GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: tjguitar on July 04, 2007, 07:45:30 PM

Title: York Bowen
Post by: tjguitar on July 04, 2007, 07:45:30 PM
New cd from Dutton:
(http://www.duttonvocalion.co.uk/prodimages/7187.gif)

York Bowen
Piano Concerto no.2 (‘Concertstück’) in D minor op.17 (1905)
Piano Concerto no.3 (‘Fantasia’) in G minor op.23 (1907)
Symphonic Fantasia: a tone poem op.16 (1905)

Michael Dussek (piano)
BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA
Vernon Handley CBE (conductor)

Recorded at The Colosseum, Town Hall, Watford
20-21 February 2007

CDLX 7187


Anyone have it yet/planning on picking it up?
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: sound67 on July 04, 2007, 09:35:18 PM
No, but I got the first Bowen concerto CD they recorded

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/Jun06/Bowen_CDLX7169.jpg)

... and found the Violin Concerto to be an absolute beauty. Not quite fully the equal of the Elgar, but with many similarities and continuous incidental pleasures. The (1st) Piano Concerto I found rather weak, it is an earlier work. That keeps me wondering whether it's necessary to  get this Piano Concerti disc.

His viola concerto (recorded by Lawrence Power, who just released a superb reading of the lovely Rubbra concerto, coupled with )the first modern recording of Walton's Viola Concerto in its original version) is a beautiful work though.

Thomas
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: tjguitar on July 05, 2007, 06:30:50 AM
Cheapest I've seen the new one at this point is HMV.CO.Uk for £5.99
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dax on February 04, 2009, 05:15:42 PM
A seriously underrated composer, but the most worthwhile stuff seems not to involve orchestra - even the 4th piano concerto. The solo piano music and the chamber music is the most rewarding, especially that which postdates WW1.
Stephen Hough's recording on Hyperion is highly recommended as are Joop Celis's CDs.

http://www.yorkbowen.co.uk/recordings.htm
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: schweitzeralan on February 05, 2009, 05:03:08 AM
A seriously underrated composer, but the most worthwhile stuff seems not to involve orchestra - even the 4th piano concerto. The solo piano music and the chamber music is the most rewarding, especially that which postdates WW1.
Stephen Hough's recording on Hyperion is highly recommended as are Joop Celis's CDs.

http://www.yorkbowen.co.uk/recordings.htm

I "discovered" Bowen only a brief year ago.  Some critics have written that Bowen's work approximates  those  works composed by several Russian composers, most notably Medtner; and, to a lesser extent, Scriabin.  The 2 Piano concertros (BBC Concert Orchestra under the direction of Vernon Handley) are quite good. The Sonata in c minor, and his Phantasy for Viola ad Piano are also included on Centaur label.  Intrigung works; however, I have to admit that I personally prefer the Bax inclusion; namely, the Sonata for Viola ad Piano (Op. 54).  It tends to across as quite sensuous and refined. Bowen's best work consist of his many piano works. His Ballade No. 2, his F minor Sonata, and two romances on Hyperion label, are exemplary  of  carefully planned and executed dramatic and psychological insights.  Stephan Hough as pianist, gives a marvelous performance.  I sense an occasional presence of Scriabin and Medtner here and there. The Ballade in particular I find to be superb.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on February 05, 2009, 06:21:54 AM
Just to add my voice - I enjoyed this recording immensely:

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classRev/dec99/bowen.jpg)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Sergeant Rock on February 05, 2009, 12:02:52 PM
This made my Best of 2008 list:

(http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/julygmg/BowenPC.jpg)


Sarge
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Christo on February 05, 2009, 12:14:10 PM
His viola concerto (recorded by Lawrence Power, who just released a superb reading of the lovely Rubbra concerto, coupled with )the first modern recording of Walton's Viola Concerto in its original version) is a beautiful work though.

Something I just recently discovered on playing another recording, also coupled with Walton's Viola Concerto - and another fine performance imho:

                 (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51586BJKN1L._SS400_.jpg)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on February 05, 2009, 05:15:53 PM
Ha!!

Have to disagree with my Dutch friends ;D I just don't take to York Bowen at all. Too Romantic, too diffuse, too old-fashioned ;D

......but then I don't much care for Rachmaninov, Medtner, Scriabin, Delius, Cyril Scott either ;D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: schweitzeralan on February 05, 2009, 08:20:16 PM
Ha!!

Have to disagree with my Dutch friends ;D I just don't take to York Bowen at all. Too Romantic, too diffuse, too old-fashioned ;D

......but then I don't much care for Rachmaninov, Medtner, Scriabin, Delius, Cyril Scott either ;D
Why not?  Just curious.  You are indeed quite informed and knowlegeable in the discipline. What's the problem with Scott, Medtner, Scriabin? Too romantic?  In your assesment which composers realize the ultimate aesthetic, intuitive, relevant, structural insights?   
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on February 05, 2009, 10:46:38 PM
Ha!!

Have to disagree with my Dutch friends ;D I just don't take to York Bowen at all. Too Romantic, too diffuse, too old-fashioned ;D

......but then I don't much care for Rachmaninov, Medtner, Scriabin, Delius, Cyril Scott either ;D

I know. And still I don't mind...  0:)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on February 06, 2009, 08:09:14 AM
Why not?  Just curious.  You are indeed quite informed and knowlegeable in the discipline. What's the problem with Scott, Medtner, Scriabin? Too romantic?  In your assesment which composers realize the ultimate aesthetic, intuitive, relevant, structural insights?   

Oh my goodness :)

First of all...regarding my being "quite informed and knowledgeable"-I am familiar with a lot of the orchestral repertoire from around 1880-(say) 1960/70 but at a level far, far below that of professional musicians, musicologists, critics or many music-lovers who can read music(which I can't :()

My appreciation of music is almost entirely therefore emotional rather than intellectual in so far as I can read about the way in which a piece of music is structured but can only vaguely glimpse that structure myself. I respond to music on a visceral level. Orchestral music holds the greatest appeal to me because of its richness, its power, its capacity to sweep me off my feet. I like music which is exciting, imposing, 'grand', dark, granitic, grim, angry. The sound of massed brass and pounding drums excites me.

