GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Maciek on April 18, 2007, 12:13:25 PM

Title: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 18, 2007, 12:13:25 PM
It seems this will be the first woman composer with a thread of her own on the new forum. What's happening to you, Saariaho, Gubaidulina, Lili Boulanger, Fanny Mendelssohn and Clara Schumann fans? ;)

(http://www.polmic.pl/foto/Bacewicz6.jpg)

Here's a link to Bruce's thread on the old forum: Grażyna Bacewicz (1909-1969) (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,7316.0.html)

Also check out these (more or less related) fun threads: Female music (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,7237.0.html), Female composers (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,703.0.html), Women Composers (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,3345.0.html), Women can compose (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,9734.0.html), Women can't compose (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,9273.0.html), Women composers - no respect? (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,4069.0.html).

Grażyna Bacewicz was one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century in Poland. And guess what - she was another Nadia Boulanger student! She went through 2 phases: first she was a typical energetic neo-classicist (or rather neo-Baroque) composer, then she decided to explore tone colors more and entered a mildly sonoristic phase. For details go to the very good USC PMC page: Grażyna Bacewicz (http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/composer/bacewicz.html).

Maciek
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 18, 2007, 09:25:13 PM
It seems this will be the first woman composer with a thread of her own on the new forum. What's happening to you, Saariaho, Gubaidulina, Lili Boulanger, Fanny Mendelssohn and Clara Schumann fans? ;)

(http://www.polmic.pl/foto/Bacewicz6.jpg)

Here's a link to Bruce's thread on the old forum: Grażyna Bacewicz (1909-1969) (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,7316.0.html)

Also check out these (more or less related) fun threads: Female music (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,7237.0.html), Female composers (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,703.0.html), Women Composers (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,3345.0.html), Women can compose (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,9734.0.html), Women can't compose (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,9273.0.html), Women composers - no respect? (http://www.good-music-guide.com/forum/index.php/topic,4069.0.html).

Grażyna Bacewicz was one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century in Poland. And guess what - she was another Nadia Boulanger student! She went through 2 phases: first she was a typical energetic neo-classicist (or rather neo-Baroque) composer, then she decided to explore tone colors more and entered a mildly sonoristic phase. For details go to the very good USC PMC page: Grażyna Bacewicz (http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/composer/bacewicz.html).

Maciek
So far you have started threads on Lutoslawski, Penderecki, Szymanowski, Panufnik, Obsucre Polish composers, Gorecki and now Bacewicz.  My favorites of hers:
Concerto for Orchestra
Viola Concerto
String qts (the fourth especially)
Cello quartet
Symphony 3
Pensieri Notturni for chamber orch
Divertimento for strings
Polish Caprice
Violin Sonatas 2 and 4

Thank you for bringing all these composers to the forefront...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 19, 2007, 01:41:23 AM
Hi Robert!

I don't know many of the pieces you mention - will have to seek them out. I only discovered the Polish Caprice about a week ago and it went straight to the top of my favorite pieces by Bacewicz list! :D

Maciek
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: violinconcerto on April 19, 2007, 03:43:24 AM
So far you have started threads on Lutoslawski, Penderecki, Szymanowski, Panufnik, Obsucre Polish composers and now Bacewicz.  My favorites of hers:
Concerto for Orchestra
Viola Concerto
String qts (the fourth especially)
Cello quartet
Symphony 3
Pensieri Notturni for chamber orch
Divertimento for strings
Polish Caprice
Violin Sonatas 2 and 4



Such a long list and no violin concerto? Grazyna would turn over in her grave if she knew that...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 19, 2007, 05:21:53 AM

Such a long list and no violin concerto? Grazyna would turn over in her grave if she knew that...

sorry about that of course a favorite of mine. I also forgot to mention her string quartets....Thats what I get for going with memory instead of checking my collection....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: violinconcerto on April 19, 2007, 08:56:25 AM

Quote
Such a long list and no violin concerto? Grazyna would turn over in her grave if she knew that...

sorry arbout that of course a favorite of mine.


 ???  ??? She wrote seven violin concertos, of which 6 still exist... so which one is your favourite of course??
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 19, 2007, 09:36:55 AM
???  ??? She wrote seven violin concertos, of which 6 still exist... so which one is your favourite of course??

 ??? ??? Which one is missing?

Of this kind of repertoire I know she wrote 7 violin concertos, 2 cello concertos, a viola concerto, 7 string quartets, 5 violin and piano sonatas and 2 sonatas for violin solo but I thought none of these were lost?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: violinconcerto on April 19, 2007, 11:40:45 AM
No.6 is missing. Bacewicz wrote it, but never released it. So no performance exists. Check out here:

http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/VEPM/bacewicz/b-wrks-f.html (http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/VEPM/bacewicz/b-wrks-f.html)

Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 19, 2007, 11:49:55 AM
Wow! Fascinating. Thanks for sharing the info. :)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 19, 2007, 12:27:55 PM
sorry arbout that of course a favorite of mine.



 ???  ??? She wrote seven violin concertos, of which 6 still exist... so which one is your favourite of course??

Im not really sure which one is my fav either 2 or 3....I have to find them. I believe they are on vinyl. If my memory is holding up I believe they are on the MUZA label.  I also  have a double disc of her music on Olympia...I just have to find them....I think they are all packed away.....I only have her sonatas and quartets concerto for string orch...at hand....I don't catalog my collection so most of my lps and discs are in my memory bank.....I have been thinking about her concertos since you mentioned it and I am drawing a blank in terms of which one is a favorite....It must be 15 years since I listened to those....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 19, 2007, 12:37:06 PM
sorry arbout that of course a favorite of mine.



 ???  ??? She wrote seven violin concertos, of which 6 still exist... so which one is your favourite of course??
Can you tell us about all these concertos?  who are the soloists ? Do you have them on disc or vinyl?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 19, 2007, 02:31:47 PM
Hi Robert!

I don't know many of the pieces you mention - will have to seek them out. I only discovered the Polish Caprice about a week ago and it went straight to the top of my favorite pieces by Bacewicz list! :D

Maciek
Maciek,
If I may rec a great Bacewicz disc. Her violin sonatas 3-5 Plawner Kupiec on hansler 03117 one of the best discs I purchased last year.....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 19, 2007, 02:32:52 PM
Wow! Fascinating. Thanks for sharing the info. :)
Maciek,
How many vc's do  you have?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 19, 2007, 02:46:38 PM
I don't remember exactly. 2 or 3 I think. I distinctly remember No. 1 because it's on one of my favorite Bacewicz discs. I also have no. 7 (an Olympia CD). Maybe there's another one lurking on some disc I've forgotten... But probably not. I also have the viola concerto and the concerto for 2 pianos and orchestra (another Olympia CD).
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: violinconcerto on April 19, 2007, 07:39:02 PM
I have these recordings, and enjoyed most No.2:

No.1: Krzysztof Bakowski, Polish RSO, Jacek Rogala
No.2: Robert Kabara, Polish RSO, Jacek Rogala
No.3: Grazyna Bacewicz, Polish RSO, Grzegorz Fitelberg
No.4: Janusz Skramlik, Polish NSO Katowice, Jerzy Swoboda
No.5: Wanda Wilkomirska, Warsaw NPO, Witold Rowicki
No.7: Roman Lasocki, Polish RSO, Karol Stryja
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 20, 2007, 12:06:15 AM
I have these recordings, and enjoyed most No.2:

No.1: Krzysztof Bakowski, Polish RSO, Jacek Rogala
No.2: Robert Kabara, Polish RSO, Jacek Rogala
No.3: Grazyna Bacewicz, Polish RSO, Grzegorz Fitelberg
No.4: Janusz Skramlik, Polish NSO Katowice, Jerzy Swoboda
No.5: Wanda Wilkomirska, Warsaw NPO, Witold Rowicki
No.7: Roman Lasocki, Polish RSO, Karol Stryja

That No. 3 looks interesting. Is that on vinyl? What about nos. 2, 4, 5 - were they released on CD? I'm not very current on this, as you can see. ;D
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: violinconcerto on April 21, 2007, 07:30:21 AM
No.2 to 5 were just broadcasted on Polish radio, no commerical recordings!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 21, 2007, 10:05:04 AM
That is simply depressing... :'( But thanks anyway. :D I'll be on the lookout for broadcasts... :-\
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: S709 on April 21, 2007, 10:56:15 AM
Great thread. I like Bacewicz a lot, the more modernist works as well as the totally neo-classical, but lately I've listened a lot to the catchy little folk-music inspired pieces like the Suite for Chamber Orchestra, some of the orchestral dances like the Krakowiak (1950) and Oberek for Violin and Orchestra (1949), and especially Folk Dances for 2 violins. It's fun stuff.

She was a good symphonist too, based only Symphony No. 3 (anyone know nos. 1 or 2?).

The Violin Concerti have their great moments but I don't think they are the high point of her work... my favorite might be No. 4 right now. No. 1 is the lightest and most tuneful I think. I haven't yet listened to No. 2 so maybe my view will change! Anyway my recordings of them are, for comparison to violinconcerto:

No.1: Krzysztof Bakowski, Polish NRSO, Jacek Rogala
No.2: Robert Kabara, Polish National RSO, Jacek Rogala
No.3: Magdalena Rezler, Polish RO in Warsaw, Boguslaw Madey
No.4: Grazyna Bacewicz, Warsaw PO, Bohdan Wodiczko
No.5: Wanda Wilkomirska, Warsaw PO, Witold Rowicki
No.6: none.
No.7: Piotr Janowski, National PO Warsaw, Andzrej Markowski





Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 21, 2007, 11:22:25 AM
Great thread. I like Bacewicz a lot, the more modernist works as well as the totally neo-classical, but lately I've listened a lot to the catchy little folk-music inspired pieces like the Suite for Chamber Orchestra, some of the orchestral dances like the Krakowiak (1950) and Oberek for Violin and Orchestra (1949), and especially Folk Dances for 2 violins. It's fun stuff.

She was a good symphonist too, based only Symphony No. 3 (anyone know nos. 1 or 2?).

The Violin Concerti have their great moments but I don't think they are the high point of her work... my favorite might be No. 4 right now. No. 1 is the lightest and most tuneful I think. I haven't yet listened to No. 2 so maybe my view will change! Anyway my recordings of them are, for comparison to violinconcerto:

No.1: Krzysztof Bakowski, Polish NRSO, Jacek Rogala
No.2: Robert Kabara, Polish National RSO, Jacek Rogala
No.3: Magdalena Rezler, Polish RO in Warsaw, Boguslaw Madey
No.4: Grazyna Bacewicz, Warsaw PO, Bohdan Wodiczko
No.5: Wanda Wilkomirska, Warsaw PO, Witold Rowicki
No.6: none.
No.7: Piotr Janowski, National PO Warsaw, Andzrej Markowski






I also own a few of her concertos on vinyl...Im just to lazy to go look for them....As My friend Maciek asked violin concerto are yours on vinyl or disc? I do not believe that many were put on disc, if so, I am very interested....I am also lazy or I would have gotten the equipment to put some of my vinyl on disc...BTW What do  you think of her chamber works??? Look above at my post about this great disc I have of her violin sonatas....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 21, 2007, 12:20:54 PM
I'm getting the Acte Préalable box set of her complete string quartet works any month now (June at the latest). :D Though I'm a bit concerned if that is a good choice in terms of performance (anyone ever heard of the Amar Corde String Quartet??). I've had some serious duds from that label in the past - and their sound quality is very variable too. >:(
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Robert on April 21, 2007, 10:07:36 PM
I'm getting the Acte Préalable box set of her complete string quartet works any month now (June at the latest). :D Though I'm a bit concerned if that is a good choice in terms of performance (anyone ever heard of the Amar Corde String Quartet??). I've had some serious duds from that label in the past - and their sound quality is very variable too. >:(
Please let me know how they are. I do not have them all. I have 3 4 6 7... I never knew they were available complete...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on April 21, 2007, 11:18:04 PM
I will on this thread! 8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: johnQpublic on April 22, 2007, 05:52:12 AM
My favs:

Divertimento for Strings - short & sweet but not a note wasted. Just the right touch of lightness too.

Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion - bold and fervent.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: S709 on April 22, 2007, 10:10:03 AM
I also own a few of her concertos on vinyl...Im just to lazy to go look for them....As My friend Maciek asked violin concerto are yours on vinyl or disc? I do not believe that many were put on disc, if so, I am very interested....I am also lazy or I would have gotten the equipment to put some of my vinyl on disc...BTW What do  you think of her chamber works??? Look above at my post about this great disc I have of her violin sonatas....

