GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Dancing Divertimentian on April 06, 2007, 05:36:56 PM

Title: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on April 06, 2007, 05:36:56 PM
This one ought to be a sticky!

But until enough folks catch the Handel bug it will undoubtedly fluctuate.

My newest Handel arrival is a selection from the Concerti Grossi, Op.6 (Manze). Central works in Handel's oeuvre but until now overlooked by yours truly in favor of the operatic works, which, of course, are titans of the stage.

Fine works, the Op.6, and worth every inch of their popularity. Even so I feel the tug of the stage works at every turn. Something missing, I suppose, when 'endless' appoggiaturas (vocal, that is...) are left out of the picture. 8)

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on April 08, 2007, 07:32:00 PM
Wouldn't want to forget D Minor's wonderful Handel link:


www.gfhandel.org/index.htm



Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: woodshedder on April 21, 2007, 04:33:20 PM
I have been feasting on the Messiah for the last month approx. I was astounded to read that Handel wrote it in only 24 days!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: knight66 on April 21, 2007, 10:13:57 PM
Although Messiah was written quickly, it was not all fresh music. For instance the Halleluah Chorus was borrowed from an earlier work, as were several other very famous sections. Nevertheless, Messiah is so well crafted that they all fit together like a jigsaw and feel right in the new context.

Mike
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: DavidW on April 23, 2007, 05:24:05 PM
A friend on this forum sent me a gift--

His Italian Cantatas, nice, light music! :)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: knight66 on April 23, 2007, 11:26:59 PM
They can also be seriously dramatic, such as 'Lucretia'. By no means are they fluff.

Mike
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: DavidW on April 24, 2007, 04:56:25 AM
They can also be seriously dramatic, such as 'Lucretia'. By no means are they fluff.

Mike

I haven't heard that one.  I have the Kirkby cd, I think either she picked some lightweight music or she is a lightweight, one of the two.  But it's some nice listening. :)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: knight66 on April 24, 2007, 06:41:50 AM
Yes David, Kirkby is fine in her way, but it essentially has to be pretty pastoral. To hear what a dramatic interpretation can be like, I suggest Lorraine Hunt-Lieberson's Handel recital.

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HQ0GXZHFL._SS500_.jpg)

Mike
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on July 29, 2008, 08:30:59 AM
Here is your first true "fluctuation" Don!  ;D  My wife and I continue to enjoy Handel's music more and more.  This past Sunday we heard his Chaconne in G Major for solo harpsichord played live in a small church here in Denver.  Absolutely lovely stuff.  Also, my wife and I have worked through this set that Harry sent us a number of times:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61AHRETA38L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Handel: Chamber Music (Complete) (though from the larger box set I believe)

And today, I had this playing:

Haendel Apollo e Dafne
Judith Nelson/David Thomas
McGegan/Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
Harmonia Mundi

We also hope to attend this Handel celebration in May:
http://dcc1079.googlepages.com/

I will continue to post my Handel listening here and I am sure we will see more as we approach the 250th anniversary of his death in April of 2009.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on July 29, 2008, 05:38:49 PM
Here is your first true "fluctuation" Don!  ;D

 ;D

After a year! :o

Thanks for jump-starting this thread, Bill. It's great to read your impressions on Handel. 

I hope you and your wife can make it to that celebration. Keep us posted on whatever Handel subject tickles your fancy. :)


 
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: val on July 29, 2008, 11:27:53 PM
One of the most powerful and impressive works of Händel is the funeral anthem "The ways of Zion do mourn", composed on the death of Queen Caroline. It is not as famous as the oratorios or some other anthems, but, in my opinion, it is one of Händel's supreme inspirations.

There is a remarkable version conducted by Gardiner.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on February 23, 2011, 08:49:50 PM
Doctor, we have a pulse:

(http://t1.ftcdn.net/jpg/00/00/90/84/400_F_908447_Y8JX3vog3wog3wJKqjFcd0sGHe2PvI.jpg)

Top shelf:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51V7vba5AML._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
 
From the liner notes:

In Italy Handel was desired to furnish his quota of cantatas for the musical evenings held by patrons at their great houses.  Sometimes a complete cantata might be composed and performed in a single evening (now that is some "smithing"!), but the larger pieces with orchestral accompiament, usually produced for special occasions, were composed in advance and rehearsed in the usual way.  In Rome, cantatas were useful substitutes for opera, which could not be performed in the city.....

Anyone know why they were banned in Rome?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on February 23, 2011, 09:26:17 PM
Doctor, we have a pulse:

(http://t1.ftcdn.net/jpg/00/00/90/84/400_F_908447_Y8JX3vog3wog3wJKqjFcd0sGHe2PvI.jpg)

Bill to the rescue once again!


Quote
Top shelf:

In Italy Handel was desired to furnish his quota of cantatas for the musical evenings held by patrons at their great houses.  Sometimes a complete cantata might be composed and performed in a single evening (now that is some "smithing"!), but the larger pieces with orchestral accompiament, usually produced for special occasions, were composed in advance and rehearsed in the usual way.  In Rome, cantatas were useful substitutes for opera, which could not be performed in the city.....

Anyone know why they were banned in Rome?

"...now that is some smithing!..."  ;D


Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on February 23, 2011, 09:45:03 PM
(http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSDPjH-AD5nEVPOiMm74JLcJbaOrHSfpILRPEuh58zgNvKqCRih&t=1)

"I'm just getting warmed up!"
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: The new erato on February 23, 2011, 09:51:01 PM
  In Rome, cantatas were useful substitutes for opera, which could not be performed in the city.....[/i]

Anyone know why they were banned in Rome?
Isn't that rather obvious with operas regularly being banned during church holidays all over catholic Europe given Rome's particular position within catholicism? Gave growth to the oratorio as an alternative, more dramatic than the cantata.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on February 24, 2011, 06:31:43 PM
Thanks, Erato.

Today I snagged these four cds (thanks George for the look-ups at your end):

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41CAa9vJNzL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41VZHMptojL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41220T0HG5L._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-0w34CpKL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


Already spun the Water Music.  Fascinating.  The Alla Hornpipe on this one is syrupy slow, but brilliant, light and beautiful.  My Pinnock recording takes this movement at a strong clip with force.  However, the Pinnock is 4:13 and the Scherchen is 4:01.  Not sure why this is.  Any thoughts?
 
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: PaulSC on February 24, 2011, 06:58:15 PM
Thanks, Erato.

