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The Music Room => Great Recordings and Reviews => Topic started by: Que on March 29, 2008, 02:19:19 AM

Title: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on March 29, 2008, 02:19:19 AM
To sidestep some postings on the listening thread: here is the one and only thread on music for the lute.
Oh yes, mind that this includes the theorbo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theorbo), which is a certain type of lute, and the vihuela (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vihuela), a predecessor of the guitar.

Recommendations of repertoire, lutenists, (on line) recources, and of course lute recordings are welcome!

My contribution will be modest, I'm just a beginner in lute recordings.

For Bach, Lutz Kirchof:



This bargain 4CD-set by Nigel North, with transcriptions of the cello suites and sonatas & partitas for violin is mighty impressive as well.



Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: val on March 29, 2008, 04:52:55 AM
I have Bach's works for lute played by Junghänel (2 CD, HARMONIA MUNDI).

To me, Weiss is not inferior to Bach, regarding their lute music. They were contemporary, since Weiss lived between 1686 and 1750. My favorite piece of Weiss is Le Tombeau sur la mort do Conte de Logy, a very austere but also very impressive work. It reminds me of the Tombeaux composed by Froberger to the harpsichord.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Brian on March 29, 2008, 07:12:19 AM
I am very busily and happily collecting the Weiss sonatas series on Naxos, featuring the extraordinary performer Robert Barto (I think his custom instrument has 13 strings). Frequently I listen to a sonata right before sleep to help clear my mind out from the stress of the day.  :)

When Naxos finishes recording Dowland's lute music, I may purchase the set if it is released in box form.

So glad you started this thread.  :)  I love the lute, much more than the guitar in fact; unlike the latter instrument, I could listen to lute music just about all day.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on March 29, 2008, 08:17:38 AM
Blow, John - Awake My Lyre w/ Redbyrd & Parley of Instruments - theobro part of the group!
Dowland, John - Lute Works w/ Paul O'Dette - box set of 5 discs which I don't own, but have 3 of the CDs!
Kapsberger, Giovanni Lute Pieces w/ the wonderful Paul O'Dette yet again -  :D
O'Dette, Paul - Robin Hood... - Elizabethan ballads et al (plenty of O'Dette options)!
Vivaldi, Antonio - Lute & Mandolin Music w/ O'Dette & Parley of Instruments.
Wilson, Christopher - Vihuela Music of Spanish Renaissance - just to add another early string instrument!

Vihuela Information (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vihuela), if interested; actually, I thought that my collection had MORE lute discs; of course, there is a lot of lute playing in many of the Renaissance and adjoining periods CDs - looking forward to more recommendations!  :)

(http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/jpegs/66658.jpg)  (http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioArt/260/266544.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/418D6KMPBBL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5155PTPMD9L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HJKTdRmVL._AA240_.jpg)  (http://www.opacmeiga.rbgalicia.org/Portadas%5C2546.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: The new erato on March 29, 2008, 08:30:12 AM
This is a stunning recording (about the best sound I've ever heard) of some melodious, finely wrought music:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61dslPRYHoL.jpg)

I have it in its previous incarnation on now defunct fnac music.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Guido on March 29, 2008, 08:59:28 AM
I will be watching this thread with great interest. Actually this is real coincidence - I just finished watching this youtube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuoBpNz6fD8&feature=related

Julian Bream playing to Stravinsky. It's quite sweet how starstruck he is, and he plays as fantastically as ever.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Josquin des Prez on March 29, 2008, 09:04:34 AM
To me, Weiss is not inferior to Bach, regarding their lute music.

I think he's far superior, except for the BWV 997 suite, which is greater then anything i heard from Weiss (when Bach put his mind into something he has no peers). Either way, he's my favored composer for the instrument.

As for the aforementioned suite by Bach, i like the recording by Hopkinson Smith. Very clear counterpoint and the sound quality is excellent (always a plus when it comes to "quiet" instruments like the lute).
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Josquin des Prez on March 29, 2008, 09:19:52 AM
I am very busily and happily collecting the Weiss sonatas series on Naxos, featuring the extraordinary performer Robert Barto (I think his custom instrument has 13 strings).

Is that going to be a complete set? I already have all the suites from the London source by Michel Cardin but i've always wanted to put my hands on the Dresden Manuscript.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: FideLeo on March 29, 2008, 11:19:43 AM
This is a stunning recording (about the best sound I've ever heard) of some melodious, finely wrought music:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61dslPRYHoL.jpg)

I have it in its previous incarnation on now defunct fnac music.

The mention of Robert de Visse (the Sun King's lute teacher and house lutenist) is very welcomed since there were probably more lute player-composers in 17th and 18th century France than in Germany at the same time.  This recording has wonderfully resonant sound and relaxed playing, and is currently available with the same player's Bach transcriptions BWV1007-09 in a Virgin Verita 2x set.  Hopkinson Smith's recordings of other French composers (the Gaultier's, Dufaut, de Gallot, de Rippe, Mouton, etc.) are great.

I think music for the 6-course vihuela should also be categorised with lute pieces since the methods of both instruments are said to be quite similar even though the Spanish vihuela looks very much like a Renaissance guitar.

(http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/3658/morenomediumrg8.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)

The photograph above shows Jose Miguel Moreno, one of the best musicians around, playing a vihuela.  His lute recordings (on own brand Glossa) (de Visse, Weiss etc.) are also wonderful.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Shrunk on March 29, 2008, 02:23:12 PM
Thanks for starting this thread!  I'm all over the lute.   I'm considering taking classical guitar lessons (Been playing the instrument for years, but have only sporadically taken classical lessons), but since I'm mostly interested in learning lute pieces, I'm wondering if it might be best just to go directly for the real thing and study the lute instead, though I might be a bit too old to take up something new..

A couple other O'Dette suggestions:



Daniel Bachelar:  The Bachelar's Delight

Bachelar was a contemporary of Dowland's.  While his music is in a similar vein, it is less melancholic and more obviously virtuosic.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61GefuRGENL.jpg)

Alla Venetiana (16th Century Venetian lute music)



And his Bach series is off to an excellent start, thought the North set mentioned above is also exceptional.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: 71 dB on March 30, 2008, 01:13:25 AM
I am very busily and happily collecting the Weiss sonatas series on Naxos, featuring the extraordinary performer Robert Barto

I collected the first 5 volumes. Great music performed very well but maybe a bit redundant. I think the first volume could have been enough (there's so much other classical music to be purchased...)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: FideLeo on March 30, 2008, 02:30:10 AM
I collected the first 5 volumes. Great music performed very well but maybe a bit redundant. I think the first volume could have been enough (there's so much other classical music to be purchased...)

Redundant?  Never Weiss, the "Bach of Lute"!
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Shrunk on March 30, 2008, 02:45:17 AM
I will be watching this thread with great interest. Actually this is real coincidence - I just finished watching this youtube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuoBpNz6fD8&feature=related

Julian Bream playing to Stravinsky. It's quite sweet how starstruck he is, and he plays as fantastically as ever.

I read an interview with Bream recently where he talked about what an uncomfortable experience this was for him.  It seemed obvious to him that Stravinsky was very busy and resented the intrusion, but the film crew encouraged Bream to persist.  The early part of the video seems to confirm this, but at the same time Stravinsky appears to genuinely appreciate the performance.  The narration is a bit bizarre, though, isn't it?
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Guido on March 30, 2008, 07:46:49 AM
Yes, he sort of regresses into embarrassed school boy mode at the beginning, but it soon all relaxes and as you say Stravinsky seems genuinly appreciative
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: val on March 31, 2008, 01:30:48 AM
MOUTON: Works from the First and Second Book   / Hopkinson Smith

Mouton, who died in 1699, is a very touching composer. Melancholic, with beautiful motifs, almost romantic.

Another suggestion:

NARVAEZ:  Works for voice and for the vilhuela  / Marta Almajano, Juan Carlos Rivera

The vilhuela is not the lute, but this CD is the best to discover this instrument. The songs, in special "Paseavase el rey moro", have an extreme beauty.
Another great composer for the vilhuela was MUDARRA. There is a good CD played by the inevitable Hopkinson Smith.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Florestan on March 31, 2008, 03:37:05 AM
Slightly off-topic or maybe not. In the interesting historical fiction book Imprimatur by Monaldi & Sorti Robert De Visee is mentioned as having composed a sarabande which had the curious property of curing the pest when played to an infected person. Do you know anything about it?  :)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Bunny on April 02, 2008, 11:18:22 AM
Here's one of my favorite lute recordings:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/519VRJTDMWL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on April 09, 2008, 05:44:34 AM
Well, stimulated by this thread & the arrival of a couple of CD orders recently, I've added the following to my lute collection; so far, just listening to the first 2 discs of the 4-CD set w/ Nigel North (agree w/ Que's assessment in the OP):

Bach, JS - Solo Violin & Cello Transcriptions w/ Nigel North.

Weiss, Sylvius - Sonatas Lute, Vol. 1 w/ Robert Barto - Weiss's dates (1686-1750) just off 1 yr from Bach!

Lute Music of Renaissance w/ Joachim Held - various composers/anon. - excellent BMG bargain!  :D

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31lq3Sf4OIL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://www.haendel.it/photogallery/photo18120/copertine/weiss_cd.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51B1CQ5HB0L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: bassio on April 09, 2008, 03:25:38 PM
I think he's far superior, except for the BWV 997 suite, which is greater then anything i heard from Weiss (when Bach put his mind into something he has no peers). Either way, he's my favored composer for the instrument.

As for the aforementioned suite by Bach, i like the recording by Hopkinson Smith. Very clear counterpoint and the sound quality is excellent (always a plus when it comes to "quiet" instruments like the lute).

I'll have to look at Weiss then.

Anyway for the Bach, I have Sollscher (not that known in America .. more in Europe I believe, anyone have his set what do you think?) and John Williams. What do you guys think of both these sets?
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on April 13, 2008, 09:58:47 PM
OK people, I decided to get myself Dowland's lute works.

The choice seems to be between Paul O'dette on Harmonia Mundi and Nigel North on Naxos (though his series is not yet complete). Price will be roughly the same.
Any opinions or experiences to share on those? :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5118XZERH2L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)   (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41d-z11GRtL.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: FideLeo on April 14, 2008, 04:59:31 AM
OK people, I decided to get myself Dowland's lute works.

The choice seems to be between Paul O'dette on Harmonia Mundi and Nigel North on Naxos (though his series is not yet complete). Price will be roughly the same.
Any opinions or experiences to share on those? :)


There is one difference anyway: one will have to wait for Mr North to complete his series! 
I have the O'Dette in single discs..(legacy of my time being a BMG club member) never
managed to listen to them all.  Is that a meaningful response to your question?  Maybe it's
a matter of how much Dowland one can take before feeling imposssibly "down" him- or herself.
Needless to say, it was quite fast for me.  2 discs worth of tears, frowns, sighs, or dying
(even done ever so quietly) was enough.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on April 14, 2008, 05:10:16 AM
Is that a meaningful response to your question? 

Yes, indeed it is. Quite telling I think, although we don't know for sure if Dowland was to blame, or O'dette? ;D Maybe one volume of Nigel North is a wise course of action to take - I liked him in Bach. :)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: FideLeo on April 14, 2008, 05:18:47 AM
Maybe one volume of Nigel North is a wise course of action to take - I liked him in Bach. :)

I would suggest so.  If, after the 2 Naxos discs you'd still be "dying" to hear more Dowland,
I suspect either choice would be fine!
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Shrunk on April 14, 2008, 02:09:03 PM
OK people, I decided to get myself Dowland's lute works.

The choice seems to be between Paul O'dette on Harmonia Mundi and Nigel North on Naxos (though his series is not yet complete). Price will be roughly the same.
Any opinions or experiences to share on those? :)

Just to confuse matters further, there's also Jakob Lindberg on BIS.

Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 20, 2009, 10:12:11 AM
Interesting post:

There is a Vihuela literature from the earlier

El Maestro by Luis de Milán (1536)
Los seys libros del Delphin by Luis de Narváez (1538)
Tres Libros de Música by Alonso Mudarra (1546)
Silva de sirenas by Enríquez de Valderrábano (1547)
Libro de música de Vihuela by Diego Pisador (1552)
Orphénica Lyra by Miguel de Fuenllana (1554)
El Parnasso by Estevan Daça (1576).


http://www.youtube.com/v/iYOFviCC7DA
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 20, 2009, 10:12:56 AM
And another:

Co-incidentally La Cancion del Emperador (actually a rearrangement of Mille Regrets by Josquin) is a piece I'm polishing up myself at the moment. I love the Vihuela repertoire and am really fortunate in that I have access to the Pujol editions of the Milan (both volumes) and the Narvaez, among others. Pisador, however, I find a bit dry and academic.

Anyone who wants to play through some of these can probably get them online for free or the best are available in a Pujol edited anthology "Hispanae Citharae Ars Viva" that includes Pisador-Pavana muy llana, Villanesca; Valderrabano-Soneto I & II; Milan-Fantasia del quarto tono, Fantasia de consonancias y redobles; Mudarra-Gallarda, Diferencias Conde Claros, Fantsia de Ludovico; Narvaez-Cancion del Emperador, Baxa de contrapunto, Diferencias Guardame las Vacas, and Tres diferencias por otra parte.

As for recordings, well Hopkinson Smith has done quite a lot of vihuela repertoire and is really the benchmark but I'll always have a soft spot for this


http://www.youtube.com/v/Upd8HJxYeb0

Superb!!
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Antoine Marchand on December 04, 2009, 02:39:57 AM
Dowland - Fancyes, Dreams and Spirits. Lute Music 1
Nigel North, lute
Recording: 23-26 July 2004
Naxos

Extraordinary performances by North, well captured on Naxos. Currently Naxos has joined all four volumes (Dowland - Complete Lute Music) in one box at very convenient price.

Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 04, 2009, 06:57:25 AM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9WeOIGmNDSU/UNNTBIlxV9I/AAAAAAABLNs/fXLwE_u4Fkg/s1600/weiss+portada+3.PNG)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51IJyZUqiSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513EX843NSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)


Q - would be curious about your impressions of that series?  I have just 2 discs of Weiss's lute works, Vol. 1 on Naxos w/ Barto, who is now up to Vol. 10 (how much did Weiss compose for this instrument?), and Lindberg on an historic lute (which I may have put more info in the 'old instrument' thread?) - pics inserted above.

Maybe a 'box set' should be next?  Dave  :D
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: The new erato on December 04, 2009, 07:11:33 AM
(how much did Weiss compose for this instrument?),
His sonatas is numbered into the sixties IIRC.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 04, 2009, 07:32:14 AM
His sonatas is numbered into the sixties IIRC.

Erato - thanks!  I was exploring more on Weiss & Lindberg, and have just added the disc below to my Amazon cart, i.e. a Vol. 2 w/ Lindberg on a different Baroque lute - review on Arkiv Music HERE (http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=234652); according to that story more than 100 solo lute works and 90+ movements survive, so much is likely lost or yet to be found?

In a WIKI article, the paragraph below is quoted - this guy was kind of a 'super star' of his times! Dave  ;D

Quote
Weiss was one of the most important and most prolific composers of lute music in history and one of the best-known and most technically accomplished lutenists of his day. He wrote around 600 pieces for lute, most of them grouped into 'sonatas' (not to be confused with the later classical sonata, based on sonata form) or suites, which consist mostly of baroque dance pieces. Weiss also wrote chamber pieces and concertos, but only the solo parts have survived.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YHK-L6CCL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on December 04, 2009, 12:29:04 PM

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9WeOIGmNDSU/UNNTBIlxV9I/AAAAAAABLNs/fXLwE_u4Fkg/s1600/weiss+portada+3.PNG)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51IJyZUqiSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513EX843NSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Q - would be curious about your impressions of that series?  I have just 2 discs of Weiss's lute works, Vol. 1 on Naxos w/ Barto, who is now up to Vol. 10 (how much did Weiss compose for this instrument?), and Lindberg on an historic lute (which I may have put more info in the 'old instrument' thread?) - pics inserted above.

Maybe a 'box set' should be next?  Dave  :D

Good question indeed, Dave! :)

That's why I picked up this issue by Michel Cardin (http://www.michelcardin.com/homecardin.html). I was intrigued by the comments by Mark Sealy (http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/s/sne00600a.php) on ClassicalNet, in whom Cardin's complete series of Weiss' lute works (12 discs) has found a strong advocate. (More (http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/s/sne00635a.php)) BTW a nice discography of Weiss' Dresden manuscripts HERE (http://www.classical.net/music/comp.lst/articles/dresden/disco/weiss.php).

Anyway, I have also one volume of Roberto Barto's series on Naxos, and although the works on the two discs are not the same, comparing the two approaches provided much interesting listening and revealed quite some differences.

Let me state first that it took a while before a preference emerged - these are two very good lutenists. Cardin is the more deliberate player, Barto is swifter and more flowing making a grasp on Weiss' musical architecture easier on first listening. Cardin is on the other hand is more articulate. The Naxos recording of Barto is also "easier on the ear" with a more mellow soundsstage at some distance of the instrument while the SNE recording of Cardin is up-close to the instrument with extra sonic "gruff" and "gut-effect" as a result. In the end I found Cardin's more probing and expressive approach more satisfying than Barto's admittedly very elegant playing that glosses just a bit over the music IMO.

Perhaps not the most convenient result, I might add... The Cardin series being OOP en fetching high prices, that were considerably higher than Naxos to begin with. Maybe buying directly from Michel cardin's website (http://www.michelcardin.com/homecardin.html) is an option.

Although... a wondefull OOP series on a tiny label, doesn't that sound like a perfect deal for Brilliant Classics? :o ;)
Harry, you might want to tip the people at Brilliant ... and do us all a big favour. 8)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on December 04, 2009, 12:38:25 PM

(http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6895.0;attach=22438;image)

Dowland - Fancyes, Dreams and Spirits. Lute Music 1
Nigel North, lute
Recording: 23-26 July 2004
Naxos

Extraordinary performances by North, well captured on Naxos. Currently Naxos has joined all four volumes (Dowland - Complete Lute Music) in one box at very convenient price.

I'm seriously considering that, after I found the recordings by Lindberg (BIS, now Brilliant Classics) slightly disappointing. To my taste Lindberg's approach is too sober, too barren, though beautifully proportioned. I missed a bit of imagination, poetry. The remaining question for me is: is Paul O'Dette series still worth considering, or is he too far at the other end of the spectrum and too melodramatic, as Masolino seems to suggest in earlier comments on this thread? ::)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 04, 2009, 03:54:58 PM
Q - thanks for your comments on the Weiss recordings by Cardin and the links - 12 volumes!  WOW - could not find a pricing for these discs on the web site, but a BOX SET is certainly a need for us lute fans!

Concerning Dowland, I currently own the Lindberg box on Brilliant and also 3 of O'Dette's discs on H. Mundi (these were purchased cheap years ago from the BMG club); tonight, I'm doing a brief listening comparison of the two performers.  First, I agree that Lindberg despite his excellent playing & fingering, just does not show that much emotion in the music; now, this music is often played in such a fashion but a little more FLASH would appeal to me!  I love Paul O'Dette and own a variety of discs by him - now there is a 5-CD box set offered by H. Mundi that is a little too pricey - his playing is wonderful and offers more emotion & dynamics vs. Lindberg; however, there are some extraneous noises that I've noticed from the beginning (some have commented that it's his breathing but the culprit is likely close miking of his finger movement on the strings).

So, bottom line is that I'm ordering the Nigel North set for a listen since the price is right!  Plus, I do own other recordings of North and have little doubt that the Dowland discs will be excellent - probably will be 'dumping' some Dowland in the near future!

Thanks for getting this thread going again - Dave  :D
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 04, 2009, 06:39:28 PM
Below is a post that I just left in the 'listening thread' - these performances certainly sound different, but is that related to the performers/instruments, the music (and century of composition), and/or sound production - there seem to be so many considerations?

But one issue that has intrigued me is Lindberg's performances in the Dowland vs. Weiss works - I really enjoy him in the latter, but not as much in the Dowland works (may be the instrument or other issues?) - but a more important consideration might be the 'era' of composition, i.e. is English lute music (vs. latter German compositions) different regarding their interpretation?  Just some thoughts to consider that came to my mind this afternoon?  :D


Quote
Listening to a lot of lute music this afternoon & evening - Weiss & Dowland, as performed by Lindberg & O'Dette:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513EX843NSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AFM6SYA3L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51x9QIv34JL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Antoine Marchand on December 05, 2009, 07:27:25 AM
I'm seriously considering that, after I found the recordings by Lindberg (BIS, now Brilliant Classics) slightly disappointing. To my taste Lindberg's approach is too sober, too barren, though beautifully proportioned. I missed a bit of imagination, poetry. The remaining question for me is: is Paul O'Dette series still worth considering, or is he too far at the other end of the spectrum and too melodramatic, as Masolino seems to suggest in earlier comments on this thread? ::)

Hi, Q.

IMO North is not too different to Lindberg. Both of them are outstanding in fields like refinement, sobriety and well-proportioned performances, with measured, elegant doses of imagination (although probably North is a bit more “alert”)… In short, I would say that Lindberg and North are more similar between them than compared with O'Dette. But for the price of the North’s set… come-on, Q! 

Besides, North offers some nice instruments and his performances has been rather closely miked by Naxos -without strange noises-, which it is a difference with the opener and more variable and natural soundstage on Bis. :)

P.S.: I have been listening to these North’s performances and I would wish to stress one point on the sound quality of this set. As I said previously this set is very closely miked and this decision has some artistic consequences because we heard principally the “immediate sound” of the lute, but not enough its delicate sound dying in the room, declining in the space. This one could be a problem for some listeners. 
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Antoine Marchand on December 05, 2009, 08:29:25 AM
QUESTIONS FOR NIGEL NORTH (http://indianapublicmedia.org/harmonia/questions-nigel-north/)

 :)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 06, 2010, 07:09:43 AM
Continues to sound impressive! :)
Forget about Lindberg (BIS/ Brilliant) IMO.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Fl3U0%2BGhL._SS500_.jpg) (http://www.jpc.de/image/w600/front/0/0747313401635.jpg)

Hello Q - I bought the Lindberg box first; then picked up North - prefer North after a couple of comparative listenings - also, decided to 'cull out' my O'Dette discs of the same music (just had 3 picked up at bargain prices) - bottom line just beautiful lute music!  Dave  :)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on January 06, 2010, 10:55:32 PM
Hello Q - I bought the Lindberg box first; then picked up North - prefer North after a couple of comparative listenings - also, decided to 'cull out' my O'Dette discs of the same music (just had 3 picked up at bargain prices) - bottom line just beautiful lute music!  Dave  :)

Hi Dave, I haven't heard O'Dette other than in samples but Nigel North's Dowland is mighty fine indeed: elegant, articulated, emotionally expressive and varied. Lindberg's rather stoic interpretation pales in comparison. From what I've gathered by just sampling O'Dette seems a bit the "Jordi Savall" of the lute with a more theatrical style and plenty of aplomb(?)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: canninator on January 07, 2010, 04:27:11 AM
So much love for Nigel! Where the North set fails for me compared to Lindberg is in tempo. It is important to bear in mind that everything in the solo Dowland lute reperoire, bar Preludium and the fantiasias, are mostly dances and Lindberg performs them as such.

You can do your own side by side comparison using Lachrimae as a great example (Lindberg Brilliant disc 1, track 14; North Naxos disc 2, track 1). A justly famous piece dripping in melancholy and pathos, ripe for emoting and this is what North sets out to do BUT it is a pavan and must have a regular pulse to be played properly. Listen and compare the musical pulse in the Lindberg versus the North. Lindberg is regular, North is a bit wayward. For me, therefore, Lindberg will always come out on top if only by virtue of the more intellectual approach he brings to the music.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 07, 2010, 03:08:31 PM
The music is very beautiful, touching & endearing. O'Dette's set is incomparable, I cannot recommend it highly enough.

Well, I've loved all 3 performers of this Dowland music that I have owned - just have 'so much' space for storage and did not have the complete O'Dette set; I can't imagine one being disappointed w/ any of these lutenists - they are all superb!  But, two sets of the 'complete' works should serve me well - like picking a 'mate', choices must be made -  ;) :D
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: canninator on January 08, 2010, 11:59:08 AM
Some new recordings to look out for Lute lovers. Barto's vol 10 in the Weiss series is out Jan 26. I am particularly looking forward to hearing his Sonata No. 40 from the Dresden manuscript. A new fascimile of this manuscript is now available so maybe some new interesting recordings will arise from this.

Also this little beauty should be in any lute lovers collection (if you don't have these pieces by Hoppy elsewhere)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41MNcAO8dlL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Hopkinson Smith on Naive records. As I'm sure you all know, Hopkinson Smith is a legend so this is a nice release. If you haven't already got it his recent Da Milano is also superb
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/617159IZVoL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

It's such a shame that so many of his classic releases on Astree have never been re-released by Naive, a real treasure trove of excellent lute and vihuela recordings
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: canninator on January 08, 2010, 12:10:23 PM
Well, I've loved all 3 performers of this Dowland music that I have owned - just have 'so much' space for storage and did not have the complete O'Dette set; I can't imagine one being disappointed w/ any of these lutenists - they are all superb!  But, two sets of the 'complete' works should serve me well - like picking a 'mate', choices must be made -  ;) :D

I don't think Hopkinson Smith will ever do a cycle. That would have benchmark written all over it but I do hope that Elizabeth Kenny does one for Hyperion, that would be great.

I really don't like what Jose Miguel Moreno did with Dowland on his 2CD set on Glossa with the introduction of the theorbe as a second voice. It would still be nice to hear him do a "regular" Dowland recording but my feeling is that he would not be so good in this idiom.

All the same, I would make room on my shelf for all these.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: zorzynek on January 08, 2010, 03:50:08 PM
I'm pretty happy with Weiss' Sonatas for 2 Lutes performed by Karl-Ernst Schröder and Robert Barto. I'm not the connoisseur though.

Is Stephen Stubbs' interpretations of David Kellner any good?
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: canninator on January 10, 2010, 01:23:43 PM
I'm pretty happy with Weiss' Sonatas for 2 Lutes performed by Karl-Ernst Schröder and Robert Barto. I'm not the connoisseur though.

Is Stephen Stubbs' interpretations of David Kellner any good?

Never heard the Kellner disc but generally speaking Stephen Stubb's is a quality lutenist so I don't imagine you would have too many problems with it. Anyway, it's not as though many people have recorded Kellner! Where are you going to pick it up, I thought it was OOP.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: zorzynek on January 10, 2010, 02:22:36 PM
Never heard the Kellner disc but generally speaking Stephen Stubb's is a quality lutenist so I don't imagine you would have too many problems with it. Anyway, it's not as though many people have recorded Kellner! Where are you going to pick it up, I thought it was OOP.

It was upped for a moment on Classical Heaven, but now it's not available anymore. Hope it will be reupped soon.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Shrunk on February 02, 2010, 10:45:30 AM
Also this little beauty should be in any lute lovers collection (if you don't have these pieces by Hoppy elsewhere)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41MNcAO8dlL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Great to have these out at budget price, but any idea why they used such a STUPID package?
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: mc ukrneal on August 20, 2011, 11:15:49 PM
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9WeOIGmNDSU/UNNTBIlxV9I/AAAAAAABLNs/fXLwE_u4Fkg/s1600/weiss+portada+3.PNG)

If only I had more issues of this complete series of Weiss' London manuscript....But it was issued on a tiny Canadian label and longtime OOP :-\

I see here a brilliant opportunity for Brilliant. 8) I really should mail them one of these days about this...

