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The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Dundonnell on May 12, 2009, 03:05:50 AM

Title: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 12, 2009, 03:05:50 AM
It seems a little quiet in The Composers Forum these days so I thought that I would start a thread on a somewhat more mainstream composer than the rather obscure figures I usually comment on ;D

(Just in case you are interested...there are quite a few famous composers who don't yet have threads of their own-Balakirev, Bernstein, Busoni. Dohnanyi, Falla, Kabalevsky, Mendelssohn, Orff, Puccini, Weber, Weill for example!)

I love the richness of Respighi's music, the superb mastery of orchestral colour, the sweeping bravura and confidence of his writing, that combination of late romantic excess and his beautiful recreation of the Italian baroque.

Obviously(and having just returned from a visit to Rome these pieces have a special resonance for me) the 'Roman trilogy' of 'The Fountains of Rome', 'The Pines of Rome' and (the lesser) 'Feste Romane' are tremendous favourites. I first got to know the first two of these in an ancient Ace of Clubs LP with Fernando Previtali and Alberto Erede but I have more modern accounts conducted by Charles Munch, Enrique Batiz and Riccardo Muti.

But there are so many luscious Respighi scores! The delightful Suite "The Birds", the Ancient Airs and Dances, the splendid 'Vetrate di chiesa', the lovely 'Three Botticelli Pictures' and the dramatic 'Brazilian Impressions'.

Chandos has recorded a lot of Respighi's less well known orchestral scores and anyone attuned to Respighi's wavelength but not familiar with works like the Straussian Sinfonia Drammatica of 1913-14, the quite magnificent Metamorphoseon of 1930, or the colourful series of concertos(many of them based on Gregorian plainchant) like the 'Concerto gregoriano' for violin or the 'Concerto in modo misolidio for piano' is in for a real treat!

There are operas and a deal of extremely beautiful choral and vocal music too :)

It is a tragedy that Respighi died at the relatively early age of 56. The late 'Metamorphoseon' suggests that his style had the potential to develop further-as did those of his contemporaries Casella and Malipiero. Respighi's music is by far the most accessible and colourful of those composers of the 'Generazione dell'ottanta' and his relative fame compared to his contemporaries reflects that but the range of his music is still not heard often enough in the concert hall today.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on May 12, 2009, 04:23:02 AM
I'm a fan too - especially of Church Windows, which is a bit like a Hollywood biblical epic score of a later period. I also like the Botticelli Pictures and the lovely Concerto Gregoriano, which I wrongly thought must be by someone like Finzi when I first heard it on the radio. Also, there is some very fine chamber music.  I have more than once been caprivated by an unknown piece of music on the radio, only to find out that it was by Respighi. Yes, Metamorphoseon is one of his greatest works - and largely unknown.

The CD with the Concerto in modo misolidio on Naxos is a good place to start in my view. The lovely main theme, once heard, cannot be forgotten.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 12, 2009, 10:32:07 AM
I'm a fan too - especially of Church Windows, which is a bit like a Hollywood biblical epic score of a later period. I also like the Botticelli Pictures and the lovely Concerto Gregoriano, which I wrongly thought must be by someone like Finzi when I first heard it on the radio. Also, there is some very fine chamber music.  I have more than once been caprivated by an unknown piece of music on the radio, only to find out that it was by Respighi. Yes, Metamorphoseon is one of his greatest works - and largely unknown.

The CD with the Concerto in modo misolidio on Naxos is a good place to start in my view. The lovely main theme, once heard, cannot be forgotten.

On the subject of the Respighi concertante works-you are right, Jeffrey, the Naxos versions are worth looking at too.

For the piano works-
The early and immature Piano concerto in A minor(1902) is coupled on Chandos CHAN 9285 with the 1925 Concerto in modo misolidio(Geoffrey Tozer/Sir Edward Downes) but the better bet may be to buy the better recorded and better played two Naxos discs: 8.553207 which has the Piano Concerto, the Fantasia Slava(1903) and the very fine 1928 Toccata for Piano and Orchestra, and 8.553366 which has the Concerto in modo misolidio(also Konstantin Scherbakov/Howard Griffiths) coupled with the engaging Concerto a cinque of 1933 for oboe, trumpet, piano, viola d'amore, double-bass and strings.
Tozer makes a rather more impressive job of the Toccata-which may just be the best of Respighi's piano concertante works- and the Fantasia Slava on Chandos CHAN 9311.

For violin-
The Chandos coupling(CHAN 9232) of the 1921 Concerto gregoriano and the Poeme autunnale of 1926 played by Lydia Mordkovitch is superb and you also get the colourful Ballata delle Gnomidi. Marco Polo/Naxos have recorded these works but Mordkovitch is to be preferred. Respighi also wrote an early Concerto all'Antica for violin which has been recorded but which I have not(yet!) heard.

There are also the Suite in G major for organ and strings(1905) and the short Adagio con variazione for cello and orchestra(1920).

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: snyprrr on May 12, 2009, 11:12:19 PM
I believe I too have been surprised by Respighi on the radio. He does make a good radio friendly composer.

I was disappointed with his SQ No.2 "Dorian". I guess I was expecting fourths and fifths and a very heavy gothic sound, but it comes off light as air, and I found it's profile lacking. Not what you expect from such an opulent composer.

His SQ No.1, however, is in the best tradition of big ambitious arrogant student works that were endemic in Respighi's generation. Much preferred.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 13, 2009, 01:53:22 AM
Researching Respighi's current discography for this thread has been expensive ;D I have now ordered three cds containing pieces I did not previously have-the early Cantata "Christus", the Cantata "Aretusa" for mezzo-sopano and orchestra, "La Sensitiva" for mezzo-soprano and orchestra, and the Concerto dell'antica for violin and orchestra.

(Given the number of members who I know like Respighi's music I am surprised that so few have replied yet!)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Christo on May 13, 2009, 02:51:32 AM
(Given the number of members who I know like Respighi's music I am surprised that so few have replied yet!)

Ok then, here is me (running away quickly; work to do!)  ;)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Dundonnell on May 13, 2009, 07:21:34 AM
Ok then, here is me (running away quickly; work to do!)  ;)

That's no excuse ;D
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on May 13, 2009, 10:07:43 AM
Researching Respighi's current discography for this thread has been expensive ;D I have now ordered three cds containing pieces I did not previously have-the early Cantata "Christus", the Cantata "Aretusa" for mezzo-sopano and orchestra, "La Sensitiva" for mezzo-soprano and orchestra, and the Concerto dell'antica for violin and orchestra.

(Given the number of members who I know like Respighi's music I am surprised that so few have replied yet!)

Those are very fine works.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on May 13, 2009, 12:47:49 PM
I like Respighi, too. The usual suspects, of course (the Roman trilogy), but I also love the Antiche danze ed arie. Considering I like the sound his music makes, I admit it's strange I haven't explored Respighi in more depth yet. But that might change, thanks to this excellent thread! (another Dundonnell classic  ;) )
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: drogulus on May 13, 2009, 03:54:14 PM

     Reference Recordings has some fine Respighi including this CD of Church Windows with Keith Clark and the Pacific Symphony.

     (http://www.discland.com/productcart/pc/catalog/REF_15_LG%20(300%20x%20299).jpg-400.jpg)

     And this Oue/Minnesota O. recording has spectacular sound. My Ormandy and Stokowski recordings of The Pines of Rome both become distorted on peaks. That's not a problem here.

     (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61TZQMKEPTL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: jowcol on May 14, 2009, 08:49:04 AM
My knowledge doesnt' go much beyond the Roman Trilogy and Church Windows.  The last movement of Church Windows is truly amazing-- I love the raw power of the organ there.

And it's hard not to love the Appian Way from the Pines of Rome.  That is one that I always played for people who "didn't like classical music".

Rather strange tangent-- but  the movie Fantasia 2000 exceeded my expectations, even though the concept of flying whales was a bit odd for the Pines of Rome.  I only wish they used the Catacombs movement, and left out the third, if they needed to leave something out.

Most of his baroque flavored stuff didn't move me-- but maybe my expectations were clouding my ears.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: karlhenning on May 14, 2009, 08:51:44 AM
. . . even though the concept of flying whales was a bit odd for the Pines of Rome.

Well, they had to outdo the dinosaurs in Le sacre from the original, for irrelevance to the music  8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Benji on November 19, 2009, 04:00:43 PM
What, one page of discussion for Respighi and nothing since May? That should be a criminal offence. Naughty posters, bad bad!

So, I am listening to the San Francisco Symphony with Edo de Waart in Pini di Roma. I wonder, does anyone have the score? I think I can hear organ pedal notes in the Catacombes movement. Is that right? And listening to the Pines of the Janiculum I think I hear more pedal notes. No missing the organ in the final movement of course.  ;D

This is music I can just become utterly lost in. Insanely beautiful, and spectacularly vivid.