That goes some way to explaining my particular tastes in music from Brahms, Wagner and Bruckner through Sibelius, Shostakovich, to the British, Scandinavian and American symphonies of the 20th century.

Of course I respond to beauty in music as well :)...but there has to be a type of 'depth' to that beauty which I find it incredibly difficult to define or explain. I suppose that it might be a kind of dignity, nostalgia, sadness which one finds in, say, Vaughan Williams or many of the Nordic composers, or my great favourite, the English composer Edmund Rubbra.

I respond much less well to the 'romantic angst'-as I hear it, of course-of some of the composers I am less comfortable with. Sweetly, sentimental, romantic music can often sound cloying to my ears. In some cases I am irritated by music that seems to 'meander' aimlessly, whose honeyed sweetness sends me to sleep or, at least, does not sufficiently grab my attention.

A VERY personal response to your searching and demanding question :) No doubt wholly inadequate :)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on February 06, 2009, 08:17:34 AM
I know. And still I don't mind...  0:)

I appreciate that magnanimity, Johan ;D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: schweitzeralan on February 06, 2009, 10:18:40 AM
Oh my goodness :)

First of all...regarding my being "quite informed and knowledgeable"-I am familiar with a lot of the orchestral repertoire from around 1880-(say) 1960/70 but at a level far, far below that of professional musicians, musicologists, critics or many music-lovers who can read music(which I can't :()

My appreciation of music is almost entirely therefore emotional rather than intellectual in so far as I can read about the way in which a piece of music is structured but can only vaguely glimpse that structure myself. I respond to music on a visceral level. Orchestral music holds the greatest appeal to me because of its richness, its power, its capacity to sweep me off my feet. I like music which is exciting, imposing, 'grand', dark, granitic, grim, angry. The sound of massed brass and pounding drums excites me.

That goes some way to explaining my particular tastes in music from Brahms, Wagner and Bruckner through Sibelius, Shostakovich, to the British, Scandinavian and American symphonies of the 20th century.

Of course I respond to beauty in music as well :)...but there has to be a type of 'depth' to that beauty which I find it incredibly difficult to define or explain. I suppose that it might be a kind of dignity, nostalgia, sadness which one finds in, say, Vaughan Williams or many of the Nordic composers, or my great favourite, the English composer Edmund Rubbra.

I respond much less well to the 'romantic angst'-as I hear it, of course-of some of the composers I am less comfortable with. Sweetly, sentimental, romantic music can often sound cloying to my ears. In some cases I am irritated by music that seems to 'meander' aimlessly, whose honeyed sweetness sends me to sleep or, at least, does not sufficiently grab my attention.

A VERY personal response to your searching and demanding question :) No doubt wholly inadequate :)

Thanks for the reply.  Interesting. What you wrote is not dissimiliar to my own approach and passions toward classical music.  Then, again, as I became older, my taste (?), passion (?) specific needs(?), as it were, had become considerably less ecumenical and expansive then my erswhile musical interests and needs. Granted, I understand and had consequently bowed before Bach, Beethoven, the Chopins, Mozart, et. al.; in sort, I had listened to and had enjoyed all the undeniable musical giants of the Baroque, Classical, or early Romantic periods. Now, however my demands have become considerably limited in taste and needs.It apears that for some reason most of my derive from te music develped and executed during the period acknowledged as that of the the Belle Epoque as well as during the two decades following.  Essentially, personally, I am drawn to those works of Sibelius, Delius, Bax, Rachmaninof, Debussy, Ravel, Schmitt ad their cloned who happened to compose in  the style and aesthetic of what had become labeled by some critics as "late tonality", a sequence  which also pervaded the  works of Suk, Scriabin, Gliere,Novak, Marx, Lyatoshinsky, plus so many others who evinced a showmansip of significant colors, dense harmonic subtleties, mystic, ethereal correspondences, etc. Many contributors to the many threads of this forum have been most interesting, and I have learned a great deal.  I don't know who is a musician and/or who is not among those who contribute.  Makes no difference to me.  Admittedly I dabble ( but do not play well on the piano, but a little helps). Thus I m familiar with aspcts of music theory.  Your statement surprised me somewhat, and I thought I would offer a brief comment. Keep up the good work. (One Belle Epoque composer whose works I can't tolerate are those of Elgar. But Bax, Moeran, Sainten, Howells, Ireland; namely, those of the Bax Generation are distinctly sacred, at least to this amateur.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Lethevich on July 24, 2011, 02:33:42 PM
BUMMPPPP!

Bowen's music scarcely fails to impress me over the past few years of gradually discovering his music. Perhaps unusually, I have yet to be quite so fully engaged by his piano concertos, or the symphony I heard. But his chamber music and solo piano works are something else.

In his compositional method I find such a richness, a strong melodic sensibility derived from Tchaikovsky and German models, but sometimes igniting in Rachmaninovian fire and spirit. Each composition tends to make me feel like I've gotten a certain "value" for my listening money with the effortless grace and density of ideas. None of his works reach masterpiece level, but despite the obvious harmonic influences, his style is both personal and endearing. He also wrote in forms that I wish the late Romantics I mention wrote more of, such as viola and violin sonatas. His Op.112 violin sonata has fortunately been recorded twice (on an excellent bargain Dutton twofer, and a fascinatingly-programmed EM Records disc) and has such a turbulent sweep to it which belies its late date of composition.

I think the primary reason why I find it so easy to get excited over such a "regressive" composer is the impeccable craft and proportion of the music. Often such descriptions would imply a Mendelssohnian quality, but it's that Bowen draws from rather more vibrant and "advanced" templates that make each exquisite piece after exquisite piece such a joy to uncover. Often these lesser figures feel almost apologetic in their styles, but Bowen has such a commitment to his writing.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on July 24, 2011, 02:48:12 PM
Ever since that Hough recording, I love Bowen's music. The Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra, just released on Dutton along with similarly-scored works bij Bush and Brian, is a very beautiful piece. He really has his own distinct, late-Romantic voice.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Lethevich on July 24, 2011, 03:18:33 PM
I need to re-discover his piano music, I think. It was the same Hough disc which drew me in (it is phenomonal - who thought composer-pianists in this manner existed this late, save for Rachmaninoff?) but the string sonatas (the Hyperion and Dutton 2CD sets) have been a growing obsession for me recently.