Today I snagged these four cds (thanks George for the look-ups at your end):

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41CAa9vJNzL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41VZHMptojL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41220T0HG5L._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-0w34CpKL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


Already spun the Water Music.  Fascinating.  The Alla Hornpipe on this one is syrupy slow, but brilliant, light and beautiful.  My Pinnock recording takes this movement at a strong clip with force.  However, the Pinnock is 4:13 and the Scherchen is 4:01.  Not sure why this is.  Any thoughts?
Well I haven't heard either, but one explanation would be if Pinnock takes repeats and Scherchen skips them.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on February 24, 2011, 08:00:53 PM
Well I haven't heard either, but one explanation would be if Pinnock takes repeats and Scherchen skips them.

Thanks, Paul.  Gurn PM'd me with the same info.  Not knowing the nuts and bolts of music, are repeats intended for this type of interpretation, that is, is it up to the conductor/performer to choose the amount, or does the composer usually note how many times something is to be repeated?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: PaulSC on February 24, 2011, 08:23:13 PM
Taking the repeats is generally the right thing to do, from a "historically informed performance" (HIP) point of view. So it makes sense that Pinnock, who works in the HIP tradition, takes them, while Scherchen, coming from more of a romantic tradition, feels free to skip them.

My personal opinion is that great performances can come from both sides, although I love the sound of period instruments playing Baroque repertoire. I'd love to hear those Scherchen Handel recordings.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 25, 2011, 04:40:20 AM
Taking the repeats is generally the right thing to do, from a "historically informed performance" (HIP) point of view.

The question remains though even for HIPer's, in cases such as Bach's Brandenburg Concerto I.  Should both halves of the minuet be repeated each time it returns in the finale?  The music sounds interminable when all implied repeats are taken, and thus few (none?) on record actually do so, HIP or not.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: PaulSC on February 25, 2011, 11:14:39 AM
The question remains though even for HIPer's, in cases such as Bach's Brandenburg Concerto I.  Should both halves of the minuet be repeated each time it returns in the finale?  The music sounds interminable when all implied repeats are taken, and thus few (none?) on record actually do so, HIP or not.
Yes, good point -- in fact I had the Brandenburg I example specifically in mind when I hedged with "generally" in my earlier remark.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on February 25, 2011, 08:51:18 PM
Thanks to all for the info.  Dave (Sonic), can you give me a link to the Handel keyboard music you have?


Now playing:

(http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/1f/bb/5d4ce03ae7a0e2d88285c110.L._AA300_.jpg)
Composed 1724

Just picked this up.  Harnoncourt has never disappointed me.  His streak continues with this purchse tonight.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 26, 2011, 01:53:11 AM
Yes, good point -- in fact I had the Brandenburg I example specifically in mind when I hedged with "generally" in my earlier remark.

Not all HIP conductors repeat the fugal-introduciton section in a French overture on record.  Ditto the development-recapitulation repeat in the first movement when performing a Haydn or Mozart symphony. 

I prefer the whole thing in most cases and am forced to check or guess for repeats whenever buying a new HIP recording of Bach orchestral suites or Mozart symphonies.   Handel's Water Music and Fireworks Music seem less plagued by this for some reason.   
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: FideLeo on February 26, 2011, 02:08:32 AM
Now playing Antonini's audacious and BIG interpretation of Handel's Grand Concerto...

http://www.youtube.com/v/N3ZrC5n3aEk

http://www.youtube.com/v/qoBdtoyYKmI



Scherchen's performance (and indeed most other) sounds not so much dated as reticent in comparison (speaking from memory, not having these discs with me at the moment).




Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on February 26, 2011, 06:51:58 AM
If you mean by reticent for Scherchen's

inclined to be silent or uncommunicative in speech

then I do not necessarily agree.  However, if you mean:

restrained in expression, presentation, or appearance <the room has an aspect of reticent dignity — A. N. Whitehead

then I am on board. :D

I really enjoyed the Antonini's, enough to add it to my wish-list.  I can see where you find the word audacious fitting, where I might bring in the words lush and full bodied. In fact comparing a few of the movements side by side at my end was very difficult.  Enough so I was wondering if I had the wrong pairings.  Meh.  Does not matter.  I enjoyed both so should have both on my shelf. ;D


Any other Handel recs mnemosyne?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: chasmaniac on September 30, 2011, 07:40:33 AM
2 pages for Handel? For shame!

Here are my favourite of his arias, if I can work this whole cut and paste technology:

As steals the morn, L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato
As when the dove laments, Acis and Galatea
Se pietà di me non senti, Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Künft’ger Zeiten eitler Kummer, Neun Deutsche Arien
Süßer Blumen Ambraflocken, Neun Deutsche Arien
Oh what pleasures, Alexander Balus
Beneath the vine or fig-tree’s shade, Solomon
Son qual stanco, Arianna in Creta
Angels ever bright and fair, Theodora
With darkness, deep, Theodora
Oh that I on wings could rise, Theodora
There, held in holy passion, L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato
Let me wander not unseen, L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato
How willing my paternal love, Samson
Heart, the seat of soft delight, Acis and Galatea
Where’er you walk, Semele
Vieni, o figlio, Ottone
Ombra mai fù, Serse
The pilgrim’s home, the sick man’s health, Theodora
To thee, thou glorious son of worth, Theodora
Lascia ch’io pianga, Rinaldo
V’adoro, pupille, Giulio Cesare in Egitto
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: chasmaniac on October 05, 2011, 08:07:41 AM
'Course, there is this thread: http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2077.0.html?PHPSESSID=ac122b43f7628be1652f290a63c22081 (http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,2077.0.html?PHPSESSID=ac122b43f7628be1652f290a63c22081).

Cancel the shame.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Geo Dude on December 26, 2011, 06:16:34 AM
I've been listening to this recording of the Harpsichord Suites lately and loving it.  Handel has a gift for melody, to say the least.

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 27, 2014, 06:02:19 PM
Handel just broke into my top 3 composers after a week of listening.  Time to bring this thread out of hibernation.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Ken B on March 27, 2014, 06:23:04 PM
Handel just broke into my top 3 composers after a week of listening.  Time to bring this thread out of hibernation.
I'm confused. Handel is not popular on GMG or something?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 27, 2014, 06:34:05 PM
I'm confused. Handel is not popular on GMG or something?