Just re: this recording in particular - I find it a little too understated in the quieter movements but the finale is rather good. The Naxos disc with the Royal Phil and Enrique Batiz is my cherished reference recording (and one of the very first discs I bought).
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Catison on November 19, 2009, 05:35:13 PM
Just heard a brass band do a version of the Appian Way.  That was powerful!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Carolus on November 19, 2009, 05:43:47 PM
Try to find his violin sonata by Heifetz with Emmanuel Bay. Fantastic.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: offbeat on November 20, 2009, 08:52:19 AM
Respighi's Ancient Airs and Dances is a constant joy for me
i know its based on composers in the past but his take on it
always puts me in good mood  :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on September 25, 2010, 07:38:46 PM
Thought I would bump this thread back towards the top as I LOVE Respighi. He's one of my favorites and one that I have explored quite deeply. I would say of the Roman Trilogy that Pines of Rome is by far my favorite. Church Windows holds a special place in my heart. It's a very appealing work: full of big tunes, lush orchestration, and invigorating rhythms.
 
I also love all the Chandos recordings with Sir Edward Downes conducting, especially the disc with Concerto Gregoriano, Poema Autunnale, etc. with Lydia Mordkovitch. Beautiful recording.
 
My favorite Roman Trilogy is Riccardo Muti/Philadelphia Orchestra. My favorite Church Windows is Geoffrey Simon/Philharmonia.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on September 25, 2010, 10:35:49 PM
Thought I would bump this thread back towards the top as I LOVE Respighi. He's one of my favorites and one that I have explored quite deeply. I would say of the Roman Trilogy that Pines of Rome is by far my favorite. Church Windows holds a special place in my heart. It's a very appealing work: full of big tunes, lush orchestration, and invigorating rhythms.
 
I also love all the Chandos recordings with Sir Edward Downes conducting, especially the disc with Concerto Gregoriano, Poema Autunnale, etc. with Lydia Mordkovitch. Beautiful recording.
 
My favorite Roman Trilogy is Riccardo Muti/Philadelphia Orchestra. My favorite Church Windows is Geoffrey Simon/Philharmonia.

I think that Geoffrey Simon is underrated as a conductor, his 'Sacred Service' by Bloch is my favourite version (out of 6  :o). The 'Poem Autumnal' by Respighi is another favourite of mine.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on September 26, 2010, 06:01:36 AM
I think that Geoffrey Simon is underrated as a conductor, his 'Sacred Service' by Bloch is my favourite version (out of 6  :o ). The 'Poem Autumnal' by Respighi is another favourite of mine.

Simon's recording of Bloch's Sacred Service is very beautiful indeed. I, too, think Simon is an underrated conductor.
 
By the way, like the Myaskovsky avatar.  8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: drogulus on September 26, 2010, 06:21:34 AM
     The Autumn Poem on the RR Church Windows disc reminds me of The Lark Ascending. It's a terrific disc to learn about Respighi minus pines & fountains. This pic was supposed to be in an earlier post but vanished somehow.

     (http://img.amazon.ca/images/I/51Qde2PFtrL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

     
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Scarpia on September 26, 2010, 06:25:11 AM
I enjoy the Pines of Rome, especially the final movement.  But I have to say that I have found almost every other piece by Respighi that I've heard a disappointment.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on September 26, 2010, 09:32:49 AM

Simon's recording of Bloch's Sacred Service is very beautiful indeed. I, too, think Simon is an underrated conductor.
 
By the way, like the Myaskovsky avatar.  8)

OT

Thank you  :) - probably my favourite photo of the great man.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: anasazi on September 26, 2010, 02:15:53 PM
Besides the more famous compositions, I'm kind of fascinated by Respighi's compositions that are somewhat loosely based on painting or in one case: stained glass.  CHURCH WINDOWS and the BOTICELLI PICTURES.  Both among my favorites.  I did own a copy of that Reference Recording CD at one time, but never found it quite to my taste.  I kind of wish that old Ormandy Columbia album would see new light on a CD some day.  For now, I have contented myself with the Telarc CD (Corboz/Cincinatti Orchestra).

Being a (very) amateurish pianist, I have the Dover pub. collection of Respighi's Ancient Airs (some of them, although I understand they were all originally written for the keyboard) and Thee Gregorian Pieces (two of which were later orchestrated and became part of Church Windows).  These are all frightfully difficult and I doubt I will ever play any of them well, but it is interesting to look inside of some of these works.  Respighi, being a particularly good pianist, wrote really very difficult piano music. 

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Wanderer on October 03, 2010, 10:37:55 PM
     The Autumn Poem on the RR Church Windows disc reminds me of The Lark Ascending. It's a terrific disc to learn about Respighi minus pines & fountains. This pic was supposed to be in an earlier post but vanished somehow.

     (http://img.amazon.ca/images/I/51Qde2PFtrL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

   

I can vouch for this disc, as well. An impressive rendition of the mighty Vetrate di chiesa (soundwise, too); the Poema autunnale is appropriately wistful and serene.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: abidoful on May 25, 2011, 11:05:44 AM
It seems that much of his works are still unpublished---particularly the early works. I just found out that he has  A PIANO SONATA (in f-minor)---i looked it from amazon listened a clip and sounded just terrific :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Rinaldo on August 07, 2011, 12:38:10 AM
Oh, Respighi, where have you been all my life?

A strong renaissance / baroque melody makes me swoon so I went absolutely bonkers when I first sampled the Ancient Airs & Dances. And when I say "bonkers", I mean "bought the overpriced Mercury Living SACD even though I've yet to buy a SACD player (but definitely will)".


Glorious recording! I'll be eating rice all month but I don't mind! The strings are perhaps too sharp for someone's ears but I love the way it makes the music jump out of the speakers and into my living room. Karajan's 3rd suite on DG is more lyrical and perhaps suits the melancholy of the piece better but hey, it's Ancient Airs & Dances and Dorati w/ Philharmonia Hungarica certainly makes me DANCE!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Lisztianwagner on September 11, 2011, 12:33:57 PM
I really like Respighi too; his music is very thrilling and overwhelming, and shows a brilliant, colourful orchestration, great intensity and a high, beautiful harmony  :)

My favourite Respighi's works are Fountains of Rome, Pines of Rome, Roman Festivals,  Ancient Airs and Dances, Church Windows, The Piano Concerto, the Nocturne, Concerto in modo misolidio and Botticelli Triptych.

Ilaria
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: The new erato on September 11, 2011, 12:38:26 PM
Oh, Respighi, where have you been all my life?

A strong renaissance / baroque melody makes me swoon so I went absolutely bonkers when I first sampled the Ancient Airs & Dances. And when I say "bonkers", I mean "bought the overpriced Mercury Living SACD even though I've yet to buy a SACD player (but definitely will)".


Glorious recording! I'll be eating rice all month but I don't mind! The strings are perhaps too sharp for someone's ears but I love the way it makes the music jump out of the speakers and into my living room. Karajan's 3rd suite on DG is more lyrical and perhaps suits the melancholy of the piece better but hey, it's Ancient Airs & Dances and Dorati w/ Philharmonia Hungarica certainly makes me DANCE!
Overpriced it ain't no more:

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/8802048.jpg)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on September 11, 2011, 12:50:44 PM
I really like Respighi too; his music shows a brilliant, colourful orchestration, great intensity and a high, beautiful harmony  :)

My favourite Respighi's works are Fountains of Rome, Pines of Rome, Roman Festivals,  Ancient Airs and Dances, Concerto in modo misolidio and Botticelli Triptych.

Ilaria
You might also like the Concerto Gregoriano and Church Windows -but maybe you know them already.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Lisztianwagner on September 11, 2011, 01:16:38 PM
You might also like the Concerto Gregoriano and Church Windows -but maybe you know them already.

Yes, I already know them, they're both excellent pieces; anyway thanks for your suggestion  :)

Ilaria
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Rinaldo on September 12, 2011, 08:07:27 AM
Overpriced it ain't no more:
(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/8802048.jpg)

Is that SACD? The standard Mercury CD was 10$ but the SACD jumps to 74$.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Cato on September 12, 2011, 08:28:52 AM
A few years ago, the Toledo Symphony (GMG member "Toledobass" i.e. Allan plays the double bass for them) performed the Pines of Rome with a 70-member drum-and-bugle corps sliently marching into the hall toward the end as the ghostly Roman army, and then playing along with the orchestra!

Talk about SurroundSound!  They lined the aisles, the sides, etc., and the effect was awesome, dudes!

They are repeating this in January: if you have the time and money, go to Toledo, which also has one of the greatest art collections in America at the Toledo Museum of Art in the same building as the orchestra's home, the Peristyle.

See:

http://www.toledosymphony.com/performances/2010-2011-Season/Classics/ClassicsIV.html (http://www.toledosymphony.com/performances/2010-2011-Season/Classics/ClassicsIV.html)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: The new erato on September 12, 2011, 09:09:35 AM
Is that SACD? The standard Mercury CD was 10$ but the SACD jumps to 74$.
Probably not.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Est.1965 on September 22, 2011, 03:52:27 AM
I think that Geoffrey Simon is underrated as a conductor, his 'Sacred Service' by Bloch is my favourite version (out of 6  :o). The 'Poem Autumnal' by Respighi is another favourite of mine.

