GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: dtwilbanks on September 18, 2007, 05:51:44 AM

Title: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 18, 2007, 05:51:44 AM
List your favorite Purcell (http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/purcell.html) recordings here, please. Thanks.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Mark on September 18, 2007, 06:00:47 AM
Tried 'The Fairy Queen' yet? You're in for a treat. ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 18, 2007, 06:02:18 AM
Tried 'The Fairy Queen' yet? You're in for a treat. ;)

Which recording, sir?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: JoshLilly on September 18, 2007, 06:04:06 AM
http://tinyurl.com/3cs9nj

This is a very low-priced two-CD box, one of the best values for the dollar in my collection. I used to hunt around for Baroque music by composers other than the infamous Big Three of that era, and Purcell seemed to be near the 4th most named. Amazingly, our local (pathetic) library had two of his complete operas, King Arthur and The Fairy Queen, which I checked out and listened to.

Some of the songs on these CDs are terrific. I got it for Nancy Argenta's voice alone, but ended up finding a few favourites here. The musicians are drawn from one of the most underrated orchestras, Ensemble Sonnerie, and sound superb. I was really surprised by how great this box is, especially taking price into consideration.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Mark on September 18, 2007, 06:04:14 AM
Which recording, sir?

I have Naxos (got it cheap in a charity shop), though I understand that Harry Christophers and The Sixteen have done a version well worth hearing.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Que on September 18, 2007, 06:49:20 AM
A thread on Purcell is an excellent idea.

This is a very obvious suggestion, but since nobody had mentioned it sofar...  8)

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/33/511533.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: The new erato on September 18, 2007, 07:28:26 AM
King Arthur with Pinnock on Archiv and The Fairy Queen with Christie on HM.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: BachQ on September 18, 2007, 07:34:05 AM
A thread on Purcell is an excellent idea.

I completely agree.

And I applaud dt's magnanimous efforts to educate the greater GMG public on this topic ..........
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Lethevich on September 18, 2007, 07:45:46 AM
This is a very nice disc, well-priced.

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/313E1Q6MHBL._SS500_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Purcell-Music-Queen-Mary-Henry/dp/B000071WE3)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on September 18, 2007, 08:42:46 AM
(http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/4553/41tv820khflss500uf4.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)

So the conductor was convicted for a crime, but he has quite a way with Purcell's music.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Lethevich on September 18, 2007, 08:45:36 AM
So the conductor was convicted for a crime, but he has quite a way with Purcell's music.

Yep, it's certainly not going to make me dump my excellent Complete Sacred Music box on Hyperion - which I will continue to recommend.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 18, 2007, 10:41:28 AM
Oh, c'mon. This is it? :) Surely there are more Purcell enthusiasts than this.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Scriptavolant on September 18, 2007, 10:50:49 AM
This is all I have:

(http://blog.roodo.com/davidlee0123/1858f596.jpg) (http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51E1BNT2SBL._AA240_.jpg) (http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HQNXRWH5L._AA240_.jpg)(http://www.naxos.com/images/cds/553129.gif)

My favorite work is the masque "The Fairy Queen". Still looking for another worthwhile recording, perhaps more recent than the one I own (recorded in 1970).
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Expresso on September 18, 2007, 11:02:46 AM

(http://aycu31.webshots.com/image/27390/2003977116231895924_rs.jpg) (http://allyoucanupload.webshots.com/v/2003977116231895924)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 18, 2007, 05:31:22 PM
Just added these to my Purcell collection:

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/21ZQ3DJVA0L._AA180_.jpg)

(http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/414XFFTBQAL._AA240_.jpg)

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51BWW607T6L._AA240_.jpg)

Will listen tomorrow at work. :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: BachQ on September 18, 2007, 06:27:31 PM
Will listen tomorrow at work. :)

It goes without saying that we await your appraisal .........
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: lukeottevanger on September 18, 2007, 11:23:09 PM
(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41C2C9S7VVL._AA240_.jpg)

Purcell's most sustained and consummate invention? Perhaps. I vaguely remember someone - possibly Harrison Birtwistle (possibly not) - choosing these pieces on R3's Private Passions and describing them as in some ways being precursors of the late Beethoven Quartets. That same rarefied feeling, absolute perfection from first to last, contrapuntally and harmonically intriguing, but suffused with profound and personal sentiment. And all made to fit snugly on one CD.... bliss, especially in these performances.

Hey, look - the Amazon UK reviewer makes the same Beethoven comparison. So it must be true:

Quote from: someone at Amazon UK

The problem with viol consort composers is that they come in two categories: Purcell and everyone else, however distinguished. Purcell wrote these pieces as the fashion for playing viol consorts was coming to an end and, in a sense, they are a summation of what went before. The music is Purcell at his most intellectual and chromatic; and in its own way it is as satisfying as the late Beethoven string quartets - though in miniature. Fretwork play it beautifully, with an unerring knack of choosing exactly the right tempo and (most important) immaculate intonation. If you like modern string music but don't know Purcell, buy it. Purcell fans will already have bought it.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 04:19:22 AM
(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41C2C9S7VVL._AA240_.jpg)

Purcell's most sustained and consummate invention? Perhaps. I vaguely remember someone - possibly Harrison Birtwistle (possibly not) - choosing these pieces on R3's Private Passions and describing them as in some ways being precursors of the late Beethoven Quartets. That same rarefied feeling, absolute perfection from first to last, contrapuntally and harmonically intriguing, but suffused with profound and personal sentiment. And all made to fit snugly on one CD.... bliss, especially in these performances.

Hey, look - the Amazon UK reviewer makes the same Beethoven comparison. So it must be true:


Sold! Thanks.

D Minor, I'm no reviewer, so I don't trust myself to "appraise" anything. However I can tell you if I like them, which I probably will. It's Purcell! :)

Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 04:41:56 AM
dt, I'm glad this new thread is actually about something!
A thread on Purcell is an excellent idea.

This is a very obvious suggestion, but since nobody had mentioned it sofar...  8)

(http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/Large/33/511533.jpg)

Q

And not to forget the Chandos Chaconne recording with Emma Kirby, also a gem.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Shrunk on September 19, 2007, 04:59:44 AM
(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MSMXEHJXL._SS500_.jpg)

Dido & Aeneas:  Dame Janet Baker, ECO, Anthony Lewis

I generally prefer my early music HIP.  However, a performance like this blows away my reservations.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:01:58 AM
, One of them should be in your collection and that is this one, never mind the stories about King, this is a absolute must for Purcell fans.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:02:05 AM
(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MSMXEHJXL._SS500_.jpg)

Dido & Aeneas:  Dame Janet Baker, ECO, Anthony Lewis

I generally prefer my early music HIP.  However, a performance like this blows away my reservations.

Have you heard other recordings of Dido? How does this compare?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:04:37 AM
I would take to much space for all the images I could post, suffice it to say that most recordings so far posted are excellent. But since you had troubles with the voices on the Messiah recording, that rules my recommendations almost out, for in the line of those voices I buy my Purcell, but one of them should be in your collection and that is this one, never mind the stories about King, this is a absolute must for Purcell fans.

11 discs. Oh my.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:08:50 AM
11 discs. Oh my.

O, common the price is within reason, I payed about 50 euro's for it, and you get a treasure back for it, for I doubt that this box when sold out, will be reprinted, in the light of the scandal about King.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:09:32 AM
O, common the price is within reason, I payed about 50 euro's for it, and you get a treasure back for it, for I doubt that this box when sold out, will be reprinted, in the light of the scandal about King.

I'll have to look into this scandal.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:12:00 AM
I'll have to look into this scandal.

Yikes!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:14:48 AM
Yikes!

Seperate the man from what he has been convicted for, from the musician, he is a eminent scholar, and without him there would not have been this fabulous recording.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:15:45 AM
Okay back on track, some Purcell recommendations.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry Collier on September 19, 2007, 05:18:17 AM
1. The Fantasias for viol consort (Phantasm)
2. Ode for St Cecilia's Day: Hail bright Cecilia (King)
3. Ode for St Cecilia's Day: Welcome to all the Pleasures (King)
4. Ode: Come ye sons of Art (Leonhardt)
5. Ode: Now does the Glorious Day (Leonhardt)
6. Dido & Aeneas (Haim)

Glorious music!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:19:12 AM
His theatre music is awesome too.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:21:12 AM
His theatre music is awesome too.
Yeah, I saw that set last night on iTunes. How does it compare to the Holman (besides having more music)?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:21:56 AM
1. The Fantasias for viol consort (Phantasm)
2. Ode for St Cecilia's Day: Hail bright Cecilia (King)
3. Ode for St Cecilia's Day: Welcome to all the Pleasures (King)
4. Ode: Come ye sons of Art (Leonhardt)
5. Ode: Now does the Glorious Day (Leonhardt)
6. Dido & Aeneas (Haim)

Glorious music!


Thanks, Harry!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:28:41 AM
Yeah, I saw that set last night on iTunes. How does it compare to the Holman (besides having more music)?

They are on equal footing really, both are good. :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:33:19 AM
They are on equal footing really, both are good.
Same voices as on the Messiah, so beware! :)


Why do you keep mentioning Messiah? I don't know what you're referring to. Perhaps you have me mixed up with another board member.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 19, 2007, 05:38:25 AM
Sorry mixed you up with another David, that disliked the voices of Hogwoods Messiah. :-[
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 19, 2007, 05:39:42 AM
Sorry mixed you up with another David, that disliked the voices of Hogwoods Messiah. :-[

No problem.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Shrunk on September 19, 2007, 06:05:33 AM
Have you heard other recordings of Dido? How does this compare?

I haven't  (Although this thread will surely help me rectify that situation!).  I'm just very taken with Dame Janet's singing on this disc.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: E d o on September 19, 2007, 06:48:05 AM
Another vote for the viol fantasias from Phantasm. Sadly it's OOP though. Fretwork is a good alternative.
I'm also quite pleased with Herreweghe's Funeral Sentences.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dirkronk on September 19, 2007, 12:07:13 PM
I haven't  (Although this thread will surely help me rectify that situation!).  I'm just very taken with Dame Janet's singing on this disc.

I concur. Inspired by this thread, I went to the local branch library at lunchtime and found a copy of this CD, which I'm listening to as I type. HIP aficionados will surely cringe at the 1961 approach of the instrument playing, even though the forces are of chamber group size, but the recording is excellent and Baker is in beautiful vocal form here. I'll be sure to track down some more recent recorded examples of Purcell, of course, but for now this provides a lovely experience. (From my point of view, anything from the younger days of Janet Baker, Elly Ameling or Frederica von Stade--to name three particular favorites--is an unalloyed aural treat.)

Cheers,

Dirk
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 20, 2007, 05:17:09 AM
Inspired by this thread, I went to the local branch library at lunchtime and found a copy of this CD, which I'm listening to as I type. HIP aficionados will surely cringe at the 1961 approach of the instrument playing, even though the forces are of chamber group size, but the recording is excellent and Baker is in beautiful vocal form here. I'll be sure to track down some more recent recorded examples of Purcell, of course, but for now this provides a lovely experience. (From my point of view, anything from the younger days of Janet Baker, Elly Ameling or Frederica von Stade--to name three particular favorites--is an unalloyed aural treat.)

Purcellmania is spreading!!!  ;D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 20, 2007, 06:55:39 AM

Born in 1659, Henry Purcell was the finest and most original composer of his day. Though he was to live a very short life (he died in 1695) he was able to enjoy and make full use of the renewed flowering of music after the Restoration of the Monarchy.
As the son of a musician at Court, a chorister at the Chapel Royal, and the holder of continuing royal appointments until his death, Purcell worked in Westminster for three different Kings over twenty-five years.