It's a head scratcher.  I believe that Handel is liked by many here. He just does not get the run of a Beethoven or Mahler or a number of other composers.  What we need is for Gurn to go "Haydn" on him. ;D
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: The new erato on March 27, 2014, 10:50:05 PM
He is en my top 10 (at least) and probably overall the composer I play the most.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: DavidW on March 28, 2014, 04:52:00 AM
Handel is in my top 10 as well.  If Gurn or MI were to push him I'm sure the thread would run for dozens of pages. :D
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Octave on March 28, 2014, 05:32:49 AM
I'd love to know of some excellent recordings of Handel's non-vocal music, as so much of what I have is vocal.  Some things I have discovered within the past year or two that I have liked very much:

1. Water/Fireworks Music by Jordi Savall (Alia Vox, sacd)
2. three discs of orchestral music (including Water/Fireworks) by Tafelmusik dir. Jeanne Lamon (in that Vivarte/Sony 6cd w/music also by Vivaldi, Purcell, Geminiani) [two of the editors of GFHandel.org picked these three to be among their 'desert island discs', fwiw]
3. chamber music box (CRD or Brilliant or Passionato...I think they are all the same program)
4. violin sonatas by Manze/Egarr (I need to look at some more recordings of these)
5. orchestral music by Pinnock (Archiv)
6. one of the Warner Handel Edition boxes with organ concertos by Koopman and keyboard music by Scott Ross and Olivier Baumont
7. keyboard suites 1720 by Ludger Remy (CPO, 2cd)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: North Star on March 28, 2014, 05:45:03 AM
I'd love to know of some excellent recordings of Handel's non-vocal music, as so much of what I have is vocal.  Some things I have discovered within the past year or two that I have liked very much:
Egarr & Academy of Ancient Music's Op.1-5, Manze & AoAM's Op. 6

...and this one , for the ouvertures ;)

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Rinaldo on March 28, 2014, 07:25:02 AM
I'm confused. Handel is not popular on GMG or something?

I've always thought the general (not necessarily GMG) consensus on Handel was "yeah, he was the popular guy of his day, while Bach's the real deal / Vivaldi a lot more fun".

I love Handel (if that wasn't obvious from my username) and even though I don't listen to his music as much nowadays, it's always a treat. Plenty of filler, obviously, but the peaks, even the overplayed ones, are tremendous. Give me Lentement from Water Music any day and I'll be moved every single time. Handel's everything I adore about baroque music - the playfulness, the instantly shifting moods, the MELODIES. Hey, even Mozart was a fan!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 07:38:39 AM
I know her Bach is loved on this board, so this might be something some want to snag. 

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61nVfn4FuxL._SY300_.jpg)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 07:45:45 AM
Another wonderful disc that is entering the tray:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6133F9H9ZXL._SY300_.jpg)

Handel's chamber music is some of my favorite.  Harry sent me some Brilliant recordings many moons ago and those hooked me. 
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 08:36:05 AM
Paul Lang writes in his introduction of his Handel bio (1963):

The regrettable and incredible fact is that the magnitude of Handel's genius and the avalanche of great music he wrote is scarcely suspected today.  True, he always is bracketed with Bach, but once the we remove the brackets and omit Messiah and two or three other works, we have precious little left.

and

His works have to be uncovered and washed free of the prejudices and falsification that cling to them.  Granted, no one can go through the entire work of Handel without admitting that a good deal of it has faded away, perhaps forever, and it is easy to suppose that he always owed his fame to one oratorio and half a dozen opera tunes that were turned into sacred songs.  But we know that much contained in these volumes possesses real life, and it is shocking how reluctant the musical world is to investigate.

Makes me think of Vivaldi a bit.   That is, once you dig past the "one hit" you find a lot of music worth having on the shelf.  I have also noticed this with Handel records that I flip through in bins.  Dozens of Messiahs and very little of other works.  Take away the Water Music and the Fireworks, and finding a piece of vinyl is actually quite a find!  Now, this was the days of vinyl.  But even in current times, do you find his recorded output after his war horses (three or so) fairly small?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: DavidW on March 28, 2014, 08:56:12 AM
But even in current times, do you find his recorded output after his war horses (three or so) fairly small?

More so than Vivaldi (you compared the two).  I have listened to many recordings of even esoteric concerti of Vivaldi.  I think that Handel's greatest contribution was in opera and oratorio.  But Handel like Lully and Scarlatti are underrepresented (as compared to Bach) even though their operas made a monumental impression during their time.  imo
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 10:31:37 AM
I believe I have some Gardiner Handel around here somewhere with an OK postmark on it .  8)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 10:36:43 AM
Point of the last post is some big names have taken on Handel, but seem
to stop short of in depth explorations.
Except for maybe Hogwood, who wrote a book on him.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: DavidW on March 28, 2014, 10:55:26 AM
I believe I have some Gardiner Handel around here somewhere with an OK postmark on it .  8)

And I some Italian Cantatas... ;D
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 11:24:02 AM
And I some Italian Cantatas... ;D

Jacobs anyone?

Just got finished with this recording:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pCxSkDQrL._SY300_.jpg)

Always fun to read the notes on the history of both pieces.  I have to say that this Water Music definitely has a different sound than my Pinnock recording.  One reason why many of us enjoy multiple efforts on this board.  As I was looking through the notes on the period instrumentation (which they did a cruddy job of listing the musicians' weapons of choice), I noted for the Fireworks an instrument known as the "serpent" played by Douglas Yeo.  Pretty cool:

(http://www.berliozhistoricalbrass.org/yeo%20lander%20web.jpg)


(http://www.berliozhistoricalbrass.org/5x7%20serpent%20trio%20-%20small.jpg)
The American Serpent Players
Douglas Yeo, Craig Kridel, and Steven Silverstein

(http://www.berliozhistoricalbrass.org/images/monk-keyless-2259-100.jpg)

This one is known as the Anaconda!
(http://www.blackdiamondbrass.com/tbahist/dougyeoanaconda.jpg)

Got to get Dave's (Sonic's) take on this bad boy....though I am sure he has already addressed it in another thread. ;D  Not sure which made it onto this recording, but Yeo wrote a whole book on it and has a great page on the instrument!

(http://necmusic.edu/sites/default/files/images/DouglasYeoSerpentDVD170px.jpg)

http://www.yeodoug.com/serpent.html
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: (: premont :) on March 28, 2014, 11:52:54 AM
Paul Lang writes in his introduction of his Handel bio (1963):

The regrettable and incredible fact is that the magnitude of Handel's genius and the avalanche of great music he wrote is scarcely suspected today.  True, he always is bracketed with Bach, but once the we remove the brackets and omit Messiah and two or three other works, we have precious little left.