Well, mine are on CD-Rs, made from radio recordings (I don't know the dates of broadcast or anything more).

No. 7 is on an Olympia CD.

As for the chamber music, I have a disc of music for violin & piano, plus a lot of string quartets etc -- I haven't listened to any of it in detail yet!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Lilas Pastia on May 07, 2007, 03:41:31 PM
Hänssler has recorded some of Grazyna Bacewicz piano works (10 Etudes, Kleines Tryptichon, 3 Burleskes, Children's Suite, Sonatina, Sonata 2 etc.) . Any comments?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 25, 2009, 04:33:49 AM
I will on this thread! 8)

Actually, it went out of print as a box set and that meant buying the issues separately, for more, so I decided to put it off. So no reviews forthcoming, at least not from me. But Jens is preparing a text for the Bacewicz 100th anniversary (he's mentioned it on the WAYLT thread). I'm looking forward to that.

Anyway, the other day he asked me about interesting Bacewicz recordings. One thing led to another and what happened in the end is that I've put together a Bacewicz discography. If anyone is interested, it can be found here (http://musicalwren.wordpress.com/2009/01/17/grazyna-bacewicz-recordings-–-a-very-long-checklist/). And a follow-up for recordings on vinyl here (http://musicalwren.wordpress.com/2009/01/23/grazyna-bacewicz-on-vinyl/).
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Ugh! on January 25, 2009, 12:24:30 PM
Well done, I'll certainly refer back to that list.

Just a note:
Philips 839260 (containing Music for strings,trumpet and percussion), was also issued as "Contemporary Polish Music" (Phillips 835 261 AY)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 25, 2009, 12:42:40 PM
Thanks! I'll add that right away. :D I'm sure there are also lots of mistakes in the catalog numbers etc. :-\ But I guess in this case a slightly faulty list is better than no list at all. ;D
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Ugh! on January 26, 2009, 02:40:34 AM
absolutely, I applaud your work  ;)

Now, do you find the mentioned work for strings, trumpet and percussion as Bartokish as I do?  8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 26, 2009, 12:28:53 PM
Thanks. :D

Now, do you find the mentioned work for strings, trumpet and percussion as Bartokish as I do?  8)

Definitely! At a certain time, she was the "most Bartokish" Polish composer I can think of (though she always had her own voice, there's no question about it, but "with a shade of Bartók" - to quote the title of another great Polish composer's piece :-X). Not to mention the explicit nod, in this title, to Music for strings, percussion and celesta. (Also, it was written in the same year as Lutoslawski's Funeral Music.)

[EDIT: did this post come out muddled? I didn't think it muddled but written out it seems muddled... :-\]
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 05, 2009, 04:04:06 AM
100th-birthday-bump.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Brewski on February 05, 2009, 07:30:12 AM
100th-birthday-bump.

Thanks, Maciek!  Amid some other more prominent centenaries, this one will no doubt receive little attention.  Glad it did, here. 

--Bruce
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 07, 2009, 05:01:28 AM
Thanks, Maciek!  Amid some other more prominent centenaries, this one will no doubt receive little attention.  Glad it did, here. 

--Bruce

Well, over here the rivalry is only between Bacewicz and Karlowicz. Krystian Zimerman has embarked on a Bacewicz tour (playing, again, after many years, her 2nd Piano Sonata) and there are lots of other Bacewicz concerts. (And Karlowicz concerts too but I digress...)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on February 07, 2009, 03:58:19 PM
Grażyna Bacewicz - 100th Anniversary (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=460)

Grażina Bacewicz was born 100 years ago today in Łódź, to a Polish mother and a Lithuanian father from whom she received her first musical training. Her prodigious talent became soon obvious and she gave her fist public performances at the age of seven. Her first composition followed at thirteen. At 19 she began to study philosophy at the University of Warsaw, but after just over a year she decided to focus more on music and enrolled in the Warsaw Conservatoire where she studied violin with Józef Jarzębski, piano with Jan Turczyński, and composition with Kazimierz Sikorski.
...  (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=460).

(Tomorrow: Torelli & Karlowicz's [death] anniversaries. I wrote little appreciations for WETA which will appear on the website  (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/)at 6am CET and noon CET, respectively)


Re: String Quartets:

Actually, it went out of print as a box set and that meant buying the issues separately, for more, so I decided to put it off. So no reviews forthcoming, at least not from me. But Jens is preparing a text for the Bacewicz 100th anniversary (he's mentioned it on the WAYLT thread). I'm looking forward to that.

I've received the Bacewicz recordings from that label one day to late. I might yet update the text, though, because I'm impressed by the works and (surprisingly?) by the performances/recording. The Piano Quintet, in particular, is a piece I have taken to quite a bit, even upon first (and so far only) hearing. If there is interest, I'll post my impressions either here or as an addendum to the WETA article.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 14, 2009, 03:00:20 AM
A heads-up (http://musicalwren.wordpress.com/2009/02/13/two-bacewicz-premieres-on-monday/) for fans of new discoveries. ;D

[EDIT: Sorry, I didn't have time to type an explanation: the link leads to a post on my blog with information about an upcoming concert that will feature world premieres of two recently discovered Grażyna Bacewicz pieces - the concert can also be caught live via a webcast]
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 15, 2009, 02:54:00 PM
If there is interest, I'll post my impressions either here or as an addendum to the WETA article.

Oops, sorry, I somehow missed the conditional part of the sentence and just kept checking here and your blog every other day. ;D Please, please do!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on February 15, 2009, 04:49:59 PM
Oops, sorry, I somehow missed the conditional part of the sentence and just kept checking here and your blog every other day. ;D Please, please do!

Hah... I should do that more often... Hidden conditionals to uppen the clicks. :-)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Dundonnell on June 03, 2009, 02:42:07 AM
Chandos will be issuing this new recording of the Violin Concertos Nos. 1, 3 and 7 towards the end of this month-

http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Chandos/CHAN10533
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on June 03, 2009, 03:08:55 AM
Wow! Thanks! Will be looking forward to that. I do have recordings of all three, and the 1st and 7th have already been released on CD (the 7th twice) but for the 3rd this will be a premiere CD release! (AFAIK)

(I'm not the greatest fan of the conductor but whatever...)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on July 05, 2009, 02:14:00 AM
And DUX has released a new recording of the 3rd Concerto as well! Don't know the exact release dates (who one-upped whom?) but while I really like Kurkowicz, Jakowicz is the one whose recording I would buy blindly (based on what I've heard from him both live and on CD - his Lutoslawski Partita, e.g., is every bit as good as Mutter's).
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on July 05, 2009, 02:56:12 AM
And DUX has released a new recording of the 3rd Concerto as well! Don't know the exact release dates (who one-upped whom?) but while I really like Kurkowicz, Jakowicz is the one whose recording I would buy blindly (based on what I've heard from him both live and on CD - his Lutoslawski Partita, e.g., is every bit as good as Mutter's).

Very good to know. Thanks!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on July 21, 2009, 06:29:05 AM
(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/CHAN10533.jpg)

I've just finished listening to this, my first Bacewicz and I'm pretty amazed at the quality of the music. Containing concertoes 1, 3 & 7 the stylistic range is  wide and it's not easy to generalize. I'm pretty stumped as to why they have placed the concertoes i the sequence 7, 3, 1 though. Makes no sense at all to me.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Brewski on July 21, 2009, 07:06:45 AM
That looks like a very enticing CD, and part of the attraction for me would be the sound on Chandos.  I don't think I've ever heard a bad-sounding recording from that company.

Her music *is* quite a find, isn't it!  I recall my first encounter--an OK-sounding CD on Olympia, of string works--and wondered why her music isn't performed more often.

--Bruce
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on August 01, 2009, 02:47:12 PM
Damn, I wish I could get my hands on those discs some time soon. But it doesn't look like it... ::) Maybe the DUX, sometime near the end of the year...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on December 31, 2009, 01:48:09 PM
The blog I've discovered yesterday (a short lived affair that only had 5 musical entries) offers a fascinating download of a Bacewicz chamber concert with the Silesian String Quartet I (with Marek Mos, when they were really good). I even think I actually went to that concert, but memories are rather hazy. The recording of one of the quintets was later released on CD, but the rest you can't get anywhere else.

The program is: 4th String Quartet - 1st Piano Quintet - 7th String Quartet - 2nd Piano Quintet
Played by: Silesian String Quartet (with Marek Moś), Vyacheslav Novikov - piano

Here's the link: http://sandflyer-titb.blogspot.com/2009/03/grazyna-bacewicz-two-string-quartets.html (http://sandflyer-titb.blogspot.com/2009/03/grazyna-bacewicz-two-string-quartets.html)

This is not to be missed! $:)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on January 03, 2010, 08:48:05 PM
The blog I've discovered yesterday (a short lived affair that only had 5 musical entries) offers a fascinating download of a Bacewicz chamber concert with the Silesian String Quartet I (with Marek Mos, when they were really good). I even think I actually went to that concert, but memories are rather hazy. The recording of one of the quintets was later released on CD, but the rest you can't get anywhere else.

The program is: 4th String Quartet - 1st Piano Quintet - 7th String Quartet - 2nd Piano Quintet
Played by: Silesian String Quartet (with Marek Moś), Vyacheslav Novikov - piano

Here's the link: http://sandflyer-titb.blogspot.com/2009/03/grazyna-bacewicz-two-string-quartets.html (http://sandflyer-titb.blogspot.com/2009/03/grazyna-bacewicz-two-string-quartets.html)

This is not to be missed! $:)

Do I have to join? I clink the link on the site, but it doesn't seem to engage the link. It looks like something is going to happen, but then it just returns to the same opening page.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on January 04, 2010, 12:10:50 AM
They have a DUX sale on prestoclassical, but no recordings of her string quartets seems to be on the list.....Pity.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 04, 2010, 01:41:47 AM
Do I have to join? I clink the link on the site, but it doesn't seem to engage the link. It looks like something is going to happen, but then it just returns to the same opening page.

Odd. Are you sure you're clicking the right link? (This one: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=VGVQEZHU (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=VGVQEZHU).) Everything worked for me, despite the minor complications (to be frank, it doesn't work as a link, you have to paste it into your address bar... and then on the megaupload site, after the verification, you have to wait through the 45 second countdown for the "real" link to appear)... ???
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 10, 2010, 10:45:46 PM
The Polish Radio is releasing an album (single disc) with her "radio-opera" King Arthur's Adventure. It was recorded last October. The Polish Radio page (http://www.polskieradio.pl/raf/klasyczna/record.aspx?id=129221) gives 2009 as the release year but I haven't seen this one around yet, and none of the internet stores seem to have it, so I'm guessing that date is more of a rough estimate... ::)

Performers: Ryszard Minkiewicz, Daniel Borowski, Przemysław Rezner, Agnieszka Makówka, Katarzyna Tylnik, Jadwiga Rappe, Anna Karasińska, Aleksander Kunach, Zbigniew Zamachowski et al. Polish Radio Choir in Cracow/Maria Orawska, Polish Radio Orchestra/Łukasz Borowicz
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on January 11, 2010, 02:38:37 AM
The Polish Radio is releasing an album (single disc) with her "radio-opera" King Arthur's Adventure. It was recorded last October. The Polish Radio page (http://www.polskieradio.pl/raf/klasyczna/record.aspx?id=129221) gives 2009 as the release year but I haven't seen this one around yet, and none of the internet stores seem to have it, so I'm guessing that date is more of a rough estimate... ::)

Performers: Ryszard Minkiewicz, Daniel Borowski, Przemysław Rezner, Agnieszka Makówka, Katarzyna Tylnik, Jadwiga Rappe, Anna Karasińska, Aleksander Kunach, Zbigniew Zamachowski et al. Polish Radio Choir in Cracow/Maria Orawska, Polish Radio Orchestra/Łukasz Borowicz

Have you heard the broadcast? If so, can you tell me anything about it?
I like the few radio operas I know (most prominently those of Egk), but I find them to be tied to the understanding of the language even more so than regular operas. Same here?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 11, 2010, 02:57:32 AM
Haven't heard it, sorry. I'm not even sure if this specific performance has ever been broadcast (though I suppose they should also have an older "original" recording somewhere in their archives).
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on January 11, 2010, 05:45:04 AM
I have this recording, which I did not find to be particularly outstanding, with respect to the performance or the music itself.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61g7ogf0m9L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on January 11, 2010, 12:50:33 PM
It took about a week for my friend to figure it out, haha, but I finally heard that radio broadcast!