In the Chapel Royal young Purcell studied with Dr. John Blow. Dr. Burney, the eighteenth century historian, is amusingly skeptical on this point: "..... he had a few lessons from Dr. Blow, which were sufficient to cancel all the instructions he had received from other masters, and to occasion the boast inscribed on the tomb-stone of Blow, that he had been 'Master to the famous Mr. Henry Purcell'." Legend has it that when, in 1679, Purcell succeeded Dr. Blow as organist of Westminster Abbey, the elder musician stepped aside in recognition of the greater genius, and it is true that on Purcell's death in 1695 Blow returned to the post, and would write a noble Ode on the Death of Purcell.

In addition to his royal duties Purcell also devoted much of his talent to writing operas, or rather musical dramas, and incidental stage music; but he would also write chamber music in the form of harpsichord suites and trio sonatas, and became involved with the growing London public concert scene. Indeed one of the most important musical developments in Restoration London was the gradual establishment of regular public concerts. Even the few meetings that began as private concerns were eventually prevailed upon to admit the general public, such as the group that gave concerts in the Castle Tavern. Whereas other organizations charged only a shilling, their admittance fee was more than twice that sum, and before long they had enough capital to equip a music room in York Buildings.

By the time Henry Purcell began to attend such concerts in the 1670s there were many highly skilled players of the violin, cello, and flute, as well as exponents of the (for London) relatively new art of playing continuo instruments, the most usual being the organ and the harpsichord. In 1683 a group of gentlemen amateurs, and professional musicians started a "Musical Society" in London to celebrate the "Festival of St. Cecilia, a great patroness of music" which any music-lover so desirous may still celebrate yearly on November 22nd. They asked Henry Purcell, then only 24, to be the first to write an Ode for their festivals; Purcell was to compose two more such Odes for the Society.

The writing of incidental theater music seems not to have been regarded by Purcell as embarrassing or beneath his dignity as Organist of Westminster Abbey. He was in the very midst of a tradition that not only permitted but actually encouraged well-known church musicians to provide lighter music for the theatre and opera, and this was an accepted practice in the great continental cities as well as in London. Most of Purcell's theatre music was written between 1690 and 1695 (the year of his death), and within that relatively brief period he supplied music for more than forty plays. Much of the instrumental music was published in 1697, when the composer's widow compiled A Collection of Ayres, Compos'd for the Theatre, and upon Other Occasions. This body of music, viewed as a whole, shows that Purcell gave to the theatre some of his happiest melodic inspirations, distributed among solemn overtures, cheerful or pathetic airs, and delightful dances of every imaginable kind.

There is hardly a department of music, as known in his day, to which Purcell did not contribute with true distinction. His anthems were long since accorded their place in the great music of the church; there are enough fine orchestral movements in his works for the theatre to establish him in this field; his fantasies and sonatas entitle him to honor in the history of chamber music; his keyboard works, if less significant in themselves, hold their place in the repertory; his one true opera. Dido and Aeneas, is an enduring masterpiece, and his other dramatic works (sometimes called operas) are full of musical riches. And, most especially, Purcell's songs themselves would be sufficient to insure his immortality. His sensitivity to his texts has been matched by few masters in musical history; when he had worthy poetry to set, he could hardly fail to produce a masterpiece.
 (http://www.baroquemusic.org/bqxpurcell.html)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 20, 2007, 08:15:08 AM
Well I am not denying it David.
Thank you for reminding us, what a genius he really was! :)
But why not write it in your other thread about this great man?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 20, 2007, 08:19:30 AM
Well I am not denying it David.
Thank you for reminding us, what a genius he really was! :)
But why not write it in your other thread about this great man?


Because he deserves a thread in here, I thought, with all the other composers.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on September 20, 2007, 08:23:36 AM
Because he deserves a thread in here, I thought, with all the other composers.


Well then ask one of the mods to merge the two together, on this thread.
Many good things were written there, and to divide attention between the two.............
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: dtwilbanks on September 20, 2007, 08:25:10 AM

Well then ask one of the mods to merge the two together, on this thread.
Many good things were written there, and to divide attention between the two.............


We have the rest of our lives to fill this thread up.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: locrian on October 17, 2007, 06:54:48 AM
Are you afraid of Purcell perhaps? I have found this CD very rewarding. And it's a Naxos so you should be able to get it cheap.

http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.553129# (http://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.553129#)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: locrian on October 19, 2007, 04:04:25 AM
Here's the link to the recording thread:

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,3463.0.html

Has anyone visited Purcell's resting place in Westminster Abbey? Can you share your experience with us if you have? I couldn't find any pictures.

"Purcell is buried adjacent to the organ in Westminster Abbey. His epitaph reads, "Here lyes Henry Purcell Esq., who left this life and is gone to that blessed place where only his harmony can be exceeded.""
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 04, 2008, 05:58:29 PM
(http://www.naxosdirect.com/templates/shared/images/titles/larger/747313014972.jpg)

Time to add a new recording to the pile...AND...

Bump this thread.  :P
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Lethevich on June 04, 2008, 06:20:37 PM
The following box has been of great value to me. I bought it for £40 and it has repaid that large (for a boxed set) expenditure many times over in musical richness...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AmPzX5fyL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

I get the feeling that he would be considered "greater" if he produced more works which fitted to the continental standards (masses, passions, oratorios, etc), although I suppose he was earlier than the great exponents of those forms. His small-scale anthems and other works are simply a joy to listen to.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 04, 2008, 06:30:34 PM
His small-scale anthems and other works are simply a joy to listen to.

I, of course, agree. :)

I haven't heard a piece of Purcell I haven't loved or at least liked. There is a lightness of spirit to his work that sounds like nothing else I've heard in the baroque. It never fails to draw me in and keep me captivated.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 04, 2008, 07:36:42 PM

I get the feeling that he would be considered "greater" if he produced more works which fitted to the continental standards (masses, passions, oratorios, etc), although I suppose he was earlier than the great exponents of those forms. His small-scale anthems and other works are simply a joy to listen to.

Hmm, no -- he wasn't earlier than those great exponents.  M-A Charpentier, for example, was a contemporary of his.  But Purcell was Protestant -- the English Church exactly -- which required none of those forms in liturgical music.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on June 05, 2008, 03:38:16 AM
The following box has been of great value to me. I bought it for £40 and it has repaid that large (for a boxed set) expenditure many times over in musical richness...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AmPzX5fyL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

I get the feeling that he would be considered "greater" if he produced more works which fitted to the continental standards (masses, passions, oratorios, etc), although I suppose he was earlier than the great exponents of those forms. His small-scale anthems and other works are simply a joy to listen to.

That is indeed a awesome box, reviewed that one very extensively.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 04:22:35 AM
Hmm, no -- he wasn't earlier than those great exponents.  M-A Charpentier, for example, was a contemporary of his.  But Purcell was Protestant -- the English Church exactly -- which required none of those forms in liturgical music.

Earlier than Bach and Handel.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 04:36:17 AM
Earlier than Bach and Handel.

So?  Handel wrote no mass setting ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 04:39:28 AM
So?  Handel wrote no mass setting ;)

You catch my drift though?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 04:41:18 AM
You catch my drift though?

No -- there were great mass, oratorio and passion composers before H & B.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 04:43:05 AM
No -- there were great mass, oratorio and passion composers before H & B.

But none greater.  0:)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 04:44:10 AM
But none greater.  0:)

For you.  I have my favourites.  0:) 0:) 0:) 
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 04:45:33 AM
For you.  0:) 0:) 0:)  I have my favourites.

Oh, I'm sure. I'd like to discover what some of those are sometime, but I've hardly tapped into Handel yet.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 04:46:08 AM
Oh, I'm sure. I'd like to discover what some of those are sometime, but I've hardly tapped into Handel yet.

Have fun.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 04:47:02 AM
Have fun.

If you have any favorite Purcell recordings, you should list them. :) [Or have you already?]
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 04:49:40 AM
If you have any favorite Purcell recordings, you should list them. :) [Or have you already?]

That's up to me to decide, isn't it?  :D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 04:53:27 AM
That's up to me to decide, isn't it?  :D

Uh...yeah...   ::)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 05:01:15 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/7619986398594.jpg)

To name one.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 05, 2008, 05:03:27 AM
Thanks!

See, that wasn't so hard. ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 05, 2008, 05:04:56 AM

See, that wasn't so hard. ;)

Who said it was hard?  It has been my second disc rec in the thread already  ::)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Bunny on June 06, 2008, 09:37:04 AM
Another vote for the viol fantasias from Phantasm. Sadly it's OOP though. Fretwork is a good alternative.
I'm also quite pleased with Herreweghe's Funeral Sentences.

If anyone is still interested, the last time I looked it was still available from HBdirect (http://www.hbdirect.com/album_detail.php?pid=237640). 

(http://www.hbdirect.com/coverm/40/237640.jpg)

Meanwhile, I just picked this up at BMG music:

The Fairy Queen - Gardiner, Monteverdi Ch., EBS.  Full texts available at the DG Alfresco (http://www2.deutschegrammophon.com/webseries/?ID=alfresco) website.  If they ask for a password, just enter archiv60. ;)

(http://www2.deutschegrammophon.com/imgs/s250x250/4776733.jpg)

Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 06, 2008, 09:39:48 AM
Some good information there, Bunny! A libretto would be nice as I don't have one. Downloaded music, don't you know, doesn't always come with notes.

This Purcellian thanks you.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Bunny on June 06, 2008, 09:48:09 AM
You are very welcome!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 06, 2008, 09:49:23 AM
You are very welcome!

Just ordered the CD too. I'm putting all your info to good use. ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Bunny on June 06, 2008, 10:08:42 AM
Btw, it's not necessary to print out the notes in more than one language.  That way I saved a tree (or part of a tree).

Btw, the password works for all the Alfresco titles.  I put it in once, and I've been getting all of the notes... :D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 06, 2008, 10:09:40 AM
Very cool. Thanks again.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on June 06, 2008, 10:24:21 AM
May I recommend this my fine fellows? 8)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 06, 2008, 10:29:21 AM
Of course you may.

But you already have earlier in the thread.  ;D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Harry on June 06, 2008, 10:31:00 AM
Of course you may.

But you already have earlier in the thread.  ;D

True, but that was a long time ago, and maybe people forgot about them, right? :)
Just saying mind! ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 06, 2008, 10:33:54 AM
True, but that was a long time ago, and maybe people forgot about them, right? :)
Just saying mind! ;)

Well, if we listen to our friend Que, we are to dredge up these old threads and use all this old information so there is no need to repeat.  ;D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 06, 2008, 10:45:39 AM
Here you may read a biography of Purcell from 1909.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14430
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 06, 2008, 08:26:41 PM
here (http://www.newolde.com/purcell.htm)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Que on June 06, 2008, 08:48:54 PM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/7619986398594.jpg)

To name one.

