playing the Prima Sinfonia by Yasushi Akutagawa. I had never heard a note from this composer till now. My impressions about it are more than positive. I wasn't prepared for such an overwhelming work. Russian influences are clearly perceived, and there is a strikingly similar passage in the beginning of the 4th movement that will surely bring to your mind a very famous Russian symphony. It's featured by dramatic episodes full of tension and epic struggle. I felt it especially gripping in the 3rd movement (Chorale). Suspense aplenty. I can't recommend it enough. A very powerful work with a fierce ending.

Granted, it may be a bit derivative, but it shouldn't be an impediment to enjoy such a blaze of a piece. Terrific discovery. Here it is the recording I listened to. It was conducted by the composer himself. The atmosphere of the recording makes it even more special.

http://www.youtube.com/v/G84bQfQQ-WM&t=31s
This sounds most interesting Cesar and right up my street. I do have a CD of his music on Naxos with the 'Ellora Symphony' but can't remember anything about it. Clearly I need to revisit that disc and search out Prima Sinfonia which, having sampled the first few minutes, sounds great. 'Epic struggle' sounds good to me. I may have asked you before but do you know Moroi's Third Symphony which is my favourite CD in that Naxos Japanese series along with Hayasaka's Piano Concerto? Thanks for posting this.

Added later:
I've just listened to the whole symphony whilst having a bath (too much information  :o). It really is very good indeed and my attention was gripped throughout. What a discovery! The relentless tread and epic qualities of the slow movement remind me, in a way, of the Epilogue of Vaughan Williams's 6th Symphony, although much louder of course. I must say that the abrupt change of atmosphere at the start of the last movement came as a jolt, especially as it then seems to morph, as you suggest, into a much better known Soviet 5th symphony. In this sense it reminded me of the incongruously perky second (last) movement of Hayasaka's Piano Concerto, which I simply wish wasn't there. However, by the end of the Akutagawa 1st Symphony I was convinced and will be listening to this again soon. There are some lovely poetic sections featuring the harp and the synthesis or at least juxtaposition of Eastern and Western influence reminded me of the Moroi and Hayasaka works as well as Avshalomov's 1st Symphony.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: SymphonicAddict on August 14, 2019, 10:13:42 AM
This sounds most interesting Cesar and right up my street. I do have a CD of his music on Naxos with the 'Ellora Symphony' but can't remember anything about it. Clearly I need to revisit that disc and search out Prima Sinfonia which, having sampled the first few minutes, sounds great. 'Epic struggle' sounds good to me. I may have asked you before but do you know Moroi's Third Symphony which is my favourite CD in that Naxos Japanese series along with Hayasaka's Piano Concerto? Thanks for posting this.

Added later:
I've just listened to the whole symphony whilst having a bath (too much information  :o). It really is very good indeed and my attention was gripped throughout. What a discovery! The relentless tread and epic qualities of the slow movement remind me, in a way, of the Epilogue of Vaughan Williams's 6th Symphony, although much louder of course. I must say that the abrupt change of atmosphere at the start of the last movement came as a jolt, especially as it then seems to morph, as you suggest, into a much better known Soviet 5th symphony. In this sense it reminded me of the incongruously perky second (last) movement of Hayasaka's Piano Concerto, which I simply wish wasn't there. However, by the end of the Akutagawa 1st Symphony I was convinced and will be listening to this again soon. There are some lovely poetic sections featuring the harp and the synthesis or at least juxtaposition of Eastern and Western influence reminded me of the Moroi and Hayasaka works as well as Avshalomov's 1st Symphony.

Excellent, Jeffrey! Interesting to read your impressions. The Ellora Symphony is also magnificent, much more rhytmic and chaotic, a bit akin to Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring.

As for the Moroi's Symphony, I haven't listened to it yet, nor the Hayasaka. There are lots of new symphonies and concertos that are awaiting for me, and certainly both the Moroi and Hayasaka are there now.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on August 14, 2019, 04:39:32 PM
Meiro Sugahara. I received his symphony last week.Soon i will write more.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on August 14, 2019, 11:03:01 PM
Excellent, Jeffrey! Interesting to read your impressions. The Ellora Symphony is also magnificent, much more rhytmic and chaotic, a bit akin to Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring.