Yes.  Some years ago (!!) you kindly sent me a Chandos release of Geoffrey Simon and the PO, Respighi, Church Windows and Brazilian Impressions, neither works I had heard before.  I have listened many times.  It is certainly not conducted without foresight, the music is beautifully portrayed by Simon.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: madaboutmahler on November 07, 2011, 11:19:28 AM
Respighi is amazing! What a brilliant, imaginative orchestrator he was!  I think he wrote some of the most thrilling music ever written, the finale to Feste Romane, or the War Dance from Belkis for examples. And I can not think of many pieces that are more powerful than the end to Pini di Roma. Absolutely great music!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 12:06:32 PM
Respighi is amazing! What a brilliant, imaginative orchestrator he was!  I think he wrote some of the most thrilling music ever written, the finale to Feste Romane, or the War Dance from Belkis for examples. And I can not think of many pieces that are more powerful than the end to Pini di Roma. Absolutely great music!

I was bitten by the Respighi bug years ago, but the one work that really made me a Respighi fan was Church Windows. This is such a powerful work. The crescendos will blow your socks off! It also contained many beautiful, lyrical moments. Many people like the Roman Trilogy and I don't fault them for liking it, but there's much more to enjoy from this composer.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Christo on November 07, 2011, 12:24:14 PM
Always good to consider the "10 personally favorite works" and desert island choice as listed by Respighi's fiercest champion, Swish conductor Adriano, in an interview with him on the occasion of the 75th year of Respighi's death, from last April: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2011/Apr11/Adriano_interview.htm

1. La campana sommersa
2. Metamorfoseon
3. La primavera
4. La Fiamma
5. Concerto in modo misolidio
6. Concerto gregoriano
7. Il tramonto
8. La sensitiva
9. Quartetto dorico
10. Fontane di Roma

Speaking for myself: I didn't listen to the operas enough (Nos. 1 and 4), though I love his Maria Egiziaca, but I would endorse Nos. 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10.  Conclusion: I should pay more attention to La sensitiva :-) and would like to add Trittico botticelliano, Lauda per la nativitá del Signore and the Belfagor Overture myself.  8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Lisztianwagner on November 07, 2011, 12:44:17 PM
I really like Respighi too; his music is very thrilling and overwhelming, and shows a brilliant, colourful orchestration, great intensity and a high, beautiful harmony  :)

My favourite Respighi's works are Fountains of Rome, Pines of Rome, Roman Festivals,  Ancient Airs and Dances, Church Windows, The Piano Concerto, the Nocturne, Concerto in modo misolidio and Botticelli Triptych.

Ilaria

I've dived into a Respighi phase this week, he definitely became one of my favourite composers :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 12:59:02 PM
I really like Respighi too; his music is very thrilling and overwhelming, and shows a brilliant, colourful orchestration, great intensity and a high, beautiful harmony  :)

My favourite Respighi's works are Fountains of Rome, Pines of Rome, Roman Festivals,  Ancient Airs and Dances, Church Windows, The Piano Concerto, the Nocturne, Concerto in modo misolidio and Botticelli Triptych.

Ilaria

What do you think about Belkis, Queen of Sheba, Ilaria? I think this is a fine work as well. The War Dance, in particular, is absolutely fantastic.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Lisztianwagner on November 07, 2011, 01:29:42 PM
What do you think about Belkis, Queen of Sheba, Ilaria? I think this is a fine work as well. The War Dance, in particular, is absolutely fantastic.

I agree, it's a very beautiful and impressive work; what a pity Respighi is mainly known just for the Roman Trilogy, he composed many other outstanding pieces! :) About Belkis, Queen of Sheba, the War Dance is my favourite part as well, really harmonic and powerful :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 01:36:54 PM
I agree, it's a very beautiful and impressive work; what a pity Respighi is mainly known just for the Roman Trilogy, he composed many other outstanding pieces! :) About Belkis, Queen of Sheba, the War Dance is my favourite part as well, really harmonic and powerful :)

I endorse this message. :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Lisztianwagner on November 07, 2011, 01:51:18 PM
I endorse this message. :)

 ;)

Just for curiosity, may I ask you what's your favourite Respighi's work John? Despite being a little expected, mine is the Roman Trilogy, especially Pines of Rome.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 02:11:29 PM
;)

Just for curiosity, may I ask you what's your favourite Respighi's work John? Despite being a little expected, mine is the Roman Trilogy, especially Pines of Rome.

That's a tough call, I really love Church Windows, Pines of Rome, Belkis, Queen of Sheba, Three Botticelli Pictures, Concerto Gregoriano, and La Sensitiva, but I'm sure I could think of more. 8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: madaboutmahler on November 07, 2011, 02:24:30 PM
What do you think about Belkis, Queen of Sheba, Ilaria? I think this is a fine work as well. The War Dance, in particular, is absolutely fantastic.

I'll join the War Dance fan club as well! Had it playing consistently on a loop for around an hour today, absolutely thrilling music!

I still have much more Respighi to explore so shall definitely report back!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 04:30:45 PM
I'll join the War Dance fan club as well! Had it playing consistently on a loop for around an hour today, absolutely thrilling music!

I still have much more Respighi to explore so shall definitely report back!

Wow, you listened to War Dance for almost an hour? ??? You must really like it. 8) I know I've repeated it several times when I first heard it, especially the part towards the end when the orchestra just explodes.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: springrite on November 07, 2011, 04:43:37 PM
The one recording that impressed me the most and got me into Respighi was the CHANDOS recording of Church Windows and Queen of Sheba, under Simon. I heard it when I was buying my AR speakers and it was the demo CD at the store. I went and bought the CD the very next day.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 04:49:29 PM
The one recording that impressed me the most and got me into Respighi was the CHANDOS recording of Church Windows and Queen of Sheba, under Simon. I heard it when I was buying my AR speakers and it was the demo CD at the store. I went and bought the CD the very next day.

Both of those recordings are outstanding, springrite. Two of my favorite Respighi discs for sure.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: AndanteCantabile on November 07, 2011, 06:07:18 PM
Wow! I'm listening to Church Windows for the first time and find it quite impressive. What a pity that Respighi's oeuvre is so little-played outside of the Roman Trilogy.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: lescamil on November 07, 2011, 07:00:39 PM
Not much love for the Concerto in Modo Misolidio here. I really love this work, and I think it shows that Respighi had a hidden knack for composing for the piano that he perhaps didn't exploit enough. I love the way he treats the piano, which is similar to how Busoni handled it in his piano music. The work is far from being insurmountable for a pianist, which should make it an attractive choice to learn for pianists who know of the work. Get the Chandos recordings of the piano and orchestra works. The Naxos recordings with Scherbakov have a terrible piano and dull sound and mechanical, lifeless playing. The new recording with Olli Mustonen playing the Concerto in Modo Misolidio leaves me a bit puzzled. He does some weird things interpretatively that I don't know what to make of. Maybe others will like it.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 07, 2011, 07:19:55 PM
Get the Chandos recordings of the piano and orchestra works.

Already have. 8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: madaboutmahler on November 08, 2011, 09:36:20 AM
Wow, you listened to War Dance for almost an hour? ??? You must really like it. 8) I know I've repeated it several times when I first heard it, especially the part towards the end when the orchestra just explodes.

haha :) Yes, and the part towards the end that you mention is my favourite part as well! So thrilling!

The one recording that impressed me the most and got me into Respighi was the CHANDOS recording of Church Windows and Queen of Sheba, under Simon. I heard it when I was buying my AR speakers and it was the demo CD at the store. I went and bought the CD the very next day.

Certainly is a great recording, I agree!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: madaboutmahler on February 06, 2012, 02:06:02 PM
Wow, you listened to War Dance for almost an hour? ??? You must really like it. 8) I know I've repeated it several times when I first heard it, especially the part towards the end when the orchestra just explodes.

It's happening again now.... :D Listening to the War Dance for the 7th time in a row now...  :P
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: cjvinthechair on February 06, 2012, 02:37:14 PM
Having ignored Respighi for years as a 'one trick pony' I've just discovered his sumptuous music. Currently listening to 'La Pentola Magica', but so many other pieces beg for attention.
If promoters want to get 'bums on seats' with supremely accessible music they could do worse than a season of this gentleman - magnifico !
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: drogulus on February 06, 2012, 02:49:35 PM

     Can someone recommend the Chandos piano and orchestra disc I should be looking for? The navigation on their site is truly awful.

     (http://www.classicalarchives.com/images/coverart/9/d/6/0/095115928523_300.jpg)

     I think this is the one lescamil and Mirror Image are talking about.