It's strange: I scoffed when I initially read reviews of Bowen's music, read capsule bio, saw his photograph and composition titles. "A would-be Chopin in England? Hah!"
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Albion on July 24, 2011, 09:33:54 PM
If you enjoy Bowen's musical idiom, the Chandos recording of Symphonies 1 and 2 is a real winner -

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61eGSzclT4L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

CHAN 10670
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on July 24, 2011, 11:57:21 PM
Thanks, Albion. I read about your adventures with the Third Symphony on the Unsung Composers forum, and I also saw these Bowen works in one of the folders. Time to finally dive in, I think...
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on July 25, 2011, 04:49:36 AM
I must say I'm with Dundonnell on this one. Like Stanford (as well) it's all very fluent & well crafted,but even the highly rated 'Preludes' (by admirers) are,like,'in one ear out the other'. Rachmaninov,Ravel,Debussy,amongst others,did it all so much better and more memorably. Why not just listen to the 'real thing? But each to his own I say,and I will leave you to enjoy you're musical 'discovery' & Albion's generous musical link, in peace!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Mirror Image on July 25, 2011, 07:04:12 AM
I heard Bowen's Symphony No. 1 the other day and was rather unimpressed with what I heard. The music is finally crafted but it failed to really leave me with anything worth noting other than this craftsmanship.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on July 27, 2011, 03:53:35 AM
The Second Symphony is better.

But I am still unconvinced :(
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on July 27, 2011, 03:57:04 AM
The Second Symphony is better.

But I am still unconvinced :(


And why not? Bowen is akin to Chopin, Delius, Rachmaninov, Scriabin, Medtner - poetic souls, with a pronounced feminine side. You like your testosterone (so do I, by the way). You won't find it in Bowen!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on July 27, 2011, 04:00:42 AM
Now there's a rolling list of composers to savour ;D :-X

Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Lethevich on July 27, 2011, 04:05:57 AM
I wasn't too keen on his first symphony, either (I will reserve judgement since Johan seems to like it), but the work on the Dutton disc with Brian and Bush more than redeems the composer's orchestral side for me. Like with Chopin, the piano concertos lack a certain conceptual thrust that I enjoy in, say, Ireland's PC or Bax's Winter Legends, but just like that composer I tend to find something draws me back to the pieces.

Orchestral music is but one segment of a composer's itinerary, however...
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on July 27, 2011, 04:08:12 AM
I wasn't too keen on his first symphony, either (I will reserve judgement since Johan seems to like it), but the work on the Dutton disc with Brian and Bush more than redeems the composer's orchestral side for me. Like with Chopin, the piano concertos lack a certain conceptual thrust that I enjoy in, say, Ireland's PC or Bax's Winter Legends, but just like that composer I tend to find something draws me back to the pieces.

Orchestral music is but one segment of a composer's itinerary, however...


No, I have never heard the First!! So judge all you like... But I am completely entranced by Bowen's Rhapsody on the Dutton. Ravishing!


Now there's a rolling list of composers to savour ;D :-X


 :D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on July 27, 2011, 04:11:23 AM

No, I have never heard the First!! So judge all you like... But I am completely entranced by Bowen's Rhapsody on the Dutton. Ravishing!



 :D

Yes....that sums it up, doesn't it ;D    "Ravishing" :D   Not a word I tend to use about music ;) :)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Lethevich on July 27, 2011, 04:23:26 AM
No, I have never heard the First!! So judge all you like...

I bothered to Google it for the first time (::)) and it turns out to be a student work, so I should probably base any opinion on the second.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Albion on July 27, 2011, 04:24:42 AM
No, I have never heard the First!! So judge all you like... But I am completely entranced by Bowen's Rhapsody on the Dutton. Ravishing!

 :D

If you like the Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra, I would strongly recommend the equally "ravishing" tone-poem Eventide (Op.69, 1922), on another mixed Dutton disc -

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51FJbItnE7L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Dutton CDLX 7237
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on July 27, 2011, 04:27:45 AM
Thanks for the recommendation, Albion!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: springrite on July 27, 2011, 04:28:10 AM
Of what I have heard so far, the Hough piano music CD is the only one I liked. The rest I never gave a second listen. In fact, I am reluctant to invest more in this composer...
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Dundonnell on July 27, 2011, 04:29:58 AM
Thanks for the recommendation, Albion!

You know how to get this collection, Johan. Just ask! :D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: kishnevi on July 27, 2011, 06:41:20 AM
I need to re-discover his piano music, I think. It was the same Hough disc which drew me in (it is phenomonal - who thought composer-pianists in this manner existed this late, save for Rachmaninoff?) but the string sonatas (the Hyperion and Dutton 2CD sets) have been a growing obsession for me recently.

It's strange: I scoffed when I initially read reviews of Bowen's music, read capsule bio, saw his photograph and composition titles. "A would-be Chopin in England? Hah!"

My only Bowen recording is the 2CD set of the sonatas by Danny Driver on Hyperion;  I like it enough that it can only be sheer laziness and my budget that has kept me from getting more of Bowen's music.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Lethevich on July 27, 2011, 06:50:54 AM
My only Bowen recording is the 2CD set of the sonatas by Danny Driver on Hyperion;  I like it enough that it can only be sheer laziness and my budget that has kept me from getting more of Bowen's music.

If you can find it at an acceptable price, this slipcase combination (http://www.amazon.com/York-Bowen-Violin-Cello-Sonatas/dp/B0055NCDH0/ref=sr_1_11?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1311781682&sr=1-11) of two recent Dutton releases is wonderful. It offers a bit more of an overview than Hyperion's twofer of complete viola & piano works. A lot of sellers divide it up and sell the CDs seperately because they make more money from it, so watch out.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: kishnevi on July 27, 2011, 07:40:15 PM
If you can find it at an acceptable price, this slipcase combination (http://www.amazon.com/York-Bowen-Violin-Cello-Sonatas/dp/B0055NCDH0/ref=sr_1_11?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1311781682&sr=1-11) of two recent Dutton releases is wonderful. It offers a bit more of an overview than Hyperion's twofer of complete viola & piano works. A lot of sellers divide it up and sell the CDs seperately because they make more money from it, so watch out.