As for the Moroi's Symphony, I haven't listened to it yet, nor the Hayasaka. There are lots of new symphonies and concertos that are awaiting for me, and certainly both the Moroi and Hayasaka are there now.
Oh, I'm sure that you will enjoy these works Cesar. The Moroi is a lament for the victims of World War Two and the Hayasaka in memory of his brother I think. I find both very moving. Hayasaka also wrote the soundtrack music for 'Seven Samurai'. I think that they should go to the top of your listening pile!
 ;)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on August 14, 2019, 11:05:34 PM
Meiro Sugahara. I received his symphony last week.Soon i will write more.
Look forward to hearing your views. I must search out the 'Ellora Symphony' by Akutagawa having enjoyed his First Symphony so much thanks to Cesar's post.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on November 20, 2019, 04:12:21 PM
Look forward to hearing your views. I must search out the 'Ellora Symphony' by Akutagawa having enjoyed his First Symphony so much thanks to Cesar's post.
To commemorate 30°anniversary of Akutagawa's Death, Jasrac release some cds mainly early works (Ballet Kappa,Taiga Drama,soundtracks ,NHK themes)

https://www.amazon.com/3SCD-0045-%E8%8A%A5%E5%B7%9D%E4%B9%9F%E5%AF%B8%E5%BF%97%E7%94%9F%E8%AA%9590%E5%B9%B4%E3%83%A1%E3%83%A2%E3%83%AA%E3%82%A2%E3%83%AB%E3%82%B3%E3%83%B3%E3%82%B5%E3%83%BC%E3%83%88-2%E6%9E%9A%E7%B5%84/dp/B07RX5QQRQ/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=%28%E8%8A%A5%E5%B7%9D+%E4%B9%9F%E5%AF%B8%E5%BF%97&qid=1574294982&s=music&sr=1-1

https://www.amazon.com/3SCD-0044-%E3%80%8C%E3%82%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%82%B1%E3%82%B9%E3%83%88%E3%83%A9%E3%83%BB%E3%83%88%E3%83%AA%E3%83%97%E3%83%86%E3%82%A3%E3%83%BC%E3%82%AF%E3%81%AB%E3%82%88%E3%82%8B%E8%8A%A5%E5%B7%9D%E4%B9%9F%E5%AF%B8%E5%BF%97%E5%80%8B%E5%B1%95%E3%80%8D/dp/B07RZ5ZH9S/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=%28%E8%8A%A5%E5%B7%9D+%E4%B9%9F%E5%AF%B8%E5%BF%97&qid=1574295036&s=music&sr=1-4
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51PhMFXYSUL.jpg)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on November 21, 2019, 05:55:31 PM
I won't pretend to be up to date on Japanese composers – I'm sure there are many great ones, but the only one I have spent much time listening to is Ryuichi Sakamoto, whom few would describe as classical, though he is a great all-around musician. I have yet to really explore Toru Takemitsu – I suspect I will learn to love his music in time, as I love what little I have heard.

I just wanted to share a piece that I think is great, yet neglected...: Toshiro Mayuzumi's Prelude for String Quartet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxGgvVE5-xE

... (is there a way to share embedded Youtube videos here on GMG...?)

Worth a listen or two, I think. I came across it because it is on a disc by the LaSalle Quartet alongside works by Lutoslawski, Penderecki, and Cage.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Mirror Image on November 21, 2019, 08:16:57 PM

... (is there a way to share embedded Youtube videos here on GMG...?)

Sure, check out this thread:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2663.0.html (https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2663.0.html)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: MadvillainQuas on April 05, 2020, 06:52:43 AM
He is primarily a soundtrack composer, but, considering the listing on Discogs classifies the album that the composition is from (Feldschlacht V) as Modern Classical, I'm including this. He also has Opus listings, so, technically, he is also a classical composer  ;). Screw it. He's too good  ;D.

Here is Masashi Hamauzu, quite possibly one of my all-time composers. He is a composer whose music features an intimate relationship with cathartical feeling. Screw all that Uematsu hype, this man is my choice for the best composer to come out of the Square Enix school.

Feldschlacht V:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_JrkEDwI_E

Etudes, Op. 4: No. 8 in G-Minor:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDUOyyZIW9E&list=OLAK5uy_m-H_Ksqor11f3-OFGJDLQqmUldbdLyShs&index=8

Piano Concerto based on the Themes of Final Fantasy X: I. Zanarkand
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdYdFUp5ijk

And, now for some cheating. Here are some choices from his soundtracks that feature full orchestra - essentially straddling the line between Classical and Soundtrack (the main body of his work, and his finest).