     
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Dundonnell on February 06, 2012, 04:08:47 PM
Yes..that Chandos cd is good and well-recorded, although it is only fair to say that some reviewers think that the Scherbakov on Naxos(which lescamil so dislikes) is an infinitely better reading ::)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: drogulus on February 06, 2012, 08:36:20 PM

     Thanks, Dundonnell.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: lescamil on February 06, 2012, 09:02:43 PM
Yes..that Chandos cd is good and well-recorded, although it is only fair to say that some reviewers think that the Scherbakov on Naxos(which lescamil so dislikes) is an infinitely better reading ::)

You're right about me disliking it, but I don't dislike it as much as I used to. Either one is fine for a first timer, but for the true connoisseurs of those works for piano and orchestra, Tozer brings a certain excitement and passion to it that Scherbakov doesn't quite get here. That and his piano is very dull and sounds like there is a pillow in it.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: cilgwyn on February 07, 2012, 03:33:54 AM
I remember taping the 'Concerto in modo misolidio' off the radio & being 'grabbed' by it! The library had the Chandos cd & the Sinfonia Drammatica. They got played allot for a while,but I admit I haven't heard them for a while. The Concerto in modo misolidio (maybe the catchy title doesn't help?) is very lush & OTT,has one or two moments where Respighi's inspiration seems to wander a little,but,oh my goodness,it's fun to listen to,like Korngold's Sinfonietta,it really lifts you up & I seem to remember that the slow movement has a wonderful tune. The Sinfonia Drammatica is another one. Please sir,can we have it at the Proms!!! ;D

  Pizzetti's Canti della Stagione alta,(for Piano & orchestra)in a very similar vein,has some wonderful tunes  that seem as if they have come out of some wonderful romantic movie,or maybe a Fellini? I love the way Pizzetti brings the melody in the first movement back at the end. Again very OTT,I suppose & Hollywood,but like the Respighi,it lifts you up. It does have one or two moments of bombast,but the orchestration is so lush! I have the Marco Polo recording,incidentally,which is very good for that company. Marvellous stuff,in it's own,not too subtle,way! I recently bought the Accord release of his opera 'Fedra'. No english language libretto,annoyingly,but his orchestration is so rich & dramatic I didn't really mind that much. Having said that,omissions like that don't really help a neglected opera composers cause!  >:( For anyone curious about this opera,the Accord set is very well performed & recorded. Having said that,not all Pizzetti cd's are that good. The recent Naxos cd of his 'Concerto dell'estate' was quite pleasant,but still a MAJOR disappointment after the wonderful Hyperion recording of (some of) his orchestral music & his very beautiful & imho,masterly, 'Messa di Requiem'.

And,back to Respighi! :o ;D
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on February 09, 2012, 02:52:13 PM
I like this performance of the Piano Concerto (Modo Misolidio). Church Windows is another favourite, especially in the Geoffrey Simon version on Chandos.

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 09, 2012, 02:58:13 PM
I remember taping the 'Concerto in modo misolidio' off the radio & being 'grabbed' by it! The library had the Chandos cd & the Sinfonia Drammatica. They got played allot for a while,but I admit I haven't heard them for a while. The Concerto in modo misolidio (maybe the catchy title doesn't help?) is very lush & OTT,has one or two moments where Respighi's inspiration seems to wander a little,but,oh my goodness,it's fun to listen to,like Korngold's Sinfonietta,it really lifts you up & I seem to remember that the slow movement has a wonderful tune. The Sinfonia Drammatica is another one. Please sir,can we have it at the Proms!!! ;D

  Pizzetti's Canti della Stagione alta,(for Piano & orchestra)in a very similar vein,has some wonderful tunes  that seem as if they have come out of some wonderful romantic movie,or maybe a Fellini? I love the way Pizzetti brings the melody in the first movement back at the end. Again very OTT,I suppose & Hollywood,but like the Respighi,it lifts you up. It does have one or two moments of bombast,but the orchestration is so lush! I have the Marco Polo recording,incidentally,which is very good for that company. Marvellous stuff,in it's own,not too subtle,way! I recently bought the Accord release of his opera 'Fedra'. No english language libretto,annoyingly,but his orchestration is so rich & dramatic I didn't really mind that much. Having said that,omissions like that don't really help a neglected opera composers cause!  >:( For anyone curious about this opera,the Accord set is very well performed & recorded. Having said that,not all Pizzetti cd's are that good. The recent Naxos cd of his 'Concerto dell'estate' was quite pleasant,but still a MAJOR disappointment after the wonderful Hyperion recording of (some of) his orchestral music & his very beautiful & imho,masterly, 'Messa di Requiem'.

And,back to Respighi! :o ;D

I can certainly understand your disappointment with Pizzetti, cilgwyn. That Hyperion recording (w/ Vanska) is really the only Pizzetti recording I heard that impressed me. The Naxos recordings were just mediocre all around.

Anyway, yes, back to Respighi....
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 09, 2012, 02:59:22 PM
I like this performance of the Piano Concerto (Modo Misolidio). Church Windows is another favourite, especially in the Geoffrey Simon version on Chandos.



I wonder how this version of Concerto in Modo Misolidio compares with the Tozer/Downes recording on Chandos? Which do you prefer, Jeffrey?
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Est.1965 on February 09, 2012, 03:02:15 PM
I like this performance of the Piano Concerto (Modo Misolidio). Church Windows is another favourite, especially in the Geoffrey Simon version on Chandos.



Jeffrey, you kindly sent me that Church Windows a few years ago.  :o  I sincerely hope you have your own copy again, or I will have to send it back to you!  Geoffrey Simon is excellent with it, he does not play to overblowing it, but has what can only be described as a well thought out delivery, no matter how dramatic the piece.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on February 09, 2012, 03:49:03 PM
I wonder how this version of Concerto in Modo Misolidio compares with the Tozer/Downes recording on Chandos? Which do you prefer, Jeffrey?

I'd need to listen to the Tozer again. I think that I liked the Ondine and Naxos versions best.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on February 09, 2012, 03:50:55 PM
Jeffrey, you kindly sent me that Church Windows a few years ago.  :o  I sincerely hope you have your own copy again, or I will have to send it back to you!  Geoffrey Simon is excellent with it, he does not play to overblowing it, but has what can only be described as a well thought out delivery, no matter how dramatic the piece.

I do have several ( :o) copies of Church Windows (am playing the Geoffrey Simon version now - my favourite) - but many thanks John.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 09, 2012, 03:54:34 PM
I'd need to listen to the Tozer again. I think that I liked the Ondine and Naxos versions best.

Thanks for your feedback, Jeffrey. 8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on February 09, 2012, 03:56:08 PM
Thanks for you feedback, Jeffrey. 8)
My pleasure  :D
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Christo on February 09, 2012, 04:12:50 PM
Are we finally finished discussing the "probably dullest piano concerto ever" (as I once heard it being called on the radio).  ;D

(I myself love it though, as I am especially fond of 'later Respighi', including most compositions from the 1920s and 1930s.)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 17, 2013, 09:08:53 PM
I really love this composer's music. Sure it may not be the most profound music and it may not tickle everyone's fancy, but, my goodness, does he know his way around the orchestra. Well when you study with Rimsky-Korsakov this is a prerequisite! ;) Anyway, some favorite works obviously the Roman Trilogy, Church Windows, Belkis: Queen of Sheba, Concerto gregoriano, Three Botticelli Pictures, and more recently the Six Pieces for Violin and Piano.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: snyprrr on January 17, 2013, 09:23:14 PM
I really love this composer's music. Sure it may not be the most profound music and it may not tickle everyone's fancy, but, my goodness, does he know his way around the orchestra. Well when you study with Rimsky-Korsakov this is a prerequisite! ;) Anyway, some favorite works obviously the Roman Trilogy, Church Windows, Belkis: Queen of Sheba, Concerto gregoriano, Three Botticelli Pictures, and more recently the Six Pieces for Violin and Piano.

Six smallish pieces? I think that's the only Respighi I have. The first String Quartet is a heaven storming hot house flower, the second did not live up to my expectations. Respighi, Enescu, Kodaly,... I dunno, I've seen too many movies maybe?...
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 17, 2013, 09:38:55 PM
Six smallish pieces? I think that's the only Respighi I have. The first String Quartet is a heaven storming hot house flower, the second did not live up to my expectations. Respighi, Enescu, Kodaly,... I dunno, I've seen too many movies maybe?...

I like Enescu, but I'm lukewarm about Kodaly. I have a recording of some of Respighi chamber works on Chandos. Very nice recording. I need to revisit that at some point. That's where I heard Six Pieces for Violin and Piano.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 07, 2013, 04:15:47 PM
The Birds (Gli Uccelli) is my favourite Respighi work.  Respighi shares the same birth date as me, albeit 95 years my senior.  :D
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: ChamberNut on April 07, 2013, 04:31:54 PM
The Birds (Gli Uccelli) is my favourite Respighi work.  Respighi shares the same birth date as me, albeit 95 years my senior.  :D

Has anyone else heard this Respighi, or am I the only one?  ???  Doesn't seem like anyone else has mentioned it.  Perhaps I don't understand Respighi's 'idiom' if I like it.  :P
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on April 07, 2013, 05:02:44 PM
Has anyone else heard this Respighi, or am I the only one?  ???  Doesn't seem like anyone else has mentioned it.  Perhaps I don't understand Respighi's 'idiom' if I like it.  :P

I like this work a lot, Ray, but my favorite Respighi work is Church Windows.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: TheGSMoeller on April 07, 2013, 05:24:59 PM
Has anyone else heard this Respighi, or am I the only one?  ???  Doesn't seem like anyone else has mentioned it.  Perhaps I don't understand Respighi's 'idiom' if I like it.  :P

I love The Birds, Ray.
Great composer, can't go wrong with any three from the Roman Trilogy (if you have the chance to ever see Pines, do it, the final Appian Way movement surrounded by offstage brass, even some showing up on the balcony, an amazing experience) and I'm a nut for his Ancient Airs and Dances.