Makes me think of Vivaldi a bit.   That is, once you dig past the "one hit" you find a lot of music worth having on the shelf. 

I'd love to know of some excellent recordings of Handel's non-vocal music, as so much of what I have is vocal.  Some things I have discovered within the past year or two that I have liked very much:

1. Water/Fireworks Music by Jordi Savall (Alia Vox, sacd)
2. three discs of orchestral music (including Water/Fireworks) by Tafelmusik dir. Jeanne Lamon (in that Vivarte/Sony 6cd w/music also by Vivaldi, Purcell, Geminiani) [two of the editors of GFHandel.org picked these three to be among their 'desert island discs', fwiw]
3. chamber music box (CRD or Brilliant or Passionato...I think they are all the same program)
4. violin sonatas by Manze/Egarr (I need to look at some more recordings of these)
5. orchestral music by Pinnock (Archiv)
6. one of the Warner Handel Edition boxes with organ concertos by Koopman and keyboard music by Scott Ross and Olivier Baumont
7. keyboard suites 1720 by Ludger Remy (CPO, 2cd)

These CDs - I know almost all of them - are IMO some of the best of the available recordings of Händel´s instrumental music. Particularly I appreciate the Pinnock recordings and Remy´s harpsichord recordings. But they do not completely hide the fact, that Händels´s scores aren´t but drafts, upon which the performer was supposd to add stylish variations, passing notes and ornamentation. It must be assumed, that Händel himself was able to do that, but very few performers of to day are. They are just in the initial process of learning how to do, and I think this is the reason why Händel performances often have fallen to the ground. This is also a problem with Vivaldi e.g., but not with Bach, who notated almost everything he wanted the musician to play. So it is a bit unfair to judge Händels instrumental music by Bach´s standard, because Bach´s music is finished, while Händel´s music is unfinished.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 28, 2014, 11:57:56 AM
These CDs - I know almost all of them - are IMO some of the best of the available recordings of Händel´s instrumental music. Particularly I appreciate the Pinnock recordings and Remy´s harpsichord recordings. But they do not completely hide the fact, that Händels´s scores aren´t but drafts, upon which the performer was supposd to add stylish variations, passing notes and ornamentation. It must be assumed, that Händel himself was able to do that, but very few performers of to day are. They are just in the initial process of learning how to do, and I think this is the reason why Händel performances often have fallen to the ground. This is also a problem with Vivaldi e.g., but not with Bach, who notated almost everything he wanted the musician to play. So it is a bit unfair to judge Händels instrumental music by Bach´s standard, because Bach´s music is finished, while Händel´s music is unfinished.

Post of the day.  Love this kind of insight!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Octave on March 28, 2014, 10:38:30 PM
[...]So it is a bit unfair to judge Händels instrumental music by Bach´s standard, because Bach´s music is finished, while Händel´s music is unfinished.

Thanks for this interesting response.  I'd certainly like to find some unusual performances of the keyboard music where such risks are taken.  I wonder if Blandine Rannou would fulfill the music in this regard?  I say this with memories of her GOLDBERG VARIATIONS [where I have heard so many other performances, hers seems to shine through as remarkable in a sense that I relate to what you are saying], though the comparison is probably unsuitable.

I am also interested in this music on anachronistic instruments, modern pianos etc.

Among all instruments and in addition to Scott Ross and Ludger Remy, I've tried Paul Wolfe, Keith Jarrett, Sviatoslav Richter (EMI/Yedang), Glenn Gould, Paul Nicholson.
I am keen to hear Lisa Smirnova, Borgstede, Egarr's brand new set, and especially Ottavio Dantone.

Aside on the serpent:
I am psyched to try out that Telarc Water/Fire disc with the serpent, Bogey.  I think my only experience with that strange instrument is from the improvising tubist (?) Michel Godard, who has made a number of recordings with the serpent as a primary or double, including some with the jazz oudist Rabih Abou-Khalil.  In fact, a GMGer once posted mention of a Godard record, some kind of Monteverdi experiment.  I am curious about it:


Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: HIPster on March 29, 2014, 07:09:29 AM
Cross-posted from the Recordings You are Considering thread:


Hear are a few Handel recordings I've been eyeing as of late:

Lautten Compagney




La Divina Armonia/Ghielmi


*Is the Pascaille label defunct?  Their recordings seems to be a) expensive in the States and b) go out of print in the blink of an eye. . .


Parley of Instruments/Holman




La Risonanza/Bonizzoni



*Ace amazon reviewer Mike Birman makes a very compelling case for this release and the entire series in general.  Our own Octave engages him in some most excellent and informative Handelian dialogue too (well worth the read for further recommendations).
Aside on the serpent:
I am psyched to try out that Telarc Water/Fire disc with the serpent, Bogey.  I think my only experience with that strange instrument is from the improvising tubist (?) Michel Godard, who has made a number of recordings with the serpent as a primary or double, including some with the jazz oudist Rabih Abou-Khalil.  In fact, a GMGer once posted mention of a Godard record, some kind of Monteverdi experiment.  I am curious about it:




Bows in Octave's direction. ;)

I posted that a while back in the Monteverdi thread. . .  I also have that high on my wish list, but have held off in favor of other Monteverdi releases (of which there have been many  :)).

I believe that Karl Henning posted some info on the serpent as a part of a museum collection he is affiliated with?  Karl, please help me out here!  Thanks.

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: North Star on March 29, 2014, 07:37:53 AM
I know it was a lack of coordination between brain and hand. I was thinking of my previous post and the Op. 1 and I wrote "recorder". I usually make this mistake because in Spanish both instruments have the same name.

That said, I was thinking of Preston.
No wonder I didn't find his recorder sonata recordings :)

Cross-posted from the Recordings You are Considering thread:

Hear are a few Handel recordings I've been eyeing as of late:

La Risonanza/Bonizzoni

*Ace amazon reviewer Mike Birman makes a very compelling case for this release and the entire series in general.  Our own Octave engages him in some most excellent and informative Handelian dialogue too (well worth the read for further recommendations).
Bows in Octave's direction. ;)
And Giordano Bruno (http://www.amazon.com/review/R309IH223O9NGI/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B002Y4Z582&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=5174&store=music) doesn't help our wallets, either.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Gordo on March 29, 2014, 08:06:56 AM
No wonder I didn't find his recorder sonata recordings :)

... c'mon, after all I didn't say he was playing the ukelele...  ;)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: North Star on March 29, 2014, 08:14:16 AM
... c'mon, after all I didn't say he was playing the ukulele...  ;)
How about those concertos Vivaldi wrote for it.  0:)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Gordo on March 29, 2014, 08:26:52 AM
How about those concertos Vivaldi wrote for it.  0:)
... yes, those concertos for mandolin are nice.

