GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => General Classical Music Discussion => Topic started by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:09:23 AM

Title: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:09:23 AM
I haven’t posted much over the past few years, although I’ve checked in fairly regularly to keep up with various threads. Now that I’ve recently retired and have more time for personal pursuits, I thought this would be a good opportunity to share my long-time exploration of two of my favorite interests – music and stamp collecting (particularly the area of postal history.)

Items that have passed through the mail during years past can have fascinating and valuable tales to tell. Sometimes, the envelopes alone reveal interesting stories. When the enclosures are still intact, they provide a greater bonus.

This 1937 BSO mailing went from Boston to nearby New Hampshire during the tenure of Serge Koussevitzky. At that time, a seat for the entire Boston Symphony season of 24 Saturday evening performances would set you back $35.00 – just under $1.50 per concert.

While Koussevitzky is legendary in the world of classical music, BSO manager G.E. Judd’s name isn’t quite so familiar. His 1977 New York Times obituary reveals some important accomplishments.   

George E. Judd, former manager of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, died Monday at his home in Unadilla, N.Y. He was 90 years old.
When Mr. Judd was given an honorary degree by Harvard University in 1955, the citation referred to him as an “imaginative impresario” whose “good‐humored patience in the face of genius” helped to lead the Boston Symphony into ever greater importance.
His association with the orchestra went back to 1914, when he became secretary to Col. Henry L. Higginson, who founded the orchestra in 1881. From 1918 to 1935, he was assistant manager. He then moved into the managerial post, which he filled i until his retirement in 1954.
Mr. Judd was active in the establishment of the Berkshire Festival at Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., as a summer activity of the Boston Symphony, and he was guiding hand in the orchestra's first coast‐to‐coast tour in 1953.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:10:02 AM
This is another enclosure.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: MusicTurner on January 11, 2021, 05:12:02 AM
That's an entertaining little subject, thank you for posting.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:15:59 AM
The Paris Opera House - Palais Garnier - on a postcard mailed in 1907. Notice the horse and carriages in front.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:17:53 AM
By 1919, when this postcard was mailed, we see old-time autos in place of horses.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:30:21 AM
in 1916, many of us would be anxiously awaiting our monthly mailing from Columbia records.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:31:33 AM
Inside would be this nicely designed catalog.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:32:47 AM
These records would be the early 78 RPM shellac products.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:34:12 AM
And to listen to them, perhaps you would use a Columbia Grafonola, their version of the Victrola with internal horn.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: OrchestralNut on January 11, 2021, 05:43:57 AM
Very interesting and unique subject. Nice to see you, Tony!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:45:07 AM
That's an entertaining little subject, thank you for posting.

Glad you enjoyed!

Tony
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:47:35 AM


I've been collecting things like this for many years from various sources - on line, antique shops, flea markets, etc. There's a lot out there and not very expensive to buy.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 05:49:31 AM
Very interesting and unique subject. Nice to see you, Tony!

Thanks! Nice to have the time to be active again.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: vandermolen on January 11, 2021, 07:00:58 AM
Nice to see you back again - you were a familiar name from the past.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 07:52:01 AM
Nice to see you back again - you were a familiar name from the past.

Thanks! Yes, it's been a while. Glad to be back.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 11, 2021, 08:53:35 AM
Welcome back! It’s good to see a familiar name again and congratulations on your retirement.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 10:11:52 AM
Welcome back! It’s good to see a familiar name again and congratulations on your retirement.

Many thanks!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 11, 2021, 01:32:28 PM
Finding the history about this cover was a challenge. Fortunately, the Sangamon County, Illinois, Historical Society had some detailed information.


William Dodd Chenery was described as  “a highbrow P.T. Barnum – a grand impresario and showman extraordinaire whose talents brought culture and classical music to the masses across the country. …
In the 1890s,  Chenery wrote what probably was his most popular opera, “Egypta,” a retelling of the story of Moses. Like most of his works, “Egypta” was always presented on a monumental scale – three acts, 10 scenes (sometimes with extra mini-scenes tailored to individual  venues) and hundreds, even thousands, of performers.
“Egypta” was performed somewhere in the U.S. for 17 straight years. That included a seven-night stand in 1925 on the grounds of Sacred Heart Academy on West Washington Street that reportedly included a cast of 2,000.
Chenery didn’t write the music for his operas. “Instead of writing themes,” the Journal said in his obituary, “he selected melodies and choruses from the classical writers of operas, oratorios, masses and other standard compositions that fitted the dramatic situations he had created.”


Original content copyright Sangamon County Historical Society. You are free to republish this content as long as credit is given to the Society.


https://sangamoncountyhistory.org/wp/?p=12328



Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 11, 2021, 03:08:54 PM
The Paris Opera House - Palais Garnier - on a postcard mailed in 1907. Notice the horse and carriages in front.

Brussels: the rue de l'Enseignement (=education/scolarisation) still exists.

(http://www.reflexcity.net/images/logo-sections/1375.jpg)

And thanks for the story on Chenery's "Egypta"!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 12, 2021, 05:36:51 AM
Brussels: the rue de l'Enseignement (=education/scolarisation) still exists.

(http://www.reflexcity.net/images/logo-sections/1375.jpg)

And thanks for the story on Chenery's "Egypta"!

You're welcome!

I'm sure I have music-related material from Belgium somewhere, although there were understandably more stamps issued dealing with visual art. Unfortunately, while I like to consider myself a collector of vinyl, books, and philatelic items, I have to admit that I'm more in the accumulator category. Getting everything in some semblance of order is on my bucket list.

While the postcard pictured here shows the Belfry at Bruges, it was posted in Brussels in 1909 - the year King Leopold II, who is pictured on the stamp, passed away. The stamp bears the detachable label that was used on the stamps of Belgium between 1893 and 1914. Since it was left attached to the stamp, this card would not be delivered on a Sunday, If the sender felt it was acceptable to have Sunday delivery, the label would have been removed.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 12, 2021, 06:46:40 AM
As the title "Egypta" piqued my curiosity, I quickly found out that Chenery's magnum opus wasn't the only exotic production with that name. Possibly, choreographer Ruth St. Denis may have been inspired by it ....????

(https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-COmTA2medrs/T5921nK2FDI/AAAAAAAAQe4/F5_MW9L0ywc/s640/Ruth+St.+Denis+and+two+unidentified+dancers+in+Egypta+1910.jpg)

Ruth St.Denis in her 1910 version of "Egypta"

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 12, 2021, 07:49:31 AM
And Ruth St. Denis' production was reperformed (adapted?) in 1995 by Laurel Victoria Gray.

http://www.egypta.org/about-egypta.html
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 12, 2021, 08:14:18 AM
Fun to read your postings!  I used to collect ephemera, but haven't purchased anything new in the past few years.  I have some old postcards (all blank I believe)...a combo of opera singers...trying to remember whether or not I've purchased any of old opera houses?  I remember looking at some in the past.

PD
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 12, 2021, 10:20:31 AM
Fun to read your postings!  I used to collect ephemera, but haven't purchased anything new in the past few years.  I have some old postcards (all blank I believe)...a combo of opera singers...trying to remember whether or not I've purchased any of old opera houses?  I remember looking at some in the past.

PD

I'm glad you enjoy them!

One of my favorite threads before my posting hiatus was "Old Instruments and Modern Reproductions". I was going to post this postcard there, but that thread was locked for some reason, so here it is. It was posted in 1925 from Marienbad, Czechoslovakia.

I also found the information below. It appears Hans Haubner was an inventor as well as a dealer in string instruments of all kinds.


H. HAUBNER TUNING PEG FOE STBINGED INSTRUMENTS.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 25 1907.

Patented Apr. 20, 1909.

HANS HAUBNER, OF MARIENBAD, AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.

TUNING-PEG FOR STRENGED INSTRU'MENTS
.

Specification of Letters Patent Application filed July 25, 1907.

Patented April 20, 1209.

Serial No. 385,563.

To all whom it may concern:

7 Be it known that l, Hans HAUBNER, a subject of the Emperor of Austria-H ingary, rcsiding at Marienbad, Bohemia, Austria-flungary, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in 'luningfegs l'or Stringed Instruments; and I do hereby declare the ro llowing to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 12, 2021, 10:21:07 AM
Here is the reverse:
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 12, 2021, 10:33:33 AM
*This day in music history*
January 12, 1723
George Frideric Handel’s opera “Ottone” premieres at the Kings Theatre, London.


Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 05:10:53 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 13, 1882
Richard Wagner completes his opera, “Parsifal”


Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: The new erato on January 13, 2021, 05:23:13 AM
Very fine idea for a thread. Hope you can keep up posting!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 05:57:44 AM
Very fine idea for a thread. Hope you can keep up posting!

Thanks!
Much more to come.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Gurn Blanston on January 13, 2021, 07:18:47 AM
Tony, I unlocked that thread. I haven't the vaguest idea why it was locked, I read the last 20 posts or so and there is not even a whiff of anything untoward there. Actually, I'm glad you pointed out the anomaly, I always enjoyed that thread.

8)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 08:23:12 AM
Tony, I unlocked that thread. I haven't the vaguest idea why it was locked, I read the last 20 posts or so and there is not even a whiff of anything untoward there. Actually, I'm glad you pointed out the anomaly, I always enjoyed that thread.

8)

Awesome!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 08:44:04 AM
This envelope was mailed to the Metropolitan Opera in 1953. The special delivery rate at the time was 20-cents plus 3-cents for regular postage, so there was 5-cents postage due. (Normally, a 3-cent stamp plus a 20-cent special delivery stamp would be used.) Special Delivery service in the U.S. was discontinued in 1997 after the introduction of Express and Priority mail.

One has to wonder what important enclosure this envelope contained from a colonel in the United States Navy. I was able to locate some info about our Colonel Lenart in a 1935 edition of The New York Guardsman.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 13, 2021, 08:54:11 AM
This envelope was mailed to the Metropolitan Opera in 1953. The special delivery rate at the time was 20-cents plus 3-cents for regular postage, so there was 5-cents postage due. (Normally, a 3-cent stamp plus a 20-cent special delivery stamp would be used.) Special Delivery service in the U.S. was discontinued in 1997 after the introduction of Express and Priority mail.

One has to wonder what important enclosure this envelope contained from a colonel in the United States Navy. I was able to locate some info about our Colonel Lenart in a 1935 edition of The New York Guardsman.
Perhaps trying to get ahold of some last-minute tickets for a superior officer and/or a visiting dignitary?
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: MusicTurner on January 13, 2021, 08:58:38 AM
I'd think all such stuff isn't that easy to find ...

Do you get it from a variety of sources?
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 10:09:49 AM
Perhaps trying to get ahold of some last-minute tickets for a superior officer and/or a visiting dignitary?

Yes, that sounds like a likely possibility.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 10:16:23 AM
I'd think all such stuff isn't that easy to find ...

Do you get it from a variety of sources?

Yes, a variety of sources over a large number of years, but not all that difficult to find if you keep your eyes open. Because it's not all that valuable monetarily, it's usually in with large lots of papers and correspondence in antique shops or stamp dealer bourses. (It also helps if you work for some of the larger stamp and collectible firms as I did in my younger years.)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 13, 2021, 10:30:39 AM
Yes, a variety of sources over a large number of years, but not all that difficult to find if you keep your eyes open. Because it's not all that valuable monetarily, it's usually in with large lots of papers and correspondence in antique shops or stamp dealer bourses. (It also helps if you work for some of the larger stamp and collectible firms as I did in my younger years.)
Ephemera shows are fun to attend and can yield all kinds of goodies.  Do you go to philatelic shows?

PD
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: MusicTurner on January 13, 2021, 11:00:36 AM
Yes, a variety of sources over a large number of years, but not all that difficult to find if you keep your eyes open. Because it's not all that valuable monetarily, it's usually in with large lots of papers and correspondence in antique shops or stamp dealer bourses. (It also helps if you work for some of the larger stamp and collectible firms as I did in my younger years.)

It sounds like great fun :)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 11:01:06 AM
Ephemera shows are fun to attend and can yield all kinds of goodies.  Do you go to philatelic shows?

PD

I haven't gone in a while, but I think once this Covid craziness is over, it would be fun to start again.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 03:30:59 PM
These are tickets to the New York Grand Conservatory of Music commencement exercises of 1900. Apparently, Mabel wasn’t able to attend.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 03:31:55 PM
The enclosures with the tickets included a program of the evening’s events.

The school was founded in 1874 by Ernest G. Eberhard, a German immigrant. President of the school for 40 years, he was an organist, conductor of choral societies and orchestras, author, and publisher of music books. Wikipedia lists Grove’s in its references for his page, but it looks like I left my copy behind in my old office. Retrieving it will be on my to-do list.

His daughter Beatrice Eberhard was a prominent violinist of her day, performing Grieg’s Violin Sonata No. 3 in c minor (Op. 45) at Carnegie Hall in 1906.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 13, 2021, 03:32:38 PM
While still a congressman in the state legislature, President Theodore Roosevelt (who is quoted first on the reverse side of the program) was involved in the legislation that allowed the conservatory to grant Musical Doctorate degrees. I haven’t been able to discover the eventual fate of the institution. Google maps reveals there are apartments with a ground floor cleaners currently at that address.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 14, 2021, 05:09:49 AM
*This Day in Music History*
 January 14, 1690
The Clarinet is Invented


This date is cited by multiple sources, but I’m not sure exactly how the specificity was determined.

Some interesting background info here:
  https://lbhsnews.com/3877/uncategorized/history-of-the-clarinet/ (https://lbhsnews.com/3877/uncategorized/history-of-the-clarinet/)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 15, 2021, 04:45:28 AM
*This Day in Music History*
 January 15, 1895
Tchaikovsky’s ballet “Swan Lake” premieres in St. Petersburg

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 15, 2021, 10:34:39 AM
Perhaps some of our German-speaking members can weigh in on this one.

 I believe our Mr.  Lewowicz was a comedic singer performing in Hamburg. (With the missing staff line, it’s hard to tell if the half note he’s holding is a B natural or F natural.)

I’m guessing that the bar he was singing at may have catered to Americans abroad. The card was postmarked in late 1919, less than a year after the end of World War I. Having performed in a variety of venues myself (some nice and others not so), I’m trying to imagine what the atmosphere and surroundings might have been like.

If someone could decipher and translate the handwriting, I’d love to know what it says.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 15, 2021, 12:59:20 PM
Perhaps some of our German-speaking members can weigh in on this one.

 I believe our Mr.  Lewowicz was a comedic singer performing in Hamburg. (With the missing staff line, it’s hard to tell if the half note he’s holding is a B natural or F natural.)

I’m guessing that the bar he was singing at may have catered to Americans abroad. The card was postmarked in late 1919, less than a year after the end of World War I. Having performed in a variety of venues myself (some nice and others not so), I’m trying to imagine what the atmosphere and surroundings might have been like.

If someone could decipher and translate the handwriting, I’d love to know what it says.
German is rusty (for me), but it looks like "In memory of the America bar, Hamburg" [using google translate]  I'm curious now too!  :)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 16, 2021, 01:04:19 AM
(https://jungle.world/sites/default/files/styles/article_wide/public/2018-04/HHAmerican%20Bar.jpg?itok=86ioMWDT)(https://pictures.abebooks.com/inventory/30294864302.jpg)

(https://shmh.de/pub/media/wysiwyg%2Fdossiers%2FStPauli%2FStPauli2.jpg)

Die American-Bar am Spielbudenplatz, in the heart of Sankt Pauli, um 1900.

The "Spielbudenplatz" was (and is) a very popular entertainment site in Hamburg. in the early 19th century it was a concoction of vendors working from wooden stalls (= Buden), street acrobats, a menagerie, restaurants etc. Later more theaters and cafe's were built. Today it is still (in)famous for markets, flea markets, cheap stuff & porn....and several theaters: the Operettentheater, the St. Paulitheater, Schmidtchentheater.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spielbudenplatz

It could well be that Jim performed at the "American Bar" in Hamburg - the first to serve cocktails, made by 12 "Mixerrinen" ( 12 girls who mixed the drinks) and organize concerts.
The building no longer exists.
The handwriting is difficult... I'll try later.
And Jim was a "stimmungsvoller Sänger" (romantic, poetic, atmospheric...singer).

Peter
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 16, 2021, 04:38:59 AM
Thanks, pjme!

Awesome info and pictures!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 16, 2021, 04:40:42 AM
*This Day in Music History”
January 16, 1938
First Jazz Concert Held at Carnegie Hall – Benny Goodman

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 16, 2021, 10:44:27 AM
If someone could decipher and translate the handwriting, I’d love to know what it says.

Not 100% sure - and with some help of a friend - it could well be:

"Recht herzliche Grüsse sendet ihr
Ella & Carl

nebst Mann"

Peter
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 16, 2021, 12:32:39 PM
Thanks, Peter -

Makes sense.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 16, 2021, 02:48:53 PM
You're welcome - a nice pastime while looking at the snow and listening to music...
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 17, 2021, 03:38:51 AM
*This Day in Music History”
January 17, 1962
Roy Harris’   8th symphony premieres in San Francisco



Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 17, 2021, 12:10:52 PM
Some Boston music companies no longer around.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 17, 2021, 12:12:09 PM
Carl Fischer and Boston Music once had large retail shops in downtown Boston with aisles and aisles of printed music. I went there frequently when in college and during my early teaching days. Stores like that are all long gone, along with most used bookstores.   :(

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 18, 2021, 01:41:26 AM
*This Day in Music History”
January 17, 1962
Roy Harris’   8th symphony premieres in San Francisco


A good tip for listening today:

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/ne5_6Cl9wBiVUWphbWoBrgia1B88gSnL2qYTYFbI6GavtUVZDEHM5VJWYDaXkf6XlgfO2bIqhTs5Hze5bwyac27irVB5--8LIFHcM26iPtXO)

On symphony nr 8:
"Those who think of Harris as a blustery bully-boy of a composer should hear this. Things wind down to a final chorale which recalls themes from previous movements. Actually, Harris does this recalling throughout the symphony, with such ease and with such "naturalness" that it took me five movements to realize what indeed he had done. I consider the entire work one of the finest American symphonies, and it's from a period critics have regarded as Harris's Decline. If that's a fall-off, I've missed something bloody wonderful."
I agree.
http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/a/alb00350a.php
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 18, 2021, 03:32:22 AM

*This Day in Music History”
January 18, 1919
Ignacy Jan Paderewski becomes Polish Prime Minister


Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 19, 2021, 04:28:21 AM
*This Day in Music History”
January 19, 1853
Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Il Trovatore” premieres in Rome



Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 19, 2021, 04:34:39 AM
*This Day in Music History”
January 19, 1853
Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Il Trovatore” premieres in Rome

Love your Verdi postcard and stamps!  8)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 19, 2021, 04:40:58 AM
Love your Verdi postcard and stamps!  8)

Italy, and especially France, produced some really attractive engraved stamps during the 1950s.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 19, 2021, 04:47:24 AM
Speaking of the 1950s, the postcard below advertised an upcoming 1952 concert by Leonard Pennario. This is his New York Times obituary:

Leonard Pennario, 83, Classical Pianist, Dies
June 28, 2008


Leonard Pennario, a popular classical pianist known for his enthusiastic public performances and recordings of the more melodic modern composers, died on Friday in La Jolla, Calif. He was 83.