But I've grown to really enjoy his Concerto Gregoriano for violin and orchestra immensely. Some truly lovely music.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on April 08, 2013, 11:46:47 PM
I love The Birds, Ray.
Great composer, can't go wrong with any three form the Roman Trilogy (if you have the chance to ever see Pines, do it, the final Appian Way movement surrounded by offstage brass, even some showing up on the balcony, an amazing experience) and I'm a nut for his Ancient Airs and Dances.

But I've grown to really enjoy his Concerto Gregoriano for violin and orchestra immensely. Some truly lovely music.

Concerto Gregoriano is indeed a lovely work. I first heard it on the radio and thought 'this must be by Finzi or some similar British composer'! I was also captivated by the Botticelli Pictures on the radio without knowing what it was. I love the epic 'Church Windows' and there is some fine chamber music too.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: snyprrr on July 31, 2013, 06:30:22 AM
respighi?????
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936) - the Violin Sonata in b-minor
Post by: Scion7 on August 04, 2015, 03:48:02 AM
This has been recorded many times, and is no doubt his most famous and most loved chamber piece (although the piano quintet is a better piece of music for those that have never heard it!) - Chung, Heifetz, Mutter, etc., have all recorded this piece.

Do any of you vinyl-huggers out there have this one?  ç1968, Vladimir Weisman-violin, Eleanor Hancock-piano

(http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg578/Scion777/reduced-FRONT_zpsrsmoanzp.jpg)  (http://i1244.photobucket.com/albums/gg578/Scion777/reduced-BACK_zpse0t62y2j.jpg)

It's now out-of-print, of course.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on December 31, 2016, 10:44:59 PM
I thought I was one of the few people who loved this "loud" composer. It is nice to see that there are people who enjoy these spectacular (really hyper colored) works as much or more than I do. I think that the end of "Church Windows" is one of the most majestic fragments ever created, it blows away my tears of ecstasy and overflowing pleasure. I also enjoy a lot of "Metamorphoseon" (owns another hallucinating ending), "Belkis' Suite", the Roman trilogy (obviously), Suite no. 3 of ancient dances and airs, Toccata for piano and orchestra, Ballata delle gnomidi, Suite in G major and recently I heard the Belfagor overture, also very entertaining. I must explore even more of his amazing output.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: cilgwyn on January 01, 2017, 03:30:29 AM
I may be one of the few (I've combed through the posts here)......but I love his Sinfonia Drammatica. Colourful orchestration,huge noisy climaxes,great tunes (imo) and completely ott! The Chandos recording is fantastic. I can't resist some "air conducting" during the noisiest bits. The second movement has a wonderful tune. Bring it on,I say! ;D
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on January 01, 2017, 02:45:02 PM
I may be one of the few (I've combed through the posts here)......but I love his Sinfonia Drammatica. Colourful orchestration,huge noisy climaxes,great tunes (imo) and completely ott! The Chandos recording is fantastic. I can't resist some "air conducting" during the noisiest bits. The second movement has a wonderful tune. Bring it on,I say! ;D

I listened to it a while ago and yes, it is superb and overwhelming symphony, showing the great power of its creator! I think I should listen to it again.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: cilgwyn on January 01, 2017, 02:49:57 PM
Wow! I didn't expect such a positive reply! Another fan of the Sinfonia Drammatica! :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on January 01, 2017, 03:11:06 PM
Hehe of course! It is difficult not to be mesmerized by its charms
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Sergeant Rock on January 01, 2017, 04:07:51 PM
Another fan of the Sinfonia Drammatica! :)

Count me in. I heard the Sinfonia D for the first time just a few months ago (after purchasing it unheard) and loved it. A few here offered me condolence on a lame purchase but, in fact, it turned out splendidly. No buyer's remorse.

Sarge
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: André on January 01, 2017, 04:08:30 PM
Lesas than 20$ on Amazon

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41pjIhq-69L.jpg)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 01, 2017, 06:58:11 PM
Lesas than 20$ on Amazon

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41pjIhq-69L.jpg)

I wonder how the performances are?
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on January 01, 2017, 11:10:20 PM
I wonder how the performances are?
Was well reviewed I think John - here is a review of one of the volumes:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/June13/Respighi_orchestral_v3_94394.htm

And here's another one featuring the excellent 'Metamorphoseon':

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Mar14/Respighi_orchestral_v4_94395.htm
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 02, 2017, 08:27:22 AM
Was well reviewed I think John - here is a review of one of the volumes:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/June13/Respighi_orchestral_v3_94394.htm

And here's another one featuring the excellent 'Metamorphoseon':

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2014/Mar14/Respighi_orchestral_v4_94395.htm

Very nice, Jeffrey. Thanks for the feedback. I've a feeling that Andre is ignoring me or has me on ignore as I've made several replies to several of his posts on different threads and he never replies back. :-\
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: André on January 02, 2017, 09:22:26 AM
Where did you get that impression ?? I do reply to your posts - sometimes 3-4 pages down the road, but I do  8). Regarding the Respighi set, I couldn't comment, as I have not heard it.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 02, 2017, 09:36:27 AM
Where did you get that impression ?? I do reply to your posts - sometimes 3-4 pages down the road, but I do  8). Regarding the Respighi set, I couldn't comment, as I have not heard it.

Sorry about this wrongful assumption, Andre. I don't know why I felt this way.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: André on January 02, 2017, 11:39:08 AM
Even if I wanted to, I wouldn't know how to put someone on an "ignore" list  :D.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 02, 2017, 11:43:42 AM
Even if I wanted to, I wouldn't know how to put someone on an "ignore" list  :D.

Hah! ;D
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on January 07, 2017, 06:31:48 PM
Just I listened to 'Poema autunnale' and 'Concerto Gregoriano'

Simply, majestic and full of beautiness. Really magnific pieces.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Maestro267 on January 26, 2017, 07:12:28 AM
Listening to Belkis, Queen of Sheba and Metamorphoseon, a new purchase today (Philharmonia/Simon). An absolute riot of orchestral colour!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on January 26, 2017, 07:28:40 AM
Concerto Gregoriano and Metamorphoseon are fine works. When I caught part of Concerto Gregoriano on the radio I thought that it must be by Finzi or another English composer! It is one of my favourite violin concertos. I've just received a CD of Antal Dorati conducting 'Church Windows' through the Dorati Society which I hope to listen to this evening.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: adriano on February 06, 2017, 12:03:13 AM
1) The specification "complete" on the cover of the Brilliant Classics CD box is a lie. There are at least 15 works missing! I only heard that it was intended to become a "complete" project, but the Rome orchestra was dissolved in 2014 due to the withdrawal of its sponsors.

2) And those in this forum calling Respighi a "loud composer" should get to know his complete works before telling such nonsense. Besides many pieces for chamber orchestra, Respighi has also written chamber music and songs:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Ottorino_Respighi
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on February 06, 2017, 01:49:57 PM
1) The specification "complete" on the cover of the Brilliant Classics CD box is a lie. There are at least 15 works missing! I only heard that it was intended to become a "complete" project, but the Rome orchestra was dissolved in 2014 due to the withdrawal of its sponsors.

2) And those in this forum calling Respighi a "loud composer" should get to know his complete works before telling such nonsense. Besides many pieces for chamber orchestra, Respighi has also written chamber music and songs:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Ottorino_Respighi
His chamber music is often very poetic. Three Botticelli Pictures is also a beautiful and not loud work either.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Christo on February 11, 2017, 08:54:11 AM
1) The specification "complete" on the cover of the Brilliant Classics CD box is a lie. There are at least 15 works missing! I only heard that it was intended to become a "complete" project, but the Rome orchestra was dissolved in 2014 due to the withdrawal of its sponsors.

2) And those in this forum calling Respighi a "loud composer" should get to know his complete works before telling such nonsense. Besides many pieces for chamber orchestra, Respighi has also written chamber music and songs:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Ottorino_Respighi

Great and honoured to see you here, as the most pre-eminent Respighi expert. Hope to learn a lot from you.  :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on February 11, 2017, 09:29:50 AM
Great and honoured to see you here, as the most pre-eminent Respighi expert. Hope to learn a lot from you.  :)
+1
And thank you for Fanelli, Auric, Honegger etcetera which have given me many hours of listening pleasure.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: relm1 on February 27, 2017, 04:35:38 PM
Why hasn't there ever been a complete recording of Belkis, Queen of Sheba?  Only multiple recordings of the suite but the music seems worthy of a full release by a commercially successful composer.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on February 27, 2017, 04:48:30 PM
Why hasn't there ever been a complete recording of Belkis, Queen of Sheba?  Only multiple recordings of the suite but the music seems worthy of a full release by a commercially successful composer.