So, I've finally heard the famous No.4. Wow, it's quite the most cosmopolitan sounding SQ I think, very Ravelian in it's sophistication, plus a bit of that gray suburban colouring of, say, Pijper, plus, the formal qualities of Hindemith, perhaps. And, don't forget Bartok. Yes, the whole of post-war Europe seems distilled here. It's abstract, yet friendly. Perhaps Ravel's string Duo is what I'm hearing, with Bartok and Hindemith. It's like I've heard this before, but Bacewicz certainly has put it together like no one before her. The mysterious first mvmt. certainly is in league with other 20th century SQ masterpieces.

SQ No.7, her last, right?, really perked up my ears, though. Bacewicz's mastery of string sound is much in evidence here. She is certainly "keeping up with the Jonses" here, in the '60s, Penderecki/Lutoslawski-type way. Much fun, and quite a leap from No.4.

The same holds true between the Two Piano Quintets. No.1's slow mvmt. was instantaneously popular to me, sounding a bit like a tortured Shosty passacaglia. I hear a lot of the mysterious piano configurations like I hear at the beginning of Bridge's Piano Trio No.2. She does favor the sort of soundworld that sounds to me like an aural equivalent to O'Keefe's(?) vagina flowers. I like it! :-*



I suppose the performances are close to bible. The group has a silky, homogenous sound that sounds like a luxury car. Just watch out for thoseaudio spiking coughs in between the performances!

Thee definition of "mid-century", or, "post-war". A definative missing link. Thanks!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 11, 2010, 01:50:21 PM
Ha, ha! The guy who keeps that blog says he likes to keep in all the coughing for the "atmosphere of a live concert" or something... ;D

Yeah, the 7th is her last and I think it's my favorite (of the ones I've heard - but I'm actually really planning to finally get all of them next month! cross your fingers), a really fun piece. I was almost blown away when I first heard it (about a year ago, on the older Olympia recording) - I didn't really expect anything of that kind, and so coherent at the same time! :o :D

And the Silesians, in their first incarnation, really were the best. Without Marek Mos, they're still really great, but I personally feel something is missing. I don't know, I'm not much of an sq expert, but that silkiness and "oneness" seems to be gone. Or at least there's a bit less of it. On the one hand, they sound a bit harsher, on the other (ironically) - interpretatively, they've lost their "edge", the sort of aggressive authoritativeness (wow, what a phrase!) that they had. It's just that with Mos they were so perfect!!! :'(
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on January 12, 2010, 09:42:10 AM
Ha, ha! The guy who keeps that blog says he likes to keep in all the coughing for the "atmosphere of a live concert" or something... ;D

Yeah, the 7th is her last and I think it's my favorite (of the ones I've heard - but I'm actually really planning to finally get all of them next month! cross your fingers), a really fun piece. I was almost blown away when I first heard it (about a year ago, on the older Olympia recording) - I didn't really expect anything of that kind, and so coherent at the same time! :o :D

And the Silesians, in their first incarnation, really were the best. Without Marek Mos, they're still really great, but I personally feel something is missing. I don't know, I'm not much of an sq expert, but that silkiness and "oneness" seems to be gone. Or at least there's a bit less of it. On the one hand, they sound a bit harsher, on the other (ironically) - interpretatively, they've lost their "edge", the sort of aggressive authoritativeness (wow, what a phrase!) that they had. It's just that with Mos they were so perfect!!! :'(

ok,...so that was the Silesians!,... right, I wasn't paying attention. But, yea, I already thought this was a pretty unique string quartet sound, so, I can only imagine them with their "main man".  I was just listening again last night (No.4),...really impressed. The actual playing itself is like a co-star with the music.

btw- this duplicates two Olympia cds, no? how do the two performances compare (I'm assuming you have them of course ::))?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on January 12, 2010, 12:50:20 PM
I regret to say that this is the Silesian Quartet with their "main man". ;D (Sorry, reading my previous post now, I realize I wasn't exactly clear about that... 0:)) On that same blog you can also find another recording (http://sandflyer-titb.blogspot.com/2009/04/krzysztof-penderecki-chamber-music-46th.html), Penderecki SQs this time, played by the "new" Silesians. (FYI, Silesians I were: Marek Moś - Arkadiusz Kubica - Łukasz Syrnicki - Piotr Janosik; Silesians II are Szymon Krzeszowiec - Arkadiusz Kubica - Łukasz Syrnicki - Piotr Janosik; Their website (http://www.silesian-quartet.art.pl/) covers both eras - it's funny, though, how they completely gloss over the change of line-up - in fact, Marek Mos isn't mentioned anywhere that I can see! :o) Haven't listened to the Penderecki concert yet, don't know if it will confirm my overall impression of (ever so slight) decline. Maybe they'll surprise me. :)

I have heard one of the two Olympia chamber Bacewicz CDs (the one with SQs 4 & 7 + PQnt 1 - pretty much the same line-up as here ;D) but I don't own it (it's proving rather elusive on e-bay, and Amazon Marketplace only ships to one or two selected countries in the world - needless to say, Poland is not one of them). I have to say that now that I have this download, I don't really feel compelled to hunt down the Olympia discs anymore. I'm completely satisfied. 8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on January 12, 2010, 09:43:54 PM
I regret to say that this is the Silesian Quartet with their "main man". ;D (Sorry, reading my previous post now, I realize I wasn't exactly clear about that... 0:)) On that same blog you can also find another recording (http://sandflyer-titb.blogspot.com/2009/04/krzysztof-penderecki-chamber-music-46th.html), Penderecki SQs this time, played by the "new" Silesians. (FYI, Silesians I were: Marek Moś - Arkadiusz Kubica - Łukasz Syrnicki - Piotr Janosik; Silesians II are Szymon Krzeszowiec - Arkadiusz Kubica - Łukasz Syrnicki - Piotr Janosik; Their website (http://www.silesian-quartet.art.pl/) covers both eras - it's funny, though, how they completely gloss over the change of line-up - in fact, Marek Mos isn't mentioned anywhere that I can see! :o) Haven't listened to the Penderecki concert yet, don't know if it will confirm my overall impression of (ever so slight) decline. Maybe they'll surprise me. :)

I have heard one of the two Olympia chamber Bacewicz CDs (the one with SQs 4 & 7 + PQnt 1 - pretty much the same line-up as here ;D) but I don't own it (it's proving rather elusive on e-bay, and Amazon Marketplace only ships to one or two selected countries in the world - needless to say, Poland is not one of them). I have to say that now that I have this download, I don't really feel compelled to hunt down the Olympia discs anymore. I'm completely satisfied. 8)

ok, so this is your favorite line-up,... ok, well, then they certainly do have "the" sound, yes.

And, yes, I don't feel compelled either. This makes for the most possibly single best Bacewicz calling card (maybe next to Olympia 311). Completely satisfied.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: zorzynek on January 13, 2010, 07:24:11 AM
I loved her Incrustations for horn and chamber ensemble
Pretty decent version of it is on this - unfortunately uneven - record:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=219127
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on February 13, 2010, 09:45:36 AM
btw- I forgot

How do you pronounce Bacewicz?? haha

I say - Batch-e-witch, haha...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 13, 2010, 11:34:42 AM
Bah-tze-vitch

The vitch is actually more like veech but the -ee- sound is short as in -i-... ::)

Bah-tze-vitch would be close enough.

(The Bah- more or less as in the British pronunciation of "bar".)

OK, sorry, maybe someone else can do this in an understandable way...?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on February 14, 2010, 10:20:16 AM
Bah-tze-vitch

The vitch is actually more like veech but the -ee- sound is short as in -i-... ::)

Bah-tze-vitch would be close enough.

(The Bah- more or less as in the British pronunciation of "bar".)

OK, sorry, maybe someone else can do this in an understandable way...?

No, that's it, haha... I ran into a Polish girl the other day and had quite a time of it saying, "Have you ever heard of Penderecki?" haha, she was adding "z"s and "t"s so I couldn't figure out who was wrong. funny!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on February 15, 2010, 08:20:34 AM
I'm afraid I'm quickly becoming the party-pooper of this thread.  Listened to most of this release.

(http://www.mdt.co.uk/public/pictures/products/standard/CHAN10533.jpg)

The Overture is very attractive, but I've listened to Concerti 1 and 3 so far and was not blown away.  I enjoyed the first more, a lightweight piece which is successful, but except for the more extroverted passages of the 3rd movement, the Concerto #3 made no impression at all after two listens.  I am coming to the conclusion that I just don't like Bacewicz so much.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 15, 2010, 08:23:09 AM
Well, you certainly can't be accused of not trying. ;D
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on February 15, 2010, 08:36:48 AM
Well, you certainly can't be accused of not trying. ;D

Except I have this feeling that I should like her music.  My impression is that if I like Martinu I should like Bacewicz, but there is a certain undefinable quality missing.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: zorzynek on February 15, 2010, 09:31:53 AM
Except I have this feeling that I should like her music.  My impression is that if I like Martinu I should like Bacewicz, but there is a certain undefinable quality missing.

Well I feel you. I like Bacewicz and I got the feeling I should like Martinu too. Somehow, I can't start digging his music.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on February 16, 2010, 07:11:28 AM
Finally listened to the last concerto on the disc, No. 7.  I just don't get it.  Constant glissandi, sounds like a theramin  in an Ed Wood science fiction movie.  Then the parts that sound like a chicken pecking or a dog scratching for a bone.  When did the idea of melody and harmony become obsolete?

One more Bacewicz disc on the shelf.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Lg9AzjETL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on February 16, 2010, 07:44:27 AM
Then the parts that sound like a chicken pecking or a dog scratching for a bone.  When did the idea of melody and harmony become obsolete?

Sounds like you just don't like modern music (I haven't checked other postings to see whether that's actually the case, but just observing) ? That's totally OK by me, but doesn't necessarily make her a bad composer. The same statements could (and surely have been, at some time or another) be made against eg Bartoks string quartets.   
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on February 16, 2010, 09:32:34 AM
Well, do let us know what you think! At this point, we're entitled to know. ;D

(FWIW, I don't have that Chandos CD, but know two of the pieces in another recording - this one (http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Dux/DUX0486) - and it happens to be one of my two favorite Bacewicz discs!)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on February 16, 2010, 09:48:56 AM
Sounds like you just don't like modern music (I haven't checked other postings to see whether that's actually the case, but just observing) ? That's totally OK by me, but doesn't necessarily make her a bad composer. The same statements could (and surely have been, at some time or another) be made against eg Bartoks string quartets.

I love Bartok's string quartets, Shostakovich as well.  Bartok throws in some odd effects to spice things up here and there, but the basic language of the music is melody, harmony, counterpoint.  As far as violin music goes, I also adore the Stravinsky concerto, the Bartok, the Berg, the Martinu, Hindemith, Sibeluis, etc.  When I listen to the 7th Bacewicz, all I hear is an attempt to get a violin to make weird sounds.  I have no idea what the point of it is.  (Of course, I may just be missing it, that's happened before.)


Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on February 16, 2010, 09:54:24 AM
I love Bartok's string quartets, Shostakovich as well.  Bartok throws in some odd effects to spice things up here and there, but the basic language of the music is melody, harmony, counterpoint.  As far as violin music goes, I also adore the Stravinsky concerto, the Bartok, the Berg, the Martinu, Hindemith, Sibeluis, etc.  When I listen to the 7th Bacewicz, all I hear is an attempt to get a violin to make weird sounds.  I have no idea what the point of it is.  (Of course, I may just be missing it, that's happened before.)
OK; that clarifies things. I need to relisten to that disc!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on February 16, 2010, 09:59:45 AM
OK; that clarifies things. I need to relisten to that disc!

I generally liked the 1st, parts of the 3rd (the finale) and the Overture.  It was the 7th that just went over my head, so to speak.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Ugh on February 16, 2010, 11:41:49 PM
Finally listened to the last concerto on the disc, No. 7.  I just don't get it.  Constant glissandi, sounds like a theramin  in an Ed Wood science fiction movie.  Then the parts that sound like a chicken pecking or a dog scratching for a bone.  When did the idea of melody and harmony become obsolete?