The cause was complications of Parkinson’s disease, said Mary Kunz Goldman, who is writing his biography.

Mr. Pennario, who also became a life master in tournament bridge, was listed in both the New Grove’s Dictionary of Music and The Official Encyclopedia of Bridge. As a pianist, he made many recordings in the days of long-playing records, notably of works by Gershwin and Rachmaninoff, and appeared with well-known orchestras and conductors. Beginning in the 1960s, he also played in trios with the violinist Jascha Heifetz and the cellist Gregor Piatigorsky.

Mr. Pennario made more than 60 recordings in all, of music by composers as diverse as Bela Bartok and Louis Moreau Gottschalk. Ms. Goldman said he was the first pianist after Rachmaninoff himself to record all four Rachmaninoff concertos and the “Variations on a Theme of Paganini.”
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 19, 2021, 07:16:00 AM
I suppose this qualifies for a post in this thread, but I bought a postcard (and it was also a stamp) from Royal Mail many years ago that featured Frederick Delius:

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ce/03/18/ce031872743e968492638bed0cc7256d.jpg)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 19, 2021, 07:33:57 AM
I suppose this qualifies for a post in this thread, but I bought a postcard (and it was also a stamp) from Royal Mail many years ago that featured Frederick Delius:

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ce/03/18/ce031872743e968492638bed0cc7256d.jpg)

Absolutely! It was part of a 1985 stamp set honoring British composers that also included Handel, Holst, and Elgar.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 19, 2021, 07:43:30 AM
Absolutely! It was part of a 1985 stamp set honoring British composers that also included Handel, Holst, and Elgar.

Actually, this particular stamp was a part of a 2012 set titled Britons of Distinction as seen here:

(https://www.collectgbstamps.co.uk/images/gb/2012/2012_7192_l.jpg)

The 1985 stamp you’re referring to did not have Delius on the cover but of a cuckoo:

(https://www.collectgbstamps.co.uk/images/gb/1985/1985_1759_l.jpg)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 19, 2021, 07:47:02 AM
Thanks for that! Nice to see Delius represented twice!
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 19, 2021, 08:05:05 AM
Thanks for that! Nice to see Delius represented twice!

Yes, indeed. 8)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 20, 2021, 04:12:46 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 20, 1954
Dmitri Shotakovich’s “Concertino opus 94” premieres

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 20, 2021, 07:22:36 AM
I just found this and it’s so cool: a 2018 Hungarian stamp celebrating Bartók’s Bluebeard’s Castle:

(https://eshop.posta.hu/storefront/renderImage.image?imageName=Kekszakall_blokk.jpg&width=600&height=400&padding=0)

Link: https://posta.hu/stamps/stamps/new_stamps/bela-bartok-bluebeards-castle (https://posta.hu/stamps/stamps/new_stamps/bela-bartok-bluebeards-castle)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 20, 2021, 08:08:55 AM
I just found this and it’s so cool: a 2018 Hungarian stamp celebrating Bartók’s Bluebeard’s Castle:

(https://eshop.posta.hu/storefront/renderImage.image?imageName=Kekszakall_blokk.jpg&width=600&height=400&padding=0)

Link: https://posta.hu/stamps/stamps/new_stamps/bela-bartok-bluebeards-castle (https://posta.hu/stamps/stamps/new_stamps/bela-bartok-bluebeards-castle)

Cool!

I'd love to get ahold of one of these (issued in 1972 I believe?):  (http://www.collectgbstamps.co.uk/images/gb/1972/1972_412_l.jpg)

PD
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 20, 2021, 09:09:13 AM
Yes, 1972 for his birth centenary. That's a score of his "Sea Symphony" behind his image.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 20, 2021, 09:55:13 AM
Yes, 1972 for his birth centenary. That's a score of his "Sea Symphony" behind his image.
Ironically, that's my least favorite symphony of his.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 20, 2021, 10:34:59 AM
Ironically, that's my least favorite symphony of his.

My favorite is his "London Symphony", mainly because I enjoyed playing it in college.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 20, 2021, 12:47:38 PM
This is a First Day Cover for the 1948 U.S. stamp commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Rough Riders, the 1st United States Cavalry that saw combat in the Spanish American War. The stamp was cancelled on a business-return envelope addressed to George A. Kuyper at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. According to his obituary in the L.A. Times, Mr. Kuyper had a very distinguished career in the classical music world.

Los Angeles Times
AUG. 15, 198
7

A memorial service has been scheduled Aug. 30 for George A. Kuyper, former general director of the Hollywood Bowl Assn. and Southern California Assn., who died earlier this month at age 88 in Santa Ana.
Kuyper had been living in Orange County since leaving the associations in 1963. They sponsor the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra and the Hollywood Bowl seasons.
He was selected for the Los Angeles positions in 1959 after a nationwide search and came here from Chicago, where he had spent 16 years as manager of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Before that he was manager of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
Kuyper was born in Paterson, N.J., and studied at Rutgers. He was valedictorian of his graduating class the year singer-actor Paul Robeson was salutatorian.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 21, 2021, 04:50:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 21, 1927
First national opera broadcast from a U.S. opera house – Charles Gounod’s “Faust”, Chicago



https://www.oldradio.org/2013/01/january-21-1927-first-opera-on-radio.html
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 21, 2021, 07:00:24 AM
The postmark on this envelope from Decatur (Illinois) Conservatory doesn’t have a year date, which wasn’t unusual during the 19th century. Based on the issue date of the stamp and the image of the 1883 newspaper clipping, we’re safe in assuming it was mailed during the late 1880’s.

  A quick google search shows that tuition at a music conservatory near me is over $200,000 for a 4-year degree! The $12 per semester cost at Decatur seems like a really good deal, even for 138 years ago!

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 22, 2021, 04:30:09 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 22, 1859
Johannes Brahms’ 1st Piano Concerto (d minor) premieres in Hanover


At that time, Hanover was a state of the German Confederation and issued its own stamps.


Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 23, 2021, 04:42:57 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 23, 1940
Ignacy Jan Paderewski becomes head of the Polish Government in Exile
.

In 1939, with the Nazi Germany invasion of Poland at the start of World War II, the Polish government relocated to France. When France fell to the Axis powers in June 1940, this Government of Poland-in-exile moved from Paris to London.

  Postage stamps were issued and postal agencies were created on Polish warships and merchant marine craft flying the Polish flag. This envelope, mailed to the Polish Consulate in Chicago, was sent on December 12th, 1941, a few months after Paderewski’s death. The red postmark with crown signifies it passed British censorship.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 24, 2021, 05:22:19 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 24, 1874
Mussorgsky’s opera “Boris Godunov” premieres in St. Petersburg



Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 25, 2021, 04:25:39 AM

*This Day in Music History*
January 25, 1858
Felix Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March” first played at the wedding of Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Victoria, to the crown prince of Prussia.


Mendelssohn was depicted in a set of 1959 stamps featuring German composers.

Queen Victoria appeared on the first postage stamp ever issued, the 1840 Great Britain “Penny Black”.

King Frederick William IV was featured on stamps from Prussia in use at the time of the performance.


Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 25, 2021, 06:58:36 AM
Established in 1847, the Hamburg-American Line was a steamship company that connected European and North American ports. In 1933, their educational division offered enrollment and transportation to the Salzburg Orchestral Academy. This program was presented by the International Foundation Mozarteum, founded in 1880 and apparently still operating.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 25, 2021, 07:00:55 AM

Listed among the distinguished faculty members were Adrian Boult, Herbert von Karajan, and Bruno Walter.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 26, 2021, 04:30:24 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 26, 1790

Mozart’s “Cosi Fan Tutte” premieres in Vienna


Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: MusicTurner on January 26, 2021, 12:49:23 PM
A tiny remark, but the stamp below shows The Magic Flute, cf. title in Hungarian (I once had a Hungarian LP version) ... :)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 26, 2021, 01:22:15 PM
A tiny remark, but the stamp below shows The Magic Flute, cf. title in Hungarian (I once had a Hungarian LP version) ... :)

Yes, I had trouble finding a Cosi Fan Tutte stamp, so that was as close as I could get.

Thanks for the comment. I'm enjoying posting these things, but it's not the kind of thread that would generate much discussion. Good to know someone is looking!  :)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: MusicTurner on January 26, 2021, 01:25:32 PM
Yes, I had trouble finding a Cosi Fan Tutte stamp, so that was as close as I could get.

Thanks for the comment. I'm enjoying posting these things, but it's not the kind of thread that would generate much discussion. Good to know someone is looking!  :)

It's nice & I've decided to take an extra look at old envelopes etc. when later frequenting our local flea markets and bric-a-bracs  :)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: pjme on January 26, 2021, 01:44:11 PM
 :) The variations in style, colours and design are well worth discovering I'm curious what else will show up.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 26, 2021, 01:55:48 PM
It's nice & I've decided to take an extra look at old envelopes etc. when later frequenting our local flea markets and bric-a-bracs  :)

It's worth keeping your eyes open. There are a lot of things to find that aren't monetarily valuable, but have significant historical interest. Not music related, but I did come across the bottom of a naval requisition among a bunch of papers in a Cape Cod antique shop that was signed by George Dewey before he became Admiral of the U.S. Navy The date is missing, but his title at the time was "commodore", so it had to be from between 1896 and 1903.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 26, 2021, 01:58:16 PM
:) The variations in style, colours and design are well worth discovering I'm curious what else will show up.

Yes, many stamps are miniature works of art -- especially those that were printed from beautifully engraved plates from years ago.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: MusicTurner on January 26, 2021, 02:03:03 PM
It's worth keeping your eyes open. There are a lot of things to find that aren't monetarily valuable, but have significant historical interest. Not music related, but I did come across the bottom of a naval requisition among a bunch of papers in a Cape Cod antique shop that was signed by George Dewey before he became Admiral of the U.S. Navy The date is missing, but his title at the time was "commodore", so it had to be from between 1896 and 1903.

Yes, from my collecting of other stuff I know that one of the tricks is to have to some specialized knowledge & then one will discover details, that many people will totally overlook ... maybe not of any monetary value, or maybe perhaps of some monetary value; but certainly of historical or anecdotal interest, at least.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 26, 2021, 08:49:02 PM
Pretty interesting: stamps of Arnie and Alban!

(https://apic.alamy.com/zooms/9/%7Be2ba76e7-2ef7-486d-8ae5-c45713256975%7D/m7p78p.jpg)

(https://apic.alamy.com/zooms/9/%7B8fd525ef-ef47-46aa-8319-7e31d44b2940%7D/m55ew2.jpg)
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 27, 2021, 04:37:25 AM
Do you think that the quality of the stamps--in terms of artwork, engraving and paper quality, ink used, etc., have diminished over the years?  If so, starting when?

On the flip side, any 'newish' stamps that you really love?

PD
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 27, 2021, 05:10:52 AM
Pretty interesting: stamps of Arnie and Alban!

(https://apic.alamy.com/zooms/9/%7Be2ba76e7-2ef7-486d-8ae5-c45713256975%7D/m7p78p.jpg)

(https://apic.alamy.com/zooms/9/%7B8fd525ef-ef47-46aa-8319-7e31d44b2940%7D/m55ew2.jpg)

Yes, Austria is highly-respected in the philatelic world for issuing country-related themed stamps, and in the area of music, there is a wealth of possibilities.
Here are some lesser-know composers/musicians honored on Austrian postage stamps:

Thomas Koschat, Edmund Eysler, Leo Slezak, Leo Ascher, Franz Schmidt, and Carl Michael Ziehrer.

Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 27, 2021, 05:23:33 AM
Do you think that the quality of the stamps--in terms of artwork, engraving and paper quality, ink used, etc., have diminished over the years?  If so, starting when?

On the flip side, any 'newish' stamps that you really love?

PD

Back when I was involved in the field (early 1990s), the number of postage stamps ever issued required a 4 volume catalog to list with about 1,000 pages per volume. Today, it has expanded to 12 volumes! The number of different stamps countries produce each year has increased dramatically and, while some are still very well done, overall I think the quality has diminished greatly. Now that stamps are mostly self-adhesive and those used on mail rarely get cancelled, they're not as interesting either.

I'm not up-to-date at all on recent stamps. This is one of my favorite of all time - issued for Franz Liszt in 1934.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Szykneij on January 27, 2021, 05:26:06 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 27, 1778
Niccolo Piccinni’s opera “Roland” premieres in Paris



Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 27, 2021, 06:13:06 AM
Yes, Austria is highly-respected in the philatelic world for issuing country-related themed stamps, and in the area of music, there is a wealth of possibilities.
Here are some lesser-know composers/musicians honored on Austrian postage stamps:

Thomas Koschat, Edmund Eysler, Leo Slezak, Leo Ascher, Franz Schmidt, and Carl Michael Ziehrer.
Nice!
Yes, many stamps are miniature works of art -- especially those that were printed from beautifully engraved plates from years ago.
Yes, I love the engraved ones.

Back when I was involved in the field (early 1990s), the number of postage stamps ever issued required a 4 volume catalog to list with about 1,000 pages per volume. Today, it has expanded to 12 volumes! The number of different stamps countries produce each year has increased dramatically and, while some are still very well done, overall I think the quality has diminished greatly. Now that stamps are mostly self-adhesive and those used on mail rarely get cancelled, they're not as interesting either.

I'm not up-to-date at all on recent stamps. This is one of my favorite of all time - issued for Franz Liszt in 1934.
Wow!  That's a lot of catalogues!  And like the Liszt!

And, yes, like you, I tend to be more fascinated with older things--like prints (engravings, lithographs, etchings, woodblock prints--Ukiyo-e, etc.) and their stories (though I have also collected some contemporary work too).  :)  I've also collected some opera ephemera too (think that I might have mentioned that earlier?).
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 27, 2021, 06:36:53 AM
And, yes, like you, I tend to be more fascinated with older things--like prints (engravings, lithographs, etchings, woodblock prints--Ukiyo-e, etc.) and their stories (though I have also collected some contemporary work too).  :)  I've also collected some opera ephemera too (think that I might have mentioned that earlier?).

Post some here. I'd like to see them!

I also changed the title of the thread to be more encompassing.
Title: Re: Music and the Mail
Post by: Mirror Image on January 27, 2021, 08:07:07 AM
Yes, Austria is highly-respected in the philatelic world for issuing country-related themed stamps, and in the area of music, there is a wealth of possibilities.
Here are some lesser-know composers/musicians honored on Austrian postage stamps:

Thomas Koschat, Edmund Eysler, Leo Slezak, Leo Ascher, Franz Schmidt, and Carl Michael Ziehrer.

Very cool! 8)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 27, 2021, 10:14:35 AM
May Beegle (October 23, 1882 – December 8, 1943) was an American concert promoter known as the "dean of Pittsburgh impresarios."

She brought outstanding international musicians to Pittsburgh for 28 years from 1913 through 1944, such as Enrico Caruso, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Ignace Jan Paderewski, Yehudi Menuhin, Fritz Kreisler, Arturo Toscanini & the NBC Symphony Orchestra, and Arthur Fielder & the Boston Pops.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 27, 2021, 10:16:58 AM
More information here:


https://sites.google.com/site/pittsburghmusichistory/pittsburgh-music-story/managers-and-promoters/may-beegle (https://sites.google.com/site/pittsburghmusichistory/pittsburgh-music-story/managers-and-promoters/may-beegle)


Some nice concerts to have seen:
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 28, 2021, 04:55:07 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 28, 1936

Pravda criticizes Dmitri Shostakovich’s opera “Lady Macbeth”



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 29, 2021, 04:07:18 AM

*This Day in Music History*
January 29, 1954
Arnold Schoenberg’s “De Profundis” premieres in Cologne



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 30, 2021, 04:17:13 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 30, 1940


Benjamin Britten’s “Les Illuminations” premieres in London



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 30, 2021, 04:34:15 AM

The Schubert Club of St. Paul, Minnesota, presented its first public recital in 1893 and  “is today one of the nation’s most vibrant music organizations, enriching Minnesota with dynamic concerts, music education programs and museum exhibits.”

During World War I, The Schubert Club added a War Services Committee to its operations. The efforts of this committee included distribution of the "Music Will Help Win the War" stamps. It appears these particular seals were issued to club violinist Anthony D. Grosso on November 27, 1918 – after the German surrender on November 11th, but before the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: ritter on January 30, 2021, 04:35:05 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 30, 1940


Benjamin Britten’s “Lesson Illuminations” premieres in London

Great thread, always interesting!...But I think autocorrect has played some games in the post above   ;).

Regards,
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 30, 2021, 04:47:28 AM
Thanks!  :P

Fixed.