Also are fine those pieces for mandolin and piano composed by Beethoven. I have a HIP version played by Duilio Galfetti and Diego Fasolis (*).

Anyway, I ignore the specific differences between ukelele and mandolin.

(*) Available on Spotify.

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: North Star on March 29, 2014, 08:47:27 AM
... yes, those concertos for mandolin are nice.
Also are fine those pieces for mandolin and piano composed by Beethoven. I have a HIP version played by Duilio Galfetti and Diego Fasolis (*).
Anyway, I ignore the specific differences between ukelele and mandolin.
(*) Available on Spotify.
The Beethoven pieces I haven't heard, I should try them later (listening to guitar, theorbo, gamba, basse de viol and clavecin now :) )
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 29, 2014, 08:12:36 PM
I am a sucker for winds, so this cd found its way onto my shelf today:



OOP, but there are a few of these discs here and there. Not sure if these are the same as on the Regis disc that is also OOP.  From the net:

On returning to Halle Handel became a pupil of Zachau, the cathedral organist, who gave him a thorough training as a composer and as a performer on keyed instruments, the oboe and the violin. Six very good trios for two oboes and bass, which Handel wrote at the age of ten, are extant; and when he himself was shown them by an English admirer who had discovered them, he was much amused and remarked, "I wrote like the devil in those days, and chiefly for the oboe, which was my favorite instrument."
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Ken B on March 29, 2014, 08:20:59 PM
I am a sucker for winds, so this cd found its way onto my shelf today:



OOP, but there are a few of these discs here and there. Not sure if these are the same as on the Regis disc that is also OOP.  From the net:

On returning to Halle Handel became a pupil of Zachau, the cathedral organist, who gave him a thorough training as a composer and as a performer on keyed instruments, the oboe and the violin. Six very good trios for two oboes and bass, which Handel wrote at the age of ten, are extant; and when he himself was shown them by an English admirer who had discovered them, he was much amused and remarked, "I wrote like the devil in those days, and chiefly for the oboe, which was my favorite instrument."
I highly recommend Rota's quintet with flute. Not all winds. Carbotta.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Octave on March 30, 2014, 05:31:47 PM
*Ace amazon reviewer Mike Birman makes a very compelling case for this release and the entire series in general.  Our own Octave engages him in some most excellent Handelian dialogue too (well worth the read for further recommendations).

Well, on my end it was more Handelian badgering, but Mike was kind to offer me some suggestions.  I am still getting mileage out of those early (for me) discoveries, a couple of years on.   :)
I remember at least one or two GMGers recommending that HANDEL IN HAMBURG (Helios)....it's on my definite 'to acquire' list.

The Italian Cantatas series from Glossa is fantastic.  Unfortunately I can't remember if I liked that disc more than the others in the series.  I regret that the prices seem to have gotten even higher.  It is exquisite singing and playing.  I don't know if you are a fan of the Emma Kirkby + Chris Hogwood collaboration, but they have a disc of Italian cantatas that is also quite nice, reissued by Eloquence. 
I have heard only samples from Brilliant's recent Italian Cantatas series; they sounded very good, but for the moment that is not on the front burner for me.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 30, 2014, 06:11:53 PM
  I don't know if you are a fan of the Emma Kirkby + Chris Hogwood collaboration, but they have a disc of Italian cantatas that is also quite nice, reissued by Eloquence. 


Truth.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: DavidW on March 30, 2014, 07:26:13 PM
Truth.

That was the cd you shipped me!  That was you right?  Sharing the love for Kirkby?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Octave on March 30, 2014, 10:19:03 PM
1.
Bogey got rid of his Kirkby/Hogwood Handel disc!   ???
I support gifting as among the greatest of acts, but WTH.

2.
Bows in Octave's direction. ;)
Yes, thanks for mentioning that one!  Godard seems to be a versatile and adventurous musician, and I don't know that side of his work (the Monteverdi record) at all.  I wonder if it would make a good double-feature with that allegedly really cool ~jazzy Monteverdi record by Christina Pluhar & co. (the one on Virgin).
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: HIPster on March 31, 2014, 04:26:16 PM
This relatively recent Handel release by Alan Curtis and Il Complesso Barocco is a total joy!



Has just the right blend of vocal and instrumental material.  Sound is vivid and lively in the best possible sense.

A disc I regularly return to.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on March 31, 2014, 04:30:28 PM
1.
Bogey got rid of his Kirkby/Hogwood Handel disc!   ???
I support gifting as among the greatest of acts, but WTH.



David's responsible for getting me on board with Bach.  Nothing I can give him to repay the debt I owe. :)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on June 23, 2014, 04:50:50 AM
More so than Vivaldi (you compared the two).  I have listened to many recordings of even esoteric concerti of Vivaldi.  I think that Handel's greatest contribution was in opera and oratorio.  But Handel like Lully and Scarlatti are underrepresented (as compared to Bach) even though their operas made a monumental impression during their time.  imo
I think there are about 30 or more complete recordings of Handel's op.3 and op.6 as well as of the more famous organ concerti. I doubt that many of Vivaldi's concerti, except for the ubiquitous 4 seasons have been recorded so many times. After Bach's Brandenburgs and Suites, 4 seasons and Fireworks/Water Handel's concerti grossi are probably the most frequently recorded baroque music, clearly better represented than anything by Telemann, Zelenka or Corelli.
There's no doubt that overall Handel's operas, oratorios and other vocal works are more important, but his concertos and also the 8 1720 harpsichord suites are certainly among the most important music of their time in the respective genres.

And by now most of this stuff is quite well represented on disc. There are more great recordings of op.6 or op.4 than there are of the "Chandos Anthems" (which is a pity, because the pieces are great, but there is hardly anything besides Christophers complete set which is good, but not great imo)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Henk on December 18, 2014, 04:07:19 AM
What is your favorite recoding of the Conceri Grossi, op. 6? Is there an ultimate recoding of it?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: The new erato on December 18, 2014, 04:16:21 AM
I have these and am happy with them:




But there are a plethora of recordings, with some superb ensembles.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on December 18, 2014, 04:56:14 AM
Of op.6 I have heard Scherchen, Marriner (Argo/Decca), Harnoncourt, Pommer, Hogwood, Manze and most recently de Vriend.