I've enjoyed that one very much, a totally new side of Purcell for me! :)


Well, if we listen to our friend Que, we are to dredge up these old threads and use all this old information so there is no need to repeat.  ;D


Indeeeed! ;)
At least now Harry has repeated himself on the same thread.. ;D ;)

Q
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on June 07, 2008, 02:10:37 AM
I've enjoyed that one very much, a totally new side of Purcell for me! :)

For me that side is, er, FCUK ;) 

IMO, William Christie and his Les arts florissants do most excellently in that regard also.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 07, 2008, 04:07:54 AM
here (http://www.newolde.com/purcell.htm)

Thanks for the link!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on June 28, 2008, 06:00:30 AM
I don't know why flash only sometimes works here. It's probably just me.  ::)

Anyway, here's Manuel Bras (still can't figure special characters out either) singing "What Power Art Thou"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdgQGcu8NMU
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 03, 2008, 07:26:45 AM
Dido and Aeneas videos have been added today on Youtube (by Case Western Reserve University), there's even a high quality option:
http://youtube.com/profile_videos?user=case&search_query=dido&search=Search
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 03, 2008, 07:31:03 AM
Dido and Aeneas videos have been added today on Youtube (by Case Western Reserve University), there's even a high quality option:
http://youtube.com/profile_videos?user=case&search_query=dido&search=Search

Thanks! I'll check it out later.

I added a link to the Purcell thread in the Composers' area, but no one bit.  :-\
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 03, 2008, 08:04:11 AM
I reckon Opera/Vocal, not to talk about baroque, are rather difficult businesses here on GMG (me included, usually listen to late romantics /  big orchestra music). But someone recommended the Purcell Opera to me, now I cannot get my hands off this CD, and I hope I'll see the opera life some day...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31A1MKG9APL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 03, 2008, 08:07:10 AM
I reckon Opera/Vocal, not to talk about baroque, are rather difficult businesses here on GMG (me included, usually listen to late romantics /  big orchestra music). But someone recommended the Purcell Opera to me, now I cannot get my hands off this CD, and I hope I'll see the opera life some day...

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31A1MKG9APL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Why, I believe that was me.  ;D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 03, 2008, 08:15:49 AM
Why? Because I love the music and singing. It's also intellectually interesting, I read and try to understand the lyrics, because english is not my native language and the opera singing is hard to understand. Usually I'd have a clear advantage, because many operas are sung/spoken in german :D
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 03, 2008, 08:18:16 AM
Why? Because I love the music and singing. It's also intellectually interesting, I read and try to understand the lyrics, because english is not my native language and the opera singing is hard to understand. Usually I'd have a clear advantage, because many operas are sung/spoken in german :D

We English-speakers need at least a handful of operas that we don't need translations for. :)

His music sounds surprisingly modern (to my ears) for someone from that era.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 07, 2008, 10:43:58 AM
I'm new to everything here, Purcell, vocal music and baroque [-thanks MN Dave]: Surprisingly Purcell works. Really surprising. What is music of his which you'd like to point out? I've listened to Dido and Aeneas a couple of times, the highlights for me are "Ah Belinda" in the biginning and of course the lament beginning with "Thy hands, Belinda..." until the last chorus words "...never part". Gives me all goosebumps.

I've also heard the songs "Cease, anxious world" and "Oh let me weep". Lovely. The latter is pretty similar to the Dido lament.
It's really all surprising, I even like the harpsichord sound. :o And organs which appear in some tracks.

What's your favourite Purcell moments then? :)

Anyway, here's Manuel Bras (still can't figure special characters out either) singing "What Power Art Thou"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdgQGcu8NMU
Oh, extraordinary. Is this from King Arthur? This must be very difficult to sing. I like the piece, I just don't like such high male pitches. Maybe an octave deeper, or sung by a female.

BTW I'd also merge the Purcell threads.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 07, 2008, 10:58:56 AM
I'm new to everything here, Purcell, vocal music and baroque: But surprisingly Purcell works. Really surprising. What is music of his which you'd like to point out? I've listened to Dido and Aeneas a couple of times, the highlights for me are "Ah Belinda" in the biginning and of course the lament beginning with "Thy hands, Belinda..." until the last chorus words "...never part". Gives me all goosebumps.

I've also heard the songs "Cease, anxious world" and "Oh let me weep". Lovely. The latter is pretty similar to the Dido lament.
It's really all surprising, I even like the harpsichord sound. :o And organs which appear in some tracks.

What's your favourite Purcell moments then? :)
Oh, extraordinary. Is this from King Arthur? This must be very difficult to sing. I like the piece, I just don't like such high male pitches. Maybe an octave deeper, or sung by a female.

Yes, King Arthur. I don't have it with me, but I just picked up a recording of King Arthur and I believe the male voice on there is at least an octave lower. I'll have to check later and get back to you.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 07, 2008, 11:15:07 AM
BTW I'd also merge the Purcell threads.

I've put in a request for this.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 07, 2008, 11:36:00 AM
And good sir Que has made it so.  0:)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 07, 2008, 12:19:45 PM
Oh, extraordinary. Is this from King Arthur? This must be very difficult to sing. I like the piece, I just don't like such high male pitches. Maybe an octave deeper, or sung by a female.

Yes, there is a bass singing this song on my Pinnock recording of King Arthur. His name is Brian Bannatyne-Scott.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 04:19:58 AM
I just ordered this from Amazon:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51giPIz63oL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

There are not many books on Purcell that I can find. This one seems to be the most current, or at least one of the most current. If you've read it, feel free to share your thoughts.

I also purchased this last night:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51W1P7V-i7L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Purcell was one of the last composers to write for the viola de gamba. And it is some of the best work ever written for the instrument.

(http://www.chambermusic.co.nz/managed_content/images/artist/166.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 04:50:36 AM
Those of us in London may want to check this out:

Saturday 4 October 2008, 10am-5pm
 (http://www.henrypurcell.org.uk/study_day.html)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 08, 2008, 05:34:59 AM
Yes, there is a bass singing this song on my Pinnock recording of King Arthur. His name is Brian Bannatyne-Scott.
Probably you knew, but I just found out this is widely known as the "cold song", youtube reveals some more performances with this name. Liked this one: http://youtube.com/watch?v=OFA_yAc_870
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 05:41:30 AM
Probably you knew, but I just found out this is widely known as the "cold song", youtube reveals some more performances with this name. Liked this one: http://youtube.com/watch?v=OFA_yAc_870

Yes, I knew. I will check out that link later.

Thank you.

Have you purchased any new Purcell?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on July 08, 2008, 05:45:56 AM


Purcell was one of the last composers to write for the viola de gamba.


 ???

In Germany Carl Friedrich Abel was still writing gamba sonatas nearly a century after Purcell died.  
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 05:47:19 AM
???

In Germany Carl Friedrich Abel was still writing gamba sonatas nearly a century after Purcell died.  

I guess no one told him it wasn't in fashion anymore.  :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on July 08, 2008, 05:48:22 AM
I guess no one told him it wasn't in fashion anymore.  :)

Check his bio and come back again.  ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 05:56:57 AM
Check his bio and come back again.  ;)

No, thanks. I have enough to keep me occupied.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on July 08, 2008, 05:59:06 AM
No, thanks. I have enough to keep me occupied.

Well no more guessing about Mr. Purcell and Mr. Abel then.  :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 06:00:03 AM
Well no more guessing about Mr. Purcell and Mr. Abel then.  :)

Maybe I meant viol consort. I know I read it somewhere.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on July 08, 2008, 06:01:28 AM
Maybe I meant viol consort. I know I read it somewhere.

So you were half-guessing.  Ha! 
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 06:02:45 AM
This from a quick google: "The last music for viol consorts before their modern revival was probably written in the early 1680s by Henry Purcell."

So there.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on July 08, 2008, 06:05:33 AM
This from a quick google: "The last music for viol consorts before their modern revival was probably written in the early 1680s by Henry Purcell."

So there.

Yes I knew that.  But that is not what you wrote.
So there.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 06:08:27 AM
Yes I knew that.  But that is not what you wrote.
So there.

So, I dropped a word.  ;D

I can see I'm going to have to keep on my toes around you.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 08, 2008, 06:11:07 AM
Just make sure those are your toes that you're keeping on, lad.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 06:12:13 AM
Well I was merely trying to keep all facts straight.

Much appreciated.

Karl, :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: FideLeo on July 08, 2008, 06:14:12 AM
So, I dropped a word.  ;D

I can see I'm going to have to keep on my toes around you.

Well I was merely trying to keep facts straight.  The word "consort" does mean something doesn't it?  :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 06:15:07 AM
Well I was merely trying to keep facts straight.  The word "consort" does mean something doesn't it?  :)

Indeed. That's what I get for working from memory.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 08, 2008, 06:53:17 AM
Hmmm - can't believe that I've not added 'something' to this thread on Henry Purcell - he is one of my favorite composers from that era; probably have about a dozen or so CDs, mostly instrumental music - also, bought the book below Purcell (1994) by Maureen Duffy - quite good as I recall but may be OOP?

(http://i2.ebayimg.com/03/c/00/c1/db/0a_7.JPG)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 06:55:15 AM
Hmmm - can't believe that I've not added 'something' to this thread on Henry Purcell - he is one of my favorite composers from that era; probably have about a dozen or so CDs, mostly instrumental music - also, bought the book below Purcell (1994) by Maureen Duffy - quite good as I recall but may be OOP?

(http://i2.ebayimg.com/03/c/00/c1/db/0a_7.JPG)

Ah, another book for me to locate. Thanks, Dave!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 08, 2008, 07:05:36 AM
This is probably so not done on this thread . . . but I do like the Britten variations on a Purcell theme (A Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra).

It is also high time I revisited a nice 'bonus' on the Hyperion disc of the complete Britten Canticles, three Purcell 'realizations', Let the dreadful engines, In the black dismal dungeon of despair & Evening Hymn.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 07:13:42 AM
This is probably so not done on this thread . . .


Seems like a valid  post to me. Thanks.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: karlhenning on July 08, 2008, 07:30:15 AM

Seems like a valid post to me. Thanks.


Well, I can come out from the black dismal dungeon of despair, then  0:)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 08, 2008, 07:33:59 AM
Well, I can come out from the black dismal dungeon of despair, then  0:)

He's a whole of fun, Purcell is.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 08, 2008, 07:54:24 AM
Just to add a few recommendations - two of my favorite 'instrumental discs' for a while (bought separately) are the Twelve Sonatas of Three Parts & Ten Sonatas in Four Parts, both w/ the London Baroque - but in searching Amazon for the images, I saw that Harmonia Mundi has combined these into a bargain package (below, far rigtht); boy, for the price, this twofer should make any Purcell fan beam w/ delight!  :D


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Y4N2B1P2L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21DQ890PDQL._SL500_AA130_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/411CVGTEXAL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 08, 2008, 08:30:21 PM
Have you purchased any new Purcell?

No, but got those from my local library yesterday, not yet listened to them:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41725REVCML._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5197QCWR3AL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 09, 2008, 03:20:08 AM
No, but got those from my local library yesterday, not yet listened to them:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41725REVCML._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5197QCWR3AL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Let us know how the listening goes, please. :)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 09, 2008, 04:20:08 AM
Just to add a few recommendations - two of my favorite 'instrumental discs' for a while (bought separately) are the Twelve Sonatas of Three Parts & Ten Sonatas in Four Parts, both w/ the London Baroque - but in searching Amazon for the images, I saw that Harmonia Mundi has combined these into a bargain package (below, far rigtht); boy, for the price, this twofer should make any Purcell fan beam w/ delight!  :D


Thanks for the tip, Dave!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Expresso on July 10, 2008, 11:01:26 AM

Any opinions on this:
https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/9658590?rk=home&rsk=hitlist
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 10, 2008, 11:16:58 AM
Any opinions on this:
https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/hnum/9658590?rk=home&rsk=hitlist

Not yet. I just ordered it because you reminded me.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 10, 2008, 01:22:40 PM
Not yet. I just ordered it because you reminded me.