Glad you find these things of interest.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on January 30, 2021, 11:17:59 AM
Really enjoyed reading through this thread.  :)

Particularly liked unexpectedly coming across the various stamp entries. I *loved* stamp collecting as a child, a passion initiated by my grandfather who sent me first day covers every time a new issue came out. Sadly the enthusiasm was eclipsed by lure of the opposite sex and music as my teens approached, but I still get a frisson of the magic I used to feel when I see some images (.. and a strange pang for how much simpler life was back then).

Lovely one of Britten above, but really enjoyed seeing all of them. Intrigued by and enjoyed reading many of the other entries too, a really interesting thread, thanks for setting it up. 
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 30, 2021, 01:03:36 PM
Really enjoyed reading through this thread.  :)

Particularly liked unexpectedly coming across the various stamp entries. I *loved* stamp collecting as a child, a passion initiated by my grandfather who sent me first day covers every time a new issue came out. Sadly the enthusiasm was eclipsed by lure of the opposite sex and music as my teens approached, but I still get a frisson of the magic I used to feel when I see some images (.. and a strange pang for how much simpler life was back then).

Lovely one of Britten above, but really enjoyed seeing all of them. Intrigued by and enjoyed reading many of the other entries too, a really interesting thread, thanks for setting it up.

I'm glad you enjoyed! Not too late to rekindle that stamp collecting passion! I'm excited to be able to combine it with my love of music.

A third passion is gardening, so it's probably good that the winter temps around here in New England lately have been in the single digits (F) with snow on the ground, or I'd probably be out with the shovel and clippers.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 30, 2021, 01:51:26 PM
I'm glad you enjoyed! Not too late to rekindle that stamp collecting passion! I'm excited to be able to combine it with my love of music.

A third passion is gardening, so it's probably good that the winter temps around here in New England lately have been in the single digits (F) with snow on the ground, or I'd probably be out with the shovel and clippers.
Hey!  Another gardener here!  Yippee!  ;D  So, you'll have to tell us (in the gardening thread) what you like to grow.  :)

PD

p.s.  And yes, like Iota, I'm enjoying your posts!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: OrchestralNut on January 30, 2021, 02:01:31 PM
Hey!  Another gardener here!  Yippee!  ;D  So, you'll have to tell us (in the gardening thread) what you like to grow.  :)

PD

p.s.  And yes, like Iota, I'm enjoying yours posts!

Oh, there is a gardening thread? Interesting! It is more my girlfriend's thing, as far as the flower gardening goes. I'm more interested in the tomato and herbs garden.  ;D
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on January 30, 2021, 02:07:18 PM
Oh, there is a gardening thread? Interesting! It is more my girlfriend's thing, as far as the flower gardening goes. I'm more interested in the tomato and herbs garden.  ;D
It's called "The GMG Green Thumb Club" I believe (under Diner).  And it's not just about flower gardening, but gardening in general.

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: OrchestralNut on January 30, 2021, 02:09:08 PM
It's called "The GMG Green Thumb Club" I believe (under Diner).  And it's not just about flower gardening, but gardening in general.

PD

Cool, thank you PD! For me in Winnipeg, still some time to wait. Gardening doesn't really start until late May.  :D
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 31, 2021, 04:48:04 AM
*This Day in Music History*
January 31, 1679
Jean-Baptiste Lully's opera "Bellerophon" premieres at the Palais-Royal in Paris
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 31, 2021, 12:47:37 PM
This postcard picturing the Leipzig Conservatory of Music was mailed in 1905 to a Harry Zehm at Elizabeth College in North Carolina. The school was a women’s educational institution founded in 1897 that later moved to Virginia in 1915.

Some research reveals that Herr Zehm was a musical director, organist, composer, and teacher at the college. Due to the great skill he exhibited playing the organ at an early age, his father took him at the age of 17 to study abroad for six years. A portion of that time was spent at Leipzig. Perhaps acquaintances he made during his stay were the senders of the postcard.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on January 31, 2021, 12:49:32 PM
These are screenshots from what was possibly a newsprint biography and from the 1905 yearbook “The Elizabethan”.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 01, 2021, 05:29:59 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 1, 1893

Giacomo Puccini’s opera “Manon Lescaut” premieres in Turin



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 01, 2021, 05:36:22 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 1, 1893

Giacomo Puccini’s opera “Manon Lescaut” premieres in Turin

Puccini! ❤️❤️❤️ 😀

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 02, 2021, 04:07:01 AM

*This Day in Music History*
February 2, 1731

George Frideric Handel’s opera “Poro” premieres in London


And Happy Ground Hog Day!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 02, 2021, 04:09:24 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P94DN0EVfQI&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P94DN0EVfQI&feature=youtu.be)

Jack Fina was a big band leader during the 1940s and 1950s, but was classically trained and had great chops. He was born in New Jersey and was educated at the New York College of Music. Unfortunately, he died young of a heart attack at the age of 56 while playing a gig at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Although Liberace was probably better known for it thanks to his television show exposure, it was Fina who turned Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumble Bee” into “The Bumble Boogie”. See the link!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on February 02, 2021, 08:41:32 AM
I'm glad you enjoyed! Not too late to rekindle that stamp collecting passion! I'm excited to be able to combine it with my love of music.

Never say never etc, but I think it will probably remain a fond memory now, I'm not really a natural collector (probably placing me firmly in a minority on this site!). But am enjoying your enthusiasm for all this ephemera, which has sparked off some pleasant connections.  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 03, 2021, 04:20:03 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 3, 1844

Hector Berlioz’s “Carnaval Romain” premieres in Paris


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 03, 2021, 05:33:07 AM
Although he doesn’t appear to be from the classical musical world, I’m fascinated by this character named Jolly Franzl. There’s an individual by the same name who is a Bavarian yodeler, but our Jolly was an American musician.

In the photo on his autographed postcard, he’s holding a conductor’s baton indicating he was a bandleader, but I’m stumped as to the significance of the strap around his chest bearing his last name. It doesn’t seem to be in the right location to be some kind of saxophone lanyard. Maybe it’s just part of his band attire to go along with his spiffy vest and oversized necktie.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 03, 2021, 05:35:33 AM
The only historical mention I can find about Jolly is a listing in a 1941 Billboard Magazine edition, which shows him as performing at a Chicago nightclub called “Links”. The club was located in Links Hall, a building built by and named for dentist John J. Links in 1914. Starting in 1978, a dance company operated there for 35 years, taking the name of the building as its own. Google maps shows the location as it appears today.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 03, 2021, 06:18:11 AM
Although he doesn’t appear to be from the classical musical world, I’m fascinated by this character named Jolly Franzl. There’s an individual by the same name who is a Bavarian yodeler, but our Jolly was an American musician.

In the photo on his autographed postcard, he’s holding a conductor’s baton indicating he was a bandleader, but I’m stumped as to the significance of the strap around his chest bearing his last name. It doesn’t seem to be in the right location to be some kind of saxophone lanyard. Maybe it’s just part of his band attire to go along with his spiffy vest and oversized necktie.
I wonder whether or not it might attach to the inside of his vest and perhaps helps to keep his tie/scarf out of the way--like a tie pin or clip?
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 03, 2021, 06:33:57 AM
I wonder whether or not it might attach to the inside of his vest and perhaps helps to keep his tie/scarf out of the way--like a tie pin or clip?

That could be, with an opportunity for some self-promotion at the same time.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 03, 2021, 10:55:56 AM
That could be, with an opportunity for some self-promotion at the same time.
Yes, I did notice his name--in rather large letters there!  :D

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 04, 2021, 04:56:03 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 4, 1677

Johann Ludwig Bach, German composer and violinist, was born in Thuringia (d. 1731).
He was a third cousin of Johann Sebastian Bach.


Stamps specifically for Thuringia were issued only between 1945 and 1946 during the Soviet occupation.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 05, 2021, 04:47:48 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 5, 1887

Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Otello” premieres at La Scala in Italy, his first new opera in over 15 years.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 05, 2021, 04:55:06 AM
This envelope was mailed in 1900 by Margarethe von Mitzlaff-Miellez, Director of Vocal Music at the Columbian School of Music in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 05, 2021, 04:58:46 AM
I can’t find much information on M. von Mitzlaff-Miellez, except for an ad in a 1908 Boston Symphony program for singing lessons. A couple of other individuals on that page – Arthur H. Turner and Emil K. Janser – seem to have had some early 20th century success getting their compositions published. 
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 05, 2021, 05:03:27 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 4, 1677

Johann Ludwig Bach, German composer and violinist, was born in Thuringia (d. 1731).
He was a third cousin of Johann Sebastian Bach.


Stamps specifically for Thuringia were issued only between 1945 and 1946 during the Soviet occupation.
Interesting!  I wonder why only during that period?

*This Day in Music History*
February 5, 1887

Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Otello” premieres at La Scala in Italy, his first new opera in over 15 years.


Love that opera!  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 05, 2021, 05:27:34 AM
Interesting!  I wonder why only during that period?


Prior to the Russian occupation, stamps of Germany would have been used. After that, stamps of East Germany (GDR). During the occupation, Russia issued stamps for the specific areas it  controlled.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 05, 2021, 05:42:12 AM
Prior to the Russian occupation, stamps of Germany would have been used. After that, stamps of East Germany (GDR). During the occupation, Russia issued stamps for the specific areas it  controlled.
Thanks for the info; that makes sense.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 06, 2021, 04:37:16 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 6, 1851

Robert Schumann’s 3rd Symphony “Rhenish” premieres in Dusseldorf

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 07, 2021, 05:16:22 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 7, 1931

Opera "Peter Ibbetson" by Deems Taylor premieres at Metropolitan Opera, New York City.



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 07, 2021, 06:07:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 7, 1931

Opera "Peter Ibbetson" by Deems Taylor premieres at Metropolitan Opera, New York City.

How was the opera received?  I've never heard of either the opera nor him.  :(
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 07, 2021, 06:26:30 AM
How was the opera received?  I've never heard of either the opera nor him.  :(

It seems February 7th was a slow day for classical music.  :-[

Information is here:

http://www.usopera.com/operas/peteribbetson.html (http://www.usopera.com/operas/peteribbetson.html)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 07, 2021, 06:54:46 AM
Thanks!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 08, 2021, 04:49:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 8, 1942

Igor Stravinsky's "Danses Concertantes" premieres in Los Angeles
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 09, 2021, 04:17:35 AM
*This Day in Music History*

February 9, 1893
Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Falstaff” premieres in Milan

February 9, 1964
First Beatles appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show”.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 09, 2021, 04:45:22 AM
Looks like, even back in 1928, there were classical music audiophiles searching for the best listening experience. This radio and phonograph, part of Amrad’s “Symphonic Series”, was all electric and had a Dynamic Power Speaker. At that point in time, it could only have received AM radio signals (significant FM broadcasting didn’t begin until the 1940s) so one has to wonder just how good the sound was over that frequency band. (Today, the Amrad building houses various businesses, including a gym I used to belong to.)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 09, 2021, 04:47:21 AM
Today, if we want to get information about a piece of music we’re listening to, we can just grab our smart phone and google. Listeners in 1941 (possibly using their Amrad system) didn’t have that luxury, but they did have the “Music Lovers Handy Dial”! Keep this dial in a handy spot near your radio … to get important facts about the great composers as you listen. Whoever owned my Handy Dial must have been a real opera buff due to the significant wear on that side.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 10, 2021, 04:38:27 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 10, 1881

Jacques Offenbach's opera "Les Contes d'Hoffman" premieres in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 11, 2021, 04:35:46 AM
This Day in Music History*
February 11, 1903

Anton Bruckner’s 9th Symphony premieres in Vienna



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 12, 2021, 04:12:35 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 12, 1924

George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” premieres at the Aeolian Hall, New York City

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 12, 2021, 04:30:24 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 12, 1924

George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” premieres at the Aeolian Hall, New York City

Love the envelope and stamp!  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 13, 2021, 05:18:51 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 13, 1914
 American Society of Composers, Authors & Publishers (ASCAP) founded at Hotel Claridge in NYC

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 14, 2021, 05:13:29 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 14, 1670
Georg Gabriel Schutz, German composer, born in Nuremberg, Germany (d. 1716)



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 15, 2021, 05:14:13 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 15, 1686

Jean Baptiste Lully's opera "Armide" premieres in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on February 15, 2021, 05:44:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 15, 1686

Jean Baptiste Lully's opera "Armide" premieres in Paris


That's a bit funny, a spelling of his name quite rarely seen, and the French postal services even using his original, Italian name ... ?! :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 15, 2021, 06:58:23 AM
That's a bit funny, a spelling of his name quite rarely seen, and the French postal services even using his original, Italian name ... ?! :)

 Yes, he was born Giovanni Battista Lulli. I thought that, perhaps, the spelling that was used had something to do with the original artwork reproduced on the stamp, but I couldn't find any background on it. The stamp is part of a set issued in 1956 to commemorate "famous men who lived in France" and includes Benjamin Franklin. Each stamp of the set bears a different name on the lower right, which I assume credits the artist.  The Lully stamp reads "Mazelim" which doesn't help much.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on February 15, 2021, 07:11:28 AM
Here is Charles Mazelin!

(https://www.timbres-de-france.com/image/graveurs/mazelin.jpg)

Charles Mazelin, né Charles Firmin Mazelin le 14 février 1882 à Elbeuf et mort le 21 août 1968 dans le 15e arrondissement de Paris, est un dessinateur et graveur de timbre français

So, indeed, mr.Mazelin is a stamp designer and engraver. He looks Tres French, with the "beret alpin'!!

https://www.timbres-de-france.com/collection/graveurs/mazelin.php
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 15, 2021, 07:14:31 AM
Here is Charles Mazelin!

So, indeed, mr.Mazelin is a stamp designer and engraver. He looks Tres French, with the "beret alpin'!!

https://www.timbres-de-france.com/collection/graveurs/mazelin.php

Great find!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on February 15, 2021, 07:28:47 AM
Yes, he was born Giovanni Battista Lulli. I thought that, perhaps, the spelling that was used had something to do with the original artwork reproduced on the stamp, but I couldn't find any background on it. The stamp is part of a set issued in 1956 to commemorate "famous men who lived in France" and includes Benjamin Franklin. Each stamp of the set bears a different name on the lower right, which I assume credits the artist.  The Lully stamp reads "Mazelim" which doesn't help much.

Still, the series theme probably explains it.

Likely based on this portrait:
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 16, 2021, 04:50:20 AM

*This Day in Music History*
February 16, 1854

Franz Liszt's symphonic poem "Orpheus" premieres. It was conducted by the composer as an introduction to the first Weimar performance of Christoph Willibald Gluck's opera, Orfeo ed Euridice.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 16, 2021, 10:47:48 AM
The original Russian Choir of the Ural Cossacks Regiment was discontinued in 1917, but was re-established at Paris in 1924. This postcard was mailed from Germany in 1929 with the writer reporting she saw the Ural Cossacks Choir perform at Schleiz the night before. Today, the group is still active and has been based in the Netherlands since 1974.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 17, 2021, 03:48:25 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 17, 1904

Giacomo Puccini's opera "Madame Butterfly" premieres in Milan

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 18, 2021, 04:29:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 18, 1902

Jules Massenet's opera "Le jongleur de Notre-Dame" premieres in Monte Carlo at the Opéra Garnier

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2021, 02:06:03 AM
Jean Antonin Delzers, né le 17 août 1873 à Castelsarrasin et mort en 1943, est un dessinateur, graveur de timbres et enseignant français. (designer, engraver and teacher)

I'm  not a stamp collector (my grandfather was), so I didn't know that French "timbres poste" mentioned the designer/engraver.

Paul-Pierre Lemagny is another designer, but not an engraver.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 19, 2021, 05:02:11 AM

*This Day in Music History*
February 19, 1923
Jean Sibelius' 6th Symphony premiered by the Helsinki  Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by the composer.



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 19, 2021, 05:05:33 AM
Jean Antonin Delzers, né le 17 août 1873 à Castelsarrasin et mort en 1943, est un dessinateur, graveur de timbres et enseignant français. (designer, engraver and teacher)

I'm  not a stamp collector (my grandfather was), so I didn't know that French "timbres poste" mentioned the designer/engraver.

Paul-Pierre Lemagny is another designer, but not an engraver.

The stamps of France are among those most respected by collectors for their design, production quality, and subject matter. The engravers had great skill and artistic ability.

Is your grandfather's collection still around? He must have had some interesting items.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on February 19, 2021, 05:29:50 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 18, 1902

Jules Massenet's opera "Le jongleur de Notre-Dame" premieres in Monte Carlo at the Opéra Garnier

I can't read/see the abbreviations next to the names very well.  May I ask what they are and what they mean?  Also, if the designer and engraver were two different people, was there a standard as to which side of the stamp that their names appear?

Jean Antonin Delzers, né le 17 août 1873 à Castelsarrasin et mort en 1943, est un dessinateur, graveur de timbres et enseignant français. (designer, engraver and teacher)

I'm  not a stamp collector (my grandfather was), so I didn't know that French "timbres poste" mentioned the designer/engraver.

Paul-Pierre Lemagny is another designer, but not an engraver.
I didn't either!


*This Day in Music History*
February 19, 1923
Jean Sibelius' 6th Symphony premiered by the Helsinki  Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by the composer.




Love the Sibelius one!  Is this from your own collection?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 19, 2021, 05:43:33 AM
I can't read/see the abbreviations next to the names very well.  May I ask what they are and what they mean?  Also, if the designer and engraver were two different people, was there a standard as to which side of the stamp that their names appear?


Love the Sibelius one!  Is this from your own collection?

PD

There was and are no standards as to what should appear on stamps, other than the country name. Great Britain is the only nation not required to print its name because it was the first ever to issue stamps. The French postal authorities apparently thought highly enough of their designers and engravers to include their names on postal issues, which most countries don't.

Most pictures I post are from my own collection, although I occasionally need to snag something online when I can't find an appropriate image for a "This Day in Music History" post. The Sibelius cover is an envelope I own.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on February 19, 2021, 05:58:13 AM
The stamps of France are among those most respected by collectors for their design, production quality, and subject matter. The engravers had great skill and artistic ability.