Well, $19.99 plus s/h seemed acceptable for the only copy on Amazon,  so I ordered it.  And now I have to wait 2 1/2 weeks or more since it's from the UK.  Hopefully this vendor doesn't use the same tramp steamer Zoverstocks used.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Lethevich on July 28, 2011, 04:57:15 AM
Well, $19.99 plus s/h seemed acceptable for the only copy on Amazon,  so I ordered it.  And now I have to wait 2 1/2 weeks or more since it's from the UK.  Hopefully this vendor doesn't use the same tramp steamer Zoverstocks used.

Ah, I'm used to GMGers always holding out for less ;D The reason I didn't suggest that particular sale is because Dutton's own site was selling the twofer for a little under £8 - although given exchange rates and shipping charges, I suppose it might not have been much better. I hope you like it!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: kishnevi on July 28, 2011, 06:19:30 AM
Ah, I'm used to GMGers always holding out for less ;D The reason I didn't suggest that particular sale is because Dutton's own site was selling the twofer for a little under £8 - although given exchange rates and shipping charges, I suppose it might not have been much better. I hope you like it!

$11.50 US per CD fits within my "cheap enough" parameters.  Below a certain price I don't bother to look for alternatives.  (And if I ordered from Dutton,  I'd get an extra 3% foreign transaction fee, on top of shipping and handling, thanks to my credit card.) 

And when I see only one new copy left on Amazon, my "get it before someone else does" mode kicks in.  So this was an easy decision.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on September 04, 2011, 10:07:21 AM
http://www.mediafire.com/?gwsteelf843vw# (http://www.mediafire.com/?gwsteelf843vw#)

I'm not an admirer myself,I admit. But here,if anyone is interested,is a link to a download of the long deleted 1994 3D French cd of Bowen's 24 Preludes performed by Marie-Catherine Girod. This preceded the Hough Hyperion cd which everyone regards as precipitating the current Bowen renaissance. It won't be up for long,so if you want it click on the link.
The French got there first!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on September 04, 2011, 10:10:10 AM
I'm interested! I like Bowen's piano music. Ta very much!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on September 04, 2011, 10:18:21 AM
My pleasure. The pianist looks rather nice in the photo,incidentally. Oooh la la!
I might try and upload her later!!!!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on September 04, 2011, 10:19:56 AM
My pleasure. The pianist looks rather nice in the photo,incidentally. Oooh la la!
I might try and upload her later!!!!


Please do. I never downloaded a woman before.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on September 04, 2011, 10:22:35 AM
It might take a while and some very high bitrates but I'll do my best!

                                                                 Yours Sincerely
                                                                  Dr Frankencilgwyn
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: J.Z. Herrenberg on September 04, 2011, 10:26:44 AM
It might take a while and some very high bitrates but I'll do my best!

                                                                 Yours Sincerely
                                                                  Dr Frankencilgwyn


 ;D


Why does 'bitrate' suddenly remind me of 'birth rate'?
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on September 04, 2011, 10:31:52 AM
You've got me worried now!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on October 14, 2015, 04:06:49 PM
Chamber music
   •   Three Duos for violin and viola
   •   Miniature Suite for flute and piano
   •   Miniature Suite for flute, oboe, 2 clarinets and bassoon
   •   Soliloquy and Frolic for unaccompanied flute
   •   Sonata for 2 flutes
   •   Romance in D? major for violin or viola and piano (1900, 1904)
   •   Sonata in B minor for violin and piano, Op. 7 (1902)
   •   Fantasia in F major for viola and organ (1903)
   •   Sonata No. 1 in C minor for viola and piano, Op. 18 (1905)
   •   Allegro de Concert in D minor for cello or viola and piano (1906)
   •   Sonata No. 2 in F major for viola and piano, Op. 22 (1906)
   •   Finale of English Suite for string quartet (1908); from Suite on Londonderry Air co-composed with Frank Bridge, Harty, J. D. Davis, Coates
   •   Phantasie Trio for violin, cello (or viola) and piano, Op. 24
   •   Poem in G? major for viola, harp and organ, Op. 27 (1912)
   •   Romance in A major for cello and piano (1908)
   •   Suite in D minor for violin and piano, Op. 28 (1909)
   •   Phantasie in E minor for violin and piano, Op. 34 (1911)
   •   Serenade for violin and piano (1917)
   •   Valse harmonique for violin and piano (1917)
   •   String Quartet No. 2 in D minor, Op. 41 (c.1918)
   •   Fantasia ("Fantasie Quartet") in E minor for 4 violas, Op. 41 No. 1 (1907)
   •   String Quartet No. 3 in G major, Op. 46 (1919)
   •   Melody on the G-String in G? major for violin or viola and piano, Op. 47 (1917)
   •   Melody for the C-String in F major for viola and piano, Op. 51 No. 2 (1918)
   •   Phantasy in F major for viola and piano, Op. 54 (1918)
   •   Two Duets for 2 violas (1920)
   •   Sonata in A major for cello and piano, Op. 64 (1921)
   •   Two Preludes for horn and piano (1921)
   •   Rhapsody Trio in A minor for violin, cello and piano, Op. 80 (1925–1926)
   •   Quintet in C minor for horn and string quartet, Op. 85 (1927)
   •   Sonata for oboe and piano, Op. 85 (1927)
   •   Albumleaf for violin and piano (published 1927)
   •   Melody for violin and piano (published 1928)
   •   Phantasie-Quintet in D minor for bass clarinet and string quartet, Op. 93 (1932)
   •   Sonata in E? major for horn and piano, Op. 101 (1937)
   •   Allegretto in G major for violin or cello and piano, Op. 105 (published 1940)
   •   Sonata in F minor for clarinet and piano, Op. 109 (1943)
   •   Sonata in E minor for violin and piano, Op. 112 (1945)
   •   Trio in 3 Movements in E minor for violin, cello and piano, Op. 118 (1945)
   •   Sonata for flute and piano, Op. 120 (1946)
   •   Sonatina for treble recorder and piano, Op. 121
   •   Song in F major for violin and piano (1949)
   •   Bolero in A minor for violin and piano (1949)
   •   Ballade for oboe, horn and piano, Op. 133
   •   Rhapsody in G minor for viola and piano, Op. 149 (1955)
   •   Three Pieces for viola d'amore and piano, Op. 153
   •   Poem for viola d'amore and piano (1957)
   •   Piece for Viola in E? (1960)
   •   Introduction and Allegro in D minor for viola d'amore and piano (1961)