Good morning! :)

Q
You could try contacting the musician if you are interested enough. I see two email addresses (one at his site and one for where he works). The sites are: http://www.michelcardin.com/ (http://www.michelcardin.com/)  and http://www.slweiss.de/index.php?id=3&type=liste&lang=eng (http://www.slweiss.de/index.php?id=3&type=liste&lang=eng). The second site gives a list of performers of the music (as well as the email address to contact for Michel). 
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on August 20, 2011, 11:34:42 PM
You could try contacting the musician if you are interested enough. I see two email addresses (one at his site and one for where he works). The sites are: http://www.michelcardin.com/ (http://www.michelcardin.com/)  and http://www.slweiss.de/index.php?id=3&type=liste&lang=eng (http://www.slweiss.de/index.php?id=3&type=liste&lang=eng). The second site gives a list of performers of the music (as well as the email address to contact for Michel).

Thanks for the heads up, I have considered that before, and maybe I'll just do that.  :)

The prospect of eleven seperate full price CDs, if even available and maybe only as CD-Rs, has put me off till now. But frankly the more I hear of this disc, the more I like it. Even more so than Barto's series on Naxos, though that is nothing less than excellent. It's Cardin's expressive articulation, enhanced by the life-like recording (Naxos' recording of Barto is more mellow), and his grasp of the overall musical architecture that is like clockwork, that wins the day.

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on August 21, 2011, 12:48:47 AM
Having seen the posting about Harmonia Mundi bargains at Presto Classical I bought

Marco Dall'Aquila: Pieces for Lute (Paul O'Dette)

via Amazon direct from HM.  Very soon after I started playing it I recalled reading a review somewhere last year, which must have been about this disc, bewailing the recording quality.  It is recorded in a very reverberant acoustic.  Best avoided!

That's what I've read as well. Pity, really. :-\

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51y633pc2UL._SS400_.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: kishnevi on August 21, 2011, 05:46:42 AM
That's what I've read as well. Pity, really. :-\

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51y633pc2UL._SS400_.jpg)

Q

Have it.  The acoustics are noticeable but don't (for me) detract from the music.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on October 05, 2011, 10:04:23 PM
Paul O'Dette - Art of the Lute - 5 disc box from H. Mundi w/ a mixture of composers (already own 2 complete sets of Dowland's lute works w/ 2 other performers, so don't need his Dowland box) - this is now selling @ BRO for $25 - of course, just a compilation of previous single discs, but the price is hard to beat! :)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Fq108KZhL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Go for it, Dave. I've enjoyed that set immensely.  :) In particular the Kapsberger, also the music from Lord Herbert of Cherburry's Lute Book and the Molinari disc. For the Bach and Dowland I have other options that O'Dette doesn't trump, but still very nice performances indeed.

BRO is not as cheap as I expected, though! ::)

Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Leo K. on January 22, 2012, 07:37:54 AM
A very beautiful recording, of a composer new to me. This appears to be a hard to find recording (lent to me by a friend):

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41hZRgQg6tL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Album: Baron: Music at the Court of Frederick the Great
Artist(s): Pier Luigi Polato (lute), Ensemble Barocco Sans Souci
Release date: 2000
Label: Dynamic
Catalog #: CDS 270
Total time: 00:59:29


Quote
Ernst Gottlieb Baron or Ernst Theofil Baron ( February 17, 1696 – April 12, 1760). Baron was born in Breslau. He studied law in Leipzig, but later became successful as a performer on the lute. In 1735, he took up an appointment as theorbo player at the court of King Frederick II of Prussia. Baron is best known for his treatise on lute-playing, which is still widely available. He was personally acquainted with both Johann Sebastian Bach and Sylvius Leopold Weiss.


I particulary like the 2 solo sonatas (in Bb and G Major) for lute amongst the various instrument combinations found in this recording.

Sonata for lute in B flat:
No. 1, Fantasia 
No. 2, Allegro 
No. 3, Bourée 
No. 4, Aria
No. 5, Rondeau 
No. 6, Tempo di menuet 

Suite for lute in G:
No. 1, Prelude 
No. 2, Allemande   
No. 3, Courante   
No. 4, Menuet 
No. 5, Bourée 
No. 6, Polonaise 
No. 7, Gigue 



Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on January 22, 2012, 09:56:28 AM
Edin Karamzov is an interesting player. Here's his take on Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor! (I wish the OP would consolidate it into one part...)

http://www.youtube.com/v/gmHVj6tiIi0
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Leo K. on January 29, 2012, 07:11:17 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51f8CYgHDTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Also enjoying Barto's Vol.10 of Weiss works. Should be interesting to compare to Michel Cardin, of which I just aquired four of the CDs from his cycle.

Also, this incredible recording of Robert de Visée's works for the Théorbe:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61dslPRYHoL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I have absolutely no reservations about this superb disc, it's really a wonder to hear the glory of the Théorbe, and the quality of Visée's music is a wonder.


Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 29, 2012, 08:21:55 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51f8CYgHDTL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)  (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61dslPRYHoL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I have absolutely no reservations about this superb disc, it's really a wonder to hear the glory of the Théorbe, and the quality of Visée's music is a wonder.

Hi Leo - I own about 4 discs of Weiss's lute works - waiting for a BIG BOX to appear; he wrote so much! I've added that 2nd disc to my Amazon cart - sounds right up my alley!  Dave :)

For those liking classical guitar, a couple of new additions on MDG of duos by two different composers - made a few comments in the 'listening thread' w/o any interest, so I'll re-post here - part of a small bargain order from BRO!

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-8MrcjGG/0/O/AlbertGuitar.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-dDjFTjv/0/O/MertzGuitar.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Leo K. on January 29, 2012, 08:49:59 AM
Hi Leo - I own about 4 discs of Weiss's lute works - waiting for a BIG BOX to appear; he wrote so much! I've added that 2nd disc to my Amazon cart - sounds right up my alley!  Dave :)

For those liking classical guitar, a couple of new additions on MDG of duos by two different composers - made a few comments in the 'listening thread' w/o any interest, so I'll re-post here - part of a small bargain order from BRO!

(http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-8MrcjGG/0/O/AlbertGuitar.jpg)  (http://giradman.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-dDjFTjv/0/O/MertzGuitar.jpg)

I wish a major box would appear too, I about six disks from various performers. Another one I love is by Stephen Stubbs, unfortunately OOP, but with very nice playing of two Weiss suites and a suite of Bach's. Right now I am happy with Cardin (hard to find unfortunately) and Barto (very easy to find).  8)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4105wS2naLL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Leo K. on February 14, 2012, 10:24:32 AM
(http://www.johnschneiderman.com/images/JSfalken.jpg)
Sonatas for Solo Lute, Op.1 (1740)

(http://www.johnschneiderman.com/images/partitas.jpg)
Partitas for Solo Lute, Op.2 (1742)



My wife has got me the lute works of Adam Falckenhagen (26 April 1697 – 6 October 1754).

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3f/Adam_Falckenhagen.jpg/220px-Adam_Falckenhagen.jpg)

Quoth the Wiki:
Quote
Adam Falckenhagen (26 April 1697 – 6 October 1754) was a German lutenist and composer of the Baroque period.

He was born in Groß-Dölzig, near Leipzig in Saxony, but spent the later part of his life in Bayreuth. He wrote tuneful music which is still played today on lute and guitar. Much of this music survives in the Bavarian State Library, Munich.

He received his first musical instruction in the village of Knauthain, the native home of Johann Christian Weyrauch. Weyrauch was a pupil of Johann Sebastian Bach and transcriber of works by Bach for the lute. In 1713 Falckenhagen is mentioned as "gifted in literature and music," and in 1715 as "Musician and footman of the young Lord of Dieskau." The Dieskaus were a family for whom J.S. Bach later wrote the Bauernkantate in Merseburg. Falckenhagen stayed in Merseburg with the Dieskaus from about 1715, until in 1719 he succeeded Johann Graf in the position of Saxe Court lutenist. Falckenhagen attended Leipzig University from 1719 to 1720. It has been suggested that Falckenhagen also studied with Johann Jakob Graf, a pupil of Sylvius Leopold Weiss (1686-1750), and later with Weiss himself.

Like many of his contemporaries, Falckenhagen travelled from court to court most of his life (Weissenfels, 1720-1727; Jena and Weimar (1729-1732), eventually settling in Bayreuth, where he won the favour of Wilhelmine of Prussia, Margravine of Bayreuth, in 1734. Wilhelmine was a lutenist and sister of Frederick the Great; she invited him to be the court lutenist at Bayreuth. Falckenhagen held this position until his death in 1754.

Falckenhagen's music is representative of the final flowering of 18th-century lute music in Germany.


I am excited to hear this, and I shall report back!

 8)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on December 12, 2014, 12:28:35 AM

Good question indeed, Dave! :)

That's why I picked up this issue by Michel Cardin (http://www.michelcardin.com/homecardin.html). I was intrigued by the comments by Mark Sealy (http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/s/sne00600a.php) on ClassicalNet, in whom Cardin's complete series of Weiss' lute works (12 discs) has found a strong advocate. (More (http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/s/sne00635a.php)) BTW a nice discography of Weiss' Dresden manuscripts HERE (http://www.classical.net/music/comp.lst/articles/dresden/disco/weiss.php).

Anyway, I have also one volume of Roberto Barto's series on Naxos, and although the works on the two discs are not the same, comparing the two approaches provided much interesting listening and revealed quite some differences.

Let me state first that it took a while before a preference emerged - these are two very good lutenists. Cardin is the more deliberate player, Barto is swifter and more flowing making a grasp on Weiss' musical architecture easier on first listening. Cardin is on the other hand is more articulate. The Naxos recording of Barto is also "easier on the ear" with a more mellow soundsstage at some distance of the instrument while the SNE recording of Cardin is up-close to the instrument with extra sonic "gruff" and "gut-effect" as a result. In the end I found Cardin's more probing and expressive approach more satisfying than Barto's admittedly very elegant playing that glosses just a bit over the music IMO.

Perhaps not the most convenient result, I might add... The Cardin series being OOP en fetching high prices, that were considerably higher than Naxos to begin with. Maybe buying directly from Michel cardin's website (http://www.michelcardin.com/homecardin.html) is an option.

Although... a wondefull OOP series on a tiny label, doesn't that sound like a perfect deal for Brilliant Classics? :o ;)
Harry, you might want to tip the people at Brilliant ... and do us all a big favour. 8)

Q

Fast forward for five years:



Q
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Florestan on December 12, 2014, 01:15:20 AM
Don´t know if this has been mentioned, but it´s oustanding in every possible way.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51eWRgZfwLL._SS280.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on January 30, 2015, 11:05:18 AM
Novelty, or Music? You make the call ....

Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: "Harry" on January 30, 2015, 11:28:09 AM
Jolly good, I will post soon here.! :)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Artem on April 03, 2016, 07:36:02 AM
I only have a couple of disks with lute music, but I look forward to investigating that specific repertoire. Does anybody have any favorites/suggestions?

This one is among my favorites:

Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on April 03, 2016, 08:43:58 AM
Hi Artem -

My favorite lutenist is Rolf Lislevand.  He has several recordings on his own, as well as with other groups, most notably under the leadership of Jordi Savall.

I am a huge fan of his two ensemble recordings on the ECM label.  Both are essential in my view:





Each emphasizes the use of improvisation in early music. 

Lislevand has a new, solo recording, coming out soon.  I have already pre-ordered it (something I very rarely do) and I eagerly await its arrival:



Rolf Lislevand - La Mascarade
Rolf Lislevand: Baroque guitar, theorbo

In this wonderful solo album, Norwegian early music performer Rolf Lislevand turns his attention to two composers from the court of Louis XIV: Robert de VisEe (c. 1655-1732) and the Italian-born Francesco Corbetta (c. 1615-1681), and plays their masterpieces with historical awareness and an inventiveness which belongs to the tradition.

De Visee wrote about playing what the instruments themselves called for, advice Lislevand takes to heart, adding improvised introductions to passacaglias from both composers. He uses two contrasting instruments here, the small Baroque guitar with its sparkling, crystal-clear sonorities and the theorbo, the dark-toned and earthy king of the lutes.

In his fascinating liner notes, Lislevand reminds us that 17th century instrumental performance was often an intimate affair, with lutenists frequently playing to a dozen privileged listeners.

The physical presence of the instruments and that sense of intimacy is recaptured by Manfred Eichers production of La Mascarade, made at Luganos Auditorio Stelio Molo.


FWIW, I recently took up the lute and just last month, purchased a 13 course, descant lute.

 :)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Todd on April 03, 2016, 08:49:45 AM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51x9QIv34JL._SY425_.jpg)


I don't have too many lute recording, but Jakob Lindberg's recording of John Dowland's lute music is superbly played and in SOTA sound, and is a bargain in its Brilliant Classics iteration.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on April 03, 2016, 09:47:34 AM
Todd's recommendation of Jakob Lindberg's Dowland is spot on.

Another outstanding lute recording by Lindberg, is his Vivaldi:



Just superb.