One more Bacewicz disc on the shelf.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Lg9AzjETL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Ha ha you're not the first to be baffled by this one... Lots of glissandi yes, particularly in the allegro, but hardly anything like a Theremin. Personally I like the Largo, particularly the instrumentation of it....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Lethevich on February 19, 2010, 10:04:10 AM
One more Bacewicz disc on the shelf.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Lg9AzjETL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Interested in what you think of this when you get around to it. I am finding her violin sonatas increasingly rising in my esteem - there are some interesting "effects", but always utilised to highly musical ends.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on February 19, 2010, 10:49:32 AM
Constant glissandi, sounds like a theramin  in an Ed Wood science fiction movie.  Then the parts that sound like a chicken pecking or a dog scratching for a bone. 

See? Already this sounds interesting to me. Suono gratia artis? One man's meat...

Plus, you really can't blame anyone for living through the '60s, can you? ;D Everyone went wacky!

Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on May 23, 2010, 10:21:44 AM
Dip Your Ears, No. 103
by jfl | Sunday, May 23, 2010 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/dip-your-ears-no-103.html)
(http://www.usc.edu/dept/polish_music/news/events/Discography/Aug09/DUX0685.jpg)
 (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/dip-your-ears-no-103.html)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on June 20, 2010, 12:08:27 PM
Does anyone know what happened to the alleged Zimerman recording of the 2nd piano sonata and the piano quintets?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: lescamil on June 22, 2010, 09:34:44 AM
Does anyone know what happened to the alleged Zimerman recording of the 2nd piano sonata and the piano quintets?

As far as I know, Zimerman cancelled the production of this recording (it appeared on the DG website as a future release, but was removed). It is quite a shame, because in 2011 he has said that he will retire from performances and recordings. This is quite a shame, for his earlier recording of the 2nd sonata from the 1970s is still the benchmark for this piece, and a new interpretation by him would have been most welcome. The piano quintets have already been recorded quite splendidly by Waldemar Malicki and the Amar Corde String Quartet.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on June 22, 2010, 09:36:58 AM
As far as I know, Zimerman cancelled the production of this recording (it appeared on the DG website as a future release, but was removed). It is quite a shame, because in 2011 he has said that he will retire from performances and recordings.

He as decided to just sit at home and seethe with hatred for the U.S. in the comfort of his own home?   8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: lescamil on June 24, 2010, 06:50:18 PM
He as decided to just sit at home and seethe with hatred for the U.S. in the comfort of his own home?   8)

Basically. I really don't like Zimerman's attitude lately, even despite all of the US boycott bullcrap. I heard an interview with him once, and he boasted that he only performs and records about 1% of all of the repertoire he knows, and then listed a bunch of pieces that he plays at home for fun. I remember one of them being the Dutilleux Piano Sonata, and he named some works by Alkan, I believe. He said that for the majority of these pieces, they haven't reached his "standard", and then he went on about how audiences aren't prepared for a lot of it anyways. Just shameful.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 24, 2010, 07:09:45 PM
It seems this will be the first woman composer with a thread of her own on the new forum. What's happening to you, Saariaho, Gubaidulina, Lili Boulanger, Fanny Mendelssohn and Clara Schumann fans? ;)

Don't forget Doreen Carwithen.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: lescamil on June 25, 2010, 02:11:31 PM

Don't forget Doreen Carwithen.

I'm sorry, but given the quality of her music, it is extremely easy to forget her. Pleasant listening, but nothing distinctive for me, unlike some of the composers Maciek mentioned.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on June 25, 2010, 04:55:57 PM
I'm sorry, but given the quality of her music, it is extremely easy to forget her. Pleasant listening, but nothing distinctive for me, unlike some of the composers Maciek mentioned.

Yes, she's not outstanding, but Richard Hickox I think made a strong case for her. I never listen to her, but there just aren't that many great female composers.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on July 01, 2010, 04:32:07 AM
Hm, that's very odd. Especially considering that, AFAIK, he did record it (or at least the chamber music part of the planned disc)...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: lescamil on July 01, 2010, 06:54:35 AM
Hm, that's very odd. Especially considering that, AFAIK, he did record it (or at least the chamber music part of the planned disc)...

It wouldn't be the first time he recorded something, yet still withheld it from release. A recital from Tokyo was supposed to be released on DVD recently, but he chose to stop the release after seeing bits of it on YouTube. I suppose that is a different situation, though, since none of the new Bacewicz disk has been leaked to the public.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: CaramelJones on July 31, 2010, 02:08:29 PM
what recordings are you recommending for her works?

I find it very hard to find good Polish music.  A lot of the stuff just isn't available to buy anywhere that I can find...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on July 31, 2010, 02:27:42 PM
what recordings are you recommending for her works?

I find it very hard to find good Polish music.  A lot of the stuff just isn't available to buy anywhere that I can find...
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=460 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=460)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=732 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=732)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/dip-your-ears-no-103.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/dip-your-ears-no-103.html)
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=631 (http://www.weta.org/fmblog/?p=631)
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended.html)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: CaramelJones on July 31, 2010, 03:11:17 PM
Thanks J -

Actually I've already got most of these.  I'm not keen to duplicate my Karlowicz symphonies and violin concerto either.

The kind of hard to find Polish composers are the interesting newer Polish household names like Skrowaczewski; Lason; Krzanowski, Panufnik, Szymanski....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on July 31, 2010, 11:00:14 PM
Do you know these two newish discs?

If you dig around the forum, Szymanski has his own thread (in dire need of a bump 0:)). I think Panufnik does too. Then there were two or three "Polish composer" threads as well. All of them have sunk quite a while ago.

You can check Lethe's index (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,8566.0.html).
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on July 31, 2010, 11:26:30 PM
Thanks J -

Actually I've already got most of these.  I'm not keen to duplicate my Karlowicz symphonies and violin concerto either.

The kind of hard to find Polish composers are the interesting newer Polish household names like Skrowaczewski; Lason; Krzanowski, Panufnik, Szymanski....

I'll add reviews about Apollony Szeluto and Jadwiga Sarnecka soon.

Baird, Serocki, Krenz
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/dip-your-ears-no-99.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/dip-your-ears-no-99.html)

Nowowiejski
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended_12.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended_12.html)

Moniuszko
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/08/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/08/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended.html)



Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: CaramelJones on August 01, 2010, 12:04:13 AM
Do you know these two newish discs?

If you dig around the forum, Szymanski has his own thread (in dire need of a bump 0:)). I think Panufnik does too. Then there were two or three "Polish composer" threads as well. All of them have sunk quite a while ago.

You can check Lethe's index (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,8566.0.html).


My collection of Polish string quartets is woefully inadequate - I only have 4 CDs with the Silesian Quartet. 

I've been hunting for these ones for ages! Where did you get these ones?

My guess is that they have limited distribution.   Never seen them stocked anywhere here :(


Yeah - I only discovered this forum - its fabulous to see how detailed and knowledgeable it is.  Who'd have thunk Panufnik would have his own thread!

Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: CaramelJones on August 01, 2010, 04:36:23 AM
I'll add reviews about Apollony Szeluto and Jadwiga Sarnecka soon.

Baird, Serocki, Krenz
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/dip-your-ears-no-99.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/02/dip-your-ears-no-99.html)

Nowowiejski
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended_12.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2010/05/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended_12.html)

Moniuszko
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/08/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended.html (http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2009/08/reviewed-not-necessarily-recommended.html)

I already know Moniuszko's work - I have a lot of his Latin Masses and Songs, as well as the string quartet release on the Dux label. 

That album is the strongest of the work I've heard of him so far.  It is exceptionally satisfying in a classical-romantic sort of way.  Hoping for more.

Tadeusz Baird ... I have a few of his albums already.  He's interesting but a bit too much of his 'Psychodrama' style maybe.  Not really my taste. 

Is that Nowowiejski = Noskowski?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on October 09, 2010, 01:00:10 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028947783329.jpg)'

Looks like this will finally be released, great news indeed. Release date 31.12.2010 noted on jpc.de.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Maciek on October 09, 2010, 05:25:35 AM
[clapping smiley!]
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on June 10, 2011, 04:20:58 AM
To quote Prof. Farnsworth: "Good news, everyone!"

Chandos is now releasing recordings of the 2nd, 4th and 5th violin concerto with the same performers who did the 1st, 3rd and 7th.

http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product/NR_July11/CHAN10673.htm (http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/product/NR_July11/CHAN10673.htm)

What price the 6th? Or is it a withdrawn/phantom work?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Lethevich on June 10, 2011, 05:59:53 AM
What price the 6th? Or is it a withdrawn/phantom work?

I am hoping that it will be coupled with the viola concerto...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on June 10, 2011, 07:00:02 AM
Yeah, I'm not even sure of the status of the work--I know it's unpublished but with a copy in the Polish National Library.

I'd like to see all of the significant late works out on CD; hopefully Antoni Wit plans to handle the orchestral part of this given that he mentioned Bacewicz recordings in a recent interview.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scarpia on June 10, 2011, 07:09:19 AM
The first installment was a mixed bag, I thought, but I'm willing to give part 2 a try.  I see there is a bit of a wait before the release.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on June 11, 2011, 06:24:29 AM
(http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0028947783329.jpg)'

Looks like this will finally be released, great news indeed. Release date 31.12.2010 noted on jpc.de.

Strangely enough, The Washington Post carried an article about this cd in its Style section today. Of course it didn't mention its availability.

Contact Tom Huizenga,... style@washpost.com
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on June 11, 2011, 06:59:16 AM
Strangely enough, The Washington Post carried an article about this cd in its Style section today. Of course it didn't mention its availability.

Contact Tom Huizenga,... style@washpost.com

The CD is out; I have a copy in my hands... what seems to be the issue?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on June 11, 2011, 08:56:06 AM
The CD is out; I have a copy in my hands... what seems to be the issue?

oh, I see it,... perhaps Toucan lives in another country...

so, what do you think? (plus, pretty neat seeing it in the Post)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on June 11, 2011, 09:14:50 AM
oh, I see it,... perhaps Toucan lives in another country...
No, he posted his post last year. ;)

I personally like the disc a lot. The music covers her middle and late periods, and is all very well done.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on August 02, 2011, 04:35:38 PM
I find it very hard to find good Polish music.  A lot of the stuff just isn't available to buy anywhere that I can find...

You find it hard to find good Polish music? Are you kidding me? There are many great Polish composers: Szymanowski, Lutoslawski, Karlowicz, Panufnik, and, yes, Bacewicz! Do your research!!!!

Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on August 02, 2011, 04:38:34 PM
Bought these tonight:



Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on August 02, 2011, 04:40:00 PM
I think, overall, that Polish composers, besides Chopin, are so underrated. Their music is so distinctive, colorful, imaginative, and emotional. I can't wait to dig into these Bacewicz recordings.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on February 17, 2012, 06:53:42 AM
Marvelous composer - easily the greatest female composer in classical music - perhaps if Fanny and Clara had written more music, they'd be more competition in the 'overall' sweepstakes.  I'm not impressed by any of the later modern plethora of women composers - heard it all before and done much better.

I also feel she is Poland's second-greatest composer after Chopin (even if Szymanowski is more 'important' - mainly because Bacewicz is more 'out there' and not as widely heard on radio, or the concert hall.)

A couple of things -

The ProActe disc of Wind Quintets has two of her pieces - someone's already mentioned the Incrustations piece  - but her first major composition is on there, too - the Quintet for Winds (1932) - and while it is a neo-classical work, it is very enjoyable, especially the last movement.  It won an award for some musical academic contest.
For those who are wanting more "melody" from her, like Scapula, they would find satisfaction here.

The complete works for Oboe have been released on ProActe - performances by Pedzialek, Grodecki, Stuhr, Zajac, Sikorzak-Olec, Pilch -
Trios, Sonata, and a Sonatine - for Oboe and strings, harp, piano ... very nice work!  From 1937 to 1965.  She composed a fair amount of chamber pieces, none of which I have disliked that I've heard.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bacewicz-Complete-Oboe-Works-Pedzialek/dp/B000HLDCWA (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bacewicz-Complete-Oboe-Works-Pedzialek/dp/B000HLDCWA)

I found a CD of her supposedly "lost" radio broadcasts - http://www.amazon.com/Wanda-Wilkomirska-Maestra-Johannes-Brahms/dp/B005WPT02C (http://www.amazon.com/Wanda-Wilkomirska-Maestra-Johannes-Brahms/dp/B005WPT02C) -

CD 2 Grazyna Bacewicz - Concerts for violin and orchestra
1. Concerto no. 5 for violin and orchestra: Allegro
2. Concerto no. 5 for violin and orchestra: Andante sostenuto
3. Concerto no. 5 for violin and orchestra: Finale. Vivace
4. Concerto No. 7 for violin and orchestra: Tempo mutabile
5. Concerto No. 7 for violin and orchestra: Largo
6. Concerto No. 7 for violin and orchestra: Allegro

Wanda Wilkomirska - violin [excellent Polish violinist, badly represented currently on record-now a univ. prof in Sydney, Australia]
Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra ((tracks 1-6)
Witold Rowicki - conductor (tracks 1-3)
Andrzej Markowski (tracks 4-6)

Recorded in 1955 (track 1-3), 1979 (tracks 4-9).