Born Anew - A Verdi's Requiem-esque piece w/ Orchestra & Choir:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXr-J-Pv154

Ending Credits - A full showing of his compositional power, akin to Sibelius in impact. I wouldn't be exaggerating if I stated that, from 2:54, this features some of the most powerful sequences of music I've heard.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4ytiqB6xlU

Nautilius - A rhapsodic composition similar to John Williams.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpRtJFsHUxQ

Ragnarok - A piece for organ and choir very similar in tone to Schnittke's Requiem.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1AjTdQ2OeY

Right, now it's time to cease the gushing.

I'm also a defender of Yoshimatsu's compositional style. A portion of his music that I have heard gone unacknowledged, are his piano works; some of which I find sublime.

Dance Toward East is one of these works:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wndFNi7zhmg

One ESPECIALLY neglected piece, featuring Satie-esque chord play, is his Villon's Wife piece.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWPCe5xutUY

Alongside the 'Odes to Birds and Rainbow' which I love, I also particularly enjoy his work 'And The Birds are Still...'

Takashi Niigaki is also a name I will recommend, as previously mentioned (along with his funny backstory). His recent work, 'Elegy', is particularly beautiful.

Obviously, Ryuichi Sakamoto should be close to the top of anyone's lists when talking about Japanese composers (even if he straddles the line finely).

Such a work to get you started on a journey through his music is 'Amore'.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMeDgrD4yXQ

Another face to check out, is Takashi Kako, if I can ever find the music that I love him for on YouTube, that is.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: T. D. on April 05, 2020, 07:02:41 AM
(http://s0.limitedrun.com/images/1086766/pinna-2-cover-664.jpg)
(https://img.discogs.com/egf2fzUqkAghzjs5QvnfzaHhptY=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-1165185-1222891035.jpeg.jpg)
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/070/MI0000070860.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Someone must have posted these before? Good stuff!
I was reading this thread for the first time hoping to see Fujieda mentioned.
I enjoy his 2 Patterns of Plants discs on Tzadik, haven't heard the others shown.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 05, 2020, 07:10:07 AM
+1 for the Yoshimatsu piano works - lovely disc.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Symphonic Addict on April 05, 2020, 11:52:26 AM
He is primarily a soundtrack composer, but, considering the listing on Discogs classifies the album that the composition is from (Feldschlacht V) as Modern Classical, I'm including this. He also has Opus listings, so, technically, he is also a classical composer  ;). Screw it. He's too good  ;D.

Here is Masashi Hamauzu, quite possibly one of my all-time composers. He is a composer whose music features an intimate relationship with cathartical feeling. Screw all that Uematsu hype, this man is my choice for the best composer to come out of the Square Enix school.

Feldschlacht V:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_JrkEDwI_E

Etudes, Op. 4: No. 8 in G-Minor:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDUOyyZIW9E&list=OLAK5uy_m-H_Ksqor11f3-OFGJDLQqmUldbdLyShs&index=8

Piano Concerto based on the Themes of Final Fantasy X: I. Zanarkand
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdYdFUp5ijk

And, now for some cheating. Here are some choices from his soundtracks that feature full orchestra - essentially straddling the line between Classical and Soundtrack (the main body of his work, and his finest).

Born Anew - A Verdi's Requiem-esque piece w/ Orchestra & Choir:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXr-J-Pv154

Ending Credits - A full showing of his compositional power, akin to Sibelius in impact. I wouldn't be exaggerating if I stated that, from 2:54, this features some of the most powerful sequences of music I've heard.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4ytiqB6xlU

Nautilius - A rhapsodic composition similar to John Williams.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpRtJFsHUxQ

Ragnarok - A piece for organ and choir very similar in tone to Schnittke's Requiem.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1AjTdQ2OeY

Right, now it's time to cease the gushing.

I'm also a defender of Yoshimatsu's compositional style. A portion of his music that I have heard gone unacknowledged, are his piano works; some of which I find sublime.

Dance Toward East is one of these works:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wndFNi7zhmg

One ESPECIALLY neglected piece, featuring Satie-esque chord play, is his Villon's Wife piece.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWPCe5xutUY

Alongside the 'Odes to Birds and Rainbow' which I love, I also particularly enjoy his work 'And The Birds are Still...'

Takashi Niigaki is also a name I will recommend, as previously mentioned (along with his funny backstory). His recent work, 'Elegy', is particularly beautiful.

Obviously, Ryuichi Sakamoto should be close to the top of anyone's lists when talking about Japanese composers (even if he straddles the line finely).

Such a work to get you started on a journey through his music is 'Amore'.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMeDgrD4yXQ

Another face to check out, is Takashi Kako, if I can ever find the music that I love him for on YouTube, that is.