Is your grandfather's collection still around? He must have had some interesting items.

At the moment I cannot remember where the collection went. Probably with one of my brothers. I'll ask. But grandfather died in the mid sixties...so, much has changed since then.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 20, 2021, 05:35:37 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 20, 1724

George Frideric Handel's opera "Giulio Cesare in Egitto" premieres at the King's Theatre in Haymarket, London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 21, 2021, 04:36:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 21, 1911
Gustav Mahler conducts his last concert, an all Italian program, at Carnegie Hall in New York City.



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 22, 2021, 04:18:12 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 22, 1749
Birth of Johann Nikolaus Forkel, German musicologist and first biographer of Johann Sebastian Bach



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 23, 2021, 03:45:43 AM
This Day in Music History*
February 23, 1886
Tchaikovsky's "Manfred" symphony premieres in Moscow.




Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 23, 2021, 04:55:56 AM
This undated postcard featuring a young Thomas Beecham was produced before he became Sir Thomas Beecham in 1916. The photograph was taken by Dover Street Studios, one of the leading firms of its day to specialize in theatrical portraiture and active between 1906 and 1912. The Augener Ltd.  Company that distributed the card was a music publishing firm founded in 1855 as “Augener and Company”, changing its name to Augener Ltd. after a 1904 business merger.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 24, 2021, 04:20:49 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 24, 1939
Roy Harris' 3rd Symphony premieres in Boston


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 25, 2021, 04:13:25 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 25, 1911
Victor Herbert's opera "Natoma" premieres at the Metropolitan Opera House, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on February 25, 2021, 06:22:38 AM
Wow! "Natoma" - "probably the biggest flop of all time"!! ;D
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natoma_(opera)

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2c/Mary_Garden_in_Victor_Herbert%27s_Natoma.jpg)

More at : https://www.allmusic.com/composition/natoma-opera-in-3-acts-mc0002361876?cmpredirect
But how does it sound?
The "Dagger dance" from Natoma : https://youtu.be/u6F4yzuHJk0
Risë Stevens sings in 1959 "Beware of a hawk, my baby" : https://youtu.be/yqiDylC-_Ws
Prelude to act 3: https://youtu.be/nMlo-4ibV8Y (Feroce - Maestoso e patetico - Largamente grandioso!)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 25, 2021, 06:31:11 AM
Wow! "Natoma" - "probably the biggest flop of all time"!! ;D


I guess Santa Barbara was a better setting for a soap opera than for a real opera!  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 25, 2021, 09:30:01 AM
The "Dagger dance" from Natoma : https://youtu.be/u6F4yzuHJk0 (http://The "Dagger dance" from Natoma : https://youtu.be/u6F4yzuHJk0)

It's really hard to tell one pentatonic composition with a Native American theme from another.

An interesting note from this video, though, is that the album cover lists George Liberace as one of the performers. George was an orchestra leader and the famous Liberace's "my brother George", frequently mentioned on the pianist's TV show.

Satirized here by Bugs himself:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7NZza-C-AY (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7NZza-C-AY)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 26, 2021, 04:20:54 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 26, 1770

Giuseppe Tartini, Venetian Baroque composer and violinist (Trillo del Diavolo), dies at 77.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 27, 2021, 04:12:16 AM
.*This Day in Music History*
February 27, 1814

Ludwig van Beethoven's 8th Symphony in F premieres in a concert at Vienna that also included his Seventh Symphony and "Wellington's Victory".

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on February 28, 2021, 05:24:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*
February 28, 1819

 First public performance of Franz Schubert's "Schäfers Klagelied".

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 01, 2021, 04:20:46 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 1, 1810   
1810 Frederic Chopin, Polish-French pianist and composer (Concert in F Minor), born in Żelazowa Wola, Duchy of Warsaw (d. 1849)


.. and, if this was a leap year


February 29, 1836
Giacomo Meyerbeer’s opera "Les Huguenots," premieres in Paris





Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 02, 2021, 04:32:33 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 2, 1969
 Dmitri Shostakovich completes his 14th Symphony

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 03, 2021, 04:26:19 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 3, 1875

Georges Bizet's opera "Carmen" premieres in Paris


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 04, 2021, 04:50:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 4, 1877

Tchaikovsky's ballet "Swan Lake" has its world premiere, performed by the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 05, 2021, 04:16:26 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 5, 1807
First performance of Ludwig van Beethoven's 4th Symphony in B

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 06, 2021, 05:13:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 6, 1853
Giuseppe Verdi's Opera "La Traviata" premieres in Venice

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 07, 2021, 04:40:34 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 7, 1875
Maurice Ravel born in Ciboure, France (d. 1937)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on March 07, 2021, 05:04:29 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 6, 1853
Giuseppe Verdi's Opera "La Traviata" premieres in Venice


In was surprised to discover that Melba's carreer started at La Monnaie/ De Munt in Brussels. She sang in Rigoletto, La Traviata, Lucia di Lammermoor, Lakmé, Hamlet and Romeo et Juliette.

https://nelliemelbamuseum.com.au/belgium-dame-nellie-melba-museum/

As for Ravel:
https://www.touradour.com/towns/ciboure/cibravel.htm
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on March 07, 2021, 07:41:47 AM
(...)

As for Ravel:
https://www.touradour.com/towns/ciboure/cibravel.htm

Nice, thank you. Didn't know about that Ravel idenfication.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 07, 2021, 01:14:26 PM


As for Ravel:
https://www.touradour.com/towns/ciboure/cibravel.htm

The historic architecture of Europe is amazing. Because the United States is a much newer country in comparison to those on the European continent, I'm sure what is considered  "old" here is more commonplace in places like France.
  I live on what was formerly the grounds of the Sir Isaac Royall House, which I can see from my window as I type this. Nearby is a building known as the Craddock House, although the Peter Tufts House is a more accurate title. Buildings of this vintage here are few and far between. Both are operated as museums.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on March 07, 2021, 01:33:54 PM
 :) Thanks!

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 08, 2021, 04:18:17 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 8, 1902
1st performance of Jean Sibelius' 2nd Symphony, by the Helsinki Philharmonic Society

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 08, 2021, 02:08:51 PM
*This Day in Music History"
March 8, 1902
1st performance of Jean Sibelius' 2nd Symphony, by the Helsinki Philharmonic Society

Cool!  8) :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 09, 2021, 04:09:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 9, 1910
Samuel Barber, American composer, born in West Chester, Pennsylvania (d. 1981)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 10, 2021, 03:55:01 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 10, 1892
Arthur Honegger, Swiss composer, born in Le Havre, France (d. 1955)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Papy Oli on March 10, 2021, 04:15:13 AM
Thank you Tony for that for that interesting daily thread.

Until recently, my father had been collecting all the new stamps released by the French post for the last 25-30 odd years and older ones too. I could ask him to have a search in his collection for anything that relates to composers or (classical) music.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 10, 2021, 04:54:55 AM
Thank you Tony for that for that interesting daily thread.

Until recently, my father had been collecting all the new stamps released by the French post for the last 25-30 odd years and older ones too. I could ask him to have a search in his collection for anything that relates to composers or (classical) music.

That would be great! Most of what I have is older material, so I'd be very interested in seeing more recent issues, especially from France.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 11, 2021, 04:29:07 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 11, 1829
Johann Sebastian Bach's "St Matthew Passion" is revived by Felix Mendelssohn, aged 20, conducting in Berlin

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 11, 2021, 04:44:51 AM


Elisabeth in Bavaria (1876–1965) was queen of the Belgians as the spouse of King Albert I, and a duchess in Bavaria by birth. As queen dowager, she became a patron of the arts and was known for her friendship with such notable scientists as Albert Einstein. While Belgium was under German occupation between 1940 and 1944, she used her influence as queen and German connections to assist in the rescue of hundreds of Jewish children from deportation by the Nazis. After the liberation of Brussels, she allowed her palace to be used by the British for headquarters and after the war, was awarded the title "Righteous Among the Nations" by the Israeli government.

Eugène Ysaÿe, (1858-1931, Brussels), was a Belgian violinist, conductor, and composer known as the foremost interpreter of the string works of French and Belgian composers of his time.

1937 stamps picturing Queen Elisabeth and commemorating her music foundation in conjunction with the Eugene Ysaye International Competition.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on March 11, 2021, 07:01:25 AM
Queen Elisabeth was indeed quite a  character!
Late in her life she showed explicitly her admiration for "strong leaders" and traveled (privately) to Russia, China, Poland and Yugoslavia, she praised Mao and Khrushchev....Art - especially music - was her weapon and she claimed, of course, that art and intellectual cooperation would and should pave the way to peace and prosperity. She was driven by genuine curiosity: she wanted to see with her own eyes how life was in those strange and exotic countries. Of course, one can question the reality of the insight granted to her by the authorities. Nevertheless, it was quite a feat to visit China in 1958, a country  whose existence was almost ignored by the West.
Anyway, I like to think that she was some kind of rebel and enjoyed bullying her ultra conservative family...

Apart from that, Belgium can be grateful for the Queen Elisabeth Competition. The Competition was founded in 1937 at the instigation of Elisabeth and Ysaÿe. Originally called the Eugène Ysaÿe Competition, it adopted its current name in 1951, thus paying tribute to its Honorary President and initiator

This is a little fun video: https://youtu.be/giImmyUGAxk

At https://queenelisabethcompetition.be/en/home/ check "watch & listen" for concerts.

(https://www.vivreenbelgique.be/images/vivreenbelgique/fiche19/musique-concours-reine-elisabth.jpg)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 11, 2021, 09:02:16 AM
Queen Elisabeth was indeed quite a  character!
Late in her life she showed explicitly her admiration for "strong leaders" and traveled (privately) to Russia, China, Poland and Yugoslavia, she praised Mao and Khrushchev....Art - especially music - was her weapon and she claimed, of course, that art and intellectual cooperation would and should pave the way to peace and prosperity. She was driven by genuine curiosity: she wanted to see with her own eyes how life was in those strange and exotic countries. Of course, one can question the reality of the insight granted to her by the authorities. Nevertheless, it was quite a feat to visit China in 1958, a country  whose existence was almost ignored by the West.
Anyway, I like to think that she was some kind of rebel and enjoyed bullying her ultra conservative family...

Apart from that, Belgium can be grateful for the Queen Elisabeth Competition. The Competition was founded in 1937 at the instigation of Elisabeth and Ysaÿe. Originally called the Eugène Ysaÿe Competition, it adopted its current name in 1951, thus paying tribute to its Honorary President and initiator

This is a little fun video: https://youtu.be/giImmyUGAxk

At https://queenelisabethcompetition.be/en/home/ check "watch & listen" for concerts.

(https://www.vivreenbelgique.be/images/vivreenbelgique/fiche19/musique-concours-reine-elisabth.jpg)
Sounds like she was a fascinating and very brave and adventurous human being!  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 11, 2021, 11:04:29 AM


This is a little fun video: https://youtu.be/giImmyUGAxk

At https://queenelisabethcompetition.be/en/home/ check "watch & listen" for concerts.

(https://www.vivreenbelgique.be/images/vivreenbelgique/fiche19/musique-concours-reine-elisabth.jpg)

Very enjoyable! Especially regarding the early winners, victory in this competition seemed to be a pretty good indicator of future fame. The video started with one of my favorite violinists, David Oistrakh. I love the fact that someone who looked like he could be an offensive lineman in the NFL could produce such beautiful music.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 11, 2021, 12:43:47 PM
Boy, I'm embarrassed to admit that I don't recognize many of the winners!  ???

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on March 11, 2021, 02:53:03 PM
Well, not all (the first prizes) became world stars.
Soprano Aga Winska teaches in a music school in Brussels, Ekaterina  Novitskaia married a Belgian, became a mother of 5 and performs very rarely, Cecile Ousset retired in 2006, due to health problems, Philip Hirschhorn died at age 50...Pierre Alain Volondat has a quiet life as a teacher in a small city (but does dream of recording very difficult concerti, Bartok 2 and Prokofiev 5)...la vie, quoi!

But many had and have brillant careers.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 12, 2021, 04:02:34 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 12, 1710
British Composer Thomas Arne born in London (d. 1778)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 13, 2021, 04:17:01 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 13, 2004
Luciano Pavarotti performs in his last opera, New York Metropolitan Opera's "Tosca"

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 14, 2021, 04:24:01 AM
*This Day in Music history*
March 14, 1879


Albert Einstein is born in Ulm, Germany, the first child of Hermann and Pauline Einstein.
He played piano and violin starting at an early age and as an adult, credited his violin playing as a way to help work through big ideas.  While living in Berlin, he would often play his beloved instrument named ‘Lina” with friends, including violinist Fritz Kreisler and pianist Artur Schnabel.

“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music … I get most joy in life out of music.  Life without playing music is inconceivable for me,” he once said.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 15, 2021, 03:36:21 AM
"This Day in Music History"
March 15, 1908
 First performance of Maurice Ravel's "Rapsodie Espagnole"

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 15, 2021, 03:43:26 AM
It's the Ides of March!

https://thelistenersclub.com/2016/03/14/beware-the-ides-of-march-musical-reflections-on-julius-caesar/

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 16, 2021, 03:41:37 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 16, 1894
Jules Massenet's opera "Thaïs" premieres in Paris.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 16, 2021, 03:57:56 AM
*This Day in Music history*
March 14, 1879


Albert Einstein is born in Ulm, Germany, the first child of Hermann and Pauline Einstein.
He played piano and violin starting at an early age and as an adult, credited his violin playing as a way to help work through big ideas.  While living in Berlin, he would often play his beloved instrument named ‘Lina” with friends, including violinist Fritz Kreisler and pianist Artur Schnabel.

“If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music … I get most joy in life out of music.  Life without playing music is inconceivable for me,” he once said.
Loved the Einstein stories and quote (and stamps)!  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 17, 2021, 03:47:49 AM
Slow day for classical music.

*This Day in Music History"
March 17, 1926
Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's musical "Girl Friend" premieres in NYC


Happy St. Patrick's Day!




Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 18, 2021, 03:16:19 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 18, 1902
Italian operatic tenor Enrico Caruso becomes 1st well-known performer to make a record

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 18, 2021, 12:45:32 PM
*This Day in Music History*
March 18, 1902
Italian operatic tenor Enrico Caruso becomes 1st well-known performer to make a record

Cool!  8)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 19, 2021, 03:32:13 AM
"This Day in Music History*
March 19, 1859
Charles Gounod's opera "Faust" premieres in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 20, 2021, 04:07:05 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 19, 1873
Max Reger, German composer, pianist and professor (Leipzig University), born in Brand, Bavarian Empire (d. 1916)



*This Day in Music History"
March 20, 1873
Sergei V Rachmaninov, Russian/US pianist/composer born near Semyonovo, Russia




Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 21, 2021, 03:34:35 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 21, 1826
Beethoven's "String Quartet No. 13" in B flat major (Op 130) premieres in Vienna

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on March 21, 2021, 09:31:00 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 21, 1826
Beethoven's "String Quartet No. 13" in B flat major (Op 130) premieres in Vienna


🙂 ... which BTW makes one wonder: we practically never hear about India's Western-CM life ... I can mention Mehta, and that's about it.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on March 21, 2021, 10:53:13 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 12, 1710
British Composer Thomas Arne born in London (d. 1778)


(https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=30559.0;attach=71854;image)

Blimey, if Thomas Arne as is came in to audition for a part as one of the seven dwarfs, I have a pretty good idea which one I might suggest ..

Very much enjoy the interesting facts and images this thread turns up.  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 21, 2021, 01:38:04 PM
Blimey, if Thomas Arne as is came in to audition for a part as one of the seven dwarfs, I have a pretty good idea which one I might suggest ..

Very much enjoy the interesting facts and images this thread turns up.  :)

Yes, not a very flattering portrayal.  :)

Wikipedia says about the artist Francesco Bartolozzi RA (Florence, 21 September 1727 – 7 March 1815, Lisbon) was an Italian engraver, whose most productive period was spent in London. He is noted for popularizing the "crayon" method of engraving.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 21, 2021, 01:58:27 PM
🙂 ... which BTW makes one wonder: we practically never hear about India's Western-CM life ... I can mention Mehta, and that's about it.

In addition to Beethoven, India has honored Schubert, Handel, and Bach with stamps.

The country has produced a lot of music-related stamps, but most feature Indian musicians and instruments.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 22, 2021, 03:27:21 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 22, 1687
Jean-Baptiste Lully, Italian-born French composer, dies at the age of 54

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 22, 2021, 06:44:59 AM
Please excuse the duplication if this has been posted previsously.


No, it hasn't been posted. It was part of this U.S. series.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 23, 2021, 03:36:50 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 23, 1743
George Frideric Handel's oratorio "Messiah" premieres in London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 24, 2021, 03:50:18 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 24, 1721
Johann Sebastian Bach dedicates his Brandenburg Concertos to Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 25, 2021, 03:23:12 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 25, 1881
Béla Bartok, Hungarian composer and pianist (Concerto for Orchestra), born in Nagyszentmiklós, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (d. 1945)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 25, 2021, 06:59:42 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 25, 1881
Béla Bartok, Hungarian composer and pianist (Concerto for Orchestra), born in Nagyszentmiklós, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (d. 1945)

Nice!  :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on March 26, 2021, 02:36:43 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 25, 1881
Béla Bartok, Hungarian composer and pianist (Concerto for Orchestra), born in Nagyszentmiklós, Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (d. 1945)


Denijs Dille (1904 - 2005), a Belgian priest helped establish the Bartok archives:

https://zti.hu/index.php/en/ba/archives-history

https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q2428060#/media/File:Denijs_Dille_Szentendre.JPG
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 26, 2021, 03:14:41 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 26, 1827
Ludwig van Beethoven dies of liver disease at 56


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 26, 2021, 03:16:25 AM
Denijs Dille (1904 - 2005), a Belgian priest helped establish the Bartok archives:

https://zti.hu/index.php/en/ba/archives-history


Great site!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 26, 2021, 04:07:16 AM
Denijs Dille (1904 - 2005), a Belgian priest helped establish the Bartok archives:

https://zti.hu/index.php/en/ba/archives-history

https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q2428060#/media/File:Denijs_Dille_Szentendre.JPG
Thanks for those links!  :)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 27, 2021, 04:06:52 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 27, 1892
Ferde Grofé, American composer, born in New York (d. 1972)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 28, 2021, 03:46:08 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 28, 1859
First performance of Johannes Brahms' 1st Serenade for Orchestra
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 29, 2021, 03:39:12 AM
*This Day in Music History*
March 29, 1827

20,000 attend Ludwig von Beethovens burial in Vienna.