 ---- Bacewicz was in a bad car wreck in 1954 that ended her professional performance career, damage to some tendons in one hand I think - the 1955 recording is the premiere of Concerto No.5, I believe with Bacewicz's direct input to the performers?

Her later work is not in the same vein as Saint-Saen, etc.; she is approaching music from a very different mind set - the abstractions of a mood that we are in when we read Rod Serling or watch a film like Deep Red.  This experimental area of Hindemith, Bartok, Schoenberg is not everyone's cup of tea.  I love her music.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Dundonnell on February 17, 2012, 08:33:38 AM
Still waiting for some sign of the three unrecorded symphonies(Nos. 1, 2 and 4) :(
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on February 17, 2012, 11:08:46 AM
Dundonnell - absolutely!

My main hope would be for Symphony #4 (1953) - this has had only one performance as far as I can find - the Polish radio broadcast 'premiere' - and it was awarded some prize that I don't recall offhand.   But this would be awesome to have!  It would be just before her more abstract/late phase - and I have no doubt it would be significantly "better" than the third.  I've looked all over the web for some archival file of this to no avail.  I've emailed various record companies about any plans for it in the future - unanswered. 

This would be a wonderful opportunity for a city or very-good university ensemble to tackle.  Of course, it would require a skilled group of musicians to be able to play it.  Public tv or radio would be a nice outlet for this if no commercial release is forthcoming.

The use of colouristic resources such as, for instance, layers of tremolandos and trills or quick ostinatos acting as dramatic factors is much more frequent in the Fourth Symphony than in the preceding one. The above tendency seems to indicate new directions in the composer's explorations which will soon result in a new quality in the works to come. But the real flavour of the symphony is to be found somewhere else. Being immersed, like its predecessor, in the rhetoric of bombastic, symphonic gestures (powerful climaxes), the symphony at the same time ''gives the listener a wink'': ''Look, I am making light of the traditional 'straitjacket' imposed on me''.

I cannot speak or read/write any slavic language, but if I could, I'd try to contact some fans in Poland via blogs or what-not and try to see if any of them could track down some bootleg Polish LP or tape of this over there . . .
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on February 17, 2012, 11:24:20 AM
I spent a while going back over the recordings of her music that I have a week or two ago, and emerged with a few comments:

I don't think the selection of recordings that are easily available in the West at present have necessarily done her orchestral music the best service. In particular, the performances Hyperion disc of string orchestral works strike me as a bit flabby; hearing Krzysztof Penderecki's recording of Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion was a revelation by comparison--such drive and intensity that I didn't hear in the Hyperion recording and which brought out the colouristic imagination, forward momentum and structure of the work so much better. The performances on the Chandos violin concerto series are better, but I'm not convinced (perhaps with the exception of #3 and #7) they're her best works--certainly the violin writing is extremely idiomatic, as one would expect from a fine violinist, but perhaps that's part of the problem: too often compositional questions (at least in the outer movements) seem to me to be solved by some rather routine passagework. The slow movements of the earlier works certainly left me much more satisfied; if nothing else the melodic interest seems much higher in them.

I'm more impressed by the chamber discs (Zimerman's collection on DG with fine performances of some of her best works) and Kurkowicz's fine Chandos chamber disc (though I'm not convinced the overall compositional quality is as quite as high there). It's a shame that some of the Polish recordings weren't more easily available here--there were also a bunch of excellent discs once licenced to Olympia, including such gems as the viola concerto and concerto for orchestra, Władysław Szpilman (aka 'The Pianist') in the piano quintets, the first of Krystian Zimerman's recordings of the second sonata, and so on.

It's probably a vain hope, but maybe we can hope for Brilliant Classics to pick up these since they've raided quite a few Olympia-licenced discs already.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Brewski on February 17, 2012, 11:24:28 AM
Hi Scion7, and welcome. Impressed that for your first posts, you chose Bacewicz (whom I greatly admire as well).

--Bruce
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: jlaurson on February 17, 2012, 03:28:15 PM
Dundonnell - absolutely!

My main hope would be for Symphony #4 (1953) - this has had only one performance as far as I can find - the Polish radio broadcast 'premiere' - and it was awarded some prize that I don't recall offhand.   But this would be awesome to have!  It would be just before her more abstract/late phase - and I have no doubt it would be significantly "better" than the third.  I've looked all over the web for some archival file of this to no avail.  I've emailed various record companies about any plans for it in the future - unanswered. 

This would be a wonderful opportunity for a city or very-good university ensemble to tackle.  Of course, it would require a skilled group of musicians to be able to play it.  Public tv or radio would be a nice outlet for this if no commercial release is forthcoming.

The use of colouristic resources such as, for instance, layers of tremolandos and trills or quick ostinatos acting as dramatic factors is much more frequent in the Fourth Symphony than in the preceding one. The above tendency seems to indicate new directions in the composer's explorations which will soon result in a new quality in the works to come. But the real flavour of the symphony is to be found somewhere else. Being immersed, like its predecessor, in the rhetoric of bombastic, symphonic gestures (powerful climaxes), the symphony at the same time ''gives the listener a wink'': ''Look, I am making light of the traditional 'straitjacket' imposed on me''.

I cannot speak or read/write any slavic language, but if I could, I'd try to contact some fans in Poland via blogs or what-not and try to see if any of them could track down some bootleg Polish LP or tape of this over there . . .

Tempered enthusiasm for Bacewicz seconded! In the series of anniversary pieces I wrote in '09, she was my favorite. I'd known of her and heard a few things (like the Second Piano Sonata in recital with K.Z.), but I really only 'discovered' her for myself then and there.  Grażyna Bacewicz – 100th Anniversary (http://www.weta.org/oldfmblog/?p=460)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Dundonnell on February 17, 2012, 04:14:24 PM
You may be interested to know that her Piano Concerto(1949) and the two Cello Concertos, No.1 from 1951 and No.2 from 1963 can be downloaded from 'Unsung Composers'.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on February 17, 2012, 04:29:30 PM
Yeah, I'm not even sure of the status of the work--I know it's unpublished but with a copy in the Polish National Library.

Yes, the 6th V.C. is still unpublished.  From what I understand, she just quit working on it for a while to move to other things, and I suppose her untimely death prevented its completion.
It would be great if a photocopy of the manuscript could be taken, worked over, copied in clean script, and a conductor take it up for performance.  I doubt it happens any time soon.
Real shame - there are other unpublished works in her collection that should also be looked at by some serious current musicians.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on February 17, 2012, 06:54:41 PM
... assuming it's more than just a sketch, of course ....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on February 18, 2012, 01:46:18 AM
..... Piano Concerto(1949) and the two Cello Concertos, No.1 from 1951 and No.2 from 1963 can be downloaded from 'Unsung Composers'.

HOLY SMOKES!  Thank you so much!  Well, there are three major pieces that I can add to the library of her music.  Wish there weren't those dang drop-outs in Cello Concerto Nr.2 - argh.  But sure beats nothing!  Both of these should be polished up and released on CD via the Polish Radio label.  The piano concerto has a very good sound for 1955??

Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on February 18, 2012, 01:51:24 AM
http://en.chopin.nifc.pl/=files/foto/1/7453/o/4817199.jpg (http://en.chopin.nifc.pl/=files/foto/1/7453/o/4817199.jpg)

Age? 19-22, maybe?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on March 08, 2012, 02:21:17 PM
(http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Lib-BIG/Bacewicz-Grazyna-01.jpg)(http://theblues-thatjazz.com/ObrMuz/Singles/bacewicz.jpg)

Grażyna Bacewicz

from The New Grove:

(b Łódź, 5 Feb 1909; d Warsaw, 17 Jan 1969). Polish composer, violinist and pianist. After early instrumental and theory studies in Łódź, she attended the Warsaw Conservatory, where she studied composition with Kazimierz Sikorski, the violin with Józef Jarzębski and the piano with Józef Turczyński (she also studied philosophy at Warsaw University). She graduated in composition and the violin in 1932, furthering her studies in Paris in 1932 and 1933 with Boulanger and the violinist André Touret. After a brief period spent teaching in Łódź, she returned to Paris to study with Carl Flesch in 1934. At the request of the conductor Grzegorz Fitelberg, Bacewicz was principal violinist of the Polish RO (1936–8) and she performed as a soloist in several European countries before returning to Poland two months before World War II. She continued as a concert violinist after the war until the mid-1950s. Her prowess as a pianist should not be ignored: she was, for example, a notable interpreter of her own Second Piano Sonata.
Among her other activities, Bacewicz was an accomplished writer of short stories, novels and autobiographical anecdotes. Among the awards she received for her music were the top prize at the International Chopin Competition for Composers in Warsaw (1949) for her Piano Concerto, first prize at the International Composers’ Competition in Liège (1951) for her String Quartet no.4, first prize in the orchestral section at UNESCO’s International Rostrum of Composers in Paris (1960) for her Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion and the Gold Medal at the Queen Elisabeth International Music Competition in Brussels (1965) for her Violin Concerto no.7, as well as various State awards from 1949 onwards.
Bacewicz made her most lasting mark on 20th-century music as a composer rather than as a performer or teacher (she taught composition rarely, but notably at the Warsaw Conservatory during the last three years of her life). She had an uncommonly vibrant yet modest personality and was much admired and loved by her fellow Poles during her lifetime.
Her career as a composer may be seen to divide into three broad spans, of which the first (1932–44) is largely preparatory to the second (1945–59), with the third (1960–69) a more distinct entity. The first period shows the development and refinement of Bacewicz’s neo-classical persona. Although only a few of these early works have been published, her music’s salient characteristics of clarity, wit and brevity are already evident in the Wind Quintet, a piece in which she seems to be following Szymanowski’s example in the incorporation of folk elements. Her works from the time of World War II show a greater muscularity and unrelenting activity, with a daring disregard for traditional classical structures, as in the Sonata no.1 for solo violin. The Overture exemplifies Bacewicz’s unerring ability to propel her music towards a final goal.
After the war, Bacewicz’s music became increasingly personal, casting off any remaining Parisian chic and becoming distinctively resilient. Occasionally she indulged in pastiche (the Sonata da camera), but her stronger music is reminiscent of Szymanowski (the Violin Concerto no.3 and, later, the Piano Sonata no.2 and Violin Concerto no.5). These and other outstanding works such as the String Quartet no.3 and the Concerto for String Orchestra have mostly maintained their place in the international repertory. As with many of her contemporaries, she used folk materials (both directly and indirectly) during the period of intense socialist realism (1949–54), in large forms (the Piano Concerto) and in encore pieces for her recitals. Her output during the height of Stalinist cultural dogma is, however, remarkably free of mass songs or other pieces with a ‘message’. The three symphonies are the most grandiose works, though their scoring is at times refreshingly restrained. The chamber music reveals a tougher, more challenging musical idiom, most notably in the fourth and fifth quartets: the former is structurally loose-limbed, while the latter is highly integrated in its motivic design and adventurous for the time in its non-diatonic harmonic language. This innovatory streak in Bacewicz’s musical personality is carried through into the Partita, especially in its intermezzo. By the mid-1950s Bacewicz had already moved far from conventional notions of neo-classicism.
In the late 1950s Bacewicz, like her contemporaries, had to recognize the emergence of a new generation of younger composers and an influx of avant-garde influences from abroad. Unlike some of her contemporaries, she grasped the nettle, even though it was not always with absolute conviction. In some works, such as the String Quartet no.6, there are passages of outright 12-note writing. But she soon settled down to her own brand of chromaticism and dynamic gestures that veer from the routine (Cello Concerto no.2) to the highly imaginative (Pensieri notturni). At times, Bacewicz appears to have experienced some difficulty in putting pen to paper, although in 1965 she composed no fewer than seven large-scale works. The extensive self-borrowings which became evident when discarded works from 1965–7 were published posthumously seem to indicate a degree of uncertainty about the new directions she was taking. Her evident attachment to the Intermezzo from the Partita gave rise to citations from that movement’s opening bars in later works (e.g. the Viola Concerto); such quotations form part of a highly successful patchworking technique that Bacewicz developed during the 1960s. There is even the suggestion in the Viola Concerto that Bacewicz, like some of her younger compatriots, was returning to folk material.
Bacewicz’s position in Polish postwar music is undeniable: hers was an individual and independent voice; she was more innovative than is generally acknowledged and she carried the torch for the many Polish women composers who followed her example. Even though she may have lost her sure-footedness in the mid-1960s, this should not detract from a musical achievement that is being recognized outside Poland as one of the most remarkable of the mid-20th century.