Amazon reviewer Gio, makes a compelling case for this recording and Lindberg.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: JCBuckley on April 03, 2016, 10:44:38 AM
Another vote for Lindberg. And I think this CD is wonderful:

Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 03, 2016, 12:21:40 PM
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71wl2GUSorL._SL1193_.jpg)  (https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Xdoh%2BsyVL._SS280_PJStripe-Robin,TopLeft,0,0.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41L7mx-xgRL.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/519mSJ7b%2BdL.jpg) (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51x2cWcrRTL.jpg)
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on April 04, 2016, 09:23:57 AM
There's something really special going on here:
Toyohiko Satoh plays Bach and Weiss ~




The new solo CD of Toyohiko Satoh, the 72 year-old Japanese lutenist who is considered by many as one of the most influential lute players of the last century, presents a well-known repertoire of baroque lute music. Mr. Satoh was the first lutenist to record Bachs lute music on LP in the 70s (Phillips). Now he returns to this music 40 years later, delivering a completely different rendering of these iconic pieces. His playing has been influenced much by the studies of traditional Japanese arts such as tea ceremony, No-theater and Zen meditation. So here we are presented a recording that draws from the deep silence within, from the awareness of everything in the universe being connected, and from the understanding of Bachs music as a universal, almost superhuman symbol of completeness.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 04, 2016, 08:54:46 PM
There's something really special going on here:
Toyohiko Satoh plays Bach and Weiss ~





He has developed a distinctive and  extreme approach to rubato, tempo and phrasing.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 30, 2016, 09:41:27 PM
(http://cdn.naxos.com/SharedFiles/images/cds/others/8.550774.gif)

Christopher Wilson and Shirley Rumsey play music by Francesco Canova da Milano. It's unexpected that for me this music seems closer to Cabezon than to Frescobaldi, and it makes me wonder why Cabezon hasn't been more widely taken up by lutenists. Anyway it's a wonderful CD.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on July 31, 2016, 03:28:00 PM
To my ears, the modern guitar sounds tonally/harmonically very dry and uninteresting compared to these instruments. Does this have something to do with construction or is it a matter of tuning? Or both?

Any thoughts on Jonas Nordberg?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81CEoBpH%2BdL._SY355_.jpg)

I like this performance a great deal:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeUcGD4rRRc
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: GioCar on July 31, 2016, 08:00:58 PM
(http://cdn.naxos.com/SharedFiles/images/cds/others/8.550774.gif)

Christopher Wilson and Shirley Rumsey play music by Francesco Canova da Milano. It's unexpected that for me this music seems closer to Cabezon than to Frescobaldi, and it makes me wonder why Cabezon hasn't been more widely taken up by lutenists. Anyway it's a wonderful CD.

Actually Francesco da Milano (as he's better known) lived a century before Frescobaldi:
Francesco da Milano 1497-1543
Antonio de Cabezón 1510-1566
Girolamo Frescobaldi 1583-1643

I am a bit surprised there have been no posts on him before #70.
From wiki:
Francesco was heralded throughout Europe as the foremost lute composer of his time. More of his music is preserved than of any other lutenist of the period, and his work continued to influence composers for more than a century after his death.


May I recommend two more wonderful CDs of his music?

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/652/MI0003652513.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/182/MI0001182038.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 31, 2016, 09:19:09 PM
Of course it may just be a superficial and half baked idea of mine that Francesco da Milano's music sounds a bit like Cabezon's, I'm not sure. But if it is true, I just thought it was interesting that there was a cross fertilisation between Spain and Italy. I will check out that those CDs by O'Dette and Hopkinson Smith sometime, thanks.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on August 10, 2016, 02:17:46 AM
(http://www.joachim-held.de/gfx/home-cd-02.gif)

An outstanding recital of 15th century German music by Joachim Held (who is turning into one of my favourite musicians.) Apparently the music is rarely played because the tablature is unusual and obscures voice leading, so the music on paper looks dry. But what Held does here is anything but dry, it's very expressive and alluring, at least for people who can appreciate this sort of thing.

Much of the music is lyrical, based as it is on popular songs. But there is more to it than this. There are "preambles" by Hans Newsidler which have the same fantasy feel as unmeasured preludes, and the are ricercars of some contrapuntal sophistication. It's altogether a rich area, German tablature. The pieces by Hans Judenkunig seem to me particularly stimulating - he's one of the earliest composer on the disc and once again I find myself drawn to the earliest music, it's a tendency of mine I've noticed before and I wonder why.

The feel of the recital is a bit like Clemencic's keyboard recordings. Anyone with a taste for one will find themselves at home with the other.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 10, 2017, 10:40:24 PM
(http://www.sf-luth.org/images/couv_cd_claire.jpg)

One of the most riveting anthologies of French lute music that I've heard, mainly because Claire Antonini projects a love and commitment to the music. Tons of rubato, but to me it all sounds quite natural. One highlight of the recording for me is the sequence of pieces by François Dufaut.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 14, 2017, 11:03:08 PM
The first thing to say is that François Dufaut is a major major composer of music.

(https://media2.jpc.de/image/w600/rear/0/4011392969567.jpg)

Sigrun Richter has the knack of playing with complete abandon of self: the performances are extremely expressive and tender, but you never for one moment think that she's expressing herself. This is rather different from the only other recording dedicated to François Dufaut I've heard, viz:

(https://chokalute.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/s-sd2.jpg)

where Hopkinson-Smith's personal involvement in the music, his commitment, is palpable. For once with Hopkinson Smith, it's not flashy!

Both seem to me very satisfying, I prefer Richter at the level of technique - she can make a greater variety of tones, timbres and textures come out of his lute. Her style is totally unassertive. Her humility and reticence, her seriousness and tranquility, are attributes which suit me well.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 19, 2017, 01:38:59 PM
(http://www.folias.nl/volta.jpg)

Sandro Volta's Kapsberger CD exudes total love for the music, it is one of the most emotionally intense lute CDs I have ever heard. He is so poetic it's untrue, like all the best musicians he knows just how long to hold a note and a pause. Very good, this one.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Richard on January 19, 2017, 07:19:20 PM






Great thread. Here's a couple of boxes I found when glancing through my shelves. The Anthony Rooley collection came out about 10 years ago. I'm not sure whether it's still available.

The Konrad Junghänel edition is a brand new release. Mine just arrived this week.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 20, 2017, 07:47:57 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51qPlSMtlBL.jpg)

This is not a bad Piccinini recital from Nigel North. It's very "Apollonian", you know, there's zero feeling of improvisation, spontaneity. He doesn't overstate the affects, which is probably right for Renaissance music like this. The beauty comes mainly from the balance, the level headedness of it. And the catchy tunes and the cool sounding instrument. Nigel North's style here makes me think of finely carved marble. Good sound, nice lute which is both quite  muscular and quite sweet at the same time, paradoxically maybe. It's always nice to hear a chittarrone too, though I maybe have heard ones with more personality, I'm not sure.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 20, 2017, 01:36:02 PM
(http://www.cdconnection.com/covers/1800746.jpg)

I think this recording of a selection of music by Piccinini by Luciano Contini is a success in every way. The music is fabulous; the performances are full of tenderness and feeling; the instruments are characterful, rich and honey-toned; the sound quality is truthful.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on January 20, 2017, 02:56:31 PM
(http://www.cdconnection.com/covers/1800746.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Ytplptt2L.jpg)

I think this recording of a selection of music by Piccinini by Luciano Contini is a success in every way. The music is fabulous; the performances are full of tenderness and feeling; the instruments are characterful, rich and honey-toned; the sound quality is truthful.

For those interested in this music, I have the Brilliant 2-CD selection added above, licensed from Tactus - does not seem to be available at the moment from Amazon USA (and just checked BRO - not there, either).  Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 20, 2017, 10:51:18 PM
For those interested in this music, I have the Brilliant 2-CD selection added above, licensed from Tactus - does not seem to be available at the moment from Amazon USA (and just checked BRO - not there, either).  Dave :)


Yes and Francesca Torelli's contribution of Bk 2 to that Brilliant box is just fine, but I thought it was not as unbelievably excellent as Luciano Contini's in Bk 1.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 21, 2017, 11:02:18 PM
(http://img.cdandlp.com/2015/11/imgL/117765084.jpg)

This 1976 recording of music by Denis Gaultier by Hopkinson Smith is (according to Discogs) his first solo release.

The tempos are slow and the articulation is jolting and unfluid, at the emotional level everything is somber. The way Smith plays first two suites makes them sound like complex technical exercises to me. The last suite on the CD, which happens to be the last suite in the manuscript, is better.

(https://img.discogs.com/A44ysRn7Ptvd-6W6P5iC7O-RPfU=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-2759100-1299756317.jpeg.jpg)


This recording by Hopkinson Smith was made 12 years later in 1988 (Discogs again) and is dedicated to music by Ennemond Gaultier.

What a difference! There's a fluid lyricism, a sense of impredictable rhythm, a variety of timbre and attack, a wide range of complex bitter-sweet emotions.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on January 22, 2017, 03:05:29 AM
(http://img.cdandlp.com/2015/11/imgL/117765084.jpg)

This 1976 recording of music by Denis Gaultier by Hopkinson Smith is (according to Discogs) his first solo release.

The tempos are slow and the articulation is jolting and unfluid, at the emotional level everything is somber. The way Smith plays first two suites makes them sound like complex technical exercises to me. The last suite on the CD, which happens to be the last suite in the manuscript, is better.

(https://img.discogs.com/A44ysRn7Ptvd-6W6P5iC7O-RPfU=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-2759100-1299756317.jpeg.jpg)


This recording by Hopkinson Smith was made 12 years later in 1988 (Discogs again) and is dedicated to music by Ennemond Gaultier.

What a difference! There's a fluid lyricism, a sense of impredictable rhythm, a variety of timbre and attack, a wide range of complex bitter-sweet emotions.

Interesting.  I've not heard any music by either of these composers, who were cousins according to Grove:

Quote
Denis and Ennemond Gaultier are also confused in many French and foreign printed and manuscript collections of lute music; a number of pieces are signed simply with the surname. Moreover, it is sometimes impossible to be certain about the authorship of pieces attributed to ‘Vieux Gaultier’, ‘Denis Gaultier’, ‘Gaultier de Paris’ or ‘Gaultier le jeune’ since the same pieces are sometimes ascribed to both in different collections. La rhétorique des dieux and Pièces de luth sur trois différens modes nouveaux, which according to the title-pages consist only of works by Denis Gaultier, include pieces attributed elsewhere to Ennemond. The Livre de tablature, which Denis Gaultier began and which was completed after his death by his pupil Montarcis, does however contain an almost equal number of pieces clearly attributed either to Denis or to Ennemond.

Pièces de luth (c1669) and the Livre de tablature (c1672) both begin with brief instructions on how to play the lute. La rhétorique des dieux (c1652), a sumptuous manuscript compiled under the patronage of Anne de Chambré, is divided into 12 parts, each named after one of the Greek modes, and is illustrated with engravings after Le Sueur, Abraham Bosse and Robert de Nanteuil. His output (and that of Ennemond too), which was originally entirely for lute, comprises principally dances, some of which are indicated by subtitles selected from mythology. The two composers developed the tombeau, which in fact they pioneered in lute music. Their use of tonality is often more adventurous than that of their predecessors. Froberger was one of several composers of keyboard music who found inspiration in the style of their music, not least the textures; some compositions by the Gaultiers indeed were transcribed for harpsichord in the 17th century.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on January 22, 2017, 03:10:36 AM
Found this on Amazon Unlimited, called the Golden Age of the French Lute and which has a number of tracks of both Gaultier's:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51cmXKgrHOL._AA500_.jpg)

Steven Stubbs is a new name to me (but I don't listen much to lute recordings).   I like the instrument he is using.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 22, 2017, 01:38:22 PM
(https://walterbitner.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/robert_nanteuil_-_la_rhc3a9torique_des_dieux.jpg)

Presumably that's Apollo, God of the sun.

Anyway my reason for mentioning it is that there's nothing more sunny in music than this interpretation of Denis Gaultier by Louis Pernot, who I bet took his cue from the above picture which is in the incipit of the manuscript of La Rhétorique Des Dieux.

(http://e.snmc.io/lk/f/l/52a9ae981c0844b0364d0bc94c7ce881/2644861.jpg)

The most striking thing when you hear it is his lute, which has hardly any reverberation. Notes don't last long. He plays quickly and with dancing rhythms. The result is a extrovert, joyful and rather simple.

Is it any good? I mean, shouldn't style Brisé be deep and dark, complex and brooding, tragic and tortured.

I don't know. No one else plays like this. It's an important and imaginative contribution.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on January 22, 2017, 04:06:35 PM
Nice, Mandryka

Thanks for posting.

Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 25, 2017, 11:11:58 AM
Actually Francesco da Milano (as he's better known) lived a century before Frescobaldi:


(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/652/MI0003652513.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)



This is O'Dette's second recording. His first for Astree is really fresh sounding.

(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514XLg49CBL._AC_US200_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on January 25, 2017, 12:00:26 PM
Some newer lute recordings recommended by the journal Early Music (Oxford University Press).

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81Y-s1qZJ5L._SX355_.jpg)

On Luys Milán: El Maestro Libro I (1536) (Naxos 8.573305, rec 2015, 66′) José Antonio Escobar simply plays through Book I of the work, which might seem unimaginative, but in fact Milán’s print is structured with didactic intent, and by key, and in any case the results are lovely. Escobar has a beautifully sure touch on what is evidently a very good instrument, whose tone is delicate yet clear, rounded and controlled, with good balance between treble and bass sides. Stylistically the music, somewhat episodic and rhetorical, stands between the noodlings of the earliest lute prints and the rigorous counterpoint of Francesco da Milano. The recording concludes with the six beautiful pavanas made famous by Segovia in the first wave of the plucked-string revival. Escobar’s taste and musicianship are faultless, as are the recorded sound, the choice of microphones and recording venue; an excellent recording all round.