Perhaps it’s because Respighi has yet to really take ahold of the classical music world. Don’t get wrong, he composed some good music, but out of the ‘Roman Trilogy,’ the rest of the music he composed isn’t all too well known.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Maestro267 on February 28, 2017, 04:37:22 AM
Perhaps it’s because Respighi has yet to really take ahold of the classical music world. Don’t get wrong, he composed some good music, but out of the ‘Roman Trilogy,’ the rest of the music he composed isn’t all too well known.

That's no excuse these days, when all sorts of non-standard-repertoire stuff is thankfully being recorded for us to hear and judge for ourselves. Does the complete score actually exist, in a performable state, I wonder? I'd love to hear the complete Belkis ballet.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: relm1 on February 28, 2017, 07:17:54 AM
That's no excuse these days, when all sorts of non-standard-repertoire stuff is thankfully being recorded for us to hear and judge for ourselves. Does the complete score actually exist, in a performable state, I wonder? I'd love to hear the complete Belkis ballet.

Isn't this it?
https://www.halleonard.com/product/viewproduct.action?itemid=50484172&lid=21&keywords=respighi&subsiteid=1&
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Maestro267 on February 28, 2017, 08:12:29 AM
Isn't this it?
https://www.halleonard.com/product/viewproduct.action?itemid=50484172&lid=21&keywords=respighi&subsiteid=1&

The fact it's got Church Windows as well, and it's only 198 pages, makes me think it's just the suite. But I may be wrong. There's no way to know just from that. According to the liner notes of the Chandos CD, the complete Belkis is close to 80 minutes in length.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: pjme on February 28, 2017, 12:26:04 PM
The complete score (including, mezzo soprano, narrator and chorus)  is available at: https://repertoire-explorer.musikmph.de/en/product/respighi-ottorinoy/


Preface

Given Ottorino Respighi’s outstanding mastery in handling the modern orchestra and his
superb gifts for impressionist tone-painting (the very qualities cited by the many detractors and
adversaries of this great composer), it is astonishing how little he composed for the ballet. The
ever-popular La Boutique fantasque on music by Gioacchino Rossini (1918), Sévres de la
vieille France (“Old French Porcelain”) on French folk tunes (1920), La pentola magica (“The
Magic Kettle”) on Russian themes (1924), and Gli uccelli (1928): these were all he had to
show by the year 1931, when La Scala in Milan commissioned him to compose what would
become his only full-length ballet, Belkis, Regina di Saba (the Ricordi catalogue gives its
duration as 80 minutes). The scenario, depicting the Queen of Sheba’s visit to King Solomon,
was supplied by Respighi’s poet-friend Claudio Guastalla (1880-1948), a professor of literature
who also wrote the libretto to Respighi’s opera Belfagor. In fact, Guastalla had written an opera
libretto on the same biblical subject but could not find a composer willing to set it to music.
Elsa Respighi, in her biography of her husband (1931), has precious little to say about Belkis.
It reads as follows: “During the spring and summer, Respighi worked on undisturbed at ‘The
Pines.’ The two operas Maria Egiziaca and Fiamma were under way and there was also the
ballet Belkis, Regina di Saba, which had to be ready for performance at La Scala early in the
following year. Respighi had given this subject much thought for many years before he decided
on a ballet and was now in possession of a great deal of thematic material (Hebrew melodies,
oriental song-accompaniments, etc.).”
Respighi made ample use of the opportunity to revive his ties to ancient Arabic and Hebrew
music. Among other things this left a mark on the gigantic size of the orchestra, which calls for
exotic instruments, a backstage band, a chorus, and a narrator. The première in Milan thus
became a major event, with Leonide Massine responsible for the choreography and Nicola
Benois for the sets and costumes. An estimated one-thousand performers were involved in the
première, which took place at La Scala on 23 January 1932 under the baton of Franco Ghione.
The public and critics responded enthusiastically, but after eleven performances the expensive
production had had its day. Nicolas Slominsky, in his inimitable way, recorded the event in
Music Since 1900: “23 January 1932: Belkis, regina di Saba, ‘choreographic spectacle with
musical illustrations’ by Ottorino Respighi, written in a resplendently eclectic style, with
orientalistically undulant arabesques characterizing the Queen of Sheba and pentatonic scales
depicting the populace, is produced at La Scala, in Milan.”
Since then Belkis, Regina di Saba has never again been mounted on stage, and the only printed
material available for purchase is the vocal score. Realizing that further performances of Belkis
were practically impossible, Respighi decided to extract two orchestral suites from it for use in
the concert hall. He was able to complete one of them in 1934, which was duly published by
Ricordi in miniature score (1935), but the second suite remained unfinished. Thanks to the
House of Ricordi, who kindly provided the production master, the present volume marks not
only the first time the ballet has appeared in study format, but its very first appearance in a
commercially available full score.
Translation: Bradford Robinson
For performance materials please contact the publisher Edizioni Ricordi, Milano.


(http://www.arterussamilano.it/wp-content/files_mf/01_belkis_rf.jpg)

(http://www.istanbulkadinmuzesi.org/i/content/718_2_teatroallascala-big.jpg)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on July 01, 2017, 09:04:01 PM
Working my way through this fine, incredibly good value (8CDs) set:


The performances and the recordings are excellent and there are some great juxtapositions of works on the same CD including two of my favourites the Concerto in modo misolidio and Metamorphoseon modi XII. Also the Three Botticelli Pictures and Church Windows on the same CD. I thought that the opening of 'St Gregory the Great' in the latter was rather fast compared to Geoffrey Simon on Chandos but it builds up great cumulative power towards the magnificent (IMHO) conclusion. Currently listening to the eloquent Concerto Gregoriano.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: relm1 on July 02, 2017, 06:23:16 AM
Working my way through this fine, incredibly good value (8CDs) set:


The performances and the recordings are excellent and there are some great juxtapositions of works on the same CD including two of my favourites the Concerto in modo misolidio and Metamorphoseon modi XII. Also the Three Botticelli Pictures and Church Windows on the same CD. I thought that the opening of 'St Gregory the Great' in the latter was rather fast compared to Geoffrey Simon on Chandos but it builds up great cumulative power towards the magnificent (IMHO) conclusion. Currently listening to the eloquent Concerto Gregoriano.

Too bad the "Complete Orchestral Music" collection doesn't include a note of Belkis let alone the entire score which I think is still waiting a recording.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on July 02, 2017, 09:16:24 AM
Too bad the "Complete Orchestral Music" collection doesn't include a note of Belkis let alone the entire score which I think is still waiting a recording.
Yes, that's naughty of them I must say.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 06, 2017, 02:52:33 PM
Working my way through this fine, incredibly good value (8CDs) set:


The performances and the recordings are excellent and there are some great juxtapositions of works on the same CD including two of my favourites the Concerto in modo misolidio and Metamorphoseon modi XII. Also the Three Botticelli Pictures and Church Windows on the same CD. I thought that the opening of 'St Gregory the Great' in the latter was rather fast compared to Geoffrey Simon on Chandos but it builds up great cumulative power towards the magnificent (IMHO) conclusion. Currently listening to the eloquent Concerto Gregoriano.

Some days ago I played that performance of Metamorphoseon on Naxos Music Library: it's terribly slow! it lasts around 35' (almost 36'), it loses its charm, its power. Simon's performance with Philharmonia Orchestra lasts 25' and for me is the best rendition. In fact, all his performances of Respighi's music are terrific.

On the other hand, also I played again the Suite from Belkis, Regina di Saba (Simon with the Philharmonia). Once more I was amazed with such a sumptuous score, throbbing display of frenetic rhythm and energy. I don't understand why it hasn't recorded totally, I'd love to have it and many other fans would like too.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: relm1 on July 06, 2017, 03:24:06 PM
Some days ago I played that performance of Metamorphoseon on Naxos Music Library: it's terribly slow! it lasts around 35' (almost 36'), it loses its charm, its power. Simon's performance with Philharmonia Orchestra lasts 25' and for me is the best rendition. In fact, all his performances of Respighi's music are terrific.

On the other hand, also I played again the Suite from Belkis, Regina di Saba (Simon with the Philharmonia). Once more I was amazed with such a sumptuous score, throbbing display of frenetic rhythm and energy. I don't understand why it hasn't recorded totally, I'd love to have it and many other fans would like too.

I agree with you.  I love Simon's recordings of Respighi especially given the ultra luxurious mid 1980's sound Chandos had. 
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Turner on July 06, 2017, 08:22:09 PM
Quote
Why hasn't there ever been a complete recording of Belkis, Queen of Sheba?  Only multiple recordings of the suite but the music seems worthy of a full release by a commercially successful composer.