           Well, I don't think she lost anything in the mid-Sixties, but they are entitled to their viewpoint.  I think she's the foremost female classical composer - and by a considerable margin.  Ms. Schumann might have been in the running if Robert hadn't said 'nein!' early in her composing career - of course, she would never have crossed the territories Grazyna did.
           A good chunk of her work is out on recordings, but much of it is still frustratingly not available.  Let's hope Polish radio didn't destroy the performance of her Fourth symphony; apparently that's the only one in existence.

So, you lovers of Chopin and Szymanowski - let's hear you jump on the bandwagon!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on March 08, 2012, 03:56:00 PM
I can't say I'm that impressed with Bacewicz. To me, her music just doesn't hit me the way Bartok's or Janacek's or Shostakovich's music does. I own both Chandos recordings of her VCs and the one Hyperion recording with various works for string orchestra. The music just didn't do much for me, but I blame myself and not the composer. If people connect with then that's great, but I'll file Bacewicz under the "composers I don't get yet" file which includes Holmboe.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on March 08, 2012, 06:23:05 PM
I can't say I'm that impressed with Bacewicz. To me, her music just doesn't hit me the way Bartok's or Janacek's or Shostakovich's music does. I own both Chandos recordings of her VCs and the one Hyperion recording with various works for string orchestra. The music just didn't do much for me, but I blame myself and not the composer. If people connect with then that's great, but I'll file Bacewicz under the "composers I don't get yet" file which includes Holmboe.
I think I've posted this before, but unfortunately those three CDs probably aren't the best case out there for Bacewicz's music. With the exception of Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion, I don't think the works on there are her best, and that work is better served by the Polish recording I've heard under Krzyzstof Penderecki (yes, that Penderecki).

If you try again with her music, I'd probably suggest the DG recording of the two piano quintets and second sonata with Krystian Zimerman and an all-star Polish cast. The first piano quartet would definitely be my favourite of Bacewicz's pre-modernist period, and the second is a good example of that later period. (YMMV, though, as I know you really hated the 7th violin concerto, which is roughly contemporary with the second quintet.)

@Scion7: handy post from Grove, thanks: I do tend to share some concern with the article author about her heavy use of that theme from Partita; it's a great and extremely atmospheric one but there's a bit of a sense for me of "oh not that theme again," like with Denisov's motto theme in later works. That kind of recycling is a dangerous game to play, but it's a shame that she didn't live long enough to see how she would resolve her compositional crisis.

(Actually, it's interesting to imagine how history would have ranked Lutoslawski--perhaps her closest relative compositionally, and someone who was also having his own compositional crisis at the time--if he'd died at the same age. No Mi-Parti, no 3rd and 4th symphony, no piano concerto, no Partita, no Chains, and so on.)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on March 08, 2012, 06:44:03 PM
I think I've posted this before, but unfortunately those three CDs probably aren't the best case out there for Bacewicz's music. With the exception of Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion, I don't think the works on there are her best, and that work is better served by the Polish recording I've heard under Krzyzstof Penderecki (yes, that Penderecki).

If you try again with her music, I'd probably suggest the DG recording of the two piano quintets and second sonata with Krystian Zimerman and an all-star Polish cast. The first piano quartet would definitely be my favourite of Bacewicz's pre-modernist period, and the second is a good example of that later period. (YMMV, though, as I know you really hated the 7th violin concerto, which is roughly contemporary with the second quintet.)

Thanks Edward, but I'll just save my money and buy more Shostakovich or Prokofiev. 8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on March 09, 2012, 08:16:22 AM
or watch a film like Deep Red.

woah now! talkin my language here. all time fav!!!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: cilgwyn on August 13, 2012, 08:15:43 AM
I've been going through some boxes of old cassettes. Off air recordings,that sort of thing! :) I found a D90 of Bacewicz's third symphony. This is great (note the small g!). Full of propulsive energy,and a strong feeling of forward momentum,which is what I want in a symphony. The sound is good too,after a rocky start. (I seem to remember using a plug in timer,while I was in bed!)
I see there are two recordings of the symphony. One on a label I have never heard of 'Music of our time',with the Polish National Radio Symphony conducted by Jan Krenz. According to Amazon it is currently out of stock. The other is a Koch recording & seller prices start at around £19 upwards.
  I think I will transfer my cassette to a cdr,for the time being. Has anyone who likes Bacewicz heard the Koch (my cassette is the Krenz).
Title: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Daverz on August 13, 2012, 09:03:16 AM
The Koch seems like a good performance to me, but I have nothing to compare.  Very enjoyable music.  Good sound, too.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on August 14, 2012, 01:01:40 PM
I was checking out the Olympia 311 disc, a nice Viola Concerto, and the Concerto for 2 Pianos. Colorful.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 04, 2013, 02:35:59 PM
Somebody record more of Bacewicz's orchestral music please!!!!!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: kyjo on November 04, 2013, 03:06:43 PM
Somebody record more of Bacewicz's orchestral music please!!!!!

Hopefully Burkhard Schmilgun (CPO) will take notice of our plea......

BTW I wonder if record company owners are secretly members of forums like this? That would be awesome if they were! You know I'd have a long list of music I want them to record ;).....
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 04, 2013, 03:09:34 PM
Hopefully Burkhard Schmilgun (CPO) will take notice of our plea......

BTW I wonder if record company owners are secretly members of forums like this? That would be awesome if they were! You know I'd have a long list of music I want them to record ;).....

Yes! CPO would be just the label Bacewicz needs!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: kyjo on November 04, 2013, 03:16:28 PM
Yes! CPO would be just the label Bacewicz needs!

One thing I really admire about CPO is that they, so far, have finished (or are in the process of finishing) pretty much all of their many series. They're a very dedicated label for sure. Their release schedule can be a bit slow, though. They've promised the first installments in their series of Edvin Kallstenius' and Johann Nepomuk David's orchestral music for years now! Their Henk Badings cycle is also pretty slow-moving. Nevertheless, CPO is a label which I hold in the highest regard for their commitment to resurrecting such undeservedly neglected music. Unlike EMI and DG, who keep reissuing the same recordings over and over with different cover art. ::)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 04, 2013, 08:55:55 PM
One thing I really admire about CPO is that they, so far, have finished (or are in the process of finishing) pretty much all of their many series. They're a very dedicated label for sure. Their release schedule can be a bit slow, though. They've promised the first installments in their series of Edvin Kallstenius' and Johann Nepomuk David's orchestral music for years now! Their Henk Badings cycle is also pretty slow-moving. Nevertheless, CPO is a label which I hold in the highest regard for their commitment to resurrecting such undeservedly neglected music. Unlike EMI and DG, who keep reissuing the same recordings over and over with different cover art. ::)

Hey, you just reminded me, I need to actually listen to my Badings recordings on CPO. They're still sealed!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on November 04, 2013, 09:45:23 PM
Their Henk Badings cycle is also pretty slow-moving.
With arounf 4 years since the last issue I call it non-moving. Which is a pity since they issue som "lame" repertoire, and Badings was real interesting. So while I have a high degree of respect for cpo, I find some of their publishing policies rather mystifying.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: kyjo on November 05, 2013, 12:05:50 PM
Hey, you just reminded me, I need to actually listen to my Badings recordings on CPO. They're still sealed!

Badings is a pretty cool composer, John! His music has a craggy, granitic power and makes interesting use of rhythm.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: kyjo on November 05, 2013, 12:07:23 PM
With arounf 4 years since the last issue I call it non-moving. Which is a pity since they issue som "lame" repertoire, and Badings was real interesting. So while I have a high degree of respect for cpo, I find some of their publishing policies rather mystifying.

Agreed and agreed. Why they are recording composers like Handel, Telemann, Offenbach and Bruckner (much as I love his music) is beyond me!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: edward on August 07, 2015, 05:07:29 AM
I'm glad to see that Naxos is doing a complete set of the string quartets with the Lutoslawski Quartet.

I wonder how they'll compare to the older Amar Corde set.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Wieland on September 29, 2015, 08:22:39 AM
I'm glad to see that Naxos is doing a complete set of the string quartets with the Lutoslawski Quartet.

I wonder how they'll compare to the older Amar Corde set.
They compare actually very well, as far as I can tell after listening to Vol. 1. The Lutoslawski Quartet is a young polish group which already made an impressive recording of the SQ of their name-giver.
Vol. 2 is just out and on my list of future acquisitions.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on September 29, 2015, 09:29:37 AM
After Chopin, my favorite Polish composer.  She was wonderful.  I want all of her symphonies recorded (properly) and released.  Much of the chamber music has been covered.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Wieland on September 29, 2015, 11:20:36 AM
After Chopin, my favorite Polish composer.  She was wonderful.  I want all of her symphonies recorded (properly) and released.  Much of the chamber music has been covered.
Well, there are also Szymanowski, Penderecki, Lutoslawski and those fabulous emigres Panufnik and Weinberg.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: North Star on September 29, 2015, 11:35:07 AM
Well, there are also Szymanowski, Penderecki, Lutoslawski and those fabulous emigres Panufnik and Weinberg.
And Górecki, Karłowicz, Preisner, Szymański, and Wieniawski too.


Even against Bacewicz’s rapidly evolving style, though, it’s hard to imagine more assured, technically accomplished performances. The Lutoslawski foursome play as if they’ve known this music for decades, with an enthusiastic sense of storytelling and impeccable technical prowess. (http://www.thestrad.com/cpt-reviews/complete-string-quartets-vol-1-bacewicz-string-quartets-nos-1-3-6-7/The seven string quartets of Polish composer Grażyna Bacewicz (1909–69) have been called the 20th century’s most significant contributions to the genre after those of Bartók. It’s a big claim – but on the strength of these hugely accomplished, vivid accounts from her compatriots the Lutoslawski Quartet, beginning a complete Bacewicz quartet cycle, it’s one that’s worth taking very seriously. Indeed, it’s a wonder that these works aren’t a staple in the chamber canon.)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on September 30, 2015, 01:55:22 PM
Only Weinberg approaches her level.   ;D
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Artem on November 15, 2015, 04:05:56 PM
After several listenings to this CD, the 6th String Quartet is a standout work for me. It is very friendly in the way it uses some of its modernist approaches.


Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Scion7 on November 16, 2015, 05:09:24 AM
Bacewicz was an excellent composer (and player).  Many fine, fine chamber works - and the most interesting member of any music panel she participated in.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: The new erato on November 16, 2015, 06:11:27 AM
Let me plug Krzysztof Meyer and his wonderful string quartets on Naxos.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969) re: Orchestral music - Symphony 4
Post by: Scion7 on November 16, 2015, 06:41:33 AM
The broadcast of the 4th symphony is finally on YouTube - the issue is, the manuscript was never formally published - the Polish Radio Symphony performance worked off her copies.  So, I would imagine that someone will need to push for this to be published first.  While it did come towards the end of her life, for whatever reasons - rewrite after hearing the performance, looking for a non-commie deal for it - she didn't have it published.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on January 24, 2018, 07:35:44 AM
A Brief History of the Composer (+ CD Review)

Classical CD Of The Week: Krystian Zimerman And A Brush With Grażyna
(https://thumbor.forbes.com/thumbor/960x0/smart/https%3A%2F%2Fblogs-images.forbes.com%2Fjenslaurson%2Ffiles%2F2018%2F01%2FForbes_Classical-CD-of-the-Week_BACEWICZ_Zimerman_DG_ChamberMusic_Classical-Critic-Jens-F-Laurson_960-1200x469.jpg%3Fwidth%3D960)

A Brush With Grażyna

I had my first brush with the music of Grażyna Bacewicz at a Krystian Zimerman recital at Baltimore’s Shriver Hall that opened their 40th Anniversary Piano Celebration in 2006. Concluding a very fine recital (albeit marred by Zimerman’s gratuitous political ranting; see: “Political Piano at Shriver Hall”), he played Grażyna Bacewicz’ Piano Sonata No.2. After that, he was off, commendably encore-less, despite wildest ovations. At the time I described the impression thus: “Music that has its home in a black pool of deep sounds all the way on the left of the keyboard, it jumps to life, repeatedly, into the higher register. Every one of its three movements ends contemplatively. It was delivered with panache […], it is a work obviously close to his heart, and he won many new ears for it with his performance.”... (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2018/01/24/classical-cd-of-the-week-krystian-zimerman-and-a-brush-with-grazina/#180d8d237fc1)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: André on January 24, 2018, 02:07:13 PM
The second sonata is indeed close to his heart. He recorded it twice, first as a very young man and later in his career (in this DG disc). I wonder how the two compare ?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on January 24, 2018, 03:07:32 PM
The second sonata is indeed close to his heart. He recorded it twice, first as a very young man and later in his career (in this DG disc). I wonder how the two compare ?

has anyone here got the Olympia recording? (Olympia presumably wasn't even the original label... they did mostly shady re-issues) It is hopelessly out of print.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 24, 2018, 03:21:23 PM
has anyone here got the Olympia recording? (Olympia presumably wasn't even the original label... they did mostly shady re-issues) It is hopelessly out of print.