(http://he3.magnatune.com/music/Richard%20MacKenzie/The%20Parisian%20Delight/cover.jpg)

Paris in the mid-16th century witnessed not exactly a golden age of lute playng such as the city was to host 100 years later, but evidently saw a good deal of charming and elegant lute music, as well as a brief craze for the little four-course guitar, lineal ancestor to the ukulele. The French court was also adoptive home to one of the great Italian players, Albert da Ripa (or de Rippe) until his death in 1551. On an online-only release, The Parisian delight (Magnatune [NO NUMBER], issued 2014, 66′) rising British lutenist Richard MacKenzie performs a selection of music from the prints of Guillaume de Morlaye and Adrian Le Roy, plus three pieces by Albert de Rippe. Some lively guitar strumming, a fair sprinkling of ground-based pieces, and a final amuse bouche of lightweight bransles (such dances do actually close the printed lute and guitar and collections of the time) mean that Gallic charm is not overwhelmed by learned fantasias and the like (though a few of these are here too); in fact perhaps one would have liked to hear more music by de Rippe, star turn of Francis I’s court. The recorded sound seems a tiny bit muffled, but MacKenzie can certainly play, and we hope for many more discs from him.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/809/MI0003809895.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Meanwhile in Italy the lute culture was undergoing more radical development with Piccinini’s invention of extended-necked lutes, around 1594. One flamboyant modern performer, Rafael Bonavita, has compared this innovation to the invention of the electric guitar in our times, and his interpretations are accordingly rumbustuous. Mónica Pustilnik, by contrast, on her disc Alessandro Piccinini: Lute music (Accent ACC24193, rec 2013, 62′) brings a much gentler interpretation to this radically innovative music, that seems to connect it to the earlier traditions of lute playing. She plays 16 pieces from Piccinini’s two extant prints of 1623 and 1639 on a single-strung archlute (distinguished from the theorbo or chitarrone in that the top two strings are not in the re-entrant, octave-down tuning). The recorded sound and tone of the archlute are excellent, and her performances sensitive and introspective, with lovely rubato and dynamics, even in the well-known chiaconnas which other players have interpreted in a more bravura way.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 05, 2017, 09:27:51 AM
(http://intunes.ru/wp-content/img/r/5307375/1.jpg)

A superb Kasberger CD here from Francesco Romano. Superb because of his wonderful sense of rubato, he makes the music come to life through gentle rhythms which sound so relaxed. And superb because of the beautiful tones he gets out of his instruments.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 05, 2017, 09:50:41 AM
Some newer lute recordings recommended by the journal Early Music (Oxford University Press).

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81Y-s1qZJ5L._SX355_.jpg)

On Luys Milán: El Maestro Libro I (1536) (Naxos 8.573305, rec 2015, 66′) José Antonio Escobar simply plays through Book I of the work, which might seem unimaginative, but in fact Milán’s print is structured with didactic intent, and by key, and in any case the results are lovely. Escobar has a beautifully sure touch on what is evidently a very good instrument, whose tone is delicate yet clear, rounded and controlled, with good balance between treble and bass sides. Stylistically the music, somewhat episodic and rhetorical, stands between the noodlings of the earliest lute prints and the rigorous counterpoint of Francesco da Milano. The recording concludes with the six beautiful pavanas made famous by Segovia in the first wave of the plucked-string revival. Escobar’s taste and musicianship are faultless, as are the recorded sound, the choice of microphones and recording venue; an excellent recording all round.

(http://he3.magnatune.com/music/Richard%20MacKenzie/The%20Parisian%20Delight/cover.jpg)

Paris in the mid-16th century witnessed not exactly a golden age of lute playng such as the city was to host 100 years later, but evidently saw a good deal of charming and elegant lute music, as well as a brief craze for the little four-course guitar, lineal ancestor to the ukulele. The French court was also adoptive home to one of the great Italian players, Albert da Ripa (or de Rippe) until his death in 1551. On an online-only release, The Parisian delight (Magnatune [NO NUMBER], issued 2014, 66′) rising British lutenist Richard MacKenzie performs a selection of music from the prints of Guillaume de Morlaye and Adrian Le Roy, plus three pieces by Albert de Rippe. Some lively guitar strumming, a fair sprinkling of ground-based pieces, and a final amuse bouche of lightweight bransles (such dances do actually close the printed lute and guitar and collections of the time) mean that Gallic charm is not overwhelmed by learned fantasias and the like (though a few of these are here too); in fact perhaps one would have liked to hear more music by de Rippe, star turn of Francis I’s court. The recorded sound seems a tiny bit muffled, but MacKenzie can certainly play, and we hope for many more discs from him.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/809/MI0003809895.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Meanwhile in Italy the lute culture was undergoing more radical development with Piccinini’s invention of extended-necked lutes, around 1594. One flamboyant modern performer, Rafael Bonavita, has compared this innovation to the invention of the electric guitar in our times, and his interpretations are accordingly rumbustuous. Mónica Pustilnik, by contrast, on her disc Alessandro Piccinini: Lute music (Accent ACC24193, rec 2013, 62′) brings a much gentler interpretation to this radically innovative music, that seems to connect it to the earlier traditions of lute playing. She plays 16 pieces from Piccinini’s two extant prints of 1623 and 1639 on a single-strung archlute (distinguished from the theorbo or chitarrone in that the top two strings are not in the re-entrant, octave-down tuning). The recorded sound and tone of the archlute are excellent, and her performances sensitive and introspective, with lovely rubato and dynamics, even in the well-known chiaconnas which other players have interpreted in a more bravura way.

It's great that you took the trouble to post this here.

I think that José Antonio's  Luys Milán recording is really interesting, because it reveals a music more contrapuntally interesting than I had expected from Hopkinson Smith's approach. This is a recording I shall be revisiting.

I was much less enamoured by Richard Mackenzie's CD: neither the music nor the performance made grabbed me. It's probably me and my mood now, and I'll revisit it in the near future.

I haven't had the chance to hear Mónica Pustilnik's Picninini yet.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 29, 2017, 02:24:04 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61Hu7d7%2Bp4L._SX466_.jpg)

Francesco da Milano by Sandro Volta.

The recording opens with a sequence of 10 ricercari which I guess are early pieces because the fun begins after that, with an extended series of fantazias. Volta relishes the introspectiveness of the music, he reveals a music which is every bit as psychological as Chopin's nocturnes. He consistently articulates the pieces into small cells, deconstructing the music into its components rather than highlighting gorgeous melodies at the expense of polyphonic complexity. The instrument is muted and reminds me of the clavichord which Clemencic used for Cabezon. There's a similar tension as I hear in Cabezon, a tension between the extreme expressiveness and finesse of the musical gestures, and the unpolished sound of the instrument. Love that sort of thing!

The recording is too reverberant, he's  playing in his bathroom, but for me it's not a deal breaker, but it is a shame.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 02, 2017, 10:11:11 AM
(http://www.carpediem-records.de/media/image/e6/0f/b8/Toyohiko-Satoh_De-Visee_lute_CD-16296_iTunes_Cover_small_600x600.jpg)

In Toyohiko Satoh's imaginative booklet essay, towards the end of his life, Robert de Visée reacted against the flamboyant, extrovert style which had come to dominate Versailles, and he fled to his native Portugal, to find a more reflective, slower, quieter, deeper way of life. And there, in his final years, he composed these  pieces  for lute, while listening to the birds singing and the river burbling. The way Satoh presents the music it sounds . . . reflective, slow, quiet, deep.

I have no idea if Satoh's postulates are true. I know that this music is rather good though - more contrapuntally interesting than I'd recalled from other performances of de Visée. And Satoh brings an attractive Zen feel - I mean reflective, slow, quiet, deep.


He's playing an authentic instrument (Laurentius Greiff in 1610) It would be seriously misleading  to say it sounds like a banjo, but it sounds a little bit more like a banjo than what people may expect to hear in French 17th century music. Love it.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on November 03, 2017, 06:09:48 AM
Hi Artem -

My favorite lutenist is Rolf Lislevand.  He has several recordings on his own, as well as with other groups, most notably under the leadership of Jordi Savall.

I am a huge fan of his two ensemble recordings on the ECM label.  Both are essential in my view:





Each emphasizes the use of improvisation in early music. 

Lislevand has a new, solo recording, coming out soon.  I have already pre-ordered it (something I very rarely do) and I eagerly await its arrival:



Rolf Lislevand - La Mascarade
Rolf Lislevand: Baroque guitar, theorbo

In this wonderful solo album, Norwegian early music performer Rolf Lislevand turns his attention to two composers from the court of Louis XIV: Robert de VisEe (c. 1655-1732) and the Italian-born Francesco Corbetta (c. 1615-1681), and plays their masterpieces with historical awareness and an inventiveness which belongs to the tradition.

De Visee wrote about playing what the instruments themselves called for, advice Lislevand takes to heart, adding improvised introductions to passacaglias from both composers. He uses two contrasting instruments here, the small Baroque guitar with its sparkling, crystal-clear sonorities and the theorbo, the dark-toned and earthy king of the lutes.

In his fascinating liner notes, Lislevand reminds us that 17th century instrumental performance was often an intimate affair, with lutenists frequently playing to a dozen privileged listeners.

The physical presence of the instruments and that sense of intimacy is recaptured by Manfred Eichers production of La Mascarade, made at Luganos Auditorio Stelio Molo.


...snip...

A big +1 on the Lislevand ECM releases; truly beautiful. 

As are the Naxos series of Silvius Leopold Weiss with Robert Barto.  His tone is beautiful, balanced; both powerful and delicate.  The albums are well-recorded, too.  The Weiss pieces are stunning to me; I never tire of this series.  The only drawback is that it is now up to 11 or 12 volumes which are only available as individual disks; no box set.  Yet.  If you love lute, I strongly recommend grabbing any volume in the Naxos Weiss/Barto series.  I'm sure it won't be your only purchase from this set.

Regards,
-09
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on November 03, 2017, 07:02:31 AM
Something new from Jakob Lindberg

A Lute by Sixtus Rauwolf: French & German Baroque Music
Jakob Lindberg
Release date: October 6, 2017

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514uvYMm-LL._SS500.jpg)



This collection is excellent.  I also like the ECM New Series recordings by Rolf Lislevand.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on November 03, 2017, 08:28:55 AM
Something new from Jakob Lindberg

A Lute by Sixtus Rauwolf: French & German Baroque Music
Jakob Lindberg
Release date: October 6, 2017

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514uvYMm-LL._SS500.jpg)



This collection is excellent.  I also like the ECM New Series recordings by Rolf Lislevand.

Cool!  I look forward to getting a copy.  I have his Weiss (BIS) CD with the Rauwolf lute and truly like it.

-09
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 03, 2017, 10:09:01 AM
Very good discussion of the Livre de Perrine here, by Louis Pernot. The whole website is an inspiration I think, he's a stimulating musician.

http://louispernot.com/Fr/Perrine.html

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 06, 2017, 11:24:23 PM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/308/MI0003308266.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)   (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51eUiUWdGML._SX450_.jpg)


Germain Pinel was old enough to be Robert Visée's grandad, he was Louis XIV's first guitar teacher, and his music has been very infrequently recorded. In fact, I think that apart from one suite by Anders Ericson, we only have his music on this Brilliant release by Miguel Yisrael.

Comparison between Ericson and Yisrael is really interesting because it reveals two completely different approaches to playing the style brisée. Yisrael is melodious, resonant, sweet and fluid, bold with rubato, introspective, more shade than light. Ericson cleaner and sharper with the articulation and the rhythms, more unpredictable, more awake, more light than shade, more tense. Their instruments suit their styles - Yisrael plays a very soft and resonant lute, and has been recorded in his bathroom;  Ericson's is muscular and solid and has an outstanding recorded sound. Yisrael will definitely appeal, I think, to people who appreciate Anthony Bailes.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 07, 2017, 06:13:07 AM
Something new from Jakob Lindberg

A Lute by Sixtus Rauwolf: French & German Baroque Music
Jakob Lindberg
Release date: October 6, 2017

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514uvYMm-LL._SS500.jpg)




This collection is excellent.  I also like the ECM New Series recordings by Rolf Lislevand.

Strangely enough there was a release last year with similar material - Mouton and Weiss - by Mauricio Buraglia, who was lutenist on Charbonnier's Marais.  I prefer Buraglia in the Mouton I think, I haven't heard either play Weiss.

(http://he3.magnatune.com/music/Mauricio%20Buraglia/Versailles%20et%20Dresde%20les%20Cours%20du%20Roi%20Luth/cover.jpg)

Mouton, by the way, seems the summit of baroque lute, the Bach of lute. Or maybe the Louis Couperin of the lute would be better to say. Along with Buraglia's recording, Anders Ericson's CD convinced me of this.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on November 07, 2017, 06:48:24 AM
Strangely enough there was a release last year with similar material - Mouton and Weiss - by Mauricio Buraglia, who was lutenist on Charbonnier's Marais.  I prefer Buraglia in the Mouton I think, I haven't heard either play Weiss.

(http://he3.magnatune.com/music/Mauricio%20Buraglia/Versailles%20et%20Dresde%20les%20Cours%20du%20Roi%20Luth/cover.jpg)

Mouton, by the way, seems the summit of baroque lute, the Bach of lute. Or maybe the Louis Couperin of the lute would be better to say. Along with Buraglia's recording, Anders Ericson's CD convinced me of this.

I am not sure why you would prefer Buraglia's recording.  The primary attraction of the Lindberg disc is the sound of the lute, which is beautiful. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 07, 2017, 07:14:42 AM
I am not sure why you would prefer Buraglia's recording.  The primary attraction of the Lindberg disc is the sound of the lute, which is beautiful.