Concertante
   •   Concerto No. 1 in E? major for piano and orchestra, Op. 11 (1903)
   •   Concerto No. 2 "Concertstück" in D minor for piano and orchestra, Op. 17 (1905)
   •   Concerto No. 3 "Fantasia" in G minor for piano and orchestra, Op. 23 (1907)
   •   Concerto in C minor for viola and orchestra, Op. 25 (1906–1907)
   •   Concerto in E minor for violin and orchestra, Op. 33 (1913)
   •   Rhapsody in D major for cello and orchestra, Op. 74 (c. 1924)
   •   Concerto No. 4 in A minor for piano and orchestra, Op. 88 (1929)
   •   Concerto for horn, string orchestra and timpani, Op. 150 (1955)


Orchestral
   •   Symphony No. 1 in G major, Op. 4 (1902)
   •   The Lament of Tasso, Op. 5 (1902)
   •   Concert Overture in G minor, Op. 15 (1903-04)
   •   Symphonic Fantasia, A Tone Poem in F major, Op. 16 (1905)
   •   Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 31 (1909)
   •   At the Play, Op. 50 (1913)
   •   Suite, Op. 57 (1920)
   •   Eventide, Orchestral Poem, Op. 69 (1922)
   •   Festal Overture in D major, Op. 89 (1929)
   •   Somerset Suite (1940)
   •   Symphonic Suite (1942)
   •   Fantasy Overture on "Tom Bowling", Op. 115 (1945)
   •   Arabesque for harp and string orchestra (1949)
   •   Symphony No. 3 in E minor, Op. 137 (1951); lost [1]
   •   Three Pieces for string orchestra with harp, Op. 140 (c. 1951); lost
   •   Miniature Suite for school orchestra (c. 1960)
   •   Symphony No. 4 in G major (1961); incomplete

Piano solo
   •   Spare Moments (Books 1 & 2), Op. 1
   •   Silhouettes, 7 Morceaux Mignons, Op. 2
   •   Four Pieces, Op. 3
   •   Sonata No. 1 in B minor, Op. 6 (published 1902)
   •   Stray Fancies, 4 Little Pieces, Op. 8
   •   First Rhapsody, Op. 8 (1902)
   •   Sonata No. 2 in C? minor, Op. 9 (1901)
   •   Concert Study No. 1 in G? major, Op. 9 No. 2
   •   Rhapsody in B minor, Op. 10 (1902)
   •   Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Op. 12
   •   Caprice No. 2, Op. 13
   •   Miniature Suite in C major, Op. 14 (1904)
   •   Nocturne (1904)
   •   A Whim, Op. 19 No. 2
   •   Three Pieces, Op. 20 (1905)
   1.   Arabesque
   2.   Rêverie d'amour
   3.   Bells, An Impression
   •   Polonaise in F? major, Op. 26 No. 2 (1906)
   •   Humoresque in G major (1908)
   •   Concert Study No. 1 in F major, Op. 32
   •   Short Sonata [Piano Sonata No. 4] in C? minor, Op. 35 No. 1
   •   Romance No. 1 in G? major, Op. 35 No. 2
   •   Suite No. 3, Op. 38
   •   Evening Calm in B? major (1915)
   •   Suite Mignonne, Suite No. 4 for Piano, Op. 39 (1915)
   •   Curiosity Suite, Suite No. 5 for Piano, Op. 42
   •   Three Sketches, Op. 43 (published 1916)
   •   Three Miniatures, Op. 44 (1916)
   •   Romance No. 2, Op. 45
   •   Twelve Studies, Op. 46
   •   Ballade No. 1 (1919)
   •   Three Serious Dances, Op. 51 (1919)
   •   Mood Phases, Op. 52
   •   Those Children!, 5 Impressions, Op. 55
   •   Fragments from Hans Andersen, Suite for Piano, Part One, Op. 58
   •   Fragments from Hans Andersen, Suite for Piano, Part Two, Op. 59
   •   Fragments from Hans Andersen, Suite for Piano, Part Three, Op. 61
   •   Variations and Fugue on an Unoriginal Theme, Op. 62
   •   Sonata No. 5 in F minor, Op. 72 (1923)
   •   The Way to Polden (An Ambling Tune), Op. 76 (1925)
   •   Capriccio, Op. 77
   •   Nocturne in A? major, Op. 78 (published 1925)
   •   Three Preludes, Op. 81
   •   Berceuse, Op. 83 (1928)
   •   Rêverie in B major, Op. 86
   •   Ballade No. 2 in A minor, Op. 87 (published 1931)
   •   Three Songs without Words, Op. 94 (published 1935)
   1.   Song of the Stream
   2.   Solitude
   3.   The Warning
   •   Idyll, Op. 97
   •   Falling Petals, Op. 98 No. 1
   •   Turnstiles, Op. 98 No. 3
   •   Twelve Easy Impromptus, Op. 99
   •   Two Pieces, Op. 100
   1.   Ripples, A Short Sketch in F major (1937)
   2.   Shadows, Prelude in D major
   •   Prelude in G minor
   •   Twenty-Four Preludes in All Major and Minor Keys, Op. 102 (1938, published 1950)
   •   Three Novelettes, Op. 124 (published 1949)
   •   Siciliano (in F major) and Toccatina (in A minor), Op. 128 (1948)
   •   Fantasia in G minor, Op. 132 (1948)
   •   Two Intermezzi, Op. 141 (1951)
   •   Sonatina, Op. 144 (1954)
   •   Four Bagatelles, Op. 147 (1956)
   •   Toccata, Op. 155 (1957)
   •   Partita, Op. 156 (1960)[2]
   •   Sonata No. 6 in B? minor, Op. 160 (1961)