That Purcell Brilliant Box Set (7-CDs) has received some excellent comments, probably in the 'listening thread' by Harry?  ;D  I have it on my 'want list' but really need to check the contents - may already have many of the recordings on other discs?   :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ox4pNuEiL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 10, 2008, 01:27:51 PM
Do you have that 11-CD Hyperion vocal set mentioned earlier in the thread, Dave?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 10, 2008, 01:44:30 PM
Do you have that 11-CD Hyperion vocal set mentioned earlier in the thread, Dave?

Good evening, Dave - I assume you mean the one shown below?  Nope - not sure that I could listen to that much 'sacred music' by Purcell?  :) ;D

I have 4 CDs of Purcell's vocal works (both sacred & secular) & Dido & Aeneas - I'd have to check the discs to see what's included?  :)


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AmPzX5fyL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: mn dave on July 10, 2008, 01:45:51 PM
Nope - not sure that I could listen to that much 'sacred music' by Purcell?

Yes, good evening. :)

Too much Purcell couldn't possibly be bad.  ???

 ;D  ;)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 10, 2008, 09:48:49 PM
Come one, tell me, which are your favourite songs/Lieder you sing out loud when you're in the bath tub? I'm currently performing the King Arthur/cold song, some Dido, Cease Anxious world Z362... successfully...
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: 71 dB on July 11, 2008, 12:59:48 AM
I guess no one told him it wasn't in fashion anymore.  :)

Gamba shouldn't have gone out of fashion in the first place!  :-\
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: (: premont :) on July 13, 2008, 06:21:23 AM
That Purcell Brilliant Box Set (7-CDs) has received some excellent comments, probably in the 'listening thread' by Harry?  ;D  I have it on my 'want list' but really need to check the contents - may already have many of the recordings on other discs?   :)

Whatever you own beforehand, this box is outstanding value for money and not to be missed.

Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on July 23, 2008, 11:43:58 PM
I found out, in baroque vocal music, I prefer the female voices. There are exclusively male voices on the latest CD I listened to (O solitude). Can someone give me recommendations for CDs with songs with more/only female vocals?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: sTisTi on July 27, 2008, 08:51:02 AM
I found out, in baroque vocal music, I prefer the female voices. There are exclusively male voices on the latest CD I listened to (O solitude). Can someone give me recommendations for CDs with songs with more/only female vocals?
For Purcell, I can recommend you "A Purcell Songbook" sung exclusively by Emma Kirkby
Even better imo is the same lady's collaboration with Fretwork in the "Consort Songs" by William Byrd

Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 12, 2009, 06:08:14 AM
This is a cheap bump, I know.  ;D

Any news on the Purcell front? Anything you'd like to say?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: jwinter on March 12, 2009, 06:21:00 AM
This is a cheap bump, I know.  ;D

Any news on the Purcell front? Anything you'd like to say?

Love Purcell.  This is a gorgeous set, IMO, wouldn't be without it:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ox4pNuEiL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

And I have a couple of versions of Dido.  For something a little different, I'm also very fond of Stokowski's transcription of Dido's Lament, done beautifully by Serebrier on Naxos.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 12, 2009, 06:24:06 AM
Love Purcell.  This is a gorgeous set, IMO, wouldn't be without it:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ox4pNuEiL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

And I have a couple of versions of Dido.  For something a little different, I'm also very fond of Stokowski's transcription of Dido's Lament, done beautifully by Serebrier on Naxos.

I have that set! Must get back to it...

Do you have this DG box set?

(http://pagesperso-orange.fr/jean-claude.brenac/Purcell_Pinnock.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: jwinter on March 12, 2009, 06:29:30 AM
No, I only have the two Didos.  This one, which is superb:
(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/9a/85/93f2225b9da0e028f7590110.L._AA240_.jpg)

and this one, which is also good, but not a patch on the above IMO:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41JE9JNCE5L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 12, 2009, 06:33:20 AM
No, I only have the two Didos.  This one, which is superb:
(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/9a/85/93f2225b9da0e028f7590110.L._AA240_.jpg)

and this one, which is also good, but not a patch on the above IMO:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41JE9JNCE5L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

You can download the Pinnock on Amazon. I don't know if buying the CDs is cheaper or not but it's a fun set.

I have that top Dido and, yeah, I don't hear anyone beating it.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: jwinter on March 12, 2009, 09:51:10 AM
Just bought this today at lunch -- instrumental parts and overtures from a number of things.  Sounded great in the car ;D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51eu9G9iDgL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 12, 2009, 09:52:10 AM
Just bought this today at lunch -- instrumental parts and overtures from a number of things.  Sounded great in the car ;D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51eu9G9iDgL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Nice!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on March 20, 2009, 07:14:45 AM
There's also a "Complete Ayres for Theater" on Hyperion.

With Purcell, maybe Baroque in general, I've got one problem: I like it. But - everything pretty much sounds the same. E.g. phrases in baroquoid music always end the same, even at the same note ... not sure how I can say this, but you may guess what I mean. A pretty monolithic concept those days.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 20, 2009, 07:17:57 AM
There's also a "Complete Ayres for Theater" on Hyperion.

With Purcell, maybe Baroque in general, I've got one problem: I like it. But - everything pretty much sounds the same. E.g. phrases in baroquoid music always end the same, even at the same note ... not sure how I can say this, but you may guess what I mean. A pretty monolithic concept those days.

I know what you mean. Yet when you have the urge for it, nothing else will do. And the works from composer to composer do vary enough to keep me fascinated.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on March 20, 2009, 07:56:54 AM
I know what you mean. Yet when you have the urge for it, nothing else will do. And the works from composer to composer do vary enough to keep me fascinated.
I'm most fascinated by Purcells Harpsichord/Organ music companioned by a female voice. So sweet. This recording has it all and is very sweet:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41GWWN3MG1L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

I hope one day I'll listen to something like this live.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Dr. Dread on March 20, 2009, 08:01:51 AM
I'm most fascinated by Purcells Harpsichord/Organ music companioned by a female voice. So sweet. This recording is very sweet:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41GWWN3MG1L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

I hope one day I'll listen to something like this live.

Thanks for the tip, sir.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on December 19, 2009, 02:22:10 AM
(http://a1.phobos.apple.com/us/r1000/013/Music/83/0b/79/mzi.kasvwkak.100x100-75.jpg)

Well, I already mentioned I'm completely stunned by the Emanuelle Haim Dido & Aeneas. Today and yesterday, I've listened to "Thanks to these lo(n|v)esome vales" by Belinda (Camilla Tilling), maybe one million times. Tillings singing is so sweet, it makes the snow melt here, honestly! ;) I love this song. Followed by "Oft she visits..", a musical masterpiece.

Tilling/Belinda/"Thanks to...": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJhLAe2JC_E (starts @ 0:45)
Dido/Haïm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlUYtL-M_Go

(http://cdn.passionato.com/artwork/100/320.jpg)
BTW, I tried Dido&Aeneas with Emma Kirkby as Dido yesterday. The one on Chandos with Taverner Choir and players. No. The choir boys voice doesn't work for me here. I also think her singing is not perfect. Also I do not like the emphacizing of the syllables, which she does in the end of words. (i.e., she sings "ah.. 1be 2lin 3in 4da" - I'm used to "1be 2lin 3da 4ha").

"Thanks to this lonesome vales" or "Thanks to this lovesome vales"? http://opera.stanford.edu/iu/libretti/dido.html#act3 writes "lovesome". But on many CDs "lonesome" is written...
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Shrunk on February 08, 2011, 09:30:34 AM
Recently got this one:



Sexy and fun.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Rinaldo on May 31, 2011, 05:53:10 AM
When I'm alone on the subway train, I enjoy singing There's not a swain (http://youtu.be/a-C4sMI39vs) in a rather silly voice. Please, don't tell anyone.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: snyprrr on June 27, 2011, 10:23:55 AM
I'm just hearing the Funeral Music for Queen Mary, and I'm shocked at how 'modern' it sounds, but then I see that it is an arragement by Steven Stucky. I hear bells and chimes, and what sounds like a piano. This is on a "President's Own" Marine Band cd, so I'm curious...

Pretty cool music,... is it really getting somewhat mysterious at the end?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Rinaldo on September 06, 2011, 12:20:05 PM
Oh, this is glorious: Hommage à Henry Purcell (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL334084DA97D148CD) (La Fenice, Jean Tubéry). Ode to / Funeral of Queen Mary, King Arthur excerpts. Beautifully played & sung (especially Blažíková). I'd love to get this performance on a CD.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Tapio Dimitriyevich Shostakovich on September 27, 2011, 07:31:22 PM
Scholl/Academia Bizantina/Purcell, Airs and Songs: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=7196384D493089EF - Has been on ARTE TV AFAICS. I love his "Music for a while".
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: milk on November 22, 2011, 09:36:32 PM
Does anybody have a favorite recording of Purcell's keyboard music? I bought Egarr's recording but somehow feel that the sound of the harpsichord doesn't quite match the music - although Egarr's performance is very good. I listened to some samples of John Gibbons and this seems better in terms of the sound of the harpsichord he uses. But this is just my opinion - not based on any knowledge of musicology. Any thoughts, recommendations?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Octave on April 22, 2013, 07:42:05 PM
Bumping this thread because it's been ~1.5 years since Milk's question (immediately above) re: the keyboard music; I have only sampled the Egarr, but I'd be interested in GMG responses to his question.

Also interested in a top FAIRY QUEEN selection or two; I read this whole thread some weeks ago and did a little keyword searching, and I'm not sure I've seen any concentrated discussion of the options.  Norrington's was praised at one point.  I've also been interested in Christie's early-90s HM audio version, though I'll have to wait for that to come back into print.  I also read a non-evaluative comment about Christie's more recent DVD/BR stage production, which seems to make use of the fully-integrated Shakespeare pastiche [?]...that's almost certainly of interest to me, eventually.

Any other recommendations for Purcell recordings would be most appreciated.  I've made do over the past year or so with two of the King/Hyperion boxes (SACRED MUSIC and WELCOME SONGS AND ODES); the Brilliant box of chamber music (Belder et al); the Deller Consort recordings on Vanguard (reissued not long ago as a 6cd); DIDO by Anthony Lewis (old school) and Scholars Baroque (Naxos, a very old acqusition); and Fretwork for the Fantasias (Savall is in the post).  I know I'm interested in another couple DIDOs, those of Haim and Hogwood, but I'm not sure what else might be considered key interpretations.  I also received one recommendation for Hogwood's THEATRE MUSIC box, which seems to be almost all music I don't know at all...I'm sure to check that one out.
EDIT: I also have a disc worth of theatre ayres from that little Sony 6cd box of Tafelmusik/Lamon playing Handel (three fine discs of him), Geminiani, etc etc; that was quite enjoyable, cheering music. 
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Parsifal on April 22, 2013, 08:11:51 PM
I'm watching a recent video of The Fairie Queen, and I am unable to engage with it.  At this point, the plan is to wait a decade and try again.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Rinaldo on May 04, 2013, 03:36:16 PM
Bumping this thread because it's been ~1.5 years since Milk's question (immediately above) re: the keyboard music; I have only sampled the Egarr, but I'd be interested in GMG responses to his question.