The previous day, castings for Beethoven’s death mask were taken. The mask appears on a stamp issued in 1947 by Rhineland-Palatinate (area established after World War II by the French military administration in allied-occupied Germany) and in 1952 by Berlin for use in the American, British, and French sectors.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on March 29, 2021, 03:41:02 AM
Very cool Tony!

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 30, 2021, 03:53:43 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 30,1858

Siegfried Alkan, German composer, born in Dillingen, Saarland (d. 1941).
The Beethoven Stamp was issued in 1951 while the region was a French protectorate. Saar issued its own stamps from 1920 until 1959 when the use of German stamps was resumed.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on March 31, 2021, 03:24:24 AM
*This Day in Music History"
March 31, 1685
Johann Sebastian Bach born in Eisenach, Germany (d. 1750)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 01, 2021, 03:33:45 AM
"This Day in Music History"
April 1, 1873
Sergei Rachmaninoff, Russian-American piano virtuoso, conductor, and composer, born in Oneg or Semyonovo, Russian Empire (d. 1943).
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on April 01, 2021, 04:57:19 AM
Allow me to post this... unusual version of Rachmaninov's "über sweet" Vocalise....Grégoire Blanc is a terrific Théréministe!

https://www.youtube.com/v/ht_juPo0ohs
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 01, 2021, 12:50:52 PM
Allow me to post this... unusual version of Rachmaninov's "über sweet" Vocalise....Grégoire Blanc is a terrific Théréministe!


That is awesome! I went to YouTube so I could enjoy it full screen. Watching Grégoire Blanc's hands playing the Thérémin is fascinating. A gorgeous piece of music and a brilliant performance!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 01, 2021, 02:50:22 PM
... and speaking of hands, I notice Laurent Beeckmans is conducting without a baton, which suggests to me he is primarily a choral person? I couldn't find any biographical information on him, but his compositions tend to support that assumption.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on April 01, 2021, 11:03:19 PM
I found some information on Laurent Beeckmans (only French and Flemish).
He is a paedagogue/pianist/conductor / arranger and mathematician. He studied at the Brussels Conservatoire (pianoclass of Evgeny Mogilevsky) and teaches musical theory at the Chapelle Musicale Reine Elisabeth.
He leads the chamber orchestra of Edingen (Enghien), the Melomania orchestra and  l'orchestre de chambre de l'Ecole Européenne de Bruxelles.
He forms a pianoduo with Pieter Dhoore (pianoduo Mahler), specialising in transcriptions of orchestral works.
http://www.mahlerpianoduo.be/bioKL_en.htm
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 02, 2021, 03:05:58 AM
*This Day in Music*
April 2, 1800
Premiere performance of Ludwig van Beethoven's 1st Symphony in C


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 03, 2021, 02:52:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 3, 1897
Johannes Brahms dies at 63

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 04, 2021, 02:53:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 4th
1957 Heitor Villa-Lobos' 10th Symphony premieres French Radio National Orchestra, conducted by the composer, in Paris
1922 Elmer Bernstein, American movie music composer (The Magnificent Seven, To Kill A Mockingbird, The Age Of innocence), born in NYC, New York (d. 2004)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 04, 2021, 02:54:12 AM
*
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 05, 2021, 02:23:04 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 5, 1902
Maurice Ravel's "Pavane pour une infante defunte" premieres in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 06, 2021, 02:19:07 AM
"This Day in Music History"
April 6, 1971
Igor Stravinsky dies of pneumonia at 88

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 07, 2021, 02:23:03 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 7
1724 Johann Sebastian Bach's "St John Passion" premieres in Leipzig
1805 Premiere of Ludwig van Beethoven's "Eroica" (conducted by himself)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 08, 2021, 02:15:41 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 8,1692
Giuseppe Tartini, Venetian Baroque composer and violinist (Trillo del Diavolo), born in Piran, Venice (d. 1770)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 09, 2021, 02:17:53 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 9, 1939
Marian Anderson sings before 75,000 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 10, 2021, 01:48:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 10,1868
1st performance of Johannes Brahms' "A German Requiem"

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on April 10, 2021, 01:53:05 AM
https://www.youtube.com/v/mAONYTMf2pk

I didn't know enough of this concert and had to do some research. 

"The Lincoln Memorial concert made Anderson an international celebrity. It overshadowed the rest of her long life as a performer — she was 96 when she died in 1993. Eventually she did sing at Constitution Hall. By that time, the DAR had apologized and changed its rules. Anderson rarely spoke of that historic April day, and Keiler says when she did, there was no rancor.

"You never heard in her voice, a single tone of meanness, bitterness, blame, it was simply lacking," he says. "There is something saintly in that. Something deeply human and good."
Source: https://www.npr.org/2014/04/09/298760473/denied-a-stage-she-sang-for-a-nation



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 10, 2021, 09:52:46 AM


"You never heard in her voice, a single tone of meanness, bitterness, blame, it was simply lacking," he says. "There is something saintly in that. Something deeply human and good."
Source: https://www.npr.org/2014/04/09/298760473/denied-a-stage-she-sang-for-a-nation

Great story - Thanks for finding that!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 11, 2021, 02:31:30 AM
"This Day in Music History"
April 11, 1830
Robert Schumann hears violinist Paganini play in Frankfurt
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 12, 2021, 01:53:33 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 12, 1945
Richard Strauss completes his "Metamorphosen"


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 13, 2021, 02:27:56 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 13, 1896
John Philip Sousa's "El Capitan" premieres at the Tremont Theatre in Boston

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 14, 2021, 02:15:39 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 14, 1759
George Frideric Handel dies at 74 in London, possibly due to a failed eye operation


https://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/how-george-handel-die.html (https://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/how-george-handel-die.html)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 15, 2021, 02:44:11 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 15, 1729
Johann Sebastian Bach's "St Matthew Passion" premieres in Leipzig


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Papy Oli on April 15, 2021, 04:26:18 AM
A nice daily discovery, Tony.

I particularly liked the Stravinsky first day envelope further up.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on April 15, 2021, 04:40:29 AM
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/Elcapitansheet.jpg)

Plenty of discoveries, indeed. A Sousa operetta !...I confess not knowing that Sousa wrote more than marches...
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 15, 2021, 08:21:00 AM

Plenty of discoveries, indeed. A Sousa operetta !...I confess not knowing that Sousa wrote more than marches...


Also, that Souza began his music studies playing the violin with John Esputa, Jr., a prominent violin and viola instructor and a fine cornetist. Esputa, who discovered Souza's perfect pitch and sight reading abilities, was able to give his student a strong foundation in music theory and harmony.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 15, 2021, 09:21:33 AM
A nice daily discovery, Tony.

I particularly liked the Stravinsky first day envelope further up.

Thanks!

That first day cover was one I serviced myself back in 1982. The first class postal rate at the time was 20 cents, so additional postage needed to be added to the 2-cent Stravinsky stamp. The musical bulk rate and non-profit stamps made good complementary choices.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Florestan on April 15, 2021, 10:49:44 AM
A very nice and extremely informative thread, Tony, thank you.

I'm curious: how many stamps do you own? As a kid I collected stamps too, though music was not my interest back then. I should still have my stamp albums somewhere, must look for them.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 16, 2021, 01:45:30 AM
A very nice and extremely informative thread, Tony, thank you.

I'm curious: how many stamps do you own? As a kid I collected stamps too, though music was not my interest back then. I should still have my stamp albums somewhere, must look for them.

I'm glad you're enjoying the thread. Most of my career was in education, but there were years I spent in the collectibles business. When I first graduated from college, music teaching jobs were hard to come by, so I got into that field. In addition to music at the time, I enjoyed collecting stamps, so I got a job with one of the major stamp firms. I subsequently worked for a couple of others and was a dealer on my own for a while. I learned more about history and geography from those jobs than from anywhere else.
 My main area of interest now is in postal history, collecting items dealing with music and my home town. Definitely try to find your old albums. They'll bring back memories and possibly rekindle an interest in a hobby that has waned in overall popularity over recent years.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 16, 2021, 01:48:12 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 16, 1854
Franz Liszt's symphonic poem "Mazeppa" premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 17, 2021, 03:06:35 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 17, 1568
Christophe Thomas Walliser, French composer, born in Strasbourg, France (d. 1648)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on April 17, 2021, 06:29:00 AM
Walliser : a rare, unknown composer, for sure!
https://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/grovemusic/view/10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.001.0001/omo-9781561592630-e-0000029848

https://www.youtube.com/v/QR4K-Littxg

Lovely.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 17, 2021, 07:33:53 AM
Walliser : a rare, unknown composer, for sure!


Lovely.

Some dates definitely require deeper digging than others!

The YouTube caption to the video you posted mentioned "Walliser’s father-in-law was actually the publisher, though Cum natus is delightful, and certainly deserved to be there alongside works by Gabrieli, Marenzio, Hassler, and others".

A beautiful composition, and great to see it still being performed more than 450 years later!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 18, 2021, 03:07:30 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 18, 1819
Franz von Suppé, born in Spalato, Dalmatia, Austrian Empire (d. 1895)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 19, 2021, 02:54:07 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 19, 1774
Christoph Willibald Gluck's opera "Iphigenia in Aulis" premieres in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 20, 2021, 01:54:23 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 20, 1759
George Frideric Handel is buried in Westminster Abbey, London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 21, 2021, 01:51:41 AM
*This Day in Music History+
April 21, 1780
Ferdinand Zellbell the younger, Swedish composer and co-founder of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music, dies at 60

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 22, 2021, 02:25:01 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 22, 1916
Yehudi Menuhin, American-British violinist, conductor and teacher, born in NYC, New York (d. 1999)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 23, 2021, 02:21:47 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 23, 1939
First performance of Béla Bartok's 2nd Concerto for violin

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 24, 2021, 03:17:15 AM
*This Day in Music History*
April 24, 1801
First performance of Haydn's oratorio "Die Jahreszeiten"




Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: pjme on April 24, 2021, 07:43:50 AM
Ferdinand Zellbell the younger, turns out to be another rare and (for me) completely unknown composer.
https://www.swedishmusicalheritage.com/composers/zellbell-ferdinand/

There are some Swedish recordings, very elegant music!

https://www.youtube.com/v/EwkYUpVjwa8
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 25, 2021, 04:49:12 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 25, 1926
Giacomo Puccini's opera "Turandot" premieres in Milan

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 26, 2021, 02:03:48 AM
*This Day in Music History"
April 26, 1835
Frederic Chopin's "Grand Polonaise Brillante" premieres in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 27, 2021, 02:22:54 AM
"This Day in Music History"
April 27, 1810
Ludwig van Beethoven composes "Für Elise.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on April 28, 2021, 02:10:42 AM
Need to list a few days in advance this morning:

*This Week in Music History”
April 28, 1892 - 1st performance of Antonín Dvořák's overture "Carnival Overture"
April 29, 1879 - Thomas Beecham born in St Helens, Lancashire (d. 1961)
              1895 - Malcolm Sargent born in Bath Villas, Ashford, Kent (d. 1967)
April 30, 1902 - Claude Debussy’s opera "Pelléas et Mélisande" premieres in Paris
May 1, 1786 - Mozart’s opera “Marriage of Figaro” premieres in Vienna with the composer conducting
May 2, 1660 - Alessandro Scarlatti born in Palermo, Sicily (d. 1725
)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 03, 2021, 02:42:34 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 3, 1917
1st performance of Ernest Bloch's symphony "Israel"

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 04, 2021, 02:37:09 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 4, 1878
Thomas Edison's Phonograph shown for first time at Grand Opera House, San Francisco.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 05, 2021, 02:51:21 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 5,1891
Music Hall (Carnegie Hall) opens in New York, Tchaikovsky is guest conductor


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on May 05, 2021, 04:28:51 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 4, 1878
Thomas Edison's Phonograph shown for first time at Grand Opera House, San Francisco.


That must have been an amazing thing to witness for the first time. :o
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 05, 2021, 05:57:15 AM
That must have been an amazing thing to witness for the first time. :o

Apparently, things didn't go smoothly. I had a lot of trouble finding background information about the event, but the attached PDF link gives some details.

https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/146079/jacquesb_1.pdf?sequence=1 (https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/146079/jacquesb_1.pdf?sequence=1)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 06, 2021, 02:36:43 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 6, 1800
Ferdinand Marcucci, Italian harpist and composer, born in Florence (d. 1871)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on May 06, 2021, 07:20:33 AM
Apparently, things didn't go smoothly. I had a lot of trouble finding background information about the event, but the attached PDF link gives some details.

https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/146079/jacquesb_1.pdf?sequence=1 (https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/146079/jacquesb_1.pdf?sequence=1)

This is a great read Tony, I’m half way through it already. Really interesting stuff about how people in the past tried to monetise the new technology of recording equipment and the attitudes people had to the machinery, artists and media. It’s hard to imagine now that people would just buy a dozen records.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 07, 2021, 02:55:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 7, 1824
Ludwig van Beethoven's 9th Symphony premieres in Vienna.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 08, 2021, 01:32:30 AM
"This Day in Music History"
May 8, 1924
Arthur Honegger's "Pacifica 231" premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 09, 2021, 02:57:50 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 9, 1707
Dietrich Buxtehude, German organist & composer, dies at about 69

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 10, 2021, 02:13:00 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 5, 1855
Anatoli Liadov born in St Petersburg, Russia

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 11, 2021, 02:00:58 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 11, 1881
Bedrich Smetana's opera "Libusa" premieres in Prague


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 12, 2021, 02:28:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 12, 1845
Gabriel Urbain Fauré born in Pamiers, France (d. 1924)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 13, 2021, 02:28:37 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 13, 1767
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's first opera "Apollo et Hyacinthus", written when he was 11 years old, premieres in Salzburg

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on May 13, 2021, 02:35:13 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 13, 1767
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's first opera "Apollo et Hyacinthus", written when he was 11 years old, premieres in Salzburg

You know what, I have 5-6 of those sets!  ;D  Not this one, but La Traviata, the Damnation of Faust and a few others.  Is that one of yours?  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 13, 2021, 02:50:34 AM
You know what, I have 5-6 of those sets!  ;D  Not this one, but La Traviata, the Damnation of Faust and a few others.  Is that one of yours?  :)

PD

Yes, it's from a "Life of Mozart" set. The "Liebig's Extract of Meat Company" produced these trade cards between 1870 and 1975.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on May 13, 2021, 03:32:06 AM
Yes, it's from a "Life of Mozart" set. The "Liebig's Extract of Meat Company" produced these trade cards between 1870 and 1975.
I collected mine probably about 15ish years ago.  I also have (and pardon, but I'm being lazy with my French use today!):  Renowned opera theaters, the Mastersingers of Nuremberg, and the Magic Flute.  Do you happen to know, were they all issued in a series of 6 each?  All of the ones that I have are like that.  I've had mine matted and framed and are on a wall at the base of the stairway going up to the top floor.  They are fun to look at!  Do you have others in that series or others?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 13, 2021, 11:03:55 AM
I collected mine probably about 15ish years ago.  I also have (and pardon, but I'm being lazy with my French use today!):  Renowned opera theaters, the Mastersingers of Nuremberg, and the Magic Flute.  Do you happen to know, were they all issued in a series of 6 each?  All of the ones that I have are like that.  I've had mine matted and framed and are on a wall at the base of the stairway going up to the top floor.  They are fun to look at!  Do you have others in that series or others?

PD

They were mostly issued in sets of 6 or 12. I have the complete Mozart set and a few additional music-related cards from various other sets.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 14, 2021, 02:10:05 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 14, 1832
Felix Mendelssohn's concert overture "Hebrides" premieres in London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on May 14, 2021, 04:37:56 AM
They were mostly issued in sets of 6 or 12. I have the complete Mozart set and a few additional music-related cards from various other sets.
Thanks!  By the way, how many are there in your Mozart set?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 14, 2021, 01:10:24 PM
Thanks!  By the way, how many are there in your Mozart set?