This sounds interesting. From Niigaki I like his gargantuan Hiroshima Symphony (not by Samuragochi) and Litany Symphony.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on April 05, 2020, 01:02:07 PM
This sounds interesting. From Niigaki I like his gargantuan Hiroshima Symphony (not by Samuragochi) and Litany Symphony.

A good ol' fashioned plagiarist, eh?  >:( Those stories are always interesting...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Symphonic Addict on April 05, 2020, 07:59:57 PM
A good ol' fashioned plagiarist, eh?  >:( Those stories are always interesting...

It's even more shocking taking into account that Samuragochi was supposed to be deaf.

EDIT: Sorry, it wasn't blind but deaf, 'apparent deafness'.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: MadvillainQuas on April 06, 2020, 01:14:25 AM
This sounds interesting. From Niigaki I like his gargantuan Hiroshima Symphony (not by Samuragochi) and Litany Symphony.

Yep, I meant to put 'Litany Symphony', but I was scrolling through my Spotify playlists, and, honestly, who knows what happened  :laugh:.

If anyone gets time, I'd definitely recommend checking Hamauzu's works. Not just because I'm the biggest fanboy of him  ;D.

A good ol' fashioned plagiarist, eh?  >:( Those stories are always interesting...

Honestly, just read through the Wikipedia article. The story is hilarious.

'a reporter from the magazine Aera interviewed Samuragochi at his apartment in Yokohama, but noticed a number of inconsistencies in Samuragochi's deafness statements, including his ability to respond to questions before the sign-language interpreter had finished, and standing up to answer a doorbell when it rang.'

And it wasn't plagiarism, it was something we both should know about from the rap game: ghostwriting.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on April 06, 2020, 01:54:20 AM
Honestly, just read through the Wikipedia article. The story is hilarious.

'a reporter from the magazine Aera interviewed Samuragochi at his apartment in Yokohama, but noticed a number of inconsistencies in Samuragochi's deafness statements, including his ability to respond to questions before the sign-language interpreter had finished, and standing up to answer a doorbell when it rang.'

 :laugh:


And it wasn't plagiarism, it was something we both should know about from the rap game: ghostwriting.

 :o What would this Niigaki have to gain by attributing his works to a "deaf" composer? Better yet, why wouldn't he just claim to be deaf himself, and publish the works under his own name?  ;D The world may never know... but maybe SymphonicAddict knows this much; has Niigaki made anything of a career for himself under his own name in the wake of this scandal?
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: milk on April 07, 2020, 01:09:19 AM
I was reading this thread for the first time hoping to see Fujieda mentioned.
I enjoy his 2 Patterns of Plants discs on Tzadik, haven't heard the others shown.
I’m a fan of that Fujieda. He just retired from teaching, incidentally (good timing).
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 16, 2020, 06:49:42 PM
I won't pretend to be up to date on Japanese composers – I'm sure there are many great ones, but the only one I have spent much time listening to is Ryuichi Sakamoto, whom few would describe as classical, though he is a great all-around musician. I have yet to really explore Toru Takemitsu – I suspect I will learn to love his music in time, as I love what little I have heard.

I just wanted to share a piece that I think is great, yet neglected...: Toshiro Mayuzumi's Prelude for String Quartet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxGgvVE5-xE

... (is there a way to share embedded Youtube videos here on GMG...?)

Worth a listen or two, I think. I came across it because it is on a disc by the LaSalle Quartet alongside works by Lutoslawski, Penderecki, and Cage.

Mayuzumi was well-known as a hard-core, and anachronistic, right-wing nationalist in Japan. The music? Interesting.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on April 16, 2020, 09:30:02 PM
I've recently been enjoying Fukai's 'Songs of Java' with its echoes of Ravel's 'Bolero' and also Stravinsky's 'The Rite of Spring':
(http://)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on April 17, 2020, 04:08:11 AM
Mayuzumi was well-known as a hard-core, and anachronistic, right-wing nationalist in Japan. The music? Interesting.

Well-known by whom? I can't seem to find any information on his politics, so I'll have to take your word on that.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 17, 2020, 08:32:37 AM
Well-known by whom? I can't seem to find any information on his politics, so I'll have to take your word on that.