Also interested in a top FAIRY QUEEN selection or two; I read this whole thread some weeks ago and did a little keyword searching, and I'm not sure I've seen any concentrated discussion of the options.  Norrington's was praised at one point.  I've also been interested in Christie's early-90s HM audio version, though I'll have to wait for that to come back into print.  I also read a non-evaluative comment about Christie's more recent DVD/BR stage production, which seems to make use of the fully-integrated Shakespeare pastiche [?]...that's almost certainly of interest to me, eventually.

Any other recommendations for Purcell recordings would be most appreciated.  I've made do over the past year or so with two of the King/Hyperion boxes (SACRED MUSIC and WELCOME SONGS AND ODES); the Brilliant box of chamber music (Belder et al); the Deller Consort recordings on Vanguard (reissued not long ago as a 6cd); DIDO by Anthony Lewis (old school) and Scholars Baroque (Naxos, a very old acqusition); and Fretwork for the Fantasias (Savall is in the post).  I know I'm interested in another couple DIDOs, those of Haim and Hogwood, but I'm not sure what else might be considered key interpretations.  I also received one recommendation for Hogwood's THEATRE MUSIC box, which seems to be almost all music I don't know at all...I'm sure to check that one out.
EDIT: I also have a disc worth of theatre ayres from that little Sony 6cd box of Tafelmusik/Lamon playing Handel (three fine discs of him), Geminiani, etc etc; that was quite enjoyable, cheering music.

Savall's Fairy Queen is gorgeous and as for the whole thing, Gardiner or Deller would be my first choice.

+1 to Hogwood's Dido and the Theatre set, which holds some of my favourite Purcell tunes.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 04, 2013, 04:14:13 PM
My current favorites for Purcell's Big Three (I just made that up btw)...


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51HelPtXYxL._SX350_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51jvpxXv3sL._SX350_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51adKN3JUUL._SX350_.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Johnll on May 05, 2013, 05:33:56 PM
My current favorites for Purcell's Big Three (I just made that up btw)...


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51HelPtXYxL._SX350_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51jvpxXv3sL._SX350_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51adKN3JUUL._SX350_.jpg)

A big plus on Currentzis Dido and Aeneas. I also rather enjoyed his Shosty 14 and Mozart Requiem.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: TheGSMoeller on May 05, 2013, 05:42:02 PM
A big plus on Currentzis Dido and Aeneas. I also rather enjoyed his Shosty 14 and Mozart Requiem.

Yes! I'm hoping to see more releases from Currentzis very soon.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Octave on May 05, 2013, 06:04:47 PM
Late thanks to John, Rinaldo, and Monkey-Greg for the tips.  There will be a lot of Purcell spun this summer, chez Octave.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Silk on August 06, 2013, 08:53:05 AM
Here's a composer who is seldom discussed.  He's magnificent!  How about a tiny sample from his "Timon of Athens", just to tempt you:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_o_pjxVldI
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on August 06, 2013, 09:12:53 AM
Here (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,3463.0.html).
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Silk on August 06, 2013, 01:34:39 PM
Woops!!  I see there is huge activity on Purcell.  Guess I need to hone my 'searching' skills!  Thanks.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Rinaldo on September 10, 2014, 04:19:42 AM
Happy 355th birthday!

Let's celebrate with the slowest Abdelazer suite ever commited to video:

https://www.youtube.com/v/MtdBebvbcO0
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: radicle on January 21, 2017, 01:20:40 AM
Is this really the main Purcell thread?

I've been enjoying the YouTube extracts from this goofy French production of King Arthur; I'd love to have seen it.

Le Concert Spirituel, Hervé Niquet

http://www.youtube.com/v/U5UtgAKRZGo

http://www.youtube.com/v/4CQ3u8y_GF8

http://www.youtube.com/v/9x1SUwNm6OI
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: snyprrr on March 25, 2017, 06:48:16 AM
anything I'd like?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Jo498 on March 25, 2017, 11:03:19 AM
try the viol fantazias
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: snyprrr on March 26, 2017, 05:15:39 PM
try the viol fantazias

sounds reasonable ;), thanks
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Mandryka on March 26, 2017, 08:51:04 PM
anything I'd like?

No yes

(https://img.discogs.com/FO4N-Yzv2-tGGJjkB9gV6B-5L7U=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-4844677-1465993471-5353.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Rinaldo on September 10, 2017, 08:49:24 AM
Happy birthday, Henry!

https://www.youtube.com/v/a-C4sMI39vs
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: cilgwyn on October 12, 2017, 07:41:49 AM
It's not my favourite recording;but I was delighted to see that Decca Eloquence have reissued the first ever complete recording of The Fairy Queen,for the first time ever,on cd! :)

(https://i.imgur.com/o7hAWhQ.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
Post by: snyprrr on October 12, 2017, 02:52:50 PM
No yes

(https://img.discogs.com/FO4N-Yzv2-tGGJjkB9gV6B-5L7U=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-4844677-1465993471-5353.jpeg.jpg)

BUT SERIOUSLY, WHAT DO I NEED TO HEAR TO "GET" pURCELL? (whoops,sorry!!) I have those viol fantasies on deck to check, but what else? Obviously, singing will probably be out. What's a great slow movement?
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 12, 2017, 07:50:33 PM
BUT SERIOUSLY, WHAT DO I NEED TO HEAR TO "GET" pURCELL? (whoops,sorry!!) I have those viol fantasies on deck to check, but what else? Obviously, singing will probably be out. What's a great slow movement?

Hey Snyprrr - well, as usual, I'm not sure what your are asking?  ::)  8)

How much Purcell have you heard and own?  Sounds like you want his non-vocal works - right?  If so, then the box below is a good recommendation - if fewer disks are desired, then check the previous pages in this thread - many comments already made.  Dave :)
.
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51ox4pNuEiL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
Post by: Mandryka on October 12, 2017, 08:53:11 PM
BUT SERIOUSLY, WHAT DO I NEED TO HEAR TO "GET" pURCELL? (whoops,sorry!!) I have those viol fantasies on deck to check, but what else? Obviously, singing will probably be out. What's a great slow movement?

I think you will enjoy this


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/519XgFeBhpL._SX425_.jpg)

Title: Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
Post by: Mandryka on October 13, 2017, 12:55:03 PM
What's a great slow movement?

Purcell wrote five Pavans for consort,  I think they are rather nice. The recording to get I think is Leonhardt's, easily downloadable but maybe not easy to find on a CD apart from in some huge box of things.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
Post by: snyprrr on October 16, 2017, 07:26:51 AM
Purcell wrote five Pavans for consort,  I think they are rather nice. The recording to get I think is Leonhardt's, easily downloadable but maybe not easy to find on a CD apart from in some huge box of things.

listened to a few minutes of the 'Pavane & Chaconne' in g-minor. Yea, ok, it reminds me of the French consort music I have on an old VoxBox of "French Baroque"...

I need SNOW for this kind of music!!
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread HELP ME UNDERSTAND PURCELL
Post by: Mandryka on October 16, 2017, 09:58:14 AM
listened to a few minutes of the 'Pavane & Chaconne' in g-minor. Yea, ok, it reminds me of the French consort music I have on an old VoxBox of "French Baroque"...

I need SNOW for this kind of music!!

I like the early viol music, but it's very atypical of Purcell. I also think the harpsichord suites are sometimes listenable given the right mood on my part and a decent performance -- but I just don't think you will enjoy them much. The later instrumental music, sonatas, are gallant baroque, they're not my style, so I can't recommend anything. There's some good vocal music including Dido and Aeneas, but you don't want vocal music.

I just don't see you as a late Baroque person.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Jo498 on October 17, 2017, 01:37:09 AM
I don't think the trio/quadro sonatas by Purcell are all that interesting but they are not "gallant late baroque", neither late nor particularly gallant. Historically they are (barely) high baroque if one takes the publication of Corelli's op.1 in 1681 as the exemplary and influential trio sonatas as the beginning of "high baroque" instrumental music. Purcell's harpsichord music and of course many brief instrumental pieces from his theatre music are far more melodic (or even gallant) than the collected chamber sonatas.

Or more practically, a fancier of Telemann's trio sonatas will probably be gravely dissappointed by Purcell's sonatas in three/four parts. I don't dare a guess whether snyppr will like them or not.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Mandryka on October 17, 2017, 07:52:30 AM
I don't think the trio/quadro sonatas by Purcell are all that interesting but they are not "gallant late baroque", neither late nor particularly gallant. Historically they are (barely) high baroque if one takes the publication of Corelli's op.1 in 1681 as the exemplary and influential trio sonatas as the beginning of "high baroque" instrumental music. Purcell's harpsichord music and of course many brief instrumental pieces from his theatre music are far more melodic (or even gallant) than the collected chamber sonatas.

Or more practically, a fancier of Telemann's trio sonatas will probably be gravely dissappointed by Purcell's sonatas in three/four parts. I don't dare a guess whether snyppr will like them or not.

I always thought there was an influence of Corelli to Purcell. For me Corelli is already gallant and late, isn't high baroque just a synonym of late baroque? And the two the same as what in French music is called clacissism?   I'm probably using the terms incorrectly, what's not gallant about the Purcell sonatas? I'd always thought that the sonata in Musical Offering was gallant too - I must just not understand the term.

Anyway I'd appreciate some clarification about these style terms.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Biffo on October 17, 2017, 09:36:55 AM
I always thought there was an influence of Corelli to Purcell. For me Corelli is already gallant and late, isn't high baroque just a synonym of late baroque? And the two the same as what in French music is called clacissism?   I'm probably using the terms incorrectly, what's not gallant about the Purcell sonatas? I'd always thought that the sonata in Musical Offering was gallant too - I must just not understand the term.

Anyway I'd appreciate some clarification about these style terms.

I had always associated 'galant' with Haydn or early Mozart or possibly J C Bach. According to Wikipedia it is a term used for music between 1720 and 1780. This book (which can be dipped into) more or less agrees but also says 'galant' was a lifestyle - my awkward paraphrase. The author also has something to say about the use of 'baroque' and 'classical' -

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005RBU93A/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 (https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005RBU93A/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1)
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: vers la flamme on September 16, 2020, 01:43:40 AM
No love for Purcell lately?