PD

Seems to be a set of 6.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 15, 2021, 02:16:30 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 15, 1567
Claudio Monteverdi, Italian composer and pioneer in development of opera (L'Orfeo, espro della Beata Vergine), baptised in Cremona, Italy (d. 1643)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 16, 2021, 01:36:08 AM
*These Days in Music History*

May 16, 1868
Bedrich Smetana's opera "Dalibor" premieres in Prague

May 17, 1866
Erik Satie born in Honfleur, Normandy (d. 1925)

May 18, 1887
Emmanuel Chabrier's opera "Le roi malgré lui" (King, in spite of himself) premieres at the Opéra-Comique in Paris; after 3 performances the theatre burns down

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 19, 2021, 08:04:06 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 19, 1886
Camille Saint-Saëns' 3rd Symphony in C premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 20, 2021, 01:55:24 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 20, 1896
Clara Schumann dies of a stroke at 76

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 21, 2021, 01:47:22 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 21, 1892
Ruggero Leoncavallo's opera "I Pagliacci" premieres in Milan

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 22, 2021, 01:35:43 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 22, 1813
Richard Wagner born in Leipzig, Saxony, Germany (d. 1883)



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 23, 2021, 01:32:38 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 23, 1939
Dmitri Shostakovich appointed professor at conservatory of Leningrad
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 24, 2021, 12:52:31 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 24, 1948
Benjamin Britten's "Beggar's Opera" premieres in Cambridge



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: vandermolen on May 24, 2021, 09:52:57 PM
I really like these stamp images - first time I've seen them.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 25, 2021, 01:24:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 25, 1934
Béla Bartòk's "Enchanted Deer" premieres
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 26, 2021, 01:34:23 AM
"This Day in Music History"

May 26, 1591 Dirck Janszoon Sweelinck, Dutch composer and son of Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, born in Amsterdam (baptism date) (d. 1652)

May 26, 1946 Darius Milhaud's 3rd Concert for piano/orchestra premieres in Prague


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on May 26, 2021, 05:36:48 AM
"This Day in Music History"

May 26, 1591 Dirck Janszoon Sweelinck, Dutch composer and son of Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, born in Amsterdam (baptism date) (d. 1652)

May 26, 1946 Darius Milhaud's 3rd Concert for piano/orchestra premieres in Prague

I really like the bottom stamp in particular!  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 27, 2021, 01:19:31 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 27, 1840
Niccolo Paganini dies at 57.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 28, 2021, 01:12:15 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 28, 1923
Gyorgy Ligeti born in Transylvania, Romania (d. 2006)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on May 28, 2021, 08:10:48 AM
*This Day in Music History*
May 28, 1923
Gyorgy Ligeti born in Transylvania, Romania (d. 2006)


Oh, are they big Ligeti fans in Suriname?
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: ritter on May 28, 2021, 08:37:49 AM
Oh, are they big Ligeti fans in Suriname?
Oh yes...it’s not uncommon to hear teenagers whistling Lux Aeterna on the streets of Paramaribo...
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on May 28, 2021, 08:41:39 AM
Oh yes...it’s not uncommon to hear teenagers whistling Lux Aeterna on the streets of Paramaribo...

I think that was last year's trend. Now they're more into Ferneyhough, but with a challenge also seen from the Birtwistle camp ...
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: ritter on May 28, 2021, 09:26:54 AM
I think that was last year's trend. Now they're more into Ferneyhough, but with a challenge also seen from the Birtwistle camp ...
:)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 29, 2021, 01:15:41 AM
"This Day in Music History"
May 29, 1913
Igor Stravinsky's ballet "Le Sacre du Printemps" (The Rite of Spring) premieres in Paris, provoking a riot

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 29, 2021, 01:27:17 AM
Oh, are they big Ligeti fans in Suriname?

Some countries issue stamps relevant to the nation's history and culture, others take advantage of themes that might be a good source of revenue. I don't believe any other country has issued a Ligeti stamp other than the one from Suriname, which is part of a "Hungarian Composers" sheet. I'm sure this is true for some of the other composers featured.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 30, 2021, 02:38:51 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 30, 1952
Darius Milhaud's "West Point Suite" premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on May 31, 2021, 02:06:19 AM
*This Day in Music History"
May 31,1809
Franz Joseph Haydn dies at 77


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 01, 2021, 01:39:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 1, 1893
Giuseppe Verdi’s Opera "Falstaff" is produced in Berlin

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 02, 2021, 01:10:13 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 2, 1857
Edward Elgar born in Lower Broadheath, Worcestershire (d. 1934)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 03, 2021, 01:04:23 AM
*This Day in Music History"
June 6, 1875
Georges Bizet dies of a heart attack at 36


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 04, 2021, 01:11:51 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 4, 1951
Serge Koussevitzky, Russian-American conductor (Boston Symphony, 1924-49), dies at 76.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 04, 2021, 04:56:08 AM
I thought that I'd also post this link here (old photos from EMI's website of early recording days and some of the singers and musicians involved, etc.):  https://www.flickr.com/photos/100030765@N07/sets/72157635013975944/with/9470912821/

I had posted a link on the 33 1/3 thread.

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 04, 2021, 09:33:12 AM
I thought that I'd also post this link here (old photos from EMI's website of early recording days and some of the singers and musicians involved, etc.):  https://www.flickr.com/photos/100030765@N07/sets/72157635013975944/with/9470912821/

I had posted a link on the 33 1/3 thread.

PD

Great pics! I especially liked this one of Henry Wood at Abbey Road.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 04, 2021, 11:18:42 AM
I thought that they had some very cool photos.  :)

Did you see the ones of Glenn Miller and Doris Day?

Tempted to send them an email asking whether or not they have any more info on the photos/events and/or suggesting that it would mean a lot to music lovers and historians to know more about the photos, etc.

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 05, 2021, 01:56:55 AM
I thought that they had some very cool photos.  :)

Did you see the ones of Glenn Miller and Doris Day?

Tempted to send them an email asking whether or not they have any more info on the photos/events and/or suggesting that it would mean a lot to music lovers and historians to know more about the photos, etc.

PD

Go for it!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 05, 2021, 01:59:01 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 5, 1826
Carl Maria von Weber dies at 39

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 06, 2021, 01:40:43 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 6, 1903
Aram Khachaturian born in Tbilisi, Georgia (d. 1978)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 07, 2021, 01:30:30 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 7, 1897
George Szell, Hungarian-born American conductor (Cleveland Orchestra, 1946-70), born in Budapest, Hungary (d. 1970)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 07, 2021, 04:05:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 7, 1897
George Szell, Hungarian-born American conductor (Cleveland Orchestra, 1946-70), born in Budapest, Hungary (d. 1970)

Cool images...thanks!  :)

Pd
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 08, 2021, 01:25:24 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 8, 1810
Robert Schumann born in Zwickau, Kingdom of Saxony (d. 1856)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 09, 2021, 03:48:49 AM
*This Day in Music History"
June 9, 1865
Carl Nielsen, Danish violinist and composer, born in Sortelung, Denmark (d. 1931)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 10, 2021, 01:48:48 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 10, 1865
Richard Wagner's opera "Tristan und Isolde" premieres in Munich, Germany

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 11, 2021, 01:23:33 AM
"This Day in Music History"
June 11, 1864
Richard Strauss born in Munich, Germany (d. 1949)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on June 11, 2021, 06:41:26 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 10, 1865
Richard Wagner's opera "Tristan und Isolde" premieres in Munich, Germany


Hmmm a stamp from Nazi occupied Bohemia & Moravia - I wonder if many of those are still around?
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 11, 2021, 07:03:15 AM
Hmmm a stamp from Nazi occupied Bohemia & Moravia - I wonder if many of those are still around?
Interesting, I had missed that.  Is that one of the stamps in your collection Tony?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 11, 2021, 07:46:46 AM
Hmmm a stamp from Nazi occupied Bohemia & Moravia - I wonder if many of those are still around?

Interesting, I had missed that.  Is that one of the stamps in your collection Tony?

PD

Stamps of Bohemia and Moravia under Nazi occupation are fairly common, but have a lot of historical interest.
I do have the Wagner stamp in my collection, as well as these Mozart issues.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 11, 2021, 08:54:05 AM
Stamps of Bohemia and Moravia under Nazi occupation are fairly common, but have a lot of historical interest.
I do have the Wagner stamp in my collection, as well as these Mozart issues.
I don't know much about stamps.  I'm trying to figure out when they were mailed and where they were stamped.  I noticed that they were cancelled in both Czech and German.

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 11, 2021, 10:43:58 AM
I don't know much about stamps.  I'm trying to figure out when they were mailed and where they were stamped.  I noticed that they were cancelled in both Czech and German.

PD

The stamps were cancelled on a folder by the postal service at a stamp exhibition in Turnov in 1941. It doesn't look like they're first day cancels because the stamps were issued that year on October 6. It's wasn't (and still isn't) unusual for stamps to receive first day, commemorative, or show cancels without actually passing through the mail for the benefit of collectors.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 12, 2021, 03:06:44 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 12, 2006
György Ligeti dies at 83 at Vienna. Born 1923 in Transylvania, Romania, he lived in Hungary before emigrating to Austria in 1956.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 12, 2021, 04:33:27 AM
The stamps were cancelled on a folder by the postal service at a stamp exhibition in Turnov in 1941. It doesn't look like they're first day cancels because the stamps were issued that year on October 6. It's wasn't (and still isn't) unusual for stamps to receive first day, commemorative, or show cancels without actually passing through the mail for the benefit of collectors.
Thank you for the info.

I did a bit of further digging and found this:  https://www.stamp-collecting-world.com/bohemiaandmoravia_1939.html

Interesting to find out (and very sad to read) that the first stamps were overprinted.  What beautiful engravings the original ones were!

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 12, 2021, 05:16:52 AM
Thank you for the info.

I did a bit of further digging and found this:  https://www.stamp-collecting-world.com/bohemiaandmoravia_1939.html

Interesting to find out (and very sad to read) that the first stamps were overprinted.  What beautiful engravings the original ones were!

PD

Overprinting stamps is not unusual. Sometimes it's done to commemorate an event, validate stamps for use in other locales, or (frequently) to surcharge the denominations in response to a change in postal rates.

The ad below is from an old stamp company circular. "Lost Nation", "Vanished Land", or other similar descriptions are used to designate stamp-issuing entities that no longer exist as such. Catalogs list Bohemia & Moravia as a "protectorate", but the term in the ad is in quotations because the occupation was brutal.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 13, 2021, 01:25:28 AM
   *The Week in Music History*
   
     June 13, 1854
   Anthony Faas, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, patents the first US accordion, having made improvements to the keyboard, and enhancing the sound.

   June 14, 1881
   Player piano patented by John McTammany Jr (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

   June 15, 1843
    Edvard Grieg born in Bergen, Norway (d. 1907)

   June 16, 1961
   Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev defects to the West at Le Bourget Airport in Paris

   June 17, 1818
        Charles Gounod born in Paris, France (d. 1893)

   June 17, 1882
        Igor Stravinsky, born in Oranienbaum, Russia (d. 1971) [OS 5th June]

   June 18, 1723
        Giuseppe Scarlatti born in Naples (d. 1777)

   June 19, 1825
        Gioachino Rossini's "Il viaggio a Reims" premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 20, 2021, 03:13:29 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 20, 1819
Jacques Offenbach, German-French composer, born in Cologne, Germany (d. 1880)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 21, 2021, 01:03:27 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 21, 1908
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov dies at 64 (June 8 old style date)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 22, 2021, 02:07:36 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 22, 1942
European broadcast première of Dmitri Shostakovich's 7th Symphony in London conducted by Sir Henry J. Wood and the London Philharmonic Orchestra


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 23, 2021, 02:06:17 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 23, 1902
Monument to Gioachino Rossini unveiled in Santa Croce, Florence
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 24, 2021, 01:43:57 AM
*This Day in Music history*
June 24, 1880
First performance of "O Canada," the song that would become the national anthem of Canada, at the Congrès national des Canadiens-Français

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 25, 2021, 02:37:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 25, 1910
Igor Stravinsky's ballet "The Firebird" premieres at the Opéra de Paris, Paris


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 26, 2021, 01:46:07 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 26,1912
Gustav Mahler's 9th Symphony premieres in Vienna


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on June 26, 2021, 03:20:23 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 25, 1910
Igor Stravinsky's ballet "The Firebird" premieres at the Opéra de Paris, Paris

Those are all lovely stamps!  Particularly like the (what I'm guessing is) Russian one.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 26, 2021, 10:11:25 AM
Those are all lovely stamps!  Particularly like the (what I'm guessing is) Russian one.

Yes, it's a 1985 Russian stamp celebrating the 115th Birth Anniversary of Firebird choreographer Michel Fokin.

Russia also issued this "Firebird" stamp in 1976.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on June 26, 2021, 11:05:19 AM
That 1976 one might perhaps be dealing with the Russian folklore Firebird legend, rather than Stravinsky's work on it.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 26, 2021, 03:08:17 PM
That 1976 one might perhaps be dealing with the Russian folklore Firebird legend, rather than Stravinsky's work on it.

Yes, it's from a set of stamps featuring paintings by Russian artists. It depicts "Firebird" by A.V. Kotuhin.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 27, 2021, 02:20:31 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 27, 1959
"West Side Story" closes at Winter Garden Theater NYC after 734 performances

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 27, 2021, 02:32:29 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 27, 1959
"West Side Story" closes at Winter Garden Theater NYC after 734 performances



Womb to tomb ....
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on June 27, 2021, 05:22:30 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 27, 1959
"West Side Story" closes at Winter Garden Theater NYC after 734 performances


Er, isn’t it illegal to dance down the street like that in The Gambia? :o
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 27, 2021, 12:13:00 PM
Er, isn’t it illegal to dance down the street like that in The Gambia? :o

Don't think so ...
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 28, 2021, 02:52:58 AM
*This Day in Music History"
June 28, 1846
The Saxophone is patented by Antoine-Joseph "Adolfe" Sax


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on June 28, 2021, 03:34:00 AM
*This Day in Music History"
June 28, 1846
The Saxophone is patented by Antoine-Joseph "Adolfe" Sax


I saw a bit about Sax in a programme the other night. Apparently he survived all sorts of accidents then the makers of traditional instruments burnt down his factories, tried to murder him, intimidated players etc.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 28, 2021, 11:01:46 AM
I saw a bit about Sax in a programme the other night. Apparently he survived all sorts of accidents then the makers of traditional instruments burnt down his factories, tried to murder him, intimidated players etc.

An interesting man, for sure ...


"Hit on the head with a brick. Swallowed a needle. Drank sulfuric acid. Fell face-first on a searing skillet. These were just a few near-misses in the life of Adolphe Sax, an incredibly accident-prone child who was born in Belgium in 1814 and one of 11 children in his family to make it to puberty (barely)."


https://allthatsinteresting.com/adolphe-sax (https://allthatsinteresting.com/adolphe-sax)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 29, 2021, 01:55:06 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 29, 1888
First (known) recording of classical music made --  Handel's oratorio “Israel in Egypt”, on wax cylinder
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on June 30, 2021, 01:52:50 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 30, 1892
László Lajtha, Hungarian composer, ethno-musicologist and conductor, born in Budapest, Hungary (d. 1963)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 01, 2021, 02:04:44 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 1, 1925
Erik Satie dies at 59 from cirrhosis of the liver after years of heavy drinking, including consumption of absinthe. He is buried in the cemetery in Arcueil.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 02, 2021, 01:50:03 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 2, 1900
Jean Sibelius' "Finlandia" premieres in Helsinki

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: steve ridgway on July 02, 2021, 05:59:01 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 2, 1900
Jean Sibelius' "Finlandia" premieres in Helsinki


Was Romania in 1965 implying Finnish nationalism was a good thing? ;)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 02, 2021, 11:02:30 AM
Was Romania in 1965 implying Finnish nationalism was a good thing? ;)

It was an interesting inclusion in Romania's 1965 postage stamp "Cultural Anniversary Series". In addition to Romanians Ion Bianu, Anton Bacalbasa, and Vasile Conta, the set featured Sibelius, Dante Alighieri, and Horace.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 03, 2021, 02:03:37 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 3, 1854
Leoš Janáček born in Hukvaldy, Moravia, Austrian Empire (d. 1928)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on July 03, 2021, 02:41:47 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 1, 1925
Erik Satie dies at 59 from cirrhosis of the liver after years of heavy drinking, including consumption of absinthe. He is buried in the cemetery in Arcueil.


...

(https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=30559.0;attach=74984)


I don't think I've seen a health warning on a stamp before!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 03, 2021, 07:30:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 3, 1854
Leoš Janáček born in Hukvaldy, Moravia, Austrian Empire (d. 1928)

I particularly like these stamps...of course though, I'm a bit biased.  :D

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 04, 2021, 02:52:56 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 4, 1826
Stephen Foster, American composer, born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania (d. 1864)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 04, 2021, 03:11:41 AM

I don't think I've seen a health warning on a stamp before!


"Porte Timbres" (French for "Stamp Carriers") were labels with a blank space where a postage stamp could be applied. Also known as "stamp collars" or "advertising collars", the labels were then pasted on an envelope where the stamp was supposed to go. These were popular in the early 20th century in Europe, especially in France. They were used for patriotic or charitable messages, product advertising, or to promote specific causes. The anti-absinthe example bears a stamp with the "Sower" design in use on French stamps starting in 1902, during Satie's later years.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 05, 2021, 02:19:09 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 5, 1942
First performance of Heitor Villa-Lobos' Chôros 6/9/11
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on July 05, 2021, 03:15:21 AM

"Porte Timbres" (French for "Stamp Carriers") were labels with a blank space where a postage stamp could be applied. Also known as "stamp collars" or "advertising collars", the labels were then pasted on an envelope where the stamp was supposed to go. These were popular in the early 20th century in Europe, especially in France. They were used for patriotic or charitable messages, product advertising, or to promote specific causes. The anti-absinthe example bears a stamp with the "Sower" design in use on French stamps starting in 1902, during Satie's later years.

Interesting thanks, I'd never heard of them before. I'm a little surprised they didn't take off more widely, businesses/charities always seem to exploit as many avenues as possible to get themselves noticed.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 06, 2021, 02:31:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 6, 1877
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (37) weds Antonina Miliukova (29) at the Church of Saint George in Moscow, Russia

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 07, 2021, 02:27:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 7, 1860
Gustav Mahler born in Kalischt, Bohemia (now Austria) (d. 1911)



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on July 07, 2021, 03:14:24 AM
Nice and a bit unexpected seeing GM on a playing card! Though a king of diamonds would better suit his status imho ...
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 07, 2021, 03:48:21 AM
Nice and a bit unexpected seeing GM on a playing card! Though a king of diamonds would better suit his status imho ...

That card was reserved for the big guy.   :)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on July 07, 2021, 04:03:16 AM
Yes, but he could have had the ace of diamonds!  ;D 

Actually perhaps the king of hearts might also be fitting for Herr M ..
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 08, 2021, 02:43:37 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 8, 1882
Percy Grainger, Australian-American concert pianist and composer, born in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 09, 2021, 01:52:27 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 9, 1879
Ottorino Respighi born in Bologna, Italy (d. 1936)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 10, 2021, 12:39:06 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 10, 1895
Carl Orff born in Munich, Germany (d. 1982)

July 10, 1979
Arthur Fiedler, orchestra leader (Boston Pops), dies at 84

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 10, 2021, 12:58:15 AM

*The Week Ahead in Music History*

July 11, 1937
George Gershwin dies at 38

July 12, 1934
Van Cliburn, American pianist, born in Shreveport, Louisiana (d. 2013)

July 13, 1951
Arnold Schoenberg dies at 76

July 14, 1682
Henry Purcell appointed organist of Chapel Royal, London

July15, 1857
Carl Czerny, Czech-Austrian pianist, composer, and teacher, dies at 66. He appears in the background of the Hungary Liszt stamp between Berlioz and Liszt.