2 Pianos
   •   Ballade
   •   Two Pieces, Op. 106 (1939)
   •   Sonata No. 2 in E minor, Op. 107 (1941)
   •   Waltz in C, Op. 108 (1941)
   •   Theme and Variations, Op. 139 (1951)

Piano 4-hands
   •   Suite in Three Movements, Op. 52 (1918)
   •   Suite No. 2, Op. 71
   •   4 Pieces for Piano Duet, Op. 90
   •   Suite, Op. 111

Organ
   •   Melody in G minor
   •   Fantasia in G minor, Op. 136
   •   Wedding March in F major (1961)

A busy man!  The more I hear, the more I like his music.  To swipe a chunk from the New Grove:

His piano playing was recognized for its technical and artistic excellence. He formed duos with the viola player Tertis and the pianist Harry Isaacs. He could also play many orchestral instruments, a fact which contributed to the mastery of his orchestral writing. During World War I he played the horn in the band of the Scots Guards.
Bowen composed over 160 works, which show a blend of Romanticism and strong individuality. Several received their premières before 1914, and his Third Symphony (1951) and Fourth Piano Concerto (1929) were performed throughout his lifetime. He won the Sunday Express Prize for March RAF (1919), Chappell’s Orchestral Suite Prize and the Hawkes and Co. Prize for Intermezzo (1920). Saint-Saëns thought him the finest of English composers.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on October 16, 2015, 12:31:51 AM
He really has his own distinct, late-Romantic voice.

When I first read a biographical note on him, which talked about his strong individuality (at least in the piano music and the chamber pieces), I sort of took that with a bit of suspicion, but after finally hearing his music (remember, he was not exactly well-recorded when I was collecting in the Sixties/Seventies/Eighties ...) over the past two years, I was very pleasantly surprised.   :)   

The viola concerto is also a fine piece.

Wish I could track down Monica's book  . . . the university erroneously discarded their copy some years back.
Title: York Bowen (1884-1961)
Post by: Scion7 on January 15, 2016, 03:23:48 AM
Finally got around to the Three Songs without Words, Op.94: "Song of the Stream", "Solitude", "The Warning"

. . . apparently, he left no description of what the piece was reflecting on.  A "warning" of what?  The music gives no clue (to me.)
Title: Re: York Bowen [1884 – 1961]
Post by: Scion7 on August 26, 2016, 01:44:52 PM
To vandermolen - ALL OF IT!   0:)


Chamber music
   •   Three Duos for violin and viola
   •   Miniature Suite for flute and piano
   •   Miniature Suite for flute, oboe, 2 clarinets and bassoon
   •   Soliloquy and Frolic for unaccompanied flute
   •   Sonata for 2 flutes
   •   Romance in D? major for violin or viola and piano (1900, 1904)
   •   Sonata in B minor for violin and piano, Op. 7 (1902)
   •   Fantasia in F major for viola and organ (1903)
   •   Sonata No. 1 in C minor for viola and piano, Op. 18 (1905)
   •   Allegro de Concert in D minor for cello or viola and piano (1906)
   •   Sonata No. 2 in F major for viola and piano, Op. 22 (1906)
   •   Finale of English Suite for string quartet (1908); from Suite on Londonderry Air co-composed with Frank Bridge, Harty, J. D. Davis, Coates
   •   Phantasie Trio for violin, cello (or viola) and piano, Op. 24
   •   Poem in G? major for viola, harp and organ, Op. 27 (1912)
   •   Romance in A major for cello and piano (1908)
   •   Suite in D minor for violin and piano, Op. 28 (1909)
   •   Phantasie in E minor for violin and piano, Op. 34 (1911)
   •   Serenade for violin and piano (1917)
   •   Valse harmonique for violin and piano (1917)
   •   String Quartet No. 2 in D minor, Op. 41 (c.1918)
   •   Fantasia ("Fantasie Quartet") in E minor for 4 violas, Op. 41 No. 1 (1907)
   •   String Quartet No. 3 in G major, Op. 46 (1919)
   •   Melody on the G-String in G? major for violin or viola and piano, Op. 47 (1917)
   •   Melody for the C-String in F major for viola and piano, Op. 51 No. 2 (1918)
   •   Phantasy in F major for viola and piano, Op. 54 (1918)
   •   Two Duets for 2 violas (1920)
   •   Sonata in A major for cello and piano, Op. 64 (1921)
   •   Two Preludes for horn and piano (1921)
   •   Rhapsody Trio in A minor for violin, cello and piano, Op. 80 (1925–1926)
   •   Quintet in C minor for horn and string quartet, Op. 85 (1927)
   •   Sonata for oboe and piano, Op. 85 (1927)
   •   Albumleaf for violin and piano (published 1927)
   •   Melody for violin and piano (published 1928)
   •   Phantasie-Quintet in D minor for bass clarinet and string quartet, Op. 93 (1932)
   •   Sonata in E? major for horn and piano, Op. 101 (1937)
   •   Allegretto in G major for violin or cello and piano, Op. 105 (published 1940)
   •   Sonata in F minor for clarinet and piano, Op. 109 (1943)
   •   Sonata in E minor for violin and piano, Op. 112 (1945)
   •   Trio in 3 Movements in E minor for violin, cello and piano, Op. 118 (1945)
   •   Sonata for flute and piano, Op. 120 (1946)
   •   Sonatina for treble recorder and piano, Op. 121
   •   Song in F major for violin and piano (1949)
   •   Bolero in A minor for violin and piano (1949)
   •   Ballade for oboe, horn and piano, Op. 133
   •   Rhapsody in G minor for viola and piano, Op. 149 (1955)
   •   Three Pieces for viola d'amore and piano, Op. 153
   •   Poem for viola d'amore and piano (1957)
   •   Piece for Viola in E? (1960)
   •   Introduction and Allegro in D minor for viola d'amore and piano (1961)


Concertante
   •   Concerto No. 1 in E? major for piano and orchestra, Op. 11 (1903)
   •   Concerto No. 2 "Concertstück" in D minor for piano and orchestra, Op. 17 (1905)
   •   Concerto No. 3 "Fantasia" in G minor for piano and orchestra, Op. 23 (1907)
   •   Concerto in C minor for viola and orchestra, Op. 25 (1906–1907)
   •   Concerto in E minor for violin and orchestra, Op. 33 (1913)
   •   Rhapsody in D major for cello and orchestra, Op. 74 (c. 1924)
   •   Concerto No. 4 in A minor for piano and orchestra, Op. 88 (1929)
   •   Concerto for horn, string orchestra and timpani, Op. 150 (1955)