I have only Christie's Dido and Æneas in my library. It's a nice performance of this classic high Baroque opera. What are some more essential Purcell recordings? I see Robert King made a lot of them on Hyperion.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Jo498 on September 16, 2020, 02:16:07 AM
Dido is his undeniable masterpiece. (There are two recordings with Christie, which one do you have?) The two great "semi-operas", King Arthur and The Fairy Queen are as good musically (and more festive/varied than the small scale Dido) but dramatically odd as most of the main action takes place outside of the musical numbers or conversely the musical numbers are given to supporting cast or certain romantic or picturesque scenes. (Admittedly I don't know the other smaller theatre music pieces like the Indian Queen not as well but I think it is generally agreed that the two mentioned before are by some margin the greatest.)
The other large body of music by Purcell is ceremonial, either explicit church music or "welcome" or birthday odes for kings and princesses etc. I think King/hyperion has the only complete set of either but there are plenty of single recordings from the likes of Gardiner, Leonhardt etc. There used to be two cheap twofers on Virgin (no warner?) mostly with Parrott that give a pretty good overview with a mix of well known and lesser known pieces. The Gardiner box contains a few recordings from his early time in the 70s when the orchestra is not entirely HIP but overall I think they are very enjoyable, incl. a very good "King Arthur" and I am not sure who's be obviously preferable for the lesser known theatre pieces. There is another box with Hogwood that is called Theatre Music and has the "lesser" theatre music, often only a handful of pieces for a play. This might be a worthy effort, but I have had this for 15 years or so and never listened to all of it... :P

Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Biffo on September 16, 2020, 02:38:53 AM
Dido is his undeniable masterpiece. (There are two recordings with Christie, which one do you have?) The two great "semi-operas", King Arthur and The Fairy Queen are as good musically (and more festive/varied than the small scale Dido) but dramatically odd as most of the main action takes place outside of the musical numbers or conversely the musical numbers are given to supporting cast or certain romantic or picturesque scenes. (Admittedly I don't know the other smaller theatre music pieces like the Indian Queen not as well but I think it is generally agreed that the two mentioned before are by some margin the greatest.)
The other large body of music by Purcell is ceremonial, either explicit church music or "welcome" or birthday odes for kings and princesses etc. I think King/hyperion has the only complete set of either but there are plenty of single recordings from the likes of Gardiner, Leonhardt etc. There used to be two cheap twofers on Virgin (no warner?) mostly with Parrott that give a pretty good overview with a mix of well known and lesser known pieces. The Gardiner box contains a few recordings from his early time in the 70s when the orchestra is not entirely HIP but overall I think they are very enjoyable, incl. a very good "King Arthur" and I am not sure who's be obviously preferable for the lesser known theatre pieces. There is another box with Hogwood that is called Theatre Music and has the "lesser" theatre music, often only a handful of pieces for a play. This might be a worthy effort, but I have had this for 15 years or so and never listened to all of it... :P




The Bitrhday Odes for Queen Mary are, for me, the pick of the  ceremonial odes. The problem I found was that some of them - especially Come ye Sons of Art have been recorded several times and others are much rarer. I have various recordings by Munrow, Gardiner, Pinnock and others. I tries to fill the gaps with Robert King but found him generally a dull Purcellian.

I have started working my way through the Welcome Odes performed by The Sixteen - these are mainly early works but well worth a listen.

My all time favourite is the Ode for Saint Cecilia's Day - Hail Bright Cecilia ; my favourite recording of the work is from Mackerras on DG/Archive. It is not a period instrument performance but very stylish and exhilarating.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: vers la flamme on September 16, 2020, 02:33:18 PM
@Jo, I have the recording on Erato. I did really enjoy it this morning, as I listened to the whole thing for the first time. Thanks for the recs, I will look into Parrott as I've been enjoying one of his Handel recordings. Thanks a lot for all of your help lately, by the way, as I've been exploring Baroque music. Your posts have been helpful in guiding me in some interesting directions.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Scion7 on September 17, 2020, 03:15:45 AM
(https://i.postimg.cc/Y9Q2RSjd/Yesterday-Dido.jpg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/9MwbN6j8/Raised-Fist-Emoticon.png)
         
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: MusicTurner on September 17, 2020, 03:27:10 AM
Yes, D&A would definitely be the chosen, single work by Purcell - in an oeuvre, where really impressive or catchy pieces seem rather few and far between, compared to other great composers from that period, IMHO ... I've discovered though that, like for most composers, recordings mean a lot for appreciating the music.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: vers la flamme on September 17, 2020, 03:38:53 PM
Yes, D&A would definitely be the chosen, single work by Purcell - in an oeuvre, where really impressive or catchy pieces seem rather few and far between, compared to other great composers from that period, IMHO ... I've discovered though that, like for most composers, recordings mean a lot for appreciating the music.

That's a shame. I liked Dido & Aeneas, but I never like hearing that the one work I discovered and enjoyed by a new composer (new to me, that is) is far and away his or her best work.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Scion7 on September 17, 2020, 04:44:52 PM
Yes, D&A would definitely be the chosen, single work by Purcell - in an oeuvre, where really impressive or catchy pieces seem rather few and far between ....

Have you really listened to all of his output? 
That's sort of an unqualified blanket statement - I haven't even heard half of this.

(this is not complete, obviously ... )

Stage Works
    =Operas and Semi-Operas   
    =   Dido and Aeneas, Z.626 (opera)   
    =   King Arthur or the British Worthy, Z.628 (semi-opera)   
    =   Pausanius, the Betrayer of His Country, Z.585 (tragedy)   
    =   Prophetess, or The History of Dioclesian, Z.627 (semi-opera)   
    =   The Fairy Queen, Z.629 (semi-opera)   
    =   The Indian Queen, Z.630 (semi-opera)   
    =   The Tempest, Z.631 (semi-opera)   
    =   Timon of Athens, Z.632 (semi-opera)   

Incidental Music
    =   A Fool's Preferment, or, The Three Dukes of Dunstable, Z.571 7 
    =   Abdelazer, or The Moor's Revenge, Z.570 61 
    =   Amphitryon, or the 2 Sosias, Z.572 29 
    =   Aureng-Zebe, or the Great Mogul, Z.573 4 
    =   Bonduca, or The British Heroine, Z.574 19 
    =   Circe, Z.575 11 
    =   Cleomenes, the Spartan Hero, Z.576 1 
    =   Distressed Innocence, or, the Princess of Persia, Z.577 13 
    =   Don Quixote, Z.578 15 
    =   Epsom Wells, Z.579 1 
    =   Henry II, King of England, Z.580 1 
    =   Love Triumphant, or Nature Will Prevail, Z.582 1 
    =   Oedipus, Z.583 27 
    =   Oroonoko, Z.584 1 
    =   Pausanius, Z.585 3 
    =   Regulus, or the Faction of Carthage, Z.586 1 
    =   Rule a Wife and Have a Wife, Z.587 3 
    =   Sir Anthony Love, or the Rambling Lady, Z.588 5 
    =   Sir Barnaby Whigg, or No Wit Like a Woman's, Z.589 2 
    =   Sophonisba, or Hannibal's Overthrow, Z.590 2 
    =   Spanish Friar, or the Double Discovery, Z.610 1 
    =   The Canterbury Guests, or A Bargain Broken, Z.591 1 
    =   The Double Dealer, Z.592 5 
    =   The English Lawyer, Z.594 1 
    =   The Fatal Marriage, or the Innocent Adultery, Z.595 2 
    =   The Female Virtuosos, Z.596 1 
    =   The Gordian Knot Unty'd, Z.597 40 
    =   The History of King Richard II, or, The Sicilian Usurper, Z.581 3 
    =   The Indian Emperor, or The Conquest of Mexico, Z.598 1 
    =   The Knight of Malta, Z.599 1 
    =   The Libertine, or the Libertine Destroyed, Z.600 7 
    =   The Maid's Last Prayer, or Any Rather than Fail, Z.601 4 
    =   The Marriage-Hater Match'd, Z.602 2 
    =   The Married Beau, or the Curious Impertinent, Z.603 37 
    =   The Massacre of Paris, Z.604 1 
    =   The Mock Marriage, Z.605 6 
    =   The Old Bachelor, Z.607 8 
    =   The Richmond Heiress, or, A Woman Once in the Right, Z.608 2 
    =   The Rival Sisters, or the Violence of Love, Z.609 6 
    =   The Virtuous Wife, or Good Luck at Last, Z.611 27 
    =   The Wives' Excuse, or Cuckolds Make Themselves, Z.612 3 
    =   Theodosius, or the Force of Love, Z.606 9 
    =   Tyrannic Love, or the Royal Martyr, Z.613 3 
    =   Dioclesian, Z.627 1 
    =   The Fairy Queen Suite, Z.629 17 
    =   The Prophetess Suite, Z 627 5 
    =   King Arthur Suite, Z.628

Keyboard Works   
    =Harpsichord Works   
    =   A New Ground in E- (originally from 'Welcome to All the Pleasures'), Z.682 17 
    =   Trumpet Tune (from 'The Indian Queen' as Z. 630/4a) for harpsichord in C ZT 698 1 
    =   A New Irish Tune ('Lilliburlero') in G, Z.646 8 
    =   A New Minuet in D-, Z.689 1 
    =   A New Scotch Tune in G, Z.655 3 
    =   Air in G, Z.641 3 
    =   Chaconne in G- (Curtain tune from 'Timon of Athens'), Z.680 7 
    =   Ground in C- (from 'Ye tuneful muses'), Z.681 4 
    =   Ground in C-, Z.221 (doubtful) 8 
    =   Ground in D-, (from 'Celebrate This Festival'), Z.222 (doubtful) 7 
    =   Ground in Gamut in G, Z.645 10 
    =   Hornpipe in E-, Z.685 2 
    =   Hornpipe in Bb (from 'The Virtuous Wife'), Z.683 1 
    =   Hornpipe in D- ('Round O' from 'Abdelazar'), Z.684 5 
    =   Jig in G- (from 'Abdelazar'), Z.686 2 
    =   Keyboard Suite in C (arr. M. Nuber; cadenza and ornamentation by B. Kratzer) 1 
    =   March in C, Z.647 1 
    =   March in C, Z.648 3 
    =   Minuet (from 'Ye Tuneful Muses') in D-, Z.688 1 
    =   Minuet in A-, Z.649 1 
    =   Minuet in A-, Z.650 1 
    =   Miscellaneous pieces from Oxford manuscripts 2 
    =   Musick's Handmaid 12 
    =   Queen's Dolour in A-, Z.670 (doubtful) 1 
    =   Rigadoon in C, Z.653 3 
    =   Round-O (Rondo), Z.684 3 
    =   Saraband in A-, Z.654 2 
    =   Sefauchi's Farewell in D-, Z.656 4 
    =   8 Suites, Z.660-669 214 
    =   Toccata in A, Z.229 (doubtful) 1 
    =   Trumpet Minuet in D (from 'The Virtuous Wife') 1 
    =   Trumpet Tune in C ('Cibell'), Z.678 6 
    =   Voluntary for Double Organ, Z.719 4 
    =   Trumpet Tune and Air (excerpt), for keyboard 1 
    =   Trumpet Tune in C, (from 'Prophetess'), for harpsichord, ZT 697 2 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons for the Harpsichord, Suite No.2 in G-, Z. 661 13 
    =   Hornpipe for harpsichord in E- (from 'The Old Bachelor' Z.607/4), ZT685 1 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.4 in A-, Z.663 8 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.1 in G, Z.660 4 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.3 in G, Z.662 3 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.5 in C, Z.666 4 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.6 in D, Z.667 3 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.7 in D-, Z.668 3 
    =   A Choice Collection of Lessons, Suite No.8 in F, Z.669 4 

Organ Works 
    =   Air (unspecified)   
    =   Trumpet Tune in D 
    =   Trumpet Voluntary in D (possibly by Blow)   
    =   Verse in F, Z.716   
    =   Verse in the Phrygian mode, Z.126   
    =   Voluntary in C, Z.717 
    =   Voluntary in D-, Z.718   
    =   Voluntary in G, Z.720   
    =   Voluntary on the 100th Psalm in A, Z.721   
    =   Slow Air, for organ, Z.603 

Chamber Works 
    =   Fantasias for Viol Consort   
    =   15 Fantasias for viols, D.732-747   
    =   9 Fantasia a 4 

Overtures 
    =   Overture and Suite in G, Z.770   
    =   Overture in D-, Z.771   
    =   Overture in G-, Z.772   
    =   The Staircase Overture, Z.614   

Pavans 
    =   Pavan in A, Z.748 
    =   Pavan in A-, Z.749   
    =   Pavan in Bb for 2 Violins, Z.750   
    =   Pavan in G-, Z.751   
    =   Pavan in G- for 3 Violins, Z.752   
    =   Pavane and Chaconne   
    =   Pavan à 4 'Here begineth ye 3 part Fantazias'   