By the Japanese people in Japan.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on June 26, 2020, 07:02:11 PM
Piano arrangements of Ryuichi Sakamoto’s compositions, for those who are interested.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lDlw8kReQgg5FdqqD2xUvUzubvHXxX4rQ
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on September 29, 2020, 08:21:29 AM
Koto Concerto: Genji. Daron Hagen.
Not a Japanese-national composer, but wonderful Japanese music
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on September 29, 2020, 01:30:04 PM
Piano arrangements of Ryuichi Sakamoto’s compositions, for those who are interested.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lDlw8kReQgg5FdqqD2xUvUzubvHXxX4rQ

This is amazing! Thanks!! I don't know if I need 5 CDs of this music, but I have loved Sakamoto's soundtracks in the past and at this price, it's tempting.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on September 29, 2020, 03:53:05 PM
This is amazing! Thanks!! I don't know if I need 5 CDs of this music, but I have loved Sakamoto's soundtracks in the past and at this price, it's tempting.

Jfyi, Behind the Mask, Yellow Magic Orchestra. Sakamoto’s composition. Eric Clapton and Michael Jackson modified the tune and sung it. I think the original is much better.

https://youtu.be/0HubIA-BGGI
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on September 29, 2020, 09:55:48 PM
This is amazing! Thanks!! I don't know if I need 5 CDs of this music, but I have loved Sakamoto's soundtracks in the past and at this price, it's tempting.
+1 Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on October 05, 2020, 12:19:23 PM
Enjoying Isao Tomita. Modern rendition of court music in the 11th century.

https://youtu.be/tB68S4edK5w
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on October 05, 2020, 04:55:58 PM
Great romantic Piano Concerto
(https://img.discogs.com/zuqOXl0KQEOf1CyLlzsM9T8vzEQ=/fit-in/600x598/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10183623-1493016086-6989.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on October 06, 2020, 08:30:25 PM
Great romantic Piano Concerto
(https://img.discogs.com/zuqOXl0KQEOf1CyLlzsM9T8vzEQ=/fit-in/600x598/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10183623-1493016086-6989.jpeg.jpg)

Wakasugi died about a decade ago. He was a well-regarded conductor in Japan. I have his Wagner works and I like it. I will look for this recording.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on October 12, 2020, 08:31:10 PM
VG.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on October 12, 2020, 09:58:30 PM
Great romantic Piano Concerto
(https://img.discogs.com/zuqOXl0KQEOf1CyLlzsM9T8vzEQ=/fit-in/600x598/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-10183623-1493016086-6989.jpeg.jpg)

Looks interesting.

I looked him up on You Tube but got a video on how to make chewy meatballs. I then realised that I had mis-spelt his name  ::)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Artem on October 13, 2020, 05:27:04 AM
VG.
Takemitsu's piano music is really great. I'm currently listening to a cd with some solo piano works played by Kumi Ogano.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on October 13, 2020, 05:44:53 PM
Suite version of the film music of Kurosawa’s “Ran”, composed by Takemitsu.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k_nYwixbMSbLJU-Yv-tdFvH6qXTAB5sqM
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: T. D. on October 13, 2020, 06:10:01 PM
Takemitsu's piano music is really great. I'm currently listening to a cd with some solo piano works played by Kumi Ogano.

Thanks. I have a CD of solo piano works played by Izumi Tateno in my wish list at Berkshire Record Outlet. Will bump it up near the top.

I have Mamoru Fujieda's two Patterns of Plants volumes on Tzadik (NOT the Sarah Cahill piano renditions), am about to add his Night Chant. Fujieda's music is considerably weirder than Takemitsu's.  :D
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on October 17, 2020, 02:55:41 PM
I'm listening to Kôsçak Yamada's Symphony in F major, "Triumph & Peace", in an effort to hear more Japanese classical music. It's available to listen here...:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY7He5w_5cY

Sounds great to my ears! Very melodic. Yamada was the first major Japanese composer of Western music and it appears he wrote in a style that is very reverent of the old masters.

Anyway, I have this Naxos disc w/ Takuo Yuasa, and it looks like there is one more Naxos disc from the same forces, but other than that, I can't find any other Yamada music on disc. Anyone know of anything else? Looks like he was quite prolific!
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on October 17, 2020, 06:17:41 PM
I'm listening to Kôsçak Yamada's Symphony in F major, "Triumph & Peace", in an effort to hear more Japanese classical music. It's available to listen here...:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY7He5w_5cY

Sounds great to my ears! Very melodic. Yamada was the first major Japanese composer of Western music and it appears he wrote in a style that is very reverent of the old masters.