There is this one, Feltz´s one from 2014, but unfortunately with narrators and only on DVD and Blu-Ray (for example, Scherchen did a handful of recordings of some other works with narrator, say Schumann´s Manfred, and it can be very annoying).

I don´t have it, but totally agree on the excellence of the suite on Chandos.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ottorino-Respighi-Belkis-Premiere-Blu-ray/dp/B00FW7P9VG
 

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on July 06, 2017, 09:31:41 PM
I agree with you.  I love Simon's recordings of Respighi especially given the ultra luxurious mid 1980's sound Chandos had.

Yes, Simon's 'Church Windows' is terrific too.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on July 07, 2017, 03:21:21 PM
There is this one, Feltz´s one from 2014, but unfortunately with narrators and only on DVD and Blu-Ray (for example, Scherchen did a handful of recordings of some other works with narrator, say Schumann´s Manfred, and it can be very annoying).

I don´t have it, but totally agree on the excellence of the suite on Chandos.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ottorino-Respighi-Belkis-Premiere-Blu-ray/dp/B00FW7P9VG

I didn't know that. I don't like narrator voices in the works either. It's a notorious disadvantage. Too bad  :(  >:(
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Christo on July 07, 2017, 11:58:23 PM
Some days ago I played that performance of Metamorphoseon on Naxos Music Library: it's terribly slow! it lasts around 35' (almost 36'), it loses its charm, its power.

Exactly what I found, too - and what me made 'suspicious' about this set. Metamorphoseon is one of my Respighi favourites and this recording is definitely spoiling it. I didn't try all of the La Vecchia recordings, but what I did listen to, is never better than the favourite recordings I had in mind. As an almost (early compositions and Belkis missing) complete set, it has its merits, but they're not the final word on Respighi.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Abuelo Igor on July 08, 2017, 01:59:32 AM
La Vecchia's versions of the Roman Trilogy must also be the slowest on record, which I often find interesting because you get to hear orchestral detail that usually whizzes by unnoticed at standard speed.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 01, 2018, 10:52:19 PM
Just recently listened to Respighi's Quintet



I didn't know quite what to expect, but I enjoyed it a great deal. The music was melodic, well structured, more "absolute" than I would have expected based on his orchestral works. On to the String Quartet from he same recording.

P.S., I couldn't resist listening again to "Pini di Roma," this time in Lorin Maazel's recording with the Pittsburgh Symphony on Sony. The final movement is particularly breathtaking in this recording, in which the orchestra was captured with only two microphones positioned high above the stage, producing a climax of exceptional clarity and great weight of sound.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on January 02, 2018, 02:08:45 AM
Just recently listened to Respighi's Quintet



I didn't know quite what to expect, but I enjoyed it a great deal. The music was melodic, well structured, more "absolute" than I would have expected based on his orchestral works. On to the String Quartet from he same recording.

P.S., I couldn't resist listening again to "Pini di Roma," this time in Lorin Maazel's recording with the Pittsburgh Symphony on Sony. The final movement is particularly breathtaking in this recording, in which the orchestra was captured with only two microphones positioned high above the stage, producing a climax of exceptional clarity and great weight of sound.
That is a great CD.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: kyjo on January 02, 2018, 11:41:09 AM
Just recently listened to Respighi's Quintet



I didn't know quite what to expect, but I enjoyed it a great deal. The music was melodic, well structured, more "absolute" than I would have expected based on his orchestral works. On to the String Quartet from he same recording.

I really enjoy the Piano Quintet as well! But the slow movement is way too brief at only 2 minutes long :o
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 15, 2018, 09:33:49 AM
Continuing my exploration of non-programic Respighi with the Metamorphoseon (a theme and variations).





In this case I don't find the piece entirely satisfying. It is peculiar that the theme itself sounds 'English' to me, as though it were the start of some fantasia or another on English folk tunes by Vaughan Williams. It is a pleasant enough starting point but the variations that follow struck me as of uneven quality, although some really hit he mark. Generally I found the Lopez-Cobos to be far less satisfactory than the Simon/Philharmonia. The balances the the Lopez-Cobos struck me as crudely unbalanced in favor of the brass, with horns not prominent enough in the texture. In any case, after three complete listens overall my impression is of a piece with some good music, but not a masterpiece through-and-through.

Probably I will turn my attention to concerti, next.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 16, 2018, 07:06:02 AM
Continuing my exploration of non-programic Respighi with the Metamorphoseon (a theme and variations).





In this case I don't find the piece entirely satisfying. It is peculiar that the theme itself sounds 'English' to me, as though it were the start of some fantasia or another on English folk tunes by Vaughan Williams. It is a pleasant enough starting point but the variations that follow struck me as of uneven quality, although some really hit he mark. Generally I found the Lopez-Cobos to be far less satisfactory than the Simon/Philharmonia. The balances the the Lopez-Cobos struck me as crudely unbalanced in favor of the brass, with horns not prominent enough in the texture. In any case, after three complete listens overall my impression is of a piece with some good music, but not a masterpiece through-and-through.

Probably I will turn my attention to concerti, next.

Interesting. Carry on  8)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: BasilValentine on January 16, 2018, 10:59:22 AM
Generally I found the Lopez-Cobos to be far less satisfactory than the Simon/Philharmonia. The balances the the Lopez-Cobos struck me as crudely unbalanced in favor of the brass, with horns not prominent enough in the texture. In any case, after three complete listens overall my impression is of a piece with some good music, but not a masterpiece through-and-through.

Probably I will turn my attention to concerti, next.

Lopez-Cobos really liked Respighi it seems. While I was working for the Cincinnati Orchestra during my conservatory days he also conducted Respighi's orchestration of some of Rachmaninoff's Etudes Tableaux. I don't know if they ever recorded them. The materials (Ricordi?) were full of errors and needed a thorough proof-reading before they were ready for prime time. Strange, I think Rachmaninoff himself made that complaint about the Respighi orchestrations.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 16, 2018, 11:11:30 AM
Lopez-Cobos really liked Respighi it seems. While I was working for the Cincinnati Orchestra during my conservatory days he also conducted Respighi's orchestration of some of Rachmaninoff's Etudes Tableaux. I don't know if they ever recorded them. The materials (Ricordi?) were full of errors and needed a thorough proof-reading before they were ready for prime time. Strange, I think Rachmaninoff himself made that complaint about the Respighi orchestrations.

Perhaps Lopez-Cobos was being true to the score, but the score needs finessing.

It is something which I find is common to Telarc recordings in Cincinnati, brass sound is too heavy and in your face. I had this impression of the Lopez-Cobos/Cincinnati Bruckner recordings as well. Perhaps an unfortunate feature of the acoustics of the hall and Telarc's puritanical recording technique. I do not find it to be a problem with Telarc recordings in other venues.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on January 16, 2018, 12:38:02 PM
Just ordered this:

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: BasilValentine on January 16, 2018, 03:33:56 PM
Perhaps Lopez-Cobos was being true to the score, but the score needs finessing.

It is something which I find is common to Telarc recordings in Cincinnati, brass sound is too heavy and in your face. I had this impression of the Lopez-Cobos/Cincinnati Bruckner recordings as well. Perhaps an unfortunate feature of the acoustics of the hall and Telarc's puritanical recording technique. I do not find it to be a problem with Telarc recordings in other venues.

The score needed more than finessing. There were lots of wrong notes and other sloppy errors. Not to mention that the orchestration itself wasn't very good, but that's another issue.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 16, 2018, 06:28:14 PM
Just ordered this:



How is Neschling’s Respighi series, Jeffrey? Worth buying?
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 16, 2018, 07:50:57 PM
Never mind, Jeffrey. ;)

Cross-posted from the ‘Purchases’ thread -

Bought a good bit of Respighi:

(https://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/150dpi/034571179308.png) (http://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h0603/4980603-origpic-08c9ee.jpg)

(http://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h5330/5015330-origpic-9a5a47.jpg) (http://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h7401/4947401-origpic-76a287.jpg)

(http://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h5472/4835472-origpic-460a9d.jpg) (http://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h9161/4459161-origpic-78056d.jpg)

(http://bis.se/shop/17115/art15/h8284/4438284-origpic-cc0d38.jpg) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/719zkGD4z3L._SL1000_.jpg)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on January 17, 2018, 12:16:33 AM
Never mind, Jeffrey. ;)

Cross-posted from the ‘Purchases’ thread -

Excellent John! My copy hasn't arrived yet but look forward to receiving it. I like the programme on the disc.
 :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 17, 2018, 05:59:16 AM
Excellent John! My copy hasn't arrived yet but look forward to receiving it. I like the programme on the disc.
 :)

Do you own the rest of Nechling’s Respighi recordings on BIS, Jeffrey? Would be curious to know what you think of the performances?
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 17, 2018, 07:22:06 AM
The score needed more than finessing. There were lots of wrong notes and other sloppy errors. Not to mention that the orchestration itself wasn't very good, but that's another issue.