Trio Sonatas and Other Chamber Sonatas 
    =   Sonata a4 No.1 in B-, Z.802 3 
    =   Sonata a4 No.2 in Eb, Z.803 3 
    =   Sonata a4 No.3 in A-, Z.804 5 
    =   Sonata a4 No.4 in D-, Z.805 4 
    =   Sonata a4 No.5 in G-, Z.806 5 
    =   Sonata a4 No.6 in G-, Z.807 8 
    =   Sonata a4 No.7 in C, Z.808 3 
    =   Sonata a4 No.8 in G-, Z.809 4 
    =   Sonata a4 No.10 in D, Z.811 8 
    =   Sonata a5 in D, Z.850 3 
    =   Trio Sonata in G-, Z.780 11 
    =   Trio Sonata No.1 in G-, Z.790 8 
    =   Trio Sonata No.11 in F-, Z.800 3 
    =   Trio Sonata No.2 in Bb, Z.791 7 
    =   Trio Sonata No.3 in D-, Z.792 6 
    =   Trio Sonata No.4 in F, Z.793 3 
    =   Trio Sonata No.5 in A-, Z.794 3 
    =   Trio Sonata No.6 in C, Z.795 9 
    =   Trio Sonata No.7 in E-, Z.796 5 
    =   Trio Sonata No.8 in G, Z.797 7 
    =   Trio Sonata No.9 in C-, Z.798 5 
    =   Trio Sonata No.9 in F ('The Golden Sonata'), Z.810 12 
    =   Trio Sonata No.10 in A, Z.799 3 
    =   Trio Sonta No.12 in D, Z.801

    =   Sonata in C, for trumpet, strings and organ 3 
    =   Trumpet Sonata in D, Z.850 48 
    =   Trumpet tune and aire (unspecified) 1 
    =   Air en Bourée (unspecified) 1 
    =   Air for Trumpet and Organ (unspecified) 1 
    =   Chaconne in F for Recorder and Organ 1 
    =   Chaconne in F for Recorder 1 
    =   Chaconne in G- for 4 Strings, Z.730 25 
    =   Fantasia in D upon a Ground for 3 Violins and Continuo, Z.731 7 
    =   Jig (unspecified), for guitar 1 
    =   March and Canzona for the Funeral of Queen Mary, for 4 trumpets, Z.860 25 
    =   Minuet (unspecified) 1 
    =   Prelude in F for Solo Recorder 1 
    =   Prelude in G- for Solo Violin, Z.773 2 
    =   Theater Suite, for chamber ensemble 6 
    =   Prelude, for violin (or recorder) solo in G-, ZN 773 2 
    =   Suite for Trumpet and Organ 8 
    =   Air, for the flute 1 
    =   In Nomine of seven parts, for chamber ensemble 3 
    =   In Nomine of six parts, for chamber ensemble, Z.746 3 
    =   Three Parts Upon a Ground, for chamber ensemble 3 
    =   A New Ground, for harpsichord, Z.T682 1 
    =   Here, the deities approve, for chamber ensemble 2 
    =   Chacony in G-, for chamber ensemble, Z.730 1 
    =   Symphony for the Flutes, for chamber ensemble 2 
    =   Strike the viol, for chamber ensemble 1 
    =   Suite in G, Z.770 1 
    =   Who can from joy refrain ?, Z.342 5 
    =   Crown the altar, deck the shrine, Z.321/6 1 
    =   Music for a while, for chamber ensemble 1 
    =   Prelude in D (arr. for Chamber Ensemble)

Vocal Works
    =   Anthems   
    =   Behold now, praise the Lord, anthem for alto, tenor, bass, chorus, 2 violins, viola and continuo, Z.3 1 
    =   Blessed is he whose unrighteousness is forgiven, anthem, for 2 sopranos, alto, 2 tenors, bass, chorus and continuo, Z.8 1 
    =   Blow up the trumpet in Sion, for soloists, chorus and continuo, Z.10 (anthem) 4 
    =   Hear me, O Lord, the great support, sacred song for alto, tenor, chorus and continuo, Z.133 2 
    =   Hear my prayer, O God, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus and organ, Z.14 (anthem) 2 
    =   Hear my prayer, O Lord, for chorus, violins and continuo, Z.15 (unfinished anthem) 13 
    =   I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus, string and organ, Z.19 (anthem) 5 
    =   I will love Thee, O Lord, anthem for bass, chorus and organ, Z.67 1 
    =   I will sing unto the Lord, for soloists, chorus and organ, Z.22 (anthem) 2 
    =   In the midst of life, for soloists, chorus and organ, Z.17a (anthem) 2 
    =   Let mine eyes run down with tears, for soloists, chorus and organ, Z.24 (anthem) 2 
    =   Lord, how long wilt Thou be angry, for alto, tenor, bass, chorus and organ, Z.25 (anthem) 4 
    =   Man that is born of a woman, for soprano, alto, tenor, chorus and organ, Z.27 (anthem) 2 
    =   My beloved spake, for alto, tenor, 2 basses, chorus, strings and continuo, Z.28 (anthem) 3 
    =   My heart is inditing, anthem for 2 sopranos, altos, tenors, basses, double chorus, strings and continuo, Z.30 4 
    =   O God the king of glory, for chorus and organ, Z.34 (anthem) 1 
    =   O God, thou art my god, for 2 sopranos, alto, tenor, bass, double chorus and organ, Z.35 (anthem) 3 
    =   O God, Thou hast cast us out, for 2 sopranos, 2 altos, tenor, bass, chorus and organ, Z.36 (anthem) 2 
    =   O Lord, our Governor, anthem for 3 sopranos, 2 basses, chorus and organ, Z.39 1 
    =   O sing unto the Lord, anthem for soprano, alto, tenor, 2 basses, chorus, 2 violins, viola and organ, Z.44 1 
    =   Out of the deep have I called, anthem for soprano, alto, bass, chorus and continuo Z.45 1 
    =   Praise the Lord, O Jerusalem, for 2 sopranos, alto, tenor, bass, chorus, 2 violins, viola and organ, Z.46 (anthem) 1 
    =   Rejoice in the Lord alway, Z.49 ('Bell Anthem') 5 
    =   Remember not, Lord, our offences, for chorus and organ, Z.50 (anthem) 10 
    =   Thou know'st, Lord (1st version of 1st setting), for chorus and organ, Z.58a (anthem) 2 
    =   Thou know'st, Lord (2nd version of 1st setting), for soprano, alto, tenor, bass, chorus and organ, Z.58b (anthem) 3 
    =   Who hath believed our report?, anthem for alto, 2 tenors, bass, chorus and organ, Z.64 1 
    =   O Lord, rebuke me not, anthem for 2 sopranos, chorus and organ, Z.40 1 
    =   Blessed is he that considereth the poor, Z.7 (anthem) 1 
    =   Lord, not to us, Z.137 (anthem) 1 

Odes   
    =   Celebrate this Festival (Birthday Ode for Queen Mary), Z.321 23 
    =   Come Ye Sons of Art Away (Birthday Ode for Queen Mary), Z.323 35 
    =   Fly Bold Rebellion (Welcome Ode for Charles II), for soloists, double chorus, strings and continuo, Z.324 2 
    =   Hail, Bright Cecilia (Ode for St. Cecilia's Day), Z.328 40 
    =   Love's Goddess Sure Was Blind (Birthday Ode for Queen Mary), Z.331 10 
    =   Now Does the Glorious Day Appear (Ode for Queen Mary's Birthday), for soloists, chorus, violins and continuo, Z.332 16 
    =   Of Old, When Heroes Thought it Base ('Yorkshire Feast Song'), Z.333 (ode) 28 
    =   Raise, Raise the Voice (Ode for St. Cecilia's day), for soprano, bass, chorus, 2 violins and continuo, Z.334 1 
    =   Sound the Trumpet, Beat the Drum (Welcome Ode for James II), Z.335 5 
    =   Swifter, Isis, Swifter Flow (Welcome Song for Charles II), for soloists, chorus and instruments, Z.336 1 
    =   The Noise of Foreign Wars (unfinished ode) 1 
    =   Welcome to all the Pleasures (Ode for St. Cecilia's Day), Z.339 34 
    =   Sound the trumpet, beat the drum (Welcome Ode for James II), for 2 altos, tenors, basses, chorus, strings and continuo, Z.335 1 

Musical Services 
    =   Burial Service (for the funeral of Queen Mary), Z.27 16 
    =   Morning Service in D, for soloists, chorus and orchestra, Z.230 3 

Other Sacred Vocal Works   
    =   An Evening Hymn, Z.193 2 
    =   Beati omnes, for soprano, bass, chorus and continuo, Z.131 (hymn) 1 
    =   Blessed is the Man that Feareth the Lord, for 3 voices and continuo, Z.9 1 
    =   Christ is Made the Sure Foundation (hymn set to a theme by Purcell) 6 
    =   Hosanna to the Highest, for bass, chorus, and continuo, Z.187 1 
    =   How Long, Great God?, for soprano and continuo, Z.189 3 
    =   In Guilty Night, Z.134 3 
    =   Jehova, quam multi sunt, sacred song for tenor, bass, chorus and continuo, Z.135 7 
    =   Let the Night Perish (Job's Curse), sacred song for soprano, chorus and continuo, Z.191 2 
    =   Lord, What is Man? for soprano and continuo, Z.192 9 
    =   Me O Ye Gods, for 2 voices and continuo 1 
    =   Miserere Mei (canon a4), Z.109 2 
    =   My Beloved Spake, Z.28 1 
    =   Now That the Sun Hath Veiled His Light ('An Evening Hymn on a Ground'), Z.193 20 
    =   O Sing Unto the Lord, Z.44 1 
    =   Since God So Tender a Regard, for tenor, bass, male chorus and continuo, Z.143 1 
    =   Sleep, Adam, for soprano and continuo, Z.195 2 
    =   Te Deum and Jubilate Deo, for soloists, chorus and instruments in D, Z.232 3 
    =   Tell Me, Some Pitying Angel ('The Blessed Virgin's Expostulation'), Z.196 11 
    =   The Earth Trembled, and Heav'n Closed, sacred song for bass (or soprano) and continuo, Z.197 2 
    =   Thou Wakeful Shepherd ('Morning Hymn'), for soprano and continuo, Z.198 3 
    =   We sing to Him whose wisdom form'd the ear, sacred song for soprano, chorus of soprano and basso continuo, Z.199 1 
    =   With Sick and Famish'd Eyes, sacred song for soprano and continuo, Z.200 2 
    =   I Will Give Thanks Unto Thee, O Lord, Z.20 1 
    =   Voluntary on the Old Hundredth, Z.721 (attrib. to J. Blow) 1 
    =   O Lord God of hosts, for chorus Z.37 1 
    =   Miserere mei, Z.109 1 
    =   Begin the Song (The Resurrection) 1 
    =   Give sentence with me, O God, for chorus, Z.12 1 