Nor am I. Ornamentation, articulation, voicing I suppose. Both lutes sound fine.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on November 15, 2017, 04:09:15 AM
Hello from Italy !!   Unfortunately, it seems that Mauricio Buraglia's recording doesn't exist in 'physical' CD , only for download.
I own another CD with Buraglia playing (impeccably) two extended suites, or sonatas, by Weiss :  CD produced by Societè Francaise de Luth .
I miss Buraglia playing Charles Mouton :  on the other hand both Hopkinson Smith and Anders Ericson are more than satisfying , with Ericson adding a final emotion to his performance allowing the microphones to catch , during the last piece , the extra music of the rain beating on the wooden roof of the small chapel in Stockholm where the recording took place !!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on November 22, 2017, 07:13:55 AM
Found this on Amazon Unlimited, called the Golden Age of the French Lute and which has a number of tracks of both Gaultier's:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51cmXKgrHOL._AA500_.jpg)

Steven Stubbs is a new name to me (but I don't listen much to lute recordings).   I like the instrument he is using.
Found it (used) on Amazon , arrived just yesterday , and immediately put on the cd player : it took me a minute or two to get used to the registered sound (1998) but then I found myself easily in love with Stubbs' way of playing : la Gigue du vieux Gaultier (track 4) is conveyed at a truly "jig" speed and the same with the famous  'la Poste' , but the real surprise are the pieces by 'le Comte de Logis' ( Jan Antonin Losy, a nobleman from Bohemia, skilled lute player, great estimator of the french style )  ,  nine tracks in total , delightful music even at repeated listening.
Generally I don't like discs  that are not devoted to a single composer, but this is an exception (alongside the Rolf Lislevand compilation "La belle homicide" on Naive) 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 08, 2018, 10:40:55 PM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/518tp3SIcnL._SS500.jpg)

When I first started to listen to classical music I remember a friend saying to me that the sign of a great musician is that he can play silence. (We were talking about the first movement of Klemperer's Brahms 1!)

If that's right, then Toyohiko Satoh proves himself to be a great musician in this recording of music by Esaias Reusner. For once this music does not purr contentedly and sleepily in the background, it jolts gently. And between every  phrase is a vision of eternity - just enough silence to reflect on the sound of one hand clapping. I don't think it's racist to say that Satoh's Reusner is Zen.

And it's Zen like a Japanese garden too: minimal, controlled, expressive. The music is laid bare, it's essence is exposed .

Satoh resolves paradoxes: he is both dancing and contemplative at the same time. Dances for the soul.

The instruments is old (1611) and fabulous and works in the music.

Reusner, by the way, is very like Froberger I'd say.  And Satoh's lute would appeal to people who have a predilection for harpsichord. What I'm trying to say is that this is a recording harpsichordphile lutophobes may like.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 26, 2018, 11:03:59 PM
(https://i.scdn.co/image/926724d80d80c437f06444ec705321149a5f4e25). (https://img.cdandlp.com/2016/05/imgL/118164850.jpg)

Luís Gasser plays fantasies by Lluís del Milà (Luys Milan)  These are the best performances of the untranscribed instrumental pieces I have ever heard. The poetry and gentleness and humility of what Gasser does is sensational - his approach leans towards the contemplative,  but in my opinion there's nothing contrived or baroque (in the pejorative sense) about his style.

A lot of the credit is due to the beauty of Gasser's vihuela, and the sound take. The ambience is never forceful or dramatic, always quiet and intimate. This is a contrast and a revelation compared to the feeling that Hopkinson Smith and the sound engineers for Astrée created with the same music. Evidently not all vihuelas are the same! I would also say that Gasser's approach is is less preoccupied about creating effects than Hopkinson Smith's, less stylised.

I just wonder if Lluís del Milà isn't a sort of peak, a summit of the Renaissance. There's something natural, peaceful, at ease with itself,  about his music. His art is touching, without the slightest hint of sentimentality. The music is directly  communicative without ever being naive.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 27, 2018, 09:16:32 PM
Did I post this already? Sorry, I'm getting confused. But this is a fantastic collection of music: tuneful stuff, lovely instrument and performance.
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/955/MI0000955831.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 27, 2018, 10:52:23 PM
Did I post this already? Sorry, I'm getting confused. But this is a fantastic collection of music: tuneful stuff, lovely instrument and performance.
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/955/MI0000955831.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Toyohiko Satoh is, IMO, the greatest of lutenist.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 28, 2018, 12:08:19 AM
Toyohiko Satoh is, IMO, the greatest of lutenist.
I'm in love with Spanish and Italian plucked stuff lately. But, I just got two of Satoh's de Visee recordings. I'm not sure what I think of it yet.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 28, 2018, 12:38:19 AM
(http://www.glossamusic.com/glossa/files/References/280/GCD_C80106_cover_HD.jpg)
I've been on a tear lately with buying lute/theorbo/vihuela/baroque guitar music. This one is a winner: very sensitive and soporific (in a good way). de Bethune is definitely a relaxant. I did not know him.   
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 28, 2018, 09:14:51 AM
I'm in love with Spanish and Italian plucked stuff lately. But, I just got two of Satoh's de Visee recordings. I'm not sure what I think of it yet.

I sometimes wonder if there's something really Japanese about Satoh's approach to style brisé, the slowness and stillness, and the tone of the lutes he likes. Listen to things like Visée's G major chaconne and the C minor Tombeau,
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 28, 2018, 09:20:37 PM
I sometimes wonder if there's something really Japanese about Satoh's approach to style brisé, the slowness and stillness, and the tone of the lutes he likes. Listen to things like Visée's G major chaconne and the C minor Tombeau,
I have to focus on those. I have the two recordings but I’ve been more into the fantastic Spanish one he did. I’m a little skeptical of this kind of thing because, living in Japan, I often see a bit of a gap between what people imagine about the country and its reality. But I also don’t want to Pooh Pooh it. I don’t know if he’s into the koto or other kinds of Japanese music. The whole Zen thing is very American in a way because most Japanese people don’t know much about it, at least consciously. Pure Land Buddhism seems much more popular in Japan. And, they didn’t have Zen popularized and romanticized the way Americans did. On the other other hand (I’m almost done), the tea ceremony and temples and stuff have a Zen influence, though it’s often hidden in Japan. I guess I’m saying I don’t know. If he’s from a wealthy family he might have had more exposure to fine culture than the average Japanese person and might take inspiration from some aspect like Zen.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 28, 2018, 09:24:13 PM
I sometimes wonder if there's something really Japanese about Satoh's approach to style brisé, the slowness and stillness, and the tone of the lutes he likes. Listen to things like Visée's G major chaconne and the C minor Tombeau,
Honestly, my first impression of the Visee album devoted solely to lute was that it’s was a bit banjo-y sounding. But let me listen again. The Moreno album on the theorbo, on the other hand, really caught my attention for its mellowness and beauty.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 28, 2018, 10:40:59 PM
Honestly, my first impression of the Visee album devoted solely to lute was that it’s was a bit banjo-y sounding.

Yes exactly, the instrument is muscular and doesn't sustain long. And it's not mellow, but it I still serene and meditative.  It's an old lute, which gives the lie to an idea that you read in one of Anthony Bailes's essays, that old French lutes sustain. The clarity of the Satoh lutes seems to me to really fit French music, Style Brisée.


Louis Pernot chooses similar types of instrument, also authentic.  I like Louis Pernot too.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on January 28, 2018, 10:54:18 PM
Rolf Lislevand's three ECM releases are worth hearing.  This one is good starting point:



Interesting liner notes too.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: bioluminescentsquid on January 28, 2018, 11:21:01 PM
Yes exactly, the instrument is muscular and doesn't sustain long. And it's not mellow, but it I still serene and meditative.  It's an old lute, which gives the lie to an idea that you read in one of Anthony Bailes's essays, that old French lutes sustain. The clarity of the Satoh lutes seems to me to really fit French music, Style Brisée.


Louis Pernot chooses similar types of instrument, also authentic.  I like Louis Pernot too.

His lute does reminds me of a koto or a guzheng. I remember that my piano teacher first tried to explain what a lute was to me a long time ago by switching a yamaha organ to "Koto" and telling me that it sounded similar to a lute.

Louis Pernot's lute also sounds like that. Part of the reason why you like it?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 29, 2018, 12:37:22 AM
Rolf Lislevand's three ECM releases are worth hearing.  This one is good starting point:



Interesting liner notes too.
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81qzVJJNOfL._SX355_.jpg)
(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/Oct03/La_Belle_Homicide_E8880.jpg)
I think these are great too!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 29, 2018, 12:38:28 AM
But my wife listens to this nonstop!

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/143/MI0001143905.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on January 29, 2018, 06:07:20 AM
His lute does reminds me of a koto or a guzheng. I remember that my piano teacher first tried to explain what a lute was to me a long time ago by switching a yamaha organ to "Koto" and telling me that it sounded similar to a lute.

Louis Pernot's lute also sounds like that. Part of the reason why you like it?
The effect Pernot obtains from his lute is absolutely deliberate, and probably he chooses the recording location that fits better to the sound he wants convey to the final listener.
Listen the Pernot CD devoted to Dufaut's music : yes, at the very start of the first piece you could be surprised, the sound is tough and 'muscular' and not really pleasing, but almost immediately you get in tune with it.  This muscular sound is just the ideal for clarify the sometimes intricated textures of the so-called Style Brisè .
( I'm not sure it's correct refer to the DeVisee's  writing as 'style brisè'   .... but surely Dufaut's style is )
Listen for a comparison the Dufaut cd by Sigrun Richter : it is a more recent recording realized in a very good acoustic  in a medieval church in Italy , the registered sound is not tough as that of Pernot , but it's rather similar ......and the outcome is simply electrifying !   
But in my shelf there is room for mellower sounding lutes, of course !!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on January 29, 2018, 07:42:37 AM
I sometimes wonder if there's something really Japanese about Satoh's approach to style brisé, the slowness and stillness, and the tone of the lutes he likes.

I love this recording, which I think is an example of what you describedd in the above post.

(https://app.nativeco.re/external/attachment/album/71/2/r/500x500)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 29, 2018, 09:00:38 AM
The effect Pernot obtains from his lute is absolutely deliberate, and probably he chooses the recording location that fits better to the sound he wants convey to the final listener.
Listen the Pernot CD devoted to Dufaut's music : yes, at the very start of the first piece you could be surprised, the sound is tough and 'muscular' and not really pleasing, but almost immediately you get in tune with it.  This muscular sound is just the ideal for clarify the sometimes intricated textures of the so-called Style Brisè .
( I'm not sure it's correct refer to the DeVisee's  writing as 'style brisè'   .... but surely Dufaut's style is )
Listen for a comparison the Dufaut cd by Sigrun Richter : it is a more recent recording realized in a very good acoustic  in a medieval church in Italy , the registered sound is not tough as that of Pernot , but it's rather similar ......and the outcome is simply electrifying !   
But in my shelf there is room for mellower sounding lutes, of course !!

Yes I knew I was wrong about Visée and Style Brisé as soon as I posted it, but I had to rush out to work so couldn't make any changes.

You're absolutely right about Sigrun Richter's Dufaut. Though I prefer Pernot I think, and even Satoh - I've only heard one Dufaut suite by Satoh. Both Pernot and Satoh seem to articulate the music more incisively, and let more air in between the notes, and this is something I very much like!

This may be very naive, I haven't really thought about it very deeply, but Visée makes me think of François Couperin's harpsichord music, I guess they knew each other.

Another artist worth thinking about for this tougher lute style is Anders Ericson, in Mouton and in one Dufaut suite. His latest recording, 12 string lute, I have but it's so far proving difficult to "get into" for me.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on January 29, 2018, 11:42:36 PM
Yes I knew I was wrong about Visée and Style Brisé as soon as I posted it, but I had to rush out to work so couldn't make any changes.

You're absolutely right about Sigrun Richter's Dufaut. Though I prefer Pernot I think, and even Satoh - I've only heard one Dufaut suite by Satoh. Both Pernot and Satoh seem to articulate the music more incisively, and let more air in between the notes, and this is something I very much like!

This may be very naive, I haven't really thought about it very deeply, but Visée makes me think of François Couperin's harpsichord music, I guess they knew each other.

Another artist worth thinking about for this tougher lute style is Anders Ericson, in Mouton and in one Dufaut suite. His latest recording, 12 string lute, I have but it's so far proving difficult to "get into" for me.
Anders Ericson , incredible artist : baroque lute player and hard metal rock guitar player ( Doctor Jekyll ? ) and he's also a rotary equipment tester for the railways in Sweden (and a proud owner of incredible mustache !!!  see photo on his Facebook page ! )
His Mouton CD is one of my preferred discs in the lute compartment :  I would be happy to listen to a Mouton recording made by Louis Pernot , as well , and compare it with Ericson's .
The third CD made by Ericson ( Lyra Sonora , I think is the title) is of course interesting, but ..... it misses something for achieve the level of the previous two CD ( Relic and Mouton)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 30, 2018, 02:24:10 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/143/MI0001143905.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Does anyone know another great solo baroque guitar recording (besides Rolf Lislevand)? Is it only going to be Spanish music recorded on this instrument?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 30, 2018, 06:20:24 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81%2BkaixE6wL._SY355_.jpg)

Balint Bakfark is a new composer for me, I'd say this music is pretty high quality contrapuntally and in terms of lyrical attractiveness. Accessible music, but not naive. The performances by Dániel Benkő seem totally expert - I know nothing about the lute he uses but it's distinctive and intense sounding. Like it!

That's the first time I've ever had to type an ő
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on January 30, 2018, 10:40:51 AM
(https://i.scdn.co/image/926724d80d80c437f06444ec705321149a5f4e25). (https://img.cdandlp.com/2016/05/imgL/118164850.jpg)

Luís Gasser plays fantasies by Lluís del Milà (Luys Milan)  These are the best performances of the untranscribed instrumental pieces I have ever heard. The poetry and gentleness and humility of what Gasser does is sensational - his approach leans towards the contemplative,  but in my opinion there's nothing contrived or baroque (in the pejorative sense) about his style.

A lot of the credit is due to the beauty of Gasser's vihuela, and the sound take. The ambience is never forceful or dramatic, always quiet and intimate. This is a contrast and a revelation compared to the feeling that Hopkinson Smith and the sound engineers for Astrée created with the same music. Evidently not all vihuelas are the same! I would also say that Gasser's approach is is less preoccupied about creating effects than Hopkinson Smith's, less stylised.

I just wonder if Lluís del Milà isn't a sort of peak, a summit of the Renaissance. There's something natural, peaceful, at ease with itself,  about his music. His art is touching, without the slightest hint of sentimentality. The music is directly  communicative without ever being naive.