The Olympia release seems to have license information

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0002/877/MI0002877193.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Cato on January 24, 2018, 03:37:36 PM
For your consideration:

https://www.youtube.com/v/V9s_Niog0J4
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Daverz on January 24, 2018, 03:53:02 PM
has anyone here got the Olympia recording? (Olympia presumably wasn't even the original label... they did mostly shady re-issues) It is hopelessly out of print.

Why do you say they were shady?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on January 24, 2018, 04:05:19 PM
Why do you say they were shady?

The people from Melodiya were bitching about them in shrill tones. Perhaps Olympia explored some gray territory when the scene (and countries?) were in upheaval.

I suppose I wouldn't-shouldn't apply that "shady" sobriquet" to the label as such.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: André on January 24, 2018, 05:07:00 PM
has anyone here got the Olympia recording? (Olympia presumably wasn't even the original label... they did mostly shady re-issues) It is hopelessly out of print.

I believe it was issued first on the polish label, Polskie nagranya

(https://img.discogs.com/09E4keFYxzsXvOSU3I5zdaRbMIA=/fit-in/480x480/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-4987469-1389799689-4712.jpeg.jpg)
(https://ring.cdandlp.com/vogelweith/photo_grande/114890830-2.jpg)


Its discmate was the Pathétique sonata... ;)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Baron Scarpia on January 24, 2018, 08:38:35 PM
I believe it was issued first on the polish label, Polskie nagranya
That's what the licensing information on the Olympia CD says.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: snyprrr on January 25, 2018, 09:47:46 AM
I think she bears a striking resemblance to Lutoslawski... the eyes and the nose...
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: ChamberNut on March 01, 2019, 05:51:11 AM
Just listened to Bacewicz for the very first time last night, and I really enjoyed what I heard - her Concert for String Orchestra

In preparation for a live performance I'm attending this evening.

The performance I listened to last night was a you tube performance by the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 24, 2019, 01:15:00 PM
(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/4010276016847.jpg?1401982543)

Lately I've been listening to this set of her complete violin and piano works. I had already enjoyed her violin concertos on Chandos, finding them utterly enjoyable and somewhat folksy (some of them).

The music on this set is absolutely wonderful, quite a discovery for me. By hearing this I often associate her style with that by Martinu in that there are traces of neoclassicism and folk gestures. The rhythmic vitality is another appeal too. I'm not an expert on Bacewicz, but this compilation of works looks essential.

Now Bacewicz is a clear favorite Polish of mine, along with Lutoslawski, Penderecki, Szymanowski, Chopin, Noskowski and Wieniawski.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 25, 2019, 04:37:18 AM
(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/4010276016847.jpg?1401982543)

Lately I've been listening to this set of her complete violin and piano works. I had already enjoyed her violin concertos on Chandos, finding them utterly enjoyable and somewhat folksy (some of them).

The music on this set is absolutely wonderful, quite a discovery for me. By hearing this I often associate her style with that by Martinu in that there are traces of neoclassicism and folk gestures. The rhythmic vitality is another appeal too. I'm not an expert on Bacewicz, but this compilation of works looks essential.

Now Bacewicz is a clear favorite Polish of mine, along with Lutoslawski, Penderecki, Szymanowski, Chopin, Noskowski and Wieniawski.

Very nice. I have that set of violin/piano music, but I haven’t listened to any of it yet. You’ve now given me a good reason to. 8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 25, 2019, 05:11:55 PM
Very nice. I have that set of violin/piano music, but I haven’t listened to any of it yet. You’ve now given me a good reason to. 8)

In my case, it's been some good invested time. When you consider pertinent, please do it. Even the many miniatures on the set are incredible.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 25, 2019, 07:37:15 PM
In my case, it's been some good invested time. When you consider pertinent, please do it. Even the many miniatures on the set are incredible.

Nice to hear, SymphonicAddict. I’ll definitely have to give some of this set a listen soon.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: kyjo on May 26, 2019, 08:02:32 AM
(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/4010276016847.jpg?1401982543)

Lately I've been listening to this set of her complete violin and piano works. I had already enjoyed her violin concertos on Chandos, finding them utterly enjoyable and somewhat folksy (some of them).

The music on this set is absolutely wonderful, quite a discovery for me. By hearing this I often associate her style with that by Martinu in that there are traces of neoclassicism and folk gestures. The rhythmic vitality is another appeal too. I'm not an expert on Bacewicz, but this compilation of works looks essential.

Now Bacewicz is a clear favorite Polish of mine, along with Lutoslawski, Penderecki, Szymanowski, Chopin, Noskowski and Wieniawski.

To the bolded text - no Karlowicz? :o

Bacewicz is a composer I need to explore more. I’ve greatly enjoyed what I’ve heard of hers (Concerto for String Orchestra, Piano Quintet no. 1, etc). I’m really surprised no one has issued modern recordings of her four symphonies, considering the increasing interest in female composers recently.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 26, 2019, 02:00:44 PM
To the bolded text - no Karlowicz? :o

Bacewicz is a composer I need to explore more. I’ve greatly enjoyed what I’ve heard of hers (Concerto for String Orchestra, Piano Quintet no. 1, etc). I’m really surprised no one has issued modern recordings of her four symphonies, considering the increasing interest in female composers recently.

Oh yes, you're quite right, Kyle, I forgot him. Karlowicz must undoubtedly be in my list. And I also agree about the need of the recordings of the non-recorded-yet symphonies (1, 2 and 4 iirc). I remember having the No. 3 but I've never have tried it.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on May 28, 2019, 12:08:42 PM
(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/4010276016847.jpg?1401982543)

Lately I've been listening to this set of her complete violin and piano works. I had already enjoyed her violin concertos on Chandos, finding them utterly enjoyable and somewhat folksy (some of them).

The music on this set is absolutely wonderful, quite a discovery for me. By hearing this I often associate her style with that by Martinu in that there are traces of neoclassicism and folk gestures. The rhythmic vitality is another appeal too. I'm not an expert on Bacewicz, but this compilation of works looks essential.

Now Bacewicz is a clear favorite Polish of mine, along with Lutoslawski, Penderecki, Szymanowski, Chopin, Noskowski and Wieniawski.

An attractive set, although I'm a little put off that the sonatas are padded to two discs with "miniatures" which I usually don't go for. But given how much I enjoy Bacewicz's work I should spring for this. Thanks for bring it to our attention.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 31, 2019, 03:38:07 PM
An attractive set, although I'm a little put off that the sonatas are padded to two discs with "miniatures" which I usually don't go for. But given how much I enjoy Bacewicz's work I should spring for this. Thanks for bring it to our attention.

I guess that it is a minor complaint, because, as you say, this music really deserves to be heard.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on May 31, 2019, 03:51:49 PM
I must confess I've been obsessed with this composer, so as a consequence I listened to the string quartets from this set:

(https://dnan0fzjxntrj.cloudfront.net/Pictures/480xAny/4/6/3/5463_bacewisz-silesian.jpg)

Definitely what terrific composer Bacewicz was. This is highly compelling, resourceful, witty and ultimately dark music (the latter regarding the last quartets). With each following quartet her style was becoming more austere, bitter and dissonant. I'd think that Lutoslawski was influenced by those astringent (but great) quartets, especially on his only and fascinating String Quartet.

I'll continue exploring more works by Bacewicz. It's rather addictive  :D
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Ghost of Baron Scarpia on May 31, 2019, 07:43:27 PM
I must confess I've been obsessed with this composer, so as a consequence I listened to the string quartets from this set:

(https://dnan0fzjxntrj.cloudfront.net/Pictures/480xAny/4/6/3/5463_bacewisz-silesian.jpg)

Definitely what terrific composer Bacewicz was. This is highly compelling, resourceful, witty and ultimately dark music (the latter regarding the last quartets). With each following quartet her style was becoming more austere, bitter and dissonant. I'd think that Lutoslawski was influenced by those astringent (but great) quartets, especially on his only and fascinating String Quartet.

I'll continue exploring more works by Bacewicz. It's rather addictive  :D

I assume you’ve heard the works for string orchestra, particularly the concerto for strings.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on May 31, 2019, 08:31:11 PM
I must confess I've been obsessed with this composer, so as a consequence I listened to the string quartets from this set:

(https://dnan0fzjxntrj.cloudfront.net/Pictures/480xAny/4/6/3/5463_bacewisz-silesian.jpg)

Definitely what terrific composer Bacewicz was. This is highly compelling, resourceful, witty and ultimately dark music (the latter regarding the last quartets). With each following quartet her style was becoming more austere, bitter and dissonant. I'd think that Lutoslawski was influenced by those astringent (but great) quartets, especially on his only and fascinating String Quartet.

I'll continue exploring more works by Bacewicz. It's rather addictive  :D

But I wonder if Lutoslawski actually knew Bacewicz’s music well?
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on June 01, 2019, 10:16:25 AM
I assume you’ve heard the works for string orchestra, particularly the concerto for strings.

I think so, but I don't have vivid memories of them. I'll be listening to them in due course.


But I wonder if Lutoslawski actually knew Bacewicz’s music well?

Who knows, I was guessing because of the similarity between their 2 styles.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 11, 2019, 06:34:34 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/kiYjz49PuGY

Just I found this rare recording of Bacewicz's 4th Symphony on a very interesting YouTube channel. Simply spectacular piece!! If there is a relentless piece, it has to be this. I can't imagine this shattering symphony in modern sound. The timpani have an important role, there are some pronounced passages for them. I really loved it.

Too bad the recording quality is poor, however, the performance seems top-notch.

Please recording labels, not more Beethoven/Brahms/Tchaikovsky/Sibelius/etc cycles! The world needs to listen to this in all its glory instead!  8)
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: schnittkease on September 12, 2019, 07:22:20 PM
What seems to be Lutosławski on Bacewicz:

"While reflecting upon the creative life of an artist, I often ask myself the following questions: What did he or she come in to this world with, i.e., what has nature endowed them with, and also, did they, by their effort, succeed in developing these inborn talents, taking advantage of them to the fullest, for the benefit of mankind? This last thought deserves special emphasis, because many creative artists treat their inherited talents as if they were their own to dispense for their own personal aims, and not always in the noblest way. As I see it, the talent of an artist is a unique privilege, a distinction. As such, it carries with it commensurate obligations. Thus an artist with any moral sense whatsoever should know that, in developing their talents for the enrichment of mankind, they are only fulfilling their obligations, while that which they create is only in small measure their own merit.

"My preceding reflections are the key to my remarks on Grażyna Bacewicz, a distinguished Polish composer of this century, whose premature departure has been an irreconcilable loss. There is no doubt in my mind that the answers to the above questions, as far as Grażyna Bacewicz is concerned, are positive ones. She was born with an incredible wealth of musical talent, which she succeeded to bring to full flourish through an almost fanatical zeal and unwavering faith in her mission. The intensity of her activities was so great that she managed, in a cruelly-shortened life, to give birth to such treasures that any composer of her stature with a considerably longer life span could only envy.

"I do not propose to discuss or dwell on the merits of her compositional legacy. To anyone who was close to her creativity, to become acquainted with and to experience her creations, their artistic value is quite evident. To be sure, I have always been of the opinion that a true judgement of the creative ability of a composer does not belong to contemporary reviewers or artists, but to thousands of audiences over many decades, which may be referred to as the “jury of time.” Based on the fact that many of her earliest works are still being performed throughout the world today, one can already predict that her music will stand this test of time. As examples, we can cite the Concerto for String Orchestra, a favorite with this type of ensemble, and her String Quartet No. 3, which is marked by an exceptional polyphonic skill in addition to its masterly idiomatic writing for string quartet.