Probably Harnoncourt is still my favorite, although it is controversial and justifiedly so. It is the most strongly characterised of those, with a fairly large tutti, some little cadenzas added and very "rhetorical". This neglects the more elegant and "sprightly" aspects of the music. If you like Harnoncourt's "Paris" symphonies you will probably like that as well (although the recorded sound is not as great, but o.k. for early 80s).

Manze is the most chamber-like of the ones mentioned, very good in its way, but I could use a little more "pomp" and also diversity. Marriner is Marriner, very good for its vintage, but mostly elegant and sprightly. Pommer is a very odd mix between a fairly big-sized, conventional chamber orchestra and some historical mannerisms, it can be found very cheaply, but I would not really recommend it, although I find some movements interestingly done.
The "safest" choice would probably be Hogwoods. It is not hugely different from Manze, but a little bigger sounding, some broader tempi.
I was slightly disappointed with de Vriend's, because it had received some rave reviews, but would have to re-listen to be more specific. I found it somewhat "cold", although it is certainly interesting, e.g more embellishments than Hogwood.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: JCBuckley on December 18, 2014, 07:20:40 AM
What is your favorite recoding of the Conceri Grossi, op. 6? Is there an ultimate recoding of it?

I don't now about 'ultimate', but the Manze set is the one I most often return to.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Henk on December 18, 2014, 01:08:07 PM
I haven't evaluated the recordings I have enough. I think the Manze is a good one as well. I also have Dyer, that's a good set, I like the approach, but it lacks some fire. Orpheus ensemble was my first recording and I enjoyed it, but it was my first encounter to the works, so my opinion about it is biased. I need to relisten to that set. I think, this:

is a great set as well, full of passion.

I need to get the Hogwood. He also wrote a biography of Handel, I noticed.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on December 18, 2014, 01:32:27 PM
Hogwood also has a beautiful op.3 (not sure if this is as easily available as his op.6 twofer). This has the advantage of more interesting reconstruction of op.3/6 (a patchwork by the editor) and you get the organ concerto movement (the traditionally second of op.3/6) as a bonus. To my knowledge only Goodman/hyperion does a similar thing (but I have not heard his recording). The otherwise brilliant more recent op.3 with Egarr has an extemporised organ slow movement and the organ concerto movement.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Moonfish on February 23, 2015, 12:32:08 PM
It is Handel's birthday today (Feb 23)!!!!   8)
Bring out the wine, cheese and harpsichord!!!

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/George_Frideric_Handel_by_Balthasar_Denner.jpg/330px-George_Frideric_Handel_by_Balthasar_Denner.jpg)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: North Star on February 23, 2015, 12:47:37 PM
It is Handel's birthday today (Feb 23)!!!!   8)
Bring out the wine, cheese and harpsichord!!!
And don't forget the sopranos
https://www.youtube.com/v/uj3SQbz-DaQ
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Moonfish on July 03, 2015, 12:40:26 AM
Brilliant Classics is releasing a new compilation/iteration of their Handel box:

http://www.brilliantclassics.com/articles/h/handel-edition/ (http://www.brilliantclassics.com/articles/h/handel-edition/)

http://www.amazon.de/H%C3%A4ndel-Edition-Various/dp/B0106UFMP6 (http://www.amazon.de/H%C3%A4ndel-Edition-Various/dp/B0106UFMP6)

(http://www.brilliantclassics.com/ImageGen.ashx?image=/covers/5028421950501.jpg&width=200&height=200&constrain=true&pad=true&bgcolor=e9e9e9&altimage=/images/no_image.jpg)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Bogey on July 03, 2015, 06:08:30 AM
Brilliant Classics is releasing a new compilation/iteration of their Handel box:

http://www.brilliantclassics.com/articles/h/handel-edition/ (http://www.brilliantclassics.com/articles/h/handel-edition/)

http://www.amazon.de/H%C3%A4ndel-Edition-Various/dp/B0106UFMP6 (http://www.amazon.de/H%C3%A4ndel-Edition-Various/dp/B0106UFMP6)

(http://www.brilliantclassics.com/ImageGen.ashx?image=/covers/5028421950501.jpg&width=200&height=200&constrain=true&pad=true&bgcolor=e9e9e9&altimage=/images/no_image.jpg)

Thanks for the tip. 
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: king ubu on August 10, 2015, 03:26:19 AM
Another wonderful disc that is entering the tray:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6133F9H9ZXL._SY300_.jpg)

Just ordered that one ... love me some Händel (or more than some, really!), but have hardly any chamber music of his so far.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on August 10, 2015, 05:22:22 AM
My favorite Handel chamber recordings are the Trios op.5 with La Stravaganza Salzburg (Intercord); this used to be really hard to find but now there are apparently several fairly cheap used offers at amazon.de (I am almost tempted to get another one as backup or for a gift.) It's the most luxuriously ornamented I have heard.

Another great mixed disc is on Zigzag with a French ensemble (Amandine Beyer plays the violin). Manze's disc is good but somewhat violin dominated.



(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/516nr6JonIL._SL500_.jpg)

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: king ubu on August 10, 2015, 10:07:06 PM
Thanks, I'll look for these!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on August 13, 2015, 01:10:58 AM
Handel's chamber music is a mess.
There are three opus numbers but probably none of these publications was supervised by Handel. The trio sonatas op.2 and op.5 are all authentic works, although most of op.5 are arrangements from orchestral pieces (like ouvertures or ballett pieces from operas). My rec for opus 5 is Stravaganza Salzburg (with Rampe on harpsichord). They use traverse flute in two sonatas.

I do not have a strong rec for op.2 but London Baroque on harmonia mundi is pretty good (violins only) and 2-3 of those sonatas have also been frequently recorded with mixed instruments: flute/violin, recorder/violin or also with two oboes. (Especially of the latter version there are also modern instruments recordings, e.g. by Holliger)

There are 3 (so-called Dresden) trio sonatas, one of which HWV 394 E major is considered spurious, one HWV 392 F major very probably authentic and another one (the best and most famous one) HWV 393 g minor maybe authentic. The latter is included in the Zigzag discs shown above. The others I have only in the Brilliant/CRD recording with Holloway et al. They also have another one HWV 403 C major about which I cannot even tell the authenticity status.

There are 6 further trio sonatas HWV 380-85, reputedly composed by the teenaged Handel in Halle before 1700 but nowadays believed to be much later (1730s) and not by Handel. There is  recording on hyperion but I have not heard it.