Secular Songs   
    =   'Tis women makes us love, catch for 4 voices, Z.281 1 
    =   A Prince, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   A Song in the Prophetess, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Ah! cruel nymph! you give despair for soprano and continuo, Z.352 1 
    =   Ah! how pleasant 'tis to love, for soprano and continuo, Z.353 1 
    =   Amidst the Shades and Cool Refreshing Streams, Z.355 1 
    =   Amidst the Shades, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   As Amoret and Thirsis lay, song (from 'The Old Bachelor'), Z. 607/11 1 
    =   As Roger Last Night to Jenny Lay Close, catch for 3 voices, Z.242 1 
    =   Be Welcome, then, Great Sir, for 2 voices and continuo 1 
    =   But ah, I see Eusebia drown’d in tears, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Cease, anxious World, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Come, Let Us Drink, catch for 3 voices and continuo, Z.245 2 
    =   Corinna is divinely fair, song, Z.365 1 
    =   Cupid, the Slyest Rogue Alive, Z.367 2 
    =   Down, Down with Bacchus, catch for 3 voices, Z.247 1 
    =   Fairest Isle (from 'King Arthur'), aria for soprano, Z.628/38 1 
    =   Fly Swift, Ye Hours, Z.369 1 
    =   From Silent Shades and the Elysian Groves ('Bess of Bedlam'), Z.370 7 
    =   Fye Nay Prithee John 1 
    =   Hail Gracious Glorianna, Hail!, for 2 voices and continuo 1 
    =   Hail, bright Cecilia, Z.328 14 
    =   Hark, how the wild musicians sing, Z.542 1 
    =   Her charming strains, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Here let my life, for 2 voices and continuo 2 
    =   How happy's the husband (from 'Love Triumphant'), song, Z. 582/1 1 
    =   How Pleasant is this Flowery Plain, for soprano, tenor, 2 recorders, and continuo, Z.543 1 
    =   I Gave Her Cakes and I Gave Her Ale, catch for 3 voices, Z.256 1 
    =   I lov'd fair Celia, Z.381 3 
    =   I Love and I Must, Z.382 1 
    =   If Ever I More Riches Did Desire, for 2 sopranos, tenor, bass, 2 violins, and continuo, Z.544 1 
    =   If Music Be the Food of Love, Z.379 24 
    =   Incassum, Lesbia, incassum rogas (on the death of Queen Mary), Z.383 5 
    =   Incassum, Lesbia, Z.383, 'Queen's Epicedium' 1 
    =   Lost is My Quiet Forever, for 2 voices and continuo, Z.502 4 
    =   Lovely Albina's Come Ashore, Z.394 2 
    =   Mad Bess of Bedlam ('From silent shades') 1 
    =   Music for a While (from 'Oedipus'), song, Z. 583/2 3 
    =   Music for a while, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   My Lady's Coachman, John, catch for 3 voices, Z.260 1 
    =   No, no resistance is but vain, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Not All My Torments Can Your Pity Move, Z.400 5 
    =   Now that the sun hath veiled his light (An Evening Hymn on a Ground), Z.193 1 
    =   O dive custos Auriacae domus (On the death of Queen Mary), for 2 sopranos and continuo, Z.504 16 
    =   O how happy's he, Z.403 (incomplete; continuo lost) 1 
    =   O lead me to some peaceful gloom, for voice and continuo 2 
    =   O let me weep, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   O Solitude, My Sweetest Choice, Z.406 19 
    =   O! Fair Cedaria, Hide Those Eyes, Z.402 2 
    =   O, I’m sick of life, Z.140 (devotional song) 2 
    =   Olinda in the Shades Unseen, Z.404 2 
    =   On the brow of Richmond Hill, Z.405 1 
    =   Once, twice, thrice, I Julia tried, catch for 3 voices, Z.265 1 
    =   Pious Celinda goes to prayers, song, Z.410 2 
    =   Plung’d in the confines of despair, Z.142 (devotional song) 1 
    =   Pox on You for a Fop, catch for 3 voices, Z.268 1 
    =   Saccharissa's grown old, for 2 voices and continuo, Z.507 1 
    =   She Loves and She Confesses Too, Z.413 5 
    =   Since from my dear Astrea's sight (from 'Prophetess'), aria for soprano, Z. 627/App2 2 
    =   Sir Walter Enjoying His Damsel, catch for 3 voices, Z.273 1 
    =   Soft Notes and Gently Raised ('A Serenading Song'), Z.510 3 
    =   Stript of Their Green Our Groves Appear, Z.444 1 
    =   Sweeter than roses (from 'Pausanius'), song, Z. 585/1 3 
    =   Sweetness of Nature, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   The Fatal Hour Comes on Apace, Z.421 6 
    =   The Miller's Daugter Riding, catch for 3 voices, Z.277 1 
    =   The Night is Come, for 2 voices and continuo, Z.77 (doubtful) 1 
    =   The Plaint, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Thrice happy lovers, for voice and continuo 1 
    =   Thus to a ripe, consenting maid (from 'Old Bachelor'), song, Z.607/10 1 
    =   Tom the Taylor 1 
    =   Urge Me No More, Z.426 1 
    =   What a sad fate is mine, Z.428 (2 versions) 3 
    =   What Can We Poor Females Do? for soprano and continuo, Z.429 1 
    =   What Hope for Us Remains Now He Is Gone?, On the Death of Matthew Locke, Z.472 1 
    =   When First Amintas Sued for a Kiss, Z.430 4 
    =   When her languishing eyes said 'love', song, Z.432 1 
    =   When on my sick bed I languish, Z.144 (devotional song) 1 
    =   Why, My Daphne, Why Complaining? for 2 voices and continuo, Z.525 1 
    =   Young Thyrsis' fate, ye hills and groves, deplore (On the death of Thomas Farmer), song for soprano, bass and continuo, Z.473 1 
    =   She That Would Gain a Faithfull Lover, for voice and ensemble, Z.414 1 
    =   The Comical History of Don Quixote, Z.578, Pt.3
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: MusicTurner on September 17, 2020, 09:58:47 PM
I wrote 'seem to', and IMHO, suggesting a certain openness to revising the opinion ... the famous 'Viola Fantasias' don't appeal much to me, I culled an Archiv recording and now have an EMI, somewhat livelier. Admittedly, it is quite introvert music. As regards the other instrumental works, I culled the trio sonatas, but I've still got the complete harpsichord works with Ruzickova; in both cases, the movements tend to be very/too short, to leave much of an impression. Concerning the vocal works, I've got around 10, including D&A and 'King Arthur' and a few more; the Naxos CD of the 'St Cecilia Ode' etc. has given a much better and livelier impression than the old Deller CD comprising that work. But overall, for multi-facetted Baroque composers, I'd personally choose Monteverdi, Bach, Vivaldi, Rameau, Telemann and Haendel, probably also Zelenka, and maybe more, rather than Purcell, based on what I have heard. If there are some further great works out there, I'd only be pleasantly surprised.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Jo498 on September 17, 2020, 10:34:24 PM
Purcell's output was huge for someone who died so young. As it was mostly music for particular occasions and functions it is to be expected that not everything is on an exalted level. I love the harpsichord music but it can hardly be denied that it is not major in the way of Couperin or Bach, or even Handel. The chamber music is rather early and the fantazias are highly respected but the zenith of the viol ensemble had been almost two generations past. Whereas the two dozen trio sonatas are rather early in the history of the genre and we tend to be more familiar with the post-Corellian standard or with the more extravagant style of Buxtehude or Biber.

I have heard only a subset (usually the most popular) of the anthems and church music but there are  certainly great pieces among them, like the St Cecilia music or the "Bell Anthem" (Rejoice in the Lord alway) I also have to admit that I am probably even less familiar with 1680s French or German church music, again only having heard isolated famous works by Charpentier or Biber etc.

The problem with some or Purcell's best works like Fairy Queen and King Arthur (and the lesser semi-operas) is that they are difficult to present nowadays. I have seen an entertaining somewhat postmodern staging of King Arthur but as a whole it is a silly piece (including not only the beautiful "Fairest isle" (i.e. Britain) but down-to-earth praise of Britain's wool and milk production) and as I wrote above the music is often not for the most important scenes and characters, i.e. the protagonists do not sing at all. The music is every bit as good as Dido and Aeneas (and actually more varied with a larger orchestra etc.) but the latter is perfectly fit for our way of presenting opera and the semi-operas are not. This does not matter so much on recordings, but even here they are roughly a sequence of scenes or moods that barely hang together. Because the continuity was provided by the spoken play.
IMO the two great semi-operas have music that is at least the equal and maybe closer to our tastes than the typical high/late baroque opera seria.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Mandryka on September 17, 2020, 11:37:51 PM
Re the sonatas, I think this recording is particularly rewarding

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/511d6c-O-qL.__AC_SY300_QL70_ML2_.jpg)

Some of the organ music is impressive and flamboyant, the opening double organ voluntary on this CD for example

(https://d1iiivw74516uk.cloudfront.net/eyJidWNrZXQiOiJwcmVzdG8tY292ZXItaW1hZ2VzIiwia2V5IjoiODA1MDUzMi4xLmpwZyIsImVkaXRzIjp7InJlc2l6ZSI6eyJ3aWR0aCI6OTAwfSwianBlZyI6eyJxdWFsaXR5Ijo2NX0sInRvRm9ybWF0IjoianBlZyJ9LCJ0aW1lc3RhbXAiOjE0NzExMzY1MzB9)

And quite recently, maybe two years ago, Ewa Rzetecka-Niewiadomska released some suites on keyboard which I thought was a bit of a game changer in terms of expressiveness

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/91jyVeqFiSL._SS500_.jpg)

But there are venerable classic recordings of these suites, from people like George Malcolm and Richard Egarr and Kenneth Gilbert.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Scion7 on September 18, 2020, 12:00:48 AM
I've never seen that last one - what an inventive cover.

I'll have a listen:  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l0LSK0ZLB6foVvExuHJAJ5Yh6mPmrItyI
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Iota on September 20, 2020, 05:08:04 AM
Purcell .. where really impressive or catchy pieces seem rather few and far between, compared to other great composers from that period, IMHO ..

If of any interest, I think the Music for Queen Mary's Funeral is an affecting, heartfelt work, seeming to express genuine personal grief. There's a nice recording with Herreweghe on Harmonia Mundi.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: MN Dave on September 20, 2020, 05:17:24 AM
If of any interest, I think the Music for Queen Mary's Funeral is an affecting, heartfelt work, seeming to express genuine personal grief. There's a nice recording with Herreweghe on Harmonia Mundi.

A favorite, so thanks for the tip.

[what do you think of the Naxos? That’s my go-to]
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Iota on September 20, 2020, 06:12:01 AM
A favorite, so thanks for the tip.

[what do you think of the Naxos? That’s my go-to]

I only know the Herreweghe and the Gardiner versions I'm afraid. So thanks actually for your recommendation.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: BasilValentine on September 20, 2020, 06:21:13 AM
That's a shame. I liked Dido & Aeneas, but I never like hearing that the one work I discovered and enjoyed by a new composer (new to me, that is) is far and away his or her best work.

The Fantasias for viols are really good.
Title: Re: The Purcell Thread
Post by: Biffo on September 20, 2020, 07:17:18 AM
Two of the three Purcell Funeral Sentences weren't played at Queen Mary's funeral. Only the March, Canzona and Thou knowest Lord were played, the rest of the Burial Service used works by Thomas Morley; his setting of Thou knowest Lord was lost so Purcell composed a replacement. Three marches were used for the procession to the Abbey - Purcell's and works by James Paisible and Thomas Tollett.

I only found this out relatively recently when I bought the album Music for Queen Mary from Martin Neary and Westminster Abbey Choir. Neary explains all in his excellent sleeve notes.

I don't suppose it matters too much, I have enjoyed the 'traditional' setting ever since LP days and have recordings by Munrow, Gardiner and Herreweghe (and possibly others). Wonderful music!