July 16, 1782
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's opera "Die Entführung aus dem Serail" premieres in Vienna with Mozart conducting

July 17, 1717
George Frideric Handel's "Water Music" premieres on the river Thames in London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 17, 2021, 02:20:11 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 17, 1717
George Frideric Handel's "Water Music" premieres on the river Thames in London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 18, 2021, 02:36:15 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 18, 1872
Julius Fučík born in Prague, Austria-Hungary (d. 1916)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 19, 2021, 02:12:11 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 19, 1941
BBC World Service begins playing V(ictory) (. . . -  in Morse code), the opening rhythmic motif of Ludwig van Beethoven's 5th symphony

July 19, 1942
US première of Dmitri Shostakovich' 7th Symphony in NYC by the NBC Symphony Orchestra under Arturo Toscanini in a concert broadcast nationwide on NBC radio
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Papy Oli on July 19, 2021, 02:25:25 AM
Nice set this one, Tony.

I quite like the technological evolution displayed on the BBC one.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 19, 2021, 03:07:41 AM
Nice set this one, Tony.

I quite like the technological evolution displayed on the BBC one.

Thanks, Olivier -
Yes, the Great Britain stamp has an interesting design.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 20, 2021, 01:42:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 20, 1942
Time magazine puts Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich on its cover

July 20, 1962
Dmitri Shostakovich completes his 13th Symphony

July 20, 1964
Dmitri Shostakovich completes his 10th String quartet

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 20, 2021, 01:52:05 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 20, 1942
Time magazine puts Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich on its cover

July 20, 1962
Dmitri Shostakovich completes his 13th Symphony

July 20, 1964
Dmitri Shostakovich completes his 10th String quartet

Neat cover!  Wow!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 21, 2021, 01:36:04 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 21, 1938
Paul Hindemith and Leonide Massine's ballet Nobilissima Visione premieres in London

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 22, 2021, 03:00:40 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 22, 1959
Benjamin Britten's "Missa Brevis" in D premieres, dedicated to George Malcolm and the boys of Westminster Cathedral Choir
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 22, 2021, 05:55:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
June 22, 1959
Benjamin Britten's "Missa Brevis" in D premieres, dedicated to George Malcolm and the boys of Westminster Cathedral Choir

Cool stamps!  8)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 23, 2021, 01:32:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 23, 1757
Domenico Scarlatti dies at the age of 71 at Madrid

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 24, 2021, 01:51:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 24, 1880
Ernest Bloch, Swiss-born American composer, born in Geneva, Switzerland (d. 1959)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 25, 2021, 02:04:23 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 25, 1903
André Fleury, French organist and composer, born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France (d. 1995)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 26, 2021, 01:26:06 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 26, 1882
Richard Wagner's opera "Parsifal" premieres in Bayreuth, Germany

July 26, 1874
 Serge Koussevitzky, Russian-American conductor (Boston Symphony, 1924-49), born in Vyshny Volochyok, Russia (d. 1951)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 26, 2021, 02:08:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 26, 1882
Richard Wagner's opera "Parsifal" premieres in Bayreuth, Germany

July 26, 1874
 Serge Koussevitzky, Russian-American conductor (Boston Symphony, 1924-49), born in Vyshny Volochyok, Russia (d. 1951)

Love the stamps and the *Koussevitzky/Magnavox ad!
*That would be cool to frame and hang up around either ones stereo or music collection.   ;D
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 26, 2021, 02:23:09 AM
Love the stamps and the *Koussevitzky/Magnavox ad!
*That would be cool to frame and hang up around either ones stereo or music collection.   ;D

It also reminds us of how much more mainstream classical music was in the past. In 1939, when that ad appeared, the general public (at least those interested in buying a phonograph) would recognize who Koussevitzky was. I'm not sure there is a conductor today who would be considered for a full-page magazine or 30-second video ipod ad.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 26, 2021, 02:30:01 AM
It also reminds us of how much more mainstream classical music was in the past. In 1939, when that ad appeared, the general public (at least those interested in buying a phonograph) would recognize who Koussevitzky was. I'm not sure there is a conductor today who would be considered for a full-page magazine or 30-second video ipod ad.
:-X  :(

Do you happen to know where that ad appeared?  Magazine?  Poster in a stereo shop or department store?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 26, 2021, 02:36:47 AM
:-X  :(

Do you happen to know where that ad appeared?  Magazine?  Poster in a stereo shop or department store?

PD

That was a full-page ad that I believe came from "Life" magazine.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 27, 2021, 01:26:46 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 27, 1867
Enrique Granados, Spanish opera composer, born in Lérida, Spain (d. 1916)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 28, 2021, 01:25:21 AM
*This Day in Music History*

July 28, 1741
Antonio Vivaldi dies at 63

July 28, 1750
Johann Sebastian Bach dies at 65

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 29, 2021, 01:34:13 AM
"This Day in Music History*
July 29, 1856
Robert Schumann dies at the age of 46

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 30, 2021, 01:15:21 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 30, 1824
Gioachino Rossini becomes manager of Theatre Italian, Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 30, 2021, 04:51:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 30, 1824
Gioachino Rossini becomes manager of Theatre Italian, Paris

Interesting!  I didn't know that he had been a theatre manager.  Any idea how long he did this for?
And when it was during his career?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 30, 2021, 06:18:32 AM
Interesting!  I didn't know that he had been a theatre manager.  Any idea how long he did this for?
And when it was during his career?

PD

From Wikipedia:

Rossini's new, and highly remunerative, contract with the French government was negotiated under Louis XVIII, who died in September 1824, soon after Rossini's arrival in Paris. It had been agreed that the composer would produce one grand opera for the Académie Royale de Musique and either an opera buffa or an opera semiseria for the Théâtre-Italien. He was also to help run the latter theatre and revise one of his earlier works for revival there.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on July 30, 2021, 07:13:57 AM
From Wikipedia:

Rossini's new, and highly remunerative, contract with the French government was negotiated under Louis XVIII, who died in September 1824, soon after Rossini's arrival in Paris. It had been agreed that the composer would produce one grand opera for the Académie Royale de Musique and either an opera buffa or an opera semiseria for the Théâtre-Italien. He was also to help run the latter theatre and revise one of his earlier works for revival there.
Thank you!  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on July 31, 2021, 01:16:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*
July 31, 1886
Franz Liszt dies at the age of 74.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on July 31, 2021, 01:27:43 AM
"This Day in Music History*
July 29, 1856
Robert Schumann dies at the age of 46


Lao Tzu — 'The flame that burns twice as bright burns half as long.'   :(
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 01, 2021, 01:01:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 8, 1779
Francis Scott Key, American lawyer, poet and writer of the lyrics to "Star-Spangled Banner", born in Carroll County, Maryland (d. 1843).

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 02, 2021, 01:56:54 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 2, 1921
Enrico Caruso dies at 48

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 02, 2021, 03:41:25 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 2, 1921
Enrico Caruso dies at 48

What a voice!

And great stamp!  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 03, 2021, 01:31:04 AM
*this Day in Music History*
August 3, 1829
Gioachino Rossini's opera "Guillaume Tell" premieres at Salle Le Peletier in Paris

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 04, 2021, 01:46:19 AM
*This Day in music History"
August 4, 1782
Wolfang Amadeus Mozart (26) weds Constanze Weber in St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna, Austria


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 04, 2021, 06:08:55 AM
Trying to figure out what to do here with some old music magazines.  I had kept a handful of some Gramophone ones plus some other odds and ends.  I doubt that they are worth much and probably more of a hassle to list on eBay than are worth.  I do have a number of older Opera News that I'm thinking of seeing whether or not an ephemera dealer might want.  I had bought most of them at an auction some years ago.  Feeling like I want to declutter around here and have been going at it today.  Making a bit of progress.  ::)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 04, 2021, 06:17:05 AM
Trying to figure out what to do here with some old music magazines.  I had kept a handful of some Gramophone ones plus some other odds and ends.  I doubt that they are worth much and probably more of a hassle to list on eBay than are worth.  I do have a number of older Opera News that I'm thinking of seeing whether or not an ephemera dealer might want.  I had bought most of them at an auction some years ago.  Feeling like I want to declutter around here and have been going at it today.  Making a bit of progress.  ::)

PD

You might want to select and remove some of the nicer pages to save or sell and discard the rest. There is a demand for interesting and/or attractive magazine pages that can be framed or displayed in albums, like this ad from National Geographic.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 04, 2021, 06:56:55 AM
You might want to select and remove some of the nicer pages to save or sell and discard the rest. There is a demand for interesting and/or attractive magazine pages that can be framed or displayed in albums, like this ad from National Geographic.
Thank you for the suggestion; I'll keep that in mind.  The handful of Gramophone ones, etc. are only within about the past 20 years.  Hard to toss these two in particular:

(https://66.media.tumblr.com/8d980878c97fbbd85adb29efe6fee958/48803a677659a66f-23/s640x960/4e428a2d25d27b56c48290673801df395097f29a.jpg)  There's another one (will grab it when I go back upstairs) which features an article by Michael Kennedy about RVW.

PD

EDIT:  Here's the Vaughan Williams one:

Having trouble finding a picture of it, but it's from August 2008 (Vol. 86).

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 05, 2021, 01:08:06 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 5, 1397

Birth of Guillaume Dufay, Franco-Flemish composer and theorist (d. 1474)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 06, 2021, 02:26:53 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 6, 1868

1665 Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, French musician and son of Jean-Baptiste Lully, born in Paris, France (d. 1743)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 07, 2021, 01:30:11 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 7, 1868
Granville Bantock born in London (d. 1946)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Daverz on August 07, 2021, 09:15:34 PM
Found while googling for info on the 1976 Broadway revival of The Threepenny Opera with Raul Julia as Mack the Knife:

(https://i.colnect.net/f/4123/017/Raul-Julia-Threepenny-Opera.jpg)

From the series Angitua & Barbuda salutes Broadway:

http://www.philatelia.net/classik/stamps/?id=12391
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 08, 2021, 02:18:17 AM
Found while googling for info on the 1976 Broadway revival of The Threepenny Opera with Raul Julia as Mack the Knife:



From the series Angitua & Barbuda salutes Broadway:

http://www.philatelia.net/classik/stamps/?id=12391

Very sad that he passed away too soon. Fine actor and humanitarian.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 08, 2021, 02:24:01 AM
"This Day in Music History"
August 8, 1929

Josef Suk, Czech composer and violinist, born in Prague, Czechoslovakia (d. 2011)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 09, 2021, 01:16:54 AM
*This Day in Music History*

August 9, 1942
Dmitri Shostakovich's 7th Symphony, dedicated to city of Leningrad, is performed in Leningrad during siege by Nazi forces. Performed by starving musicians and broadcast to German forces by loudspeaker.

August 9, 1975
1975 Dmitri Shostakovich dies of lung cancer at 68

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 10, 2021, 01:05:54 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 10, 1787

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart completes "Eine kleine Nachtmusik"

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 11, 2021, 12:43:28 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 11, 1943

Richard Strauss' 2nd Horn Concerto premieres at the Salzburg Festival

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 12, 2021, 01:32:48 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 12, 1928

Leoš Janáček dies at 74 in Ostrava, now part of the Czech Republic.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 13, 2021, 01:59:55 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 13, 1912

Jules Massenet dies in Paris at age 70. As he wished. his funeral was private with no music and held at Égreville, where he is buried in a churchyard.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 14, 2021, 01:52:56 AM
"This Day in Music*
August 14, 1975

Dimitri Shostakovich is laid to rest at the Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 15, 2021, 03:32:55 AM
*This Day in Musi History*
August 15, 1914

Anatoly Liadov, member of "The Five", dies at 59 at Novgorod Governorate, an administrative division of the Russian Empire.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 16, 2021, 12:58:06 AM
*This Day in music History"
August 16, 1876

Richard Wagner’s Opera "Siegfried" premieres at Bayreuth

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 16, 2021, 03:50:08 AM
*This Day in music History"
August 16, 1876

Richard Wagner’s Opera "Siegfried" premieres at Bayreuth

The stamp of Siegfried is wonderful!  Really dramatic and powerful!

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 16, 2021, 11:56:18 AM
The stamp of Siegfried is wonderful!  Really dramatic and powerful!

PD

It was part of a 1933 set of nine semi-postal stamps from Germany. They were the first stamps of a commemorative nature issued by the Third Reich and each features a scene from one of Wagner's operas. Semi-postal stamps are sold with a surcharge above their postal rate value to fund a specific (usually charitable) cause. The "cause" for these stamps was stated as "emergency assistance" and all have swastikas as watermarks. The scenes featured are Tannhauser, Der Fliegende Hollander, Das Rheingold, Die Meistersinger, Die Walkure, Siegried, Tristan und Isolde, Lohengrin, and Parsifal.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 17, 2021, 12:57:53 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 17, 1880

Ole Bull, Norwegian violinist and composer (born in 1810), dies at Lysøen



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 18, 2021, 01:27:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 18, 1750

Antonio Salieri born in Legnago, Republic of Venice (d. 1825)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 19, 2021, 01:55:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 19, 1881
 
Georges Enesco, violinist and composer, born in Liveni, Dorohoi, Romania (d. 1955)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 20, 2021, 01:48:32 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 20, 1882

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture" debuts in Moscow

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 21, 2021, 02:21:42 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 21, 1893

Lili [Marie-Juliette Olga] Boulanger, French composer (first female winner of the Prix de Rome composition prize) and younger sister of Nadia Boulanger, born in Paris (d. 1918).

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 22, 2021, 02:58:03 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 22, 1862

Claude Debussy born in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France (d. 1918).

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 23, 2021, 02:06:16 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 23, 1937

Albert Roussel dies in Royan, France at the age of 68 (born 1869).


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 24, 2021, 01:30:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 24, 1787
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart completes his Sonata in A major for Violin and Piano, K. 526

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: vandermolen on August 24, 2021, 01:51:31 AM
26th August will be the 63rd Anniversary of Vaughan Williams's death; here is a stamp that was issued to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of his birth (on 12th October 1972). I remember the stamp being issued then:

(http://)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 24, 2021, 09:05:46 AM
26th August will be the 63rd Anniversary of Vaughan Williams's death; here is a stamp that was issued to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of his birth (on 12th October 1972). I remember the stamp being issued then:

(http://)
Thank you for posting that stamp and the photo behind it Jeffrey!  So, did you buy and set aside any of those stamps?   :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 25, 2021, 01:37:15 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 25, 1918

Leonard Bernstein born in Lawrence, Massachusetts (d. 1990)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 25, 2021, 02:05:29 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 25, 1918

Leonard Bernstein born in Lawrence, Massachusetts (d. 1990)

Happy birthday Lennie!

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 26, 2021, 02:09:26 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 26, 1958

Ralph Vaughan Williams dies at 85.

(Jeffrey has posted a postage stamp honoring him a few messages up, which I believe is the only stamp with his image.)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 27, 2021, 02:08:40 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 27, 1900

Gabriel Fauré's "Prométhée" premieres in Beziers


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2021, 05:17:45 AM
Thank you for posting that stamp and the photo behind it Jeffrey!  So, did you buy and set aside any of those stamps?   :)

PD
I'm sure that I did PD but it was almost 50 years ago and I can't remember. Hopefully there is a Treasure Chest in the attic somewhere with them hidden away.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2021, 05:18:51 AM
*This Day in Music History*
August 26, 1958

Ralph Vaughan Williams dies at 85.

(Jeffrey has posted a postage stamp honoring him a few messages up, which I believe is the only stamp with his image.)

V interesting Tony - never seen that Brooke-Bond card before. Actually their PG Tips is my favourite tea.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on August 27, 2021, 05:34:16 AM
V interesting Tony - never seen that Brooke-Bond card before. Actually their PG Tips is my favourite tea.
So, was that card tucked inside of a tin or affixed to the outside of it?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 27, 2021, 05:42:25 AM
V interesting Tony - never seen that Brooke-Bond card before. Actually their PG Tips is my favourite tea.