I guess you are referring to those transcriptions of Rachmaninoff, I was thinking of the Metamorphoseon.

Anyway, didn't have too much time available yesterday, but did listen to the first movement of the Piano Concerto in a-minor. (Maybe, strictly speaking it is not a distinct movement, it is played attacca. Beautiful writing for piano and more subtlety in handling the orchestra. Tozer is impressive, as usual. This piece has potential!  I look forward to listening to the whole thing soon.


Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Mirror Image on January 17, 2018, 07:37:07 AM
Added these two recordings since my initial Respighi order:

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_1080/MI0001/029/MI0001029011.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/761195116524.jpg?1403885094)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on January 17, 2018, 12:10:14 PM
The only one I know John is the last one you posted with Concerto in Modo Misolido on - a fine CD and that Concerto has a lovely memorable tune.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: pjme on January 18, 2018, 12:01:01 AM
Lopez-Cobos really liked Respighi it seems. While I was working for the Cincinnati Orchestra during my conservatory days he also conducted Respighi's orchestration of some of Rachmaninoff's Etudes Tableaux. I don't know if they ever recorded them. The materials (Ricordi?) were full of errors and needed a thorough proof-reading before they were ready for prime time. Strange, I think Rachmaninoff himself made that complaint about the Respighi orchestrations.

They did :

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61aNUZEw9aL.jpg)

See evt.: https://www.allmusic.com/composition/%C3tudes-tableaux-5-for-orchestra-orchestrated-by-o-respighi-p-160-in-his-catalogue-mc0002570527
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 18, 2018, 08:56:37 AM
Had a chance to listen to Respighi's piano concerto in a-minor in its entirety. I really enjoyed the work. Beautiful piano writing, skillful use of the orchestra (individual instruments interacting with the soloist, tasteful accompaniment, impressive tutti's). The work is rhapsodic in character, but relatively succinct (doesn't overstay its welcome). Downes/Tozer with the BBC philharmonic does a great job. I will be looking for more recordings of Respighi Piano and Orchestra and more recordings of Respighi from Downes (I think I have 2 of 4 discs that were released).


Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 04, 2018, 12:04:01 PM
I've revisited the other symphony by Respighi, I mean, the Suite for orchestra in E major, a symphony in all but name. I remember I liked it very much when played it some time ago, but this time the impression it gave me was even bigger. It's magnificent, so vivid, with memorable stuff throughout. I don't know or I'm not sure whether Braga Santos was inspired by this work, but it brought to my mind some reminiscences of pieces by that great Portuguese composer, it's in the sort of same spirit.

The work is early Respighi, but it already shows an astounding talent for orchestration and melody. Perhaps the performance is not from a top-notch orchestra, albeit I don't have important complaints about it.

(https://www.chandos.net/artwork/NA7820.jpg)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on September 04, 2018, 08:52:41 PM
I've revisited the other symphony by Respighi, I mean, the Suite for orchestra in E major, a symphony in all but name. I remember I liked it very much when played it some time ago, but this time the impression it gave me was even bigger. It's magnificent, so vivid, with memorable stuff throughout. I don't know or I'm not sure whether Braga Santos was inspired by this work, but it brought to my mind some reminiscences of pieces by that great Portuguese composer, it's in the sort of same spirit.

The work is early Respighi, but it already shows an astounding talent for orchestration and melody. Perhaps the performance is not from a top-notch orchestra, albeit I don't have important complaints about it.

(https://www.chandos.net/artwork/NA7820.jpg)
How very interesting Cesar (Braga Santos connection). Must revisit this one.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: pjme on September 04, 2018, 11:54:12 PM
That's no excuse these days, when all sorts of non-standard-repertoire stuff is thankfully being recorded for us to hear and judge for ourselves. Does the complete score actually exist, in a performable state, I wonder? I'd love to hear the complete Belkis ballet.

Belkis, as performed by Julia Jentsch (narrator), Stella Doufexis (soprano) with the Czech Philharmonic Choir Brno and Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Gabriel Feltz is on YT now:

https://www.youtube.com/v/zePEmArsRyM

https://www.youtube.com/v/9ZxZo_b6XJE

I find it a very good performance and even like the narration. There is some impressive music (even a wind machine!) in Respighi's grandest manner. It is like watching a Cecil B.DeMille movie with Claudette Colbert, Gloria Swanson or Lollobrigida, of course.

And then there is this 1952 "Regina di Saba", with Leonora Ruffo!

https://www.youtube.com/v/oXwDxGJ_S4c....music by Nino Rota!
.

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 29, 2018, 08:32:33 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61RY3LW46dL.jpg)(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/977/MI0000977645.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

What are your preferred recordings of Trittico Botticelliano? I'm very fond of López-Cobos on Telarc and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on DG. I revisited the former, being bewitched once more by such a singular beauty. La Primavera and La Nascita di Venere strike me like creations of extreme and pure loveliness, the wealth of effects takes me to another dimension. Respighi at his best in chamber forms. L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on September 30, 2018, 01:28:11 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61RY3LW46dL.jpg)(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/977/MI0000977645.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

What are your preferred recordings of Trittico Botticelliano? I'm very fond of López-Cobos on Telarc and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on DG. I revisited the former, being bewitched once more by such a singular beauty. La Primavera and La Nascita di Venere strike me like creations of extreme and pure loveliness, the wealth of effects takes me to another dimension. Respighi at his best in chamber forms. L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.
I rather like the original version that I had on LP:
(http://)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Christo on September 30, 2018, 03:53:18 AM
L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.
Funny to learn, because this central movement from the Trittico, with its haunting main theme, is perhaps the most beautiful piece by Respighi that I know - indeed in all music.  :)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 30, 2018, 10:47:23 AM
I rather like the original version that I had on LP:
(http://)

I remember seeing it on CD somewhere too.


Funny to learn, because this central movement from the Trittico, with its haunting main theme, is perhaps the most beautiful piece by Respighi that I know - indeed in all music.  :)

How different we perceive music then  ;)
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: vandermolen on September 30, 2018, 11:52:22 AM
I remember seeing it on CD somewhere too.

Here it is:

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: kyjo on September 30, 2018, 09:00:57 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61RY3LW46dL.jpg)(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/977/MI0000977645.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

What are your preferred recordings of Trittico Botticelliano? I'm very fond of López-Cobos on Telarc and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra on DG. I revisited the former, being bewitched once more by such a singular beauty. La Primavera and La Nascita di Venere strike me like creations of extreme and pure loveliness, the wealth of effects takes me to another dimension. Respighi at his best in chamber forms. L'Adorazione dei Magi is less successful but with a certain appeal.

I really enjoy John Neschling’s recent recording of this lovely work with the Orchestre Philharmonique Royal De Liege on BIS:

Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on October 01, 2018, 03:10:06 PM
The Neschling and the Marriner look tempting, it will be worth investigating.

Trittico is some of the most pristine music I have heard. There are a fair amount of brilliant recordings that show this piece in all its glory.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on February 02, 2019, 07:21:21 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71dUXaz52XL._SY355_.jpg)

I fell in love with La Sensitiva from the above recording. Such magical music! Not only magical, but tender, mystical, lovely, lightweight, enchanting, subtle. Once more this composer gives a masterful lesson about orchestration. This is Respighi at his most distilled. One of his finest works as far as I can think.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 11, 2019, 04:02:11 PM
Earlier it was my first acquaintance ever with a Respighi opera, more exactly Semirâma, his 2nd opera after Re Enzo:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51SyVM7Kh0L.jpg)

How delighted to hear this!! I couldn't expect less from such a masterly composer. This is mind-blowing stuff! The best of the early Respighi is here, including some traces of Strauss and Puccini regarding the colourful orchestration and lyrical intensity respectively. Many atmospheric and exotic passages charged of sheer magic left me a strong impression, not to say the mighty voice of Eva Marton, just great. After the Strauss operas I will entirely continue with these ones.
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: Roasted Swan on September 12, 2019, 09:23:58 AM
Earlier it was my first acquaintance ever with a Respighi opera, more exactly Semirâma, his 2nd opera after Re Enzo:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51SyVM7Kh0L.jpg)

How delighted to hear this!! I couldn't expect less from such a masterly composer. This is mind-blowing stuff! The best of the early Respighi is here, including some traces of Strauss and Puccini regarding the colourful orchestration and lyrical intensity respectively. Many atmospheric and exotic passages charged of sheer magic left me a strong impression, not to say the mighty voice of Eva Marton, just great. After the Strauss operas I will entirely continue with these ones.

Try La Fiamma next - in very much the same mould and performed by a similar cast as this



ouch to the current Amazon price mind........!
Title: Re: Ottorino Respighi(1879-1936)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 12, 2019, 02:32:22 PM
Try La Fiamma next - in very much the same mould and performed by a similar cast as this



ouch to the current Amazon price mind........!

The link doesn't work, but I did read some reviews of that opera and they look pretty optimistic. I'm eager to listen to this one and the rest.