About the other mess, op.1 (comprising most of the solo sonatas), maybe some later time.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: king ubu on August 13, 2015, 05:05:34 AM
Thanks a lot for all of this information, both here and in the other threads!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: kishnevi on January 08, 2016, 07:10:40 PM
Bump for a crosspost from the main listening thread.


Just finished a first listen to one of Handel's greatest works.


The neglect of this is criminal.  As best I can tell, this is the only recording.  Fortunately, the performance is excellent, even the treble, Connor Burrowes, who sings Benjamin.

Must have for anyone interested in Handel's oratorios
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Dancing Divertimentian on January 08, 2016, 07:46:33 PM
Handel's oratorios are fantastic! And there are many which haven't gotten the notoriety they deserve. His first oratorio, Esther, is worth a listen.

I haven't heard Joseph and his Brethren so thanks for the heads up!



Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on January 09, 2016, 02:38:37 AM
Strictly speaking, his first oratorios would be the two italian pieces "La Resurrezione" and "Trionfo del tempo ed il disinganno" written when Handel was in his early 20s in Italy.

They are both fantastic pieces but rather different from the later English oratorios: Very "Italian", that is brilliant, virtuoso solo singing (also some virtuoso passages for instruments, the short sinfonia from the "Trionfo" was probably one of the first pieces with a concertante keyboard (organ) ever), hardly any choral passages.

An early German language "Johannespassion" was almost certainly not written by Handel; the "Brockes-Passion" from ca. 1716-18 is an uneven (overlong) piece but worth a listen for some strong sections, some of which were also recycled for the earliest English oratorios like Esther and/or Athalia. Bach had a copy of the Brockes-Passion and may have conducted it in Leipzig. Some of the libretto of Bach's St. John's borrows from the Brockes-Text and the first vocal piece of the Handel "Von den Stricken meiner Sünden" might remind one of a similar aria in the (later) Bach St. John.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: The new erato on January 09, 2016, 02:42:21 AM
Strictly speaking, his first oratorios would be the two italian pieces "La Resurrezione" and "Trionfo del tempo ed il disinganno" written when Handel was in his early 20s in Italy.

They are both fantastic pieces but rather different from the later English oratorios: Very "Italian", that is brilliant, virtuoso solo singing (also some virtuoso passages for instruments, the short sinfonia from the "Trionfo" was probably one of the first pieces with a concertante keyboard (organ) ever), hardly any choral passages.
As a longsuffering Handelian I prefer him in an Italian mode, and those two you mention are my favorite Handel oratorios.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on January 09, 2016, 04:53:33 AM
I think that some of the later more choral-dominated oratorios are deservedly famous, even when the overall dramaturgy might sag sometimes. E.g. "Solomon" does not really have much action to speak of (except the "harlot scene"), but the choruses are simply amazing and it is funny when Handel almost self-ironically lets Solomon give the Queen of Sheba an entertainment with 4? choral pieces each depicting a different affect/mood.

But the early italian pieces certainly deserve to be better known, although there are fortunately pretty good recordings around.
Maybe Handel basically copies the style of Alessandro Scarlatti and other older italian composers (whereas the specific stylistic fusion of the 1730-50s oratorios is his more individual "voice") but they are brilliantly done and lots of fun. And the same is true for the shorter Italian cantatas as well as the Dixit Dominus (and a few other motets/psalm settings from the Italian period).
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: The new erato on January 09, 2016, 05:52:04 AM
As a longsuffering Handelian I prefer him in an Italian mode, and those two you mention are my favorite Handel oratorios.
When speaking of his Italian mode, I am of course including his operas! Though I very much agree with your latest post.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: jlaurson on June 24, 2016, 04:26:24 AM

Latest on Forbes.com:

Classical CD Of The Week: Handel At His Most English (http://bit.ly/CDoftheWeek017)


If “no plot, no characters, no dialogue” (Ruth Smith) doesn’t sound like a promising
premise for an entertaining musical work, think again: We listen to the music primarily
as it is (as we do with many very popular but daft operas and their excuses of a plot),
but if we chose to follow the text or listen carefully, we find ourselves immersed in an
enchanted literary world – very distant from ours, but beguiling...

(http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2016/06/Forbes_Classica-CD-of-the-Week_SIGNUM_Handel_lallegro_McCreesh_1200-1200x469.jpg)
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/06/23/classical-cd-of-the-week-handel-at-his-most-english/#2c0582f8343d (http://bit.ly/CDoftheWeek017)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: jlaurson on September 19, 2016, 01:37:09 PM

latest on Forbes:

Emmanuelle Haïm Can Handel The Vienna Philharmonic
(http://blogs-images.forbes.com/jenslaurson/files/2016/09/Forbes-Classical-Emmanuelle-Haim_Vienna-Philharmonic_Handel_Theater-an-der-Wien_Jens-F-Laurson-1200x469.jpg)
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/09/19/emmanuelle-haim-can-handel-the-vienna-philharmonic/#7a9ac3e11d2e (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2016/09/19/emmanuelle-haim-can-handel-the-vienna-philharmonic/#7a9ac3e11d2e)

Unusual and in a way typical for the Theater-an-der-Wien, which likes to think outside the box.
Emmanuelle Haïm, the third woman[1] to ever conduct the Vienna Philharmonic (or at least a
small, baroque-ensemble sized section thereof), had conducted the same George Frideric Handel
program at the Lucerne Festival and repeated it here: A first half of orchestral works and the solo
cantata Il delirio amoroso (HWV 99) in the second half.

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: André on March 04, 2017, 05:15:27 PM
Ok, 'fess up time.

I own thousands of cds, and a small but representative Handel selection (some 40 discs, mostly vocal).

But no Royal Fireworks Music  ???

Not that I'm unfamiliar with the piece, far from it. But, like many such works that have (over the years) come in all kinds of various guises (in this case: MI, PI, gaudy, strict, joyful, noisy, mellifluous, exploding with the sound of timpani, drowned under a 24-strong bassoon complement etc), I never got around to settle for a particular approach.

I have noticed that in recent years some italian baroque ensembles have recorded it. My curiosity is piqued.

I would welcome recommendations that go beyond the tried and true (Gardiner, Leppard, Pinnock - yaaawn).

Any suggestions ?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: North Star on March 04, 2017, 05:21:29 PM
Not that I really know this repertoire well, but Savall is surely worth consideration.

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2017, 01:09:52 AM
Savall's is great.
Of the wind, brass, drums version I only have Pinnock's (and have not listened to it for ages as I prefer the version including strings).