Interesting recordings!  :)

I've been quite happy with Moreno playing Milán:


Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on January 30, 2018, 04:58:24 PM
Does anyone know another great solo baroque guitar recording (besides Rolf Lislevand)? Is it only going to be Spanish music recorded on this instrument?

Hi milk.  :)

Very cool to see your postings regarding lutes and early guitars!

Try David Rogers:

http://davidrogersguitar.com/index.shtml

Fair disclosure:

He is my lute teacher.  8)

Recorded a number of fine releases as a member of the Terra Nova Consort.  This one is quite nice:



Cheers.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 30, 2018, 08:59:54 PM
Hi milk.  :)

Very cool to see your postings regarding lutes and early guitars!

Try David Rogers:

http://davidrogersguitar.com/index.shtml

Fair disclosure:

He is my lute teacher.  8)

Recorded a number of fine releases as a member of the Terra Nova Consort.  This one is quite nice:



Cheers.
Thanks! This is a new genre for me. I love this Spanish music (and early Italian too), in addition to French and German lute music.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 30, 2018, 10:51:00 PM
Does anyone know another great solo baroque guitar recording (besides Rolf Lislevand)? Is it only going to be Spanish music recorded on this instrument?

There's some Italian and French music that people play on a guitar, the problem for me is finding recordings I like. Maybe check the collection of Italian music by Frank Pschichhholtz.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 30, 2018, 11:27:05 PM
There's some Italian and French music that people play on a guitar, the problem for me is finding recordings I like. Maybe check the collection of Italian music by Frank Pschichhholtz.
Thanks. Let me check it out!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 31, 2018, 10:03:35 AM
Thanks. Let me check it out!

I got to know about Pschichholz (note the correct spelling now) because he released a wonderfully understated recording of Dowland songs last year I think, with Maria Skiba.  Better than the Italian stuff! I'm not a great fan of Foscarini, or indeed guitar.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 31, 2018, 04:17:47 PM
I got to know about Pschichholz (note the correct spelling now) because he released a wonderfully understated recording of Dowland songs last year I think, with Maria Skiba.  Better than the Italian stuff! I'm not a great fan of Foscarini, or indeed guitar.
Yeah, I had to do some futzing around to figure out the spellin  :laugh:
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on January 31, 2018, 04:19:09 PM
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol32/1308/1308609/3178082-big/Santiago-De-Murcia-Codex-Ensemble-Kapsberger-Rolf-Lislevand-cover.jpg)
Does this belong in this thread? This is such a stirring, enjoyable, joy-filled offering. Great stuff. I think there's a baroque guitar here - which I think fits this thread better than the guitar thread.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: North Star on January 31, 2018, 04:26:54 PM
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol32/1308/1308609/3178082-big/Santiago-De-Murcia-Codex-Ensemble-Kapsberger-Rolf-Lislevand-cover.jpg)
Does this belong in this thread? This is such a stirring, enjoyable, joy-filled offering. Great stuff. I think there's a baroque guitar here - which I think fits this thread better than the guitar thread.
Sure, that superb disc is filled with guitar/lute family instruments: Rolf Lislevand (baroque guitar, fretless baroque guitar, chitarriglia); Björn Kjellemyr (colascione); Béatrice Pornon (baroque guitar); Eduardo Eguez (chitarra battente); Guido Morini (positive organ); Pedro Estevan; Michèle Claude; Katharina Dustman (percussions)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 31, 2018, 10:47:57 PM
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol32/1308/1308609/3178082-big/Santiago-De-Murcia-Codex-Ensemble-Kapsberger-Rolf-Lislevand-cover.jpg)
Does this belong in this thread? This is such a stirring, enjoyable, joy-filled offering. Great stuff. I think there's a baroque guitar here - which I think fits this thread better than the guitar thread.

As Ochs would say, spanische tuerei!


Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on January 31, 2018, 11:33:29 PM
The effect Pernot obtains from his lute is absolutely deliberate, and probably he chooses the recording location that fits better to the sound he wants convey to the final listener.
Listen the Pernot CD devoted to Dufaut's music : yes, at the very start of the first piece you could be surprised, the sound is tough and 'muscular' and not really pleasing, but almost immediately you get in tune with it.  This muscular sound is just the ideal for clarify the sometimes intricated textures of the so-called Style Brisè .
( I'm not sure it's correct refer to the DeVisee's  writing as 'style brisè'   .... but surely Dufaut's style is )
Listen for a comparison the Dufaut cd by Sigrun Richter : it is a more recent recording realized in a very good acoustic  in a medieval church in Italy , the registered sound is not tough as that of Pernot , but it's rather similar ......and the outcome is simply electrifying !   
But in my shelf there is room for mellower sounding lutes, of course !!

I listened again to Sigrun Richter play Dufaut on Les Accords Nouveaux III and was struck by how dreamy it is, the recording ends with a piece by Jacques Gallot called Le Sommeil de M. Dufaut, and nothing could be more appropriate! I like what she does very much, it's unique. All the lutenists bring their own style to Dufaut, I guess it's a sign of a great composer that he's susceptible to different approaches interpretively, you have to clear your head of one before listening to another!

Richter recorded another Dufaut suite on Les Accords Nouveaux II - her lute sounds different, her approach is less oneiric I'd say, the recording quality is not as good, it's nevertheless very interesting to hear.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 01, 2018, 10:29:27 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51RAs0kFBOL._SS500.jpg)

The closest we come to a  lute related instrument here is Andrew Lawrence King's psalteron, but I'm going to put it here because the transcriptions are from lute music by Lluis de Milá. This is an album which is worthy of a rave review - the gentle and humble poetic lyricism is disarming. I could hardly believe it's Jordi in the driving seat. He must have had a moment of grace.

The star of the show is Andrew Lawrence King, whether on harp or the aforementioned psalteron. The delicacy and nuance of his approach to de Mila's fantasies is exactly what so appealed me to me about Gasser's performance. Another artist who may have a similar approach is Shirley Rumsey.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 02, 2018, 09:47:18 AM
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/rBql8_3WrxU/hqdefault.jpg)

Hopkinson Smith Narvaez. If this isn't one of the greatest lute recordings ever then I'm a Dutchman. The level of expression, ardour, emotional energy, the total involvement, the colour, mastery of the rhetoric of the music, is gobsmacking.

Nice vihuela, quite muscular and intense.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 02, 2018, 04:25:18 PM
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/rBql8_3WrxU/hqdefault.jpg)

Hopkinson Smith Narvaez. If this isn't one of the greatest lute recordings ever then I'm a Dutchman. The level of expression, ardour, emotional energy, the total involvement, the colour, mastery of the rhetoric of the music, is gobsmacking.

Nice vihuela, quite muscular and intense.
Thanks! Just got it. I think this is Vihuela and not Lute. Fantastic!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 02, 2018, 09:38:50 PM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/041/MI0001041822.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
This one, on baroque guitar, is also worthwhile.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 02, 2018, 10:45:33 PM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/041/MI0001041822.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
This one, on baroque guitar, is also worthwhile.

Yes very worthwhile, and for Guerau I also enjoy this one

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/713/MI0003713956.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

In truth I've not warmed to Guerau's music as much as De Mila, Narvaez and Mudarra - some time soon I'll try again. Hopkinson Smith's Mudarra is as good as his Narvaez.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 03, 2018, 12:55:10 AM
My head is kind of spinning with this Iberian music and I get confused sometimes between renaissance and baroque. I probably recently posted this, or someone else has, but this
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81qzVJJNOfL._SX355_.jpg)
(although some of it is Italian?) is such a fantastic collection...has anyone ever seen a performance from one of these masters? Lislevand or Smith or O'dette? I also quite like the iterations of Iberian music from Savall and think he's be a wonderful concert to attend.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 03, 2018, 12:59:15 AM
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/rBql8_3WrxU/hqdefault.jpg)

Hopkinson Smith Narvaez. If this isn't one of the greatest lute recordings ever then I'm a Dutchman. The level of expression, ardour, emotional energy, the total involvement, the colour, mastery of the rhetoric of the music, is gobsmacking.

Nice vihuela, quite muscular and intense.

You're Dutchman??  ???    :D

Anyway, thanks for mentioning this!  :)

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 04, 2018, 05:35:10 AM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51-SOgl-AML._SS500.jpg)
Checking this out today. It's very natural sounding. Well, pretty amazing really that this can sound so effortless. Almost like Weiss sonatas but more complex maybe.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on February 04, 2018, 08:36:15 AM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51-SOgl-AML._SS500.jpg)
Checking this out today. It's very natural sounding. Well, pretty amazing really that this can sound so effortless. Almost like Weiss sonatas but more complex maybe.
I own the two CDs that Beier has dedicated to Esaias Reusner :  I don't like them. Boring, very slow, frayed.
But I thought the problem was in the music itself, due to some wooden quality of the writing, until ...... until I came across Sigrun Richter and her revelatory Reusner recording.
No, the problem was not in the music, Beier is the problem !!!   Alas, this prevents me to spend money for try another performance of his.
But, anyway, thanks for the tip :) :) :) :)

 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 04, 2018, 08:38:35 AM
I own the two CDs that Beier has dedicated to Esaias Reusner :  I don't like them. Boring, very slow, frayed.
But I thought the problem was in the music itself, due to some wooden quality of the writing, until ...... until I came across Sigrun Richter and her revelatory Reusner recording.
No, the problem was not in the music, Beier is the problem !!!   Alas, this prevents me to spend money for try another performance of his.
But, anyway, thanks for the tip :) :) :) :)
It's kind of hard for me to tell because I know this music so well. I mean, it's cool that it comes off as lute music. I wonder if the transcriptions are his? I guess so. But I'm not sure what I think except the repertoire works well on lute - better than I'd imagined.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 04, 2018, 12:04:54 PM
I own the two CDs that Beier has dedicated to Esaias Reusner :  I don't like them. Boring, very slow, frayed.
But I thought the problem was in the music itself, due to some wooden quality of the writing, until ...... until I came across Sigrun Richter and her revelatory Reusner recording.
No, the problem was not in the music, Beier is the problem !!!   Alas, this prevents me to spend money for try another performance of his.
But, anyway, thanks for the tip :) :) :) :)

I reckon Beier in the first CD makes Reusner sound like Froberger -- nervous edginess - frayed as you say -- and the slow tempos are singable, he plays Reusner like cantabile Froberger. I quite enjoyed it in fact! But then I like Vartolo in Froberger and Frescobaldi . . .

I like Richter in Reusner too, by the way. And Satoh.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 05, 2018, 07:45:29 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/062/MI0001062287.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Lively and joyous music. You can't go wrong with Hopkinson Smith.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 05, 2018, 11:20:10 PM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/9c/d6/0046d69c.jpg)


Listening again to this, the first volume of Beier's Reusner, I'm completely knocked out by the hypersensitivity of it. We have a Reusner à fleur de peau, a music of rapidly changing emotions. As I said before, it's only Froberger, and late Froberger to boot, who resembles Beier's vision of Reusner, and contrary to Vinbrulé, I think it's wonderful, visionary! The lute is outstanding too, sweet and rich.

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/796/MI0003796488.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Does it lose out in the counterpoint when it's played like this? Well, I don't think so, but maybe Beier does. Because if anything the second volume seems to me to be more balanced between emotion and abstract form. We have here Reusner à la style brisé.  The lute is perfectly suited for this frenchified vision, or maybe it's the same lute as before with a slightly different, more muscular,  sound-take.

Anyway, both these recordings are, IMO, masterpieces, desert island discs, and essential to know. For me the first volume above all.

I own the two CDs that Beier has dedicated to Esaias Reusner :  I don't like them. Boring, very slow, frayed.


This reminds me so much of the disagreement between me and more sensible people about Vartolo's Frescobaldi. De gustibus et coloribus non est disputandem. Anyway, I'd say the same in both cases, whether at the end of the day you like them or not, whether your response resembles mine or Vinbrulé's for the Reusner or que's for the Frescobaldi, both Vartolo's Frescobaldi and Beier's Reusner are essential to know if you're interested in how this music has been received, so singular is the vision.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 06, 2018, 01:51:34 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/143/MI0001143905.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
My wife listens to this nonstop and I know why: It's one of the most astoundingly beautiful recordings I've ever heard. It's so sweet, so sensitive, moving and lovely. There are not enough good things to say about it.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 06, 2018, 02:34:03 AM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/9c/d6/0046d69c.jpg)


Listening again to this, the first volume of Beier's Reusner, I'm completely knocked out by the hypersensitivity of it. We have a Reusner à fleur de peau, a music of rapidly changing emotions. As I said before, it's only Froberger, and late Froberger to boot, who resembles Beier's vision of Reusner, and contrary to Vinbrulé, I think it's wonderful, visionary! The lute is outstanding too, sweet and rich.

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/796/MI0003796488.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Does it lose out in the counterpoint when it's played like this? Well, I don't think so, but maybe Beier does. Because if anything the second volume seems to me to be more balanced between emotion and abstract form. We have here Reusner à la style brisé.  The lute is perfectly suited for this frenchified vision, or maybe it's the same lute as before with a slightly different, more muscular,  sound-take.

Anyway, both these recordings are, IMO, masterpieces, desert island discs, and essential to know. For me the first volume above all.

This reminds me so much of the disagreement between me and more sensible people about Vartolo's Frescobaldi. De gustibus et coloribus non est disputandem. Anyway, I'd say the same in both cases, whether at the end of the day you like them or not, whether your response resembles mine or Vinbrulé's for the Reusner or que's for the Frescobaldi, both Vartolo's Frescobaldi and Beier's Reusner are essential to know if you're interested in how this music has been received, so singular is the vision.
I'm going to acquire this. I have to say that his Bach French Suites is also worth a listen. The transcription is very good: it sounds utterly natural on the lute. It makes me wonder why two hands are ever even necessary to press notes.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 08, 2018, 03:27:18 PM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)
Listening to this at the moment.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on February 08, 2018, 03:50:52 PM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)
Listening to this at the moment.