Anyway, I have this Naxos disc w/ Takuo Yuasa, and it looks like there is one more Naxos disc from the same forces, but other than that, I can't find any other Yamada music on disc. Anyone know of anything else? Looks like he was quite prolific!

Musically, he is very Western guy with Dvorak feel.
On Youtube, please use the spell “Kosaku” Yamada, then you will find several works. Also, you may want to check out Hisato Osawa (or Ohzawa).
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on October 18, 2020, 04:18:59 AM
Musically, he is very Western guy with Dvorak feel.
On Youtube, please use the spell “Kosaku” Yamada, then you will find several works. Also, you may want to check out Hisato Osawa (or Ohzawa).

Thanks. I see a few piano works I didn't know about. Most of the results are recordings found on the two Naxos discs.

I agree, shades of Dvorák, but also hints of Strauss and Debussy in the tone poems on the disc I have (those being "The Dark Gate" and "Madara No Hana"). Very much a Westernized composer, but damn, he was a talented melodist and orchestrator. Yamada is quickly becoming a minor obsession, possibly helped in part by his obscurity. It would be great to see more recordings of his music.

I will have to check out Osawa.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on October 18, 2020, 04:33:35 AM
This also exists:

https://books.rakuten.co.jp/rb/13369300/

A recording of roughly 60 of Yamada's songs for voice and piano. Might be of interest sometime down the line...
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: milk on October 27, 2020, 07:16:50 PM
(https://s9.limitedrun.com/images/1086766/pinna-2-cover-664.jpg) I was listening to this today and thinking this would be interesting on harpsichord. Actually, it’s not super profound music, to my ears, but it’s pleasant and achieves something of value.
My idea was that a baroque keyboardist could add ornamentation and more interesting rubato and make something pseudo-baroque.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on March 13, 2021, 01:28:54 AM
just another plug for this, fine and memorable symphony from the WAYLT thread:
(http://)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vers la flamme on March 13, 2021, 04:26:33 AM
just another plug for this, fine and memorable symphony from the WAYLT thread:
(http://)

The blurb on the back of the disc calls Moroi "the greatest Japanese symphonist". Sounds like something I should hear.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: T. D. on March 13, 2021, 05:55:38 AM
(https://s9.limitedrun.com/images/1086766/pinna-2-cover-664.jpg) I was listening to this today and thinking this would be interesting on harpsichord. Actually, it’s not super profound music, to my ears, but it’s pleasant and achieves something of value.
My idea was that a baroque keyboardist could add ornamentation and more interesting rubato and make something pseudo-baroque.

I have the 2 original Patterns of Plants discs on Tzadik and enjoy them. But I never considered the piano version. I found microtonality a big part of the instrumental versions' appeal and didn't see how that could carry over to the piano works.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Symphonic Addict on March 13, 2021, 09:22:01 AM
The blurb on the back of the disc calls Moroi "the greatest Japanese symphonist". Sounds like something I should hear.

Akira Ifukube was a more interesting composer IMO. His only symphony is rather good.
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on March 13, 2021, 01:15:15 PM
Akira Ifukube was a more interesting composer IMO. His only symphony is rather good.

His music for Godzilla is pretty good as well.

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0A9A184BE549A4C3
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: vandermolen on March 13, 2021, 01:33:54 PM
The blurb on the back of the disc calls Moroi "the greatest Japanese symphonist". Sounds like something I should hear.
Yes, you should!
 :)
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: T. D. on June 10, 2021, 01:25:08 PM
bump
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Roy Bland on June 11, 2021, 01:37:26 AM
I suggest this:
https://arksquare.net/detail.php?cdno=3SCD-0055

I have Akutagawa on Toshiba and the sound isn't too much good
Title: Re: Japanese Composers
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on June 13, 2021, 04:19:06 AM
I'm listening to Kôsçak Yamada's Symphony in F major, "Triumph & Peace", in an effort to hear more Japanese classical music. It's available to listen here...:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sY7He5w_5cY

Sounds great to my ears! Very melodic. Yamada was the first major Japanese composer of Western music and it appears he wrote in a style that is very reverent of the old masters.

Anyway, I have this Naxos disc w/ Takuo Yuasa, and it looks like there is one more Naxos disc from the same forces, but other than that, I can't find any other Yamada music on disc. Anyone know of anything else? Looks like he was quite prolific!


Symphonic Poem “Oyasama”, Kosaku Yamada.

https://youtu.be/Xzg8nlFM2tc


Ed. One more. Prelude D major, composed when he was 26 y/o.

https://youtu.be/1d_9yRe4b4k