I have not heard Zefiro's (as far as I know the same recording appeared on Arcana and dhm) but this is probably one of the "wild italian" readings and their disc with the water music (+ Telemann's Hamburger Ebb und Flut) is great and I highly recommend it, it might even beat the classic Musica Antiqua Telemann recording.
Another one with a great coupling (concerti a due cori, IMO better than the Fireworks and Water musics and far less known) is Tafelmusik/Sony although this is certainly more restrained than Zefiro and more in the Pinnock/Gardiner vein. I actually recommend it more for the concerti a due cori (and it has the best cover after Savall's ;)) but it might have been superseded by Zefiro as well.

I still keep Leppard's because to me it seems more pompous than any of the others I have.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: HIPster on March 05, 2017, 11:30:13 AM
Savall's is great.

I have not heard Zefiro's (as far as I know the same recording appeared on Arcana and dhm) but this is probably one of the "wild italian" readings and their disc with the water music (+ Telemann's Hamburger Ebb und Flut) is great and I highly recommend it, it might even beat the classic Musica Antiqua Telemann recording.
Another one with a great coupling (concerti a due cori, IMO better than the Fireworks and Water musics and far less known) is Tafelmusik/Sony although this is certainly more restrained than Zefiro and more in the Pinnock/Gardiner vein. I actually recommend it more for the concerti a due cori (and it has the best cover after Savall's ;)) but it might have been superseded by Zefiro as well.

I still keep Leppard's because to me it seems more pompous than any of the others I have.

Jo498 picks some of my own recommendations.

I'll add this very fine Italian group to the mix:



This is the recording I reach for the most for the Water Music, often just letting the Fireworks play (some of my least favorite Handel).

Zefiro's Handel/Telemann/Handel program is very effective.  A close second for me in the Water Music category.

I think Paul Dombrecht's group has recorded the Fireworks, perhaps? 

Cheers.  :)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on March 05, 2017, 12:00:53 PM
Yes, Dombrecht has it also coupled with two concerti a due cori. The disc is also found in an older Vanguard incarnation as "Ceremonial Music". This is pretty good but I sold it in a phase of slimming down the collection, slightly preferring Tafelmusik and Savall. And I am not all that fond of the Fireworks either, except for La paix which is one my favorite pieces ever, and furthermore I usually find the HIP recordings too slimmed down. As I said above, that's why I still keep Leppard's around. (Marriner's is also not pompous enough despite modern instruments.)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on May 23, 2018, 02:39:37 PM
(https://thumbor.forbes.com/thumbor/960x0/https%3A%2F%2Fblogs-images.forbes.com%2Fjenslaurson%2Ffiles%2F2018%2F04%2FForbes_Classical-CD-of-the-Week_HANDEL_Imeneo_Europa-Galante_Biondi_GLOSSA_Classical-Critic-Jens-F-Laurson-960.jpg)
Classical CD Of The Week: Imeneo - A Case Of Lightly Pleasing, Pirate-Hunting Handel
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2018/05/23/classical-cd-of-the-week-imeneo-a-case-of-pirate-hunting-lightly-pleasing-handel/#362d48a06298 (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenslaurson/2018/05/23/classical-cd-of-the-week-imeneo-a-case-of-pirate-hunting-lightly-pleasing-handel/#362d48a06298)

Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: milk on January 10, 2019, 04:14:43 AM
Another wonderful disc that is entering the tray:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/6133F9H9ZXL._SY300_.jpg)

Handel's chamber music is some of my favorite.  Harry sent me some Brilliant recordings many moons ago and those hooked me.
I've a hard time getting into this, partly because of the way it's recorded. Are there any other recommended recordings of this? HIP ones?
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on January 10, 2019, 04:32:25 AM
Christie/Kurosaki is more intimate and has the organ in a few pieces (I think it skips some of the dubious works). One caveat is that the original edition is copy protected (one of a handful of such disks that found their way into my collection) but this might not affect more recent editions.
The one on Brilliant (crd) is rather minimalist and sometimes a little dry. I have not heard any others, except for the odd sonata in a mixed anthology.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: milk on January 10, 2019, 05:15:50 AM
Christie/Kurosaki is more intimate and has the organ in a few pieces (I think it skips some of the dubious works). One caveat is that the original edition is copy protected (one of a handful of such disks that found their way into my collection) but this might not affect more recent editions.
The one on Brilliant (crd) is rather minimalist and sometimes a little dry. I have not heard any others, except for the odd sonata in a mixed anthology.
Thanks!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on January 10, 2019, 05:33:51 AM
This one has a new cover, so I'd expect that it  is without copy protection. It has 7 sonatas, some of dubious authenticity.



This is the one reissued on Brilliant. It has only 4 violin sonatas, apparently the only ones certainly by Handel and certainly for violin. It is so minimalist that in one sonata they play with violin and cello only, no keyboard. (I eventually got rid of it, only kept two discs with trio sonatas from the brilliant edition).



My favorite mixed chamber disc with Handel is this one, it includes one violin sonata d minor 359a.


Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2019, 10:43:50 AM
I heard Zadok the Priest on the radio recently and had forgotten what a stirring work it is!
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on September 06, 2019, 10:57:20 PM
Arguably a new Reference Recording. Not "The Best"... but an excellent standard against which to judge others. (If one wanted to judge in the first place, I suppose.  ;D)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EDuqtkeXkAAm72g?format=jpg&name=medium)

A (Very!) Fine #Messiah From Václav Luks and Collegium 1704

https://classicstoday.com/review/a-fine-messiah-from-vaclav-luks-and-collegium-1704/ (https://classicstoday.com/review/a-fine-messiah-from-vaclav-luks-and-collegium-1704/)
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: vers la flamme on September 08, 2019, 09:18:33 AM
I'm learning the Sarabande from his D minor harpsichord suite. Very nice piece.

I heard Zadok the Priest on the radio recently and had forgotten what a stirring work it is!
Indeed a killer piece! Almost enough to sway me to Monarchism! :P
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: Jo498 on September 08, 2019, 11:08:22 AM
In European soccer they arranged a bit of Zadok as the incidental music for the "Champions league". Quite ludicrous, but it still retains some of the power of the original.
Title: Re: Handel...The Harmonious Blacksmith Of Music
Post by: SurprisedByBeauty on September 19, 2019, 09:43:22 PM
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(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EE02NaPXsAcN8tT?format=jpg&name=medium) (https://t.co/544rYwc5pL?amp=1)

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