Orchestral
   •   Symphony No. 1 in G major, Op. 4 (1902)
   •   The Lament of Tasso, Op. 5 (1902)
   •   Concert Overture in G minor, Op. 15 (1903-04)
   •   Symphonic Fantasia, A Tone Poem in F major, Op. 16 (1905)
   •   Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 31 (1909)
   •   At the Play, Op. 50 (1913)
   •   Suite, Op. 57 (1920)
   •   Eventide, Orchestral Poem, Op. 69 (1922)
   •   Festal Overture in D major, Op. 89 (1929)
   •   Somerset Suite (1940)
   •   Symphonic Suite (1942)
   •   Fantasy Overture on "Tom Bowling", Op. 115 (1945)
   •   Arabesque for harp and string orchestra (1949)
   •   Symphony No. 3 in E minor, Op. 137 (1951); lost [1]
   •   Three Pieces for string orchestra with harp, Op. 140 (c. 1951); lost
   •   Miniature Suite for school orchestra (c. 1960)
   •   Symphony No. 4 in G major (1961); incomplete

Piano solo
   •   Spare Moments (Books 1 & 2), Op. 1
   •   Silhouettes, 7 Morceaux Mignons, Op. 2
   •   Four Pieces, Op. 3
   •   Sonata No. 1 in B minor, Op. 6 (published 1902)
   •   Stray Fancies, 4 Little Pieces, Op. 8
   •   First Rhapsody, Op. 8 (1902)
   •   Sonata No. 2 in C? minor, Op. 9 (1901)
   •   Concert Study No. 1 in G? major, Op. 9 No. 2
   •   Rhapsody in B minor, Op. 10 (1902)
   •   Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Op. 12
   •   Caprice No. 2, Op. 13
   •   Miniature Suite in C major, Op. 14 (1904)
   •   Nocturne (1904)
   •   A Whim, Op. 19 No. 2
   •   Three Pieces, Op. 20 (1905)
   1.   Arabesque
   2.   Rêverie d'amour
   3.   Bells, An Impression
   •   Polonaise in F? major, Op. 26 No. 2 (1906)
   •   Humoresque in G major (1908)
   •   Concert Study No. 1 in F major, Op. 32
   •   Short Sonata [Piano Sonata No. 4] in C? minor, Op. 35 No. 1
   •   Romance No. 1 in G? major, Op. 35 No. 2
   •   Suite No. 3, Op. 38
   •   Evening Calm in B? major (1915)
   •   Suite Mignonne, Suite No. 4 for Piano, Op. 39 (1915)
   •   Curiosity Suite, Suite No. 5 for Piano, Op. 42
   •   Three Sketches, Op. 43 (published 1916)
   •   Three Miniatures, Op. 44 (1916)
   •   Romance No. 2, Op. 45
   •   Twelve Studies, Op. 46
   •   Ballade No. 1 (1919)
   •   Three Serious Dances, Op. 51 (1919)
   •   Mood Phases, Op. 52
   •   Those Children!, 5 Impressions, Op. 55
   •   Fragments from Hans Andersen, Suite for Piano, Part One, Op. 58
   •   Fragments from Hans Andersen, Suite for Piano, Part Two, Op. 59
   •   Fragments from Hans Andersen, Suite for Piano, Part Three, Op. 61
   •   Variations and Fugue on an Unoriginal Theme, Op. 62
   •   Sonata No. 5 in F minor, Op. 72 (1923)
   •   The Way to Polden (An Ambling Tune), Op. 76 (1925)
   •   Capriccio, Op. 77
   •   Nocturne in A? major, Op. 78 (published 1925)
   •   Three Preludes, Op. 81
   •   Berceuse, Op. 83 (1928)
   •   Rêverie in B major, Op. 86
   •   Ballade No. 2 in A minor, Op. 87 (published 1931)
   •   Three Songs without Words, Op. 94 (published 1935)
   1.   Song of the Stream
   2.   Solitude
   3.   The Warning
   •   Idyll, Op. 97
   •   Falling Petals, Op. 98 No. 1
   •   Turnstiles, Op. 98 No. 3
   •   Twelve Easy Impromptus, Op. 99
   •   Two Pieces, Op. 100
   1.   Ripples, A Short Sketch in F major (1937)
   2.   Shadows, Prelude in D major
   •   Prelude in G minor
   •   Twenty-Four Preludes in All Major and Minor Keys, Op. 102 (1938, published 1950)
   •   Three Novelettes, Op. 124 (published 1949)
   •   Siciliano (in F major) and Toccatina (in A minor), Op. 128 (1948)
   •   Fantasia in G minor, Op. 132 (1948)
   •   Two Intermezzi, Op. 141 (1951)
   •   Sonatina, Op. 144 (1954)
   •   Four Bagatelles, Op. 147 (1956)
   •   Toccata, Op. 155 (1957)
   •   Partita, Op. 156 (1960)[2]
   •   Sonata No. 6 in B? minor, Op. 160 (1961)

2 Pianos
   •   Ballade
   •   Two Pieces, Op. 106 (1939)
   •   Sonata No. 2 in E minor, Op. 107 (1941)
   •   Waltz in C, Op. 108 (1941)
   •   Theme and Variations, Op. 139 (1951)

Piano 4-hands
   •   Suite in Three Movements, Op. 52 (1918)
   •   Suite No. 2, Op. 71
   •   4 Pieces for Piano Duet, Op. 90
   •   Suite, Op. 111

Organ
   •   Melody in G minor
   •   Fantasia in G minor, Op. 136
   •   Wedding March in F major (1961)

A busy man!  The more I hear, the more I like his music.  To swipe a chunk from the New Grove:

His piano playing was recognized for its technical and artistic excellence. He formed duos with the viola player Tertis and the pianist Harry Isaacs. He could also play many orchestral instruments, a fact which contributed to the mastery of his orchestral writing. During World War I he played the horn in the band of the Scots Guards.
Bowen composed over 160 works, which show a blend of Romanticism and strong individuality. Several received their premières before 1914, and his Third Symphony (1951) and Fourth Piano Concerto (1929) were performed throughout his lifetime. He won the Sunday Express Prize for March RAF (1919), Chappell’s Orchestral Suite Prize and the Hawkes and Co. Prize for Intermezzo (1920). Saint-Saëns thought him the finest of English composers.