Glad to hear they're still in business. 
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: vandermolen on August 27, 2021, 11:08:33 AM
Glad to hear they're still in business.
Most certainly!
(http://)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 28, 2021, 01:37:47 AM
*This Weekend in Music History*

August 28, 1850
Richard Wagner's opera "Lohengrin" premieres at Weimar, Germany

August 29, 1686
Wilhelm Hieronymus Pachelbel, German composer and elder son of Johann Pachelbel, born in Erfurt, Germany (d. 1764)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on August 28, 2021, 01:40:17 AM
*The Week Ahead in Music History*

August 30, 1751
George Frideric Handel completes his oratorio "Jephtha"

August 31, 1834
 Amilcare Ponchielli born in Paderno Ponchielli, Italy (d. 1886)

September 1, 1785
1785Mozart publishes 6th string quartet opus 10 in Vienna

September 2, 1960
Premiere of William Walton's 2nd Symphony

September 3, 1881
1881Anton Bruckner completes his 6th Symphony

September 4, 1824
Anton Bruckner born in Ansfelden, Austria (d. 1896)

September 5, 1791
Giacomo Meyerbeer born in Berlin, Germany (d. 1864)

September 6, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti dies at 71

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 05, 2021, 06:00:11 AM
"This Day in Music History"
September 5, 1791

Giacomo Meyerbeer born in Berlin, Germany (d. 1864)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 06, 2021, 02:20:03 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 6, 2007

Luciano Pavarotti dies at 71
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 07, 2021, 01:44:18 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 7, 1726

François-André Danican Philidor, French composer and chess champion, born in Dreux, France (d. 1795)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 08, 2021, 02:36:38 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 8, 1841

Antonín Dvořák born in Nelahozeves, Czech Republic (d. 1904)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 09, 2021, 02:02:37 AM
"This Day in Music History*
September 9, 1583

Girolamo Frescobaldi born in Ferrara, Italy (d. 1643)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 09, 2021, 02:05:02 AM
*The Week ahead in Music History*

September 10, 1659
Henry Purcell born in St Ann's Lane, Old Pye Street, Westminster (d. 1695)

September 11, 1733
François Couperin dies at 64

September 12, 1764
Jean Philippe Rameau dies at 80

September 13, 1819
Clara Schumann born in Leipzig (d. 1896)

September 13, 1874
Arnold Schoenberg born in Vienna (d. 1951)

September 14, 1741
George Frideric Handel finishes his "Messiah" after working on it non-stop for 23 days

September 15, 1945
Anton (Friedrich Wilhelm) von Webern, Austrian composer, shot by American soldier on patrol at 61

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 09, 2021, 02:22:01 AM
*The Week ahead in Music History*

September 10, 1659
Henry Purcell born in St Ann's Lane, Old Pye Street, Westminster (d. 1695)

September 11, 1733
François Couperin dies at 64

September 12, 1764
Jean Philippe Rameau dies at 80

September 13, 1819
Clara Schumann born in Leipzig (d. 1896)

September 13, 1874
Arnold Schoenberg born in Vienna (d. 1951)

September 14, 1741
George Frideric Handel finishes his "Messiah" after working on it non-stop for 23 days

September 15, 1945
Anton (Friedrich Wilhelm) von Webern, Austrian composer, shot by American soldier on patrol at 61

Welcome to the world Henry!  :)

And only 23 days to write the Messiah?!  :o  Or was that a final writing spurt?  Any idea?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 09, 2021, 02:37:31 AM
Welcome to the world Henry!  :)

And only 23 days to write the Messiah?!  :o  Or was that a final writing spurt?  Any idea?

PD

Excellent Smithsonian article here:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-glorious-history-of-handels-messiah-148168540/ (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-glorious-history-of-handels-messiah-148168540/)

Handel composed Messiah in an astounding interlude, somewhere between three and four weeks in August and September 1741. "He would literally write from morning to night," says Sarah Bardwell of the Handel House Museum in London. The text was prepared in July by the prominent librettist, Charles Jennens, and was intended for an Easter performance the following year. "I hope [Handel] will lay out his whole Genius & Skill upon it, that the Composition may excel all his former Compositions, as the Subject excels every other Subject," Jennens wrote to a friend.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 09, 2021, 02:48:06 AM
Excellent Smithsonian article here:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-glorious-history-of-handels-messiah-148168540/ (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-glorious-history-of-handels-messiah-148168540/)

Handel composed Messiah in an astounding interlude, somewhere between three and four weeks in August and September 1741. "He would literally write from morning to night," says Sarah Bardwell of the Handel House Museum in London. The text was prepared in July by the prominent librettist, Charles Jennens, and was intended for an Easter performance the following year. "I hope [Handel] will lay out his whole Genius & Skill upon it, that the Composition may excel all his former Compositions, as the Subject excels every other Subject," Jennens wrote to a friend.
Thanks for the info!  Amazing!  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 15, 2021, 01:39:21 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 15, 1945

Anton Webern dies at 61


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 16, 2021, 01:35:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 16, 1966

The new Metropolitan Opera House opens in Lincoln Center, New York, with Leontyne Price as Cleopatra in "Antony and Cleopatra" by Samuel Barber.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 16, 2021, 01:49:57 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 16, 1966

The new Metropolitan Opera House opens in Lincoln Center, New York, with Leontyne Price as Cleopatra in "Antony and Cleopatra" by Samuel Barber.

Cool!  8)

I remember years ago hearing some old interviews with some opera singers about what it was like in the Old Met.  Trying to find the story; I imagine that it was one of the segments that was part of one of the Saturday's At The Met broadcasts.

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 17, 2021, 01:38:52 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 17, 1934

RCA Victor releases 1st 33 1/3 rpm recording (Beethoven's 5th)


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 18, 2021, 01:20:25 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 18, 1809

Royal Opera House in London opens.


The original theater, for which Handel composed many operas and oratorios, was destroyed by fire in 1808. A number of valuable items, including the organ bequeathed by Handel, were lost. Rebuilding of the new theater began at once, incorporating foundation stone of the original structure. A production of Macbeth on September 18, 1809, followed by musical entertainment called “The Quaker”, were the first performances held there.

The management raised seat prices to help recoup rebuilding costs, but after audiences disrupted performances by beating sticks, hissing, and booing in protest for three months, the original prices were reinstated.

Another fire in 1856 completely destroyed the opera house for a second time. The third and present Opera House was completed in 1858 and is shown on this 1980 Great Britain stamp.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on September 18, 2021, 09:55:36 AM
Thanks for that interesting ROH history, only some of which I dimly remembered.  As I write an absolutely magical Cosi fan tutte with an elderly Bohm in the 1979 springs happily to mind. It's the only time I ever saw him and there was sth quite mesmerising about him.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 19, 2021, 01:44:05 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 19, 1908

Gustav Mahler's 7th Symphony premieres in Prague

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 19, 2021, 01:47:59 AM
Thanks for that interesting ROH history, only some of which I dimly remembered.  As I write an absolutely magical Cosi fan tutte with an elderly Bohm in the 1979 springs happily to mind. It's the only time I ever saw him and there was sth quite mesmerising about him.

It's awesome that the theater in some incarnation has been on that site since 1732!
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 20, 2021, 01:18:12 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 20, 1957

Jean Sibelius dies at age 91 at Ainola, his home on the shores of Lake Tuusulanjärvi in Järvenpää, Finland.   
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 20, 2021, 01:50:00 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 20, 1957

Jean Sibelius dies at age 91 at Ainola, his home on the shores of Lake Tuusulanjärvi in Järvenpää, Finland.   

Love the stamps!  And know whose music I'll be listening to today too.  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 21, 2021, 01:32:41 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 21, 1874

Gustav Holst born in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England (d. 1934)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 21, 2021, 01:36:34 AM
That Planets stamp is particularly cool.  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 21, 2021, 02:43:43 AM
That Planets stamp is particularly cool.  :)

PD

Yes, it's part of this 1985 British Composers set from Great Britain.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 21, 2021, 03:52:28 AM
Lovely set!  :)

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 22, 2021, 01:35:42 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 22, 1869

Richard Wagner's Das Rheingold premieres in Munich


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 23, 2021, 01:35:46 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 23,1835

Vincenzo Bellini, Italian opera composer, dies at 33

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 23, 2021, 03:17:15 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 23,1835

Vincenzo Bellini, Italian opera composer, dies at 33

I hadn't realized that he had died so young!   :(

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 23, 2021, 04:00:52 AM
I hadn't realized that he had died so young!   :(

PD

And very influential for such a short career. As far as composers go, there were a large number of stamps issued in his honor.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 23, 2021, 04:02:52 AM
And very influential for such a short career. As far as composers go, there were a large number of stamps issued in his honor.
Interesting!  Neat!

I love his operas.  Hard to think about what else he might have composed had he lived longer.   :(

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 24, 2021, 01:03:50 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 24, 1813

André-Ernest-Modeste Grétry, Belgian/French composer, dies at 72

   
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 25, 2021, 02:19:18 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 25, 1849

Johann Baptist Strauss, elder, dies at 45 in Vienna


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 26, 2021, 01:45:05 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 26, 1945

Béla Bartok dies at 64  in New York City where his funeral was attended by only ten people. His body was initially buried at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York but was later re-interred at Budapest's Farkasréti Cemetery in the late 1980s.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 26, 2021, 02:28:59 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 26, 1945

Béla Bartok dies at 64  in New York City where his funeral was attended by only ten people. His body was initially buried at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York but was later re-interred at Budapest's Farkasréti Cemetery in the late 1980s.

Love the Cantata Profana stamp.

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Iota on September 26, 2021, 05:31:14 AM

Béla Bartok dies at 64  in New York City where his funeral was attended by only ten people.


That's something of an eyebrow raiser. Unless he'd requested a quiet funeral.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on September 26, 2021, 07:24:37 AM
That's something of an eyebrow raiser. Unless he'd requested a quiet funeral.
Iota,

I was wondering earlier whether or not it might have something to do with WWII having just ended?

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 26, 2021, 11:15:22 AM
Iota,

I was wondering earlier whether or not it might have something to do with WWII having just ended?

PD

That and probably due to the lack of appreciation of his music in America at the time of his death.

Bartok was a committed anti-fascist and reluctantly left his native Hungary for the U.S. in 1940. Although he was well-known in America as a pianist, there was little interest in his music there during his final years. He and his wife survived on a meager research fellowship and the charitable handouts he was reluctant to receive. His battle with leukemia late in life limited his ability to perform as well as compose, although he was able to write his Concerto for Orchestra commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky and Sonata for Solo Violin commissioned by Yehudi Menuhin in the year before his death.

After his remains were exhumed and transferred back to Budapest for burial, Hungary arranged a state funeral for him in 1988.         
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 27, 2021, 02:01:26 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 27, 1921

Engelbert Humperdinck dies at 67.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: vandermolen on September 27, 2021, 05:54:01 AM
That Planets stamp is particularly cool.  :)

PD
+1
I like the Sibelius ones as well.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 28, 2021, 01:41:43 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 28, 1922
 
Andrejs Jurjans, Latvia's first classical composer, dies at 65

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 29, 2021, 01:53:33 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 29, 1863

The “Pearl Fishers” by Georges Bizet becomes the first opera produced by the Théâtre Lyrique. Commissioned while Bizet was only 24 years old, it was performed in Paris on the Place du Châtelet.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on September 30, 2021, 01:33:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*
September 30, 1791

Mozart's opera "Magic Flute" premieres in Vienna


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: John Copeland on September 30, 2021, 12:53:00 PM
This is a superb wee slot on GMG.  Love all the stamps!  All of them minute ephemera of brilliance.  Thanks so much Szykneij.   ;D
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 01, 2021, 01:42:51 AM

This is a superb wee slot on GMG.  Love all the stamps!  All of them minute ephemera of brilliance.  Thanks so much Szykneij.   ;D


Thanks, John! Glad you enjoy it.

Tony
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 01, 2021, 01:46:13 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 1

1865 Paul Dukas born in Paris (d. 1935)

1903 Vladimir Horowitz born in Kiev, Russian Empire (now Ukraine) (d. 1989)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 02, 2021, 01:50:39 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 2, 1920

Max Bruch dies at 82 in his home in Berlin-Friedenau. He was buried next to his wife (who had died the previous year) at the Old St. Matthäus churchyard at Berlin-Schöneberg. His daughter later had "Music is the language of God" carved on the gravestone.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 03, 2021, 01:59:10 AM
*This Day in Music History*

October 3, 1931
Carl Nielsen dies of a heart attack at 66.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 04, 2021, 02:52:11 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 4, 1959

Dmitri Shostakovich's 1st Cello concert premieres in Leningrad

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on October 04, 2021, 03:43:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*

October 3, 1931
Carl Nielsen dies of a heart attack at 66.


The house is a museum nowadays and still looks like this, but it's in a quite busy area and not that charming, plus the interiors are rather sparse. So not among the best composer's museums in Scandinavia, unfortunately. We really could use a really up-to-date, interesting museum in Denmark as regards classical music or a composer.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 04, 2021, 07:37:37 AM
The house is a museum nowadays and still looks like this, but it's in a quite busy area and not that charming, plus the interiors are rather sparse. So not among the best composer's museums in Scandinavia, unfortunately. We really could use a really up-to-date, interesting museum in Denmark as regards classical music or a composer.

I'm also surprised there was never a stamp issued featuring his monument. The statue also appears to be located in a busy area, possibly near the museum?
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on October 04, 2021, 08:35:19 AM
That's true, there never was a stamp or a bank note with the statue, which was created in 1939 by his wife, Anne Marie Carl Nielsen, who was a sculptor.

The statue is in Copenhagen, so it's not close to his childhood home on the island of Funen;  it's near the picturesque Nyboder area, and thus not very far from the famous/slightly overrated  Little Mermaid statue.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on October 04, 2021, 09:33:46 AM
That's true, there never was a stamp or a bank note with the statue, which was created in 1939 by his wife, Anne Marie Carl Nielsen, who was a sculptor.

The statue is in Copenhagen, so it's not close to his childhood home on the island of Funen;  it's near the picturesque Nyboder area, and thus not very far from the famous/slightly overrated  Little Mermaid statue.
What is the meaning behind that statue MT?

PD

p.s.  Sorry, but I'm a big fan of that Little Mermaid statue (feel heartbroken whenever I hear of someone "beheading" her).
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on October 04, 2021, 10:02:44 AM
What is the meaning behind that statue MT?

PD

p.s.  Sorry, but I'm a big fan of that Little Mermaid statue (feel heartbroken whenever I hear of someone "beheading" her).

The Little Mermaid statue's qualities are of the meditative sort, that's for sure, since it's very tiny, and at times the place has become too crowded. But then, it does show the appeal of Andersen's tales, etc. And the nearby Kastellet citadel area is very nice, for example.

Concerning the Carl Nielsen statue, the small Wiki article is nonetheless quite informative: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Nielsen_Monument
- amazing that his wife designed it as a given task, and then more or less paid for it herself. Their marriage had a lot of crisis in it.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 05, 2021, 02:15:50 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 5, 1762

Opera "Orfeo Ed Euridice" by Christoph Willibald Gluck is first produced in Vienna in front of Empress Maria Theresa.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Pohjolas Daughter on October 05, 2021, 03:12:46 AM
The Little Mermaid statue's qualities are of the meditative sort, that's for sure, since it's very tiny, and at times the place has become too crowded. But then, it does show the appeal of Andersen's tales, etc. And the nearby Kastellet citadel area is very nice, for example.

Concerning the Carl Nielsen statue, the small Wiki article is nonetheless quite informative: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Nielsen_Monument
- amazing that his wife designed it as a given task, and then more or less paid for it herself. Their marriage had a lot of crisis in it.
Thank you for that link.  Sad to hear that funding was lacking and that she had to pay for it herself.   And rather wish that her Pegasus had been given his wings too. :(

PD
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 06, 2021, 02:45:09 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 6, 1869

Johannes Brahms' "Liebeslieder Walzer" premieres
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 07, 2021, 02:30:59 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 7, 1946

Charles Ives' 2nd string quartet premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 08, 2021, 02:23:07 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 8, 1897

Emperor Franz Joseph I names Gustav Mahler Director of the Vienna Court Opera.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 09, 2021, 02:27:25 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 9, 1835

Camille Saint-Saëns born in Paris (d. 1921)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 10, 2021, 02:53:27 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 10, 1813

Giuseppe Verdi born in Busseto (d. 1901)



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 11, 2021, 02:26:16 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 11, 1896

Anton Bruckner dies at 72 in Vienna.  He was buried in the crypt of the monastery church at Sankt Florian immediately below his favorite organ.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: MusicTurner on October 11, 2021, 08:13:28 AM
Thank you for posting one of those photos, where Bruckner doesn't look like a narrowminded, intellectually frozen bore (contrary to his music), rather the opposite :) ...
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 11, 2021, 05:17:06 PM
Thank you for posting one those photos, where Bruckner doesn't look like a narrowminded, intellectually frozen bore (contrary to his music), rather the opposite :) ...

The stamp was issued for the 100th anniversary of his death, so seems to show a portrait from late in his life.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 12, 2021, 03:08:15 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 12

1872 - Ralph Vaughan Williams born in Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, England (d. 1958)

1935 - Luciano Pavarotti born in Modena, Italy (d. 2007)
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 13, 2021, 02:32:57 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 13, 1903

Victor Herbert's "Babes in Toyland" premieres at Majestic Theater, New York City.


Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 14, 2021, 02:25:21 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 14, 1990

Leonard Bernstein dies of heart attack at 72

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 15, 2021, 02:34:37 AM
*This Day in Music History*

October 15, 1886
Rimsky-Korsakov’s published arrangement of Modest Mussorgsky's "Night on Bald Mountain" premieres in St. Petersburg's Kononov Hall, Russia, five years after Mussorgsky's death.  This version of the work, described as a "fantasy for orchestra",  is the one that achieved lasting fame.                 


October 15, 1905
Claude Debussy's "La Mer" premieres in Paris.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 16, 2021, 02:20:45 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 16, 1912

Arnold Schoenberg's "Pierrot Lunaire," premieres at the Berlin Choralion-Saal sung by Albertine Zehme



Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 17, 2021, 02:28:11 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 17, 1849

Frederic Chopin dies of at 39.

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 18, 2021, 03:08:08 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 18, 1855

Franz Liszt's symphonic poem "Prometheus" premieres

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 19, 2021, 02:54:57 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 19

1845 - Richard Wagner's opera "Tannhäuser" premieres in Dresden
1901 - Edward Elgar's "Pomp & Circumstance March" premieres in Liverpool

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 20, 2021, 02:20:17 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 20, 1874

Charles Ives born in Danbury, Connecticut (d. 1954)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 21, 2021, 02:26:02 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 21, 1858

Jacques Offenbach's operetta "Orpheus in the Underworld" (Orphée aux Enfers) premieres in Paris.
Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 22, 2021, 02:40:28 AM
*This Day in Music History*

October 22, 1725
Alessandro Scarlatti dies at 65 in Naples. He is entombed there at the church of Santa Maria di Montesanto.

October 22, 1811
Franz Liszt born in Raiding, Hungary (d. 1886)

Title: Re: Music, the Mail, and Ephemera
Post by: Szykneij on October 23, 2021, 02:34:26 AM
*This Day in Music History*
October 23, 1890
 
First production of the Opera "Prince Igor", performed in St. Petersburg, Russia. Written and composed by Alexander Borodin, the opera was left unfinished upon the composer's death in 1887. It was edited and completed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Alexander Glazunov.