"It does not appear proper to me to judge her works only in the light of the compositional styles and rapidly changing artistic currents of her lifetime. Like so many other composers of larger compositional forms, she was to a great degree independent of the atmosphere surrounding her. Rather, it was her music that helped to create that atmosphere and could be held up as an example to the younger generation of composers.

"When I think of Grażyna Bacewicz, I cannot limit myself to her music alone. I was fortunate to belong to that group of people who were bound with her by virtue of professional friendship. Thus I was privileged to know her closely for many years. It allowed me to observe and admire her character first hand – her integrity, honesty, compassion, and her willingness to share and sacrifice for others. This image of her as an artist and human being ought to be an inspiration to the succeeding generations of composers in Poland and throughout the world."
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on September 13, 2019, 01:17:53 PM
What seems to be Lutosławski on Bacewicz:

"While reflecting upon the creative life of an artist, I often ask myself the following questions: What did he or she come in to this world with, i.e., what has nature endowed them with, and also, did they, by their effort, succeed in developing these inborn talents, taking advantage of them to the fullest, for the benefit of mankind? This last thought deserves special emphasis, because many creative artists treat their inherited talents as if they were their own to dispense for their own personal aims, and not always in the noblest way. As I see it, the talent of an artist is a unique privilege, a distinction. As such, it carries with it commensurate obligations. Thus an artist with any moral sense whatsoever should know that, in developing their talents for the enrichment of mankind, they are only fulfilling their obligations, while that which they create is only in small measure their own merit.

"My preceding reflections are the key to my remarks on Grażyna Bacewicz, a distinguished Polish composer of this century, whose premature departure has been an irreconcilable loss. There is no doubt in my mind that the answers to the above questions, as far as Grażyna Bacewicz is concerned, are positive ones. She was born with an incredible wealth of musical talent, which she succeeded to bring to full flourish through an almost fanatical zeal and unwavering faith in her mission. The intensity of her activities was so great that she managed, in a cruelly-shortened life, to give birth to such treasures that any composer of her stature with a considerably longer life span could only envy.

"I do not propose to discuss or dwell on the merits of her compositional legacy. To anyone who was close to her creativity, to become acquainted with and to experience her creations, their artistic value is quite evident. To be sure, I have always been of the opinion that a true judgement of the creative ability of a composer does not belong to contemporary reviewers or artists, but to thousands of audiences over many decades, which may be referred to as the “jury of time.” Based on the fact that many of her earliest works are still being performed throughout the world today, one can already predict that her music will stand this test of time. As examples, we can cite the Concerto for String Orchestra, a favorite with this type of ensemble, and her String Quartet No. 3, which is marked by an exceptional polyphonic skill in addition to its masterly idiomatic writing for string quartet.

"It does not appear proper to me to judge her works only in the light of the compositional styles and rapidly changing artistic currents of her lifetime. Like so many other composers of larger compositional forms, she was to a great degree independent of the atmosphere surrounding her. Rather, it was her music that helped to create that atmosphere and could be held up as an example to the younger generation of composers.

"When I think of Grażyna Bacewicz, I cannot limit myself to her music alone. I was fortunate to belong to that group of people who were bound with her by virtue of professional friendship. Thus I was privileged to know her closely for many years. It allowed me to observe and admire her character first hand – her integrity, honesty, compassion, and her willingness to share and sacrifice for others. This image of her as an artist and human being ought to be an inspiration to the succeeding generations of composers in Poland and throughout the world."

Many thanks for sharing this!! Quite fascinating. No doubts Lutoslawski had in high esteem this gifted compatriot. It too shows how human Lutoslawski was, how grateful towards his partners or colleagues he was. Now I wouldn't hesitate that Bacewicz did influence to Lutoslawski.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: vers la flamme on October 26, 2019, 03:43:07 PM
What seems to be Lutosławski on Bacewicz:

"While reflecting upon the creative life of an artist, I often ask myself the following questions: What did he or she come in to this world with, i.e., what has nature endowed them with, and also, did they, by their effort, succeed in developing these inborn talents, taking advantage of them to the fullest, for the benefit of mankind? This last thought deserves special emphasis, because many creative artists treat their inherited talents as if they were their own to dispense for their own personal aims, and not always in the noblest way. As I see it, the talent of an artist is a unique privilege, a distinction. As such, it carries with it commensurate obligations. Thus an artist with any moral sense whatsoever should know that, in developing their talents for the enrichment of mankind, they are only fulfilling their obligations, while that which they create is only in small measure their own merit.

"My preceding reflections are the key to my remarks on Grażyna Bacewicz, a distinguished Polish composer of this century, whose premature departure has been an irreconcilable loss. There is no doubt in my mind that the answers to the above questions, as far as Grażyna Bacewicz is concerned, are positive ones. She was born with an incredible wealth of musical talent, which she succeeded to bring to full flourish through an almost fanatical zeal and unwavering faith in her mission. The intensity of her activities was so great that she managed, in a cruelly-shortened life, to give birth to such treasures that any composer of her stature with a considerably longer life span could only envy.

"I do not propose to discuss or dwell on the merits of her compositional legacy. To anyone who was close to her creativity, to become acquainted with and to experience her creations, their artistic value is quite evident. To be sure, I have always been of the opinion that a true judgement of the creative ability of a composer does not belong to contemporary reviewers or artists, but to thousands of audiences over many decades, which may be referred to as the “jury of time.” Based on the fact that many of her earliest works are still being performed throughout the world today, one can already predict that her music will stand this test of time. As examples, we can cite the Concerto for String Orchestra, a favorite with this type of ensemble, and her String Quartet No. 3, which is marked by an exceptional polyphonic skill in addition to its masterly idiomatic writing for string quartet.

"It does not appear proper to me to judge her works only in the light of the compositional styles and rapidly changing artistic currents of her lifetime. Like so many other composers of larger compositional forms, she was to a great degree independent of the atmosphere surrounding her. Rather, it was her music that helped to create that atmosphere and could be held up as an example to the younger generation of composers.

"When I think of Grażyna Bacewicz, I cannot limit myself to her music alone. I was fortunate to belong to that group of people who were bound with her by virtue of professional friendship. Thus I was privileged to know her closely for many years. It allowed me to observe and admire her character first hand – her integrity, honesty, compassion, and her willingness to share and sacrifice for others. This image of her as an artist and human being ought to be an inspiration to the succeeding generations of composers in Poland and throughout the world."

Many thanks for sharing this, it is always absolutely fascinating getting a glimpse of the thoughts of as great a composer as Lutoslawski on his colleagues. These glimpses can be elusive, and seldom so positive as this.

After falling in love with the music of Lutoslawski over these past two or three months, I am on a mission to discover the remaining great Polish composers of the 20th century. Bacewicz seems to be one of maybe five major names here, and I owe it to myself to explore her music.

I just ordered the recordings by the Silesian Quartet of her String Quartets, after listening to a handful of them on youtube. They sound fantastic. I'm very excited to explore her music further. She seems to be a great writer for strings.

Well, I'll write back in a few weeks when I've spent some time with the discs. Just wanted to write a few words of thanks for @schnittkease for sharing that insightful memorial from Lutoslawski.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on October 26, 2019, 04:43:33 PM
Bacewicz doesn't disappoint at all. Actually, she's my favorite female composer. All what I've heard of her is first-rate or close. The 7 string quartets, the 2 piano quintets, the violin sonatas, violin concertos and 3rd Symphony are substantial stuff for sure.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Irons on October 28, 2019, 08:30:24 AM
Bacewicz doesn't disappoint at all. Actually, she's my favorite female composer. All what I've heard of her is first-rate or close. The 7 string quartets, the 2 piano quintets, the violin sonatas, violin concertos and 3rd Symphony are substantial stuff for sure.


Add to your list "Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion" music that excites.

Fascinating to follow the travel of the string quartets from folk to avant-garde. 
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: SymphonicAddict on October 29, 2019, 10:57:16 AM


Add to your list "Music for Strings, Trumpets and Percussion" music that excites.

Fascinating to follow the travel of the string quartets from folk to avant-garde.

Precisely! The transition is so clear and gradual. A most fabulous development.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: vers la flamme on October 29, 2019, 02:11:40 PM
Y'all are getting me really excited to check out these string quartet discs. I love the few I've heard, but they were all earlier works.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: hvbias on October 30, 2019, 12:09:49 PM
Fascinating to follow the travel of the string quartets from folk to avant-garde.

Bartok's string quartets remind me of a similar journey.

I have had Bacewicz's string quartets in my heavy rotation (Silesian Quartet), they are highly enjoyable and have that certain quality that keeps me coming back.

schnittkease thank you for that quote from Lutoslawksi.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: schnittkease on October 30, 2019, 06:28:37 PM
For the quartets, are the Lutosławski and Silesian cycles on equal footing or is one significantly better?  Both have gotten rave reviews.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: hvbias on October 30, 2019, 06:52:21 PM
For the quartets, are the Lutosławski and Silesian cycles on equal footing or is one significantly better?  Both have gotten rave reviews.

I had a preference for Silesian, I thought their playing was more interesting in pianissimo sections lending to a more atmospheric sound.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: JBS on October 30, 2019, 07:36:47 PM
I found this CD was more interesting than the SQs (for which I have the Silesian recording).

Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: schnittkease on October 30, 2019, 07:55:26 PM
I found this CD was more interesting than the SQs (for which I have the Silesian recording).

Interesting. Will check out.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: vers la flamme on November 16, 2019, 05:55:51 AM
I've been listening to that Silesian Quartet set, mostly disc 1. These quartets are absolutely phenomenal. VERY original, and totally musical. I can tell this is the work of a great composer. I am excited to explore disc 2, which is said to contain the more avant-garde quartets.

It appears she had an affinity for strings. I am planning on exploring the string orchestra works next, or maybe the violin concerti. The disc with other chamber music from the Silesian Quartet and friends also looks great.

Who has been listening to Bacewicz lately? What a composer.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Daverz on November 16, 2019, 02:50:16 PM
I tend to prefer her earlier works, e.g. the Violin Concerto No. 1, the Piano Quintet No. 1.  Her later works tend to sound more bland to me.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 20, 2019, 08:50:06 AM
I tend to prefer her earlier works, e.g. the Violin Concerto No. 1, the Piano Quintet No. 1.  Her later works tend to sound more bland to me.

I feel similarly. I think her later music tries too hard to be ‘avant-garde' or ‘cutting edge’ when it’s obvious that others did this much better (i. e. Ligeti, Xenakis, etc.).
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: vers la flamme on November 20, 2019, 05:37:20 PM
I don't hear Ligeti or Xenakis in her later works at all. Nor do I think that those two composers ever had a monopoly on the avant-garde!
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 20, 2019, 05:43:05 PM
I don't hear Ligeti or Xenakis in her later works at all. Nor do I think that those two composers ever had a monopoly on the avant-garde!

But my point is her brand of avant-garde isn’t my cup of my tea and I like her earlier music better.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: vers la flamme on November 20, 2019, 05:58:30 PM
But my point is her brand of avant-garde isn’t my cup of my tea and I like her earlier music better.
That's fair enough. I just found it odd that you brought up Ligeti and Xenakis. Different generation, completely different sound world. Of course, if you don't like it, then you don't like it!

On a related note, can someone tell me if there are any other recordings of Bacewicz's VCs outside of the Chandos discs? Those sound great, but Chandos is never easy on the wallet.
Title: Re: Grazyna Bacewicz (1909-1969)
Post by: Mirror Image on November 20, 2019, 06:06:50 PM
That's fair enough. I just found it odd that you brought up Ligeti and Xenakis. Different generation, completely different sound world. Of course, if you don't like it, then you don't like it!

On a related note, can someone tell me if there are any other recordings of Bacewicz's VCs outside of the Chandos discs? Those sound great, but Chandos is never easy on the wallet.

But if you listen to Bacewicz’s later works, you will find that I’m not too far off and I was just using Ligeti and Xenakis as an example --- as poor of an example as they may be. Anyway, I’m afraid you’re out of luck with the VCs. There has been perhaps one or two VCs recorded outside of Chandos on the Dux label, but you’ll pay a premium price for those recordings as well. Dux recordings are usually around the same price as BIS recordings the best I can remember. If you really want the VCs, the Chandos is the only game in town right now.