(http://www.explore-parliament.net/nssMovies/01/0139/0139_02.jpg)
I'm watching you - think of your heritage, my good man!
Title: Re: York Bowen [1884 - 1961]
Post by: Scion7 on August 26, 2016, 01:52:34 PM
Please do. I never downloaded a woman before.

(https://www.solstice-music.com/img/slides/artist-slide-69.jpg)

SO - did that download ever finish?   ;)

Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on December 26, 2016, 02:56:45 PM
Bowen's art was very much the "real thing" - he's English, not Russian, German, or east-central European, and has a different composing outlook and art.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on April 01, 2017, 07:29:25 AM


Classical CD Of The Week: York Bowen, The English Rachmaninoff

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C8VkflMXcAEPTyq.jpg)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/04/01/classical-cd-of-the-week-york-bowen-the-english-rachmaninoff/#5f14ba171f0b (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2017/04/01/classical-cd-of-the-week-york-bowen-the-english-rachmaninoff/#5f14ba171f0b)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Mirror Image on April 01, 2017, 07:30:56 AM
I never heard one work from Bowen that I actually liked. An English Rachmaninov, Jens? Hmmm...not really.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on April 01, 2017, 09:15:38 AM
I never heard one work from Bowen that I actually liked. An English Rachmaninov, Jens? Hmmm...not really.

Not my quote. Just me quoting.  ;D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on April 01, 2017, 09:17:31 AM
Hopefully as you grow as a listener, that taste of yours will also expand.
I regard Bowen highly - solid composer.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on April 01, 2017, 09:21:10 AM
Hopefully as you grow as a listener, that taste of yours will also expand.
I regard Bowen highly - solid composer.
That's telling you,MI!! ;) ;D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on April 01, 2017, 09:47:51 AM
He's still in the woodshed for not liking Mozart, etc.
 ;D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: cilgwyn on April 02, 2017, 01:20:08 AM
 ;D By the way! What's your fearsome Avatar of? I'll need that lager now!! ??? :o :o ;D

I probably should know!! ::)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on April 02, 2017, 03:53:34 AM
I . . . AM . . . GROOT !!!!!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Mirror Image on April 02, 2017, 08:20:38 AM
Hopefully as you grow as a listener, that taste of yours will also expand.
I regard Bowen highly - solid composer.

This doesn’t in any way, shape, or form mean I’m going to like his music even if my tastes in music ‘expand.’ Considering my ear for music, I think I’m the best judge of what I like and what I don’t like. Bowen, unfortunately, just didn’t leave me wanting to hear any more of his music.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Florestan on April 02, 2017, 11:44:39 AM
My take on Bowen's piano sonatas:

http://cartimuzicaidei.blogspot.ro/2016/03/farmecul-intens-al-romantismului.html (http://cartimuzicaidei.blogspot.ro/2016/03/farmecul-intens-al-romantismului.html)

Google Translate will give you nothing but a horror show!  :laugh:

Cutting a long story short: me likes Bowen's piano sonatas.  8)
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: Scion7 on August 08, 2017, 08:29:10 PM
Listening to the Violin Concerto Op.33 today at work, I was struck by how the motif's sounded like Brahms.  The development is not like that of Brahms, of course.

BOWEN-McAslan, Handley, BBC Concert Orchestra

Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: kyjo on May 27, 2018, 06:09:03 PM
I have just been utterly blown away by Bowen's Viola Concerto! Much as I love the Walton, the Bowen has now surpassed it as my favorite viola concerto (granted, I don't know that many) and I'm baffled that it's not played much more often, considering the paucity of the viola repertoire. It's a sweeping, dramatic work with boundless energy, great tunes, and masterful writing for both soloist and orchestra. It's just such great fun! I can't imagine a more thrilling performance than that by Lawrence Power and the BBC Scottish SO under Martyn Brabbins:



I know some fellow members with whom I generally share similar tastes (vandermolen, Mirror Image, cilgwyn, Dundonnell) aren't too enthusiastic about Bowen's music, but his Viola Concerto, along with his Piano Trio, have proven to be great discoveries. I would hardly claim that Bowen is a "great" composer, but his music is really enjoyable for me!
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: vandermolen on May 27, 2018, 10:10:02 PM
I have just been utterly blown away by Bowen's Viola Concerto! Much as I love the Walton, the Bowen has now surpassed it as my favorite viola concerto (granted, I don't know that many) and I'm baffled that it's not played much more often, considering the paucity of the viola repertoire. It's a sweeping, dramatic work with boundless energy, great tunes, and masterful writing for both soloist and orchestra. It's just such great fun! I can't imagine a more thrilling performance than that by Lawrence Power and the BBC Scottish SO under Martyn Brabbins:



I know some fellow members with whom I generally share similar tastes (vandermolen, Mirror Image, cilgwyn, Dundonnell) aren't too enthusiastic about Bowen's music, but his Viola Concerto, along with his Piano Trio, have proven to be great discoveries. I would hardly claim that Bowen is a "great" composer, but his music is really enjoyable for me!

Clearly I need to listen to this work again. Thanks for the recommendation Kyle. I have the version on ASV.
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: kyjo on May 28, 2018, 06:26:28 AM
Clearly I need to listen to this work again. Thanks for the recommendation Kyle. I have the version on ASV.

No problem, Jeffrey. I would think that you’d like it, since I do, but we shall see! ;D
Title: Re: York Bowen
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 28, 2018, 09:37:00 AM
I've listened to all the concertos. The piano concertos 1-3 are good, the 4th piano concerto is so-so (more modern and rather Rachmaninovian), the violin and viola concertos are not that memorable, the Horn concerto is also good. I prefer the 2nd symphony in general regarding his works and his chamber music.