I did that a couple of weeks ago.  It struck me a little dry after a while. YMMV
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 08, 2018, 04:02:30 PM
I did that a couple of weeks ago.  It struck me a little dry after a while. YMMV
It's kind of a challenge in that way. So far, I find it hypnotically flat and, yeah, maybe dry. I'm still intrigued by it. It reminds me of Frescobaldi in a way.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 08, 2018, 05:11:56 PM
Milk & San Antone - I had that CD - Vincenzo Galilei (c. 1520-1591) was the father of Galileo - the concept was like the 'Well-Tempered Lutenist' a century or more before JS Bach WTC, as I recall - did not really enjoy (despite being a BIG fan of these earlier string instruments) - entered my local donation pile and has disappeared from my collection.  Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 08, 2018, 08:14:45 PM
Milk & San Antone - I had that CD - Vincenzo Galilei (c. 1520-1591) was the father of Galileo - the concept was like the 'Well-Tempered Lutenist' a century or more before JS Bach WTC, as I recall - did not really enjoy (despite being a BIG fan of these earlier string instruments) - entered my local donation pile and has disappeared from my collection.  Dave :)
I think there is another recording of this out there? In this one, there is almost no rhthymic variation. I haven’t decided yet but I’m intrigued by how staid it is. I’m curious what Mandryka thinks.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 09, 2018, 12:46:33 AM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)
Listening to this at the moment.

Hadn't got to that one yet, but it seems not generally loved.....

I can recommend this recording with music by Michelagnolo Galilei, the brother of Galileo.



Surperb disc... Anthony Bailes has a rather soft spoken style that combines elegance with plenty of expression.

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2018, 01:40:32 AM
Hadn't got to that on yet, but it seems not generally loved.

I can recommend this recording with music by Michelagnolo Galilei, the brother of Galileo.



Surperb disc... Anthony Bailes has a rather soft spoken style that combines elegance with plenty of expression.

Q
Hmm...I don't know Bailes. I'll acquire something by him if not this. Yeah...the Zak recording is an odd duck. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 09, 2018, 01:46:45 AM
Hmm...I don't know Bailes. I'll acquire something by him if not this. Yeah...the Zak recording is an odd duck.

Definitely a lutenist worth trying. :)
And the high recording quality on Ramée is a nice bonus.
I also have this recording by him, that I've enjoyed very much:


Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: JCBuckley on February 09, 2018, 06:29:06 AM


I can recommend this recording with music by Michelagnolo Galilei, the brother of Galileo.



Surperb disc... Anthony Bailes has a rather soft spoken style that combines elegance with plenty of expression.

Q

Thanks for the recommendation, Que. I have Bailes's Gaultier disc, and his Gallot & Mouton CD. I confess I wasn't immediately attuned to his style - he's very soft-spoken, as you say. But the more I listen to him, the more I like what he does.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2018, 06:52:57 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/418D6KMPBBL.jpg)
I'm surprised by how unique Kapsberger's music is, compared to other lute music I've been listening to. It stands out. I'm not sure how to describe it. It really must be the beginning of baroque although he's quite early. I hear some (influences on) Bach in places too. This is going to be a favorite. Very inventive.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on February 09, 2018, 06:53:26 AM
Thanks for the recommendation, Que ...  the more I listen to him, the more I like what he does.

+1

Thankfully he has five CDs available to stream on Amazon Music. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 09, 2018, 08:54:27 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/418D6KMPBBL.jpg)
I'm surprised by how unique Kapsberger's music is, compared to other lute music I've been listening to. It stands out. I'm not sure how to describe it. It really must be the beginning of baroque although he's quite early. I hear some (influences on) Bach in places too. This is going to be a favorite. Very inventive.

I recently revisited Sandro Volta's Kapsberger, I think the music is really wonderful, at least as conceived on that recording.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 09, 2018, 09:10:04 AM
Definitely a lutenist worth trying. :)
And the high recording quality on Ramée is a nice bonus.
I also have this recording by him, that I've enjoyed very much:


Q

I remember enjoying one of his earlier recordings of French music, called Une Douceur Violente.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on February 09, 2018, 10:39:03 AM
Hadn't got to that one yet, but it seems not generally loved.....

I can recommend this recording with music by Michelagnolo Galilei, the brother of Galileo.



Surperb disc... Anthony Bailes has a rather soft spoken style that combines elegance with plenty of expression.

Hi Que - thanks for the recommendation above - read three excellent reviews (attached) and purchased on Amazon already - had to own at least one recording from the Galilei family!   Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2018, 03:05:04 PM
I recently revisited Sandro Volta's Kapsberger, I think the music is really wonderful, at least as conceived on that recording.
I don't have anything by Sandro Volta. Maybe I'll remedy that. Hmm...why can't I get into Dowland? Should I try harder? Who created the most lute music, Dowland or Weiss (or somebody else)? It may be time for a top 5 composers for the lute, unless it exists already.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: (: premont :) on February 09, 2018, 03:59:08 PM
I don't have anything by Sandro Volta. Maybe I'll remedy that. Hmm...why can't I get into Dowland? Should I try harder? Who created the most lute music, Dowland or Weiss (or somebody else)? It may be time for a top 5 composers for the lute, unless it exists already.

Dowland's lute music is not necessarily the most accessible of his oevre. Try his consort music and songs instead to get into Dowland as such.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2018, 05:52:54 PM
Dowland's lute music is not necessarily the most accessible of his oevre. Try his consort music and songs instead to get into Dowland as such.
Right. I think I like some of his consort music.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2018, 07:52:19 PM
I was going to start a polling topic on favorite lute or lute-related composers or genre but I pooped out. Maybe here is better to say more. I love lute, Vihuela and baroque guitar music recently. I'm not sure what I like best. There's lots of great Spanish stuff. Santiago de Murcia is excellent. The French stuff, like by Gaultier, Gallot and Mouton is great (Lislevand's La belle homicide is great). I love some of the early Italian music a lot too. Christopher Wilson's "Early Venetian Lute music" is a standout. So, what are your favorites?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 09, 2018, 10:32:44 PM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)
Listening to this at the moment.

It's kind of a challenge in that way. So far, I find it hypnotically flat and, yeah, maybe dry. I'm still intrigued by it. It reminds me of Frescobaldi in a way.

It's as least as good as Willaert and Luszzaschi, I suspect it will repay repeated listening, I very much like the sobriety of it.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2018, 10:38:22 PM
It's as least as good as Willaert and Luszzaschi, I suspect it will repay repeated listening, I very much like the sobriety of it.
I kind of thought you would like this. For me, I find it intriguing. I'm very interested in music so flat as this. I didn't know the two you mention. I wanna check them. This kind of music is taciturn that I find something mysterious and interesting in it. I've been trying it late at night. I want to hear more like this. I also like how dense this music is, in terms of counterpoint.     
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2018, 12:03:49 AM
I kind of thought you would like this. For me, I find it intriguing. I'm very interested in music so flat as this. I didn't know the two you mention. I wanna check them. This kind of music is taciturn that I find something mysterious and interesting in it. I've been trying it late at night. I want to hear more like this. I also like how dense this music is, in terms of counterpoint.   

Willaert and Luszzaschi wrote keyboard music, I think Willaert invented the ricercar in fact, Glen Wilson recorded some of it on his Cavazzoni CD and there's a Stradivarius CD with a lot of his instrumental music. Luszzaschi was Frescobaldi's teacher, Matteo Mesori recorded a lot of his keyboard music.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 10, 2018, 12:11:16 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/418D6KMPBBL.jpg)
I'm surprised by how unique Kapsberger's music is, compared to other lute music I've been listening to. It stands out. I'm not sure how to describe it. It really must be the beginning of baroque although he's quite early. I hear some (influences on) Bach in places too. This is going to be a favorite. Very inventive.

Sofar my favourite recording by O'Dette!  :)

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: (: premont :) on February 10, 2018, 05:46:53 AM
I think Willaert invented the ricercar in fact,

Willi Apel considers Girolamo Cavazzoni to be the "father" of the imitative keyboard ricercare.

https://books.google.dk/books?id=rRvj70n4yY0C&pg=PA166&lpg=PA166&dq=ricercare+history&source=bl&ots=_7JulJgvvp&sig=RjTkpV4VVjKQIP0ciu3Cfz0FZFE&hl=da&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjnvuj6u5vZAhWTasAKHeZMDqkQ6AEIYDAH#v=onepage&q=ricercare%20history&f=false
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 10, 2018, 06:57:15 AM
Willaert and Luszzaschi wrote keyboard music, I think Willaert invented the ricercar in fact, Glen Wilson recorded some of it on his Cavazzoni CD and there's a Stradivarius CD with a lot of his instrumental music. Luszzaschi was Frescobaldi's teacher, Matteo Mesori recorded a lot of his keyboard music.
Willi Apel considers Girolamo Cavazzoni to be the "father" of the imitative keyboard ricercare.

https://books.google.dk/books?id=rRvj70n4yY0C&pg=PA166&lpg=PA166&dq=ricercare+history&source=bl&ots=_7JulJgvvp&sig=RjTkpV4VVjKQIP0ciu3Cfz0FZFE&hl=da&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjnvuj6u5vZAhWTasAKHeZMDqkQ6AEIYDAH#v=onepage&q=ricercare%20history&f=false
I'll have to check this out. I want to get to investigating recordings of the older/oldest organs. But I'm stuck in a lute/vihuela/baroque guitar loop now. I acquired so much lute stuff recently but the Galilei, for better or worse, is unique for it's dry, strict, slow, contrapuntal quality. I want something more like this. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: (: premont :) on February 10, 2018, 09:33:02 AM
Willi Apel considers Girolamo Cavazzoni to be the "father" of the imitative keyboard ricercare.

https://books.google.dk/books?id=rRvj70n4yY0C&pg=PA166&lpg=PA166&dq=ricercare+history&source=bl&ots=_7JulJgvvp&sig=RjTkpV4VVjKQIP0ciu3Cfz0FZFE&hl=da&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjnvuj6u5vZAhWTasAKHeZMDqkQ6AEIYDAH#v=onepage&q=ricercare%20history&f=false

BTW I think Apel's book is most recommendable.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2018, 09:56:34 AM
Sofar my favourite recording by O'Dette!  :)

Q

This is well balanced. Sane without being too sober, joyful without being over exhilarating, this recording makes me think of Aristotle's Golden Mean and Rubinstein's Chopin.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/418D6KMPBBL.jpg)
I'm surprised by how unique Kapsberger's music is, compared to other lute music I've been listening to. It stands out. I'm not sure how to describe it. It really must be the beginning of baroque although he's quite early. I hear some (influences on) Bach in places too. This is going to be a favorite. Very inventive.

To me this is quintessentially, almost charicaturally, a renaissance style of interpretation. You'll find Sandro Volta more psychological, darker and indeed more complex emotionally,  more passionate, more relishing the resonances of the instrument - especially the chitarrone. More like Pletnev's Chopin. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2018, 10:08:43 AM
I kind of thought you would like this. For me, I find it intriguing. I'm very interested in music so flat as this. I didn't know the two you mention. I wanna check them. This kind of music is taciturn that I find something mysterious and interesting in it. I've been trying it late at night. I want to hear more like this. I also like how dense this music is, in terms of counterpoint.   

Try and get hold of the Bakfark fantasies by Daniel Benko's banjo lute recording. Also maybe Joachim Held's recording called Nach Willen Dein, I managed to get my copy directly from the ORF website.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 10, 2018, 05:08:19 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/-9DLxz2UR9M
The first few notes of this reminds me of something and I can't think of what it is...is it Bach? I can't place it...
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2018, 10:59:52 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/-9DLxz2UR9M
The first few notes of this reminds me of something and I can't think of what it is...is it Bach? I can't place it...
Froberger Tombeau for Blancrocher maybe.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 10, 2018, 11:08:01 PM
Froberger Tombeau for Blancrocher maybe.
Ah!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2018, 11:31:40 PM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGr1-QgIkWvaV5nwVcMAnkhCc4KKhoauY7CIdHQSclGQKUauA)

I like this Luys de Narváez recording by José Akel on laúd very much, lively and imaginative and very contrapuntal and passionate. Can anyone help me to find a decent transfer, a lossless download or CD? I have it through spotify only, which I know is not a good thing.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2018, 11:48:07 PM
You could order it from Argentina....

https://www.clubdeldisco.com/resena/677_jose-akel_el-delfin-de-arion

Q

I tried it last week Que, but they haven't replied. I also tried to get in touch with José Akel, but no joy.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 12, 2018, 09:16:39 PM
I've decided to list which recordings have impressed me the most so far in my journey through this genre:

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/955/MI0000955831.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/143/MI0001143905.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81qzVJJNOfL._SX355_.jpg) (https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/062/MI0001062287.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Y%2BQtRiSKL._SL1050_.jpg)
This Venetian Lute music recording is a real standout from the other early Italian surveys I have.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/418D6KMPBBL.jpg) (http://alllossless.net/uploads/posts/2017-11/1510985974_jakob-lindberg.jpg)

(http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2003/Oct03/La_Belle_Homicide_E8880.jpg) (https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/199/MI0003199218.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3p9HjDwbPS4/hqdefault.jpg)
This recording by Moreno is a very appealing program and it sounds beautiful.

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/942/MI0000942397.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Above is an ensemble performance that's full of joy and fun.

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/040/MI0001040927.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Another ensemble production that can't be missed by those who love the genre of early Spanish revelry.

(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)
I think the Ozmo recording has an obsessive quality that may not appeal to everyone.
I want to mention Barto's Weiss of which I have Vol. 1, 2 and 5.
By edit, I've added this one too:
(http://www.centaurrecords.com/store/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/2/3/2359fc_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 15, 2018, 05:52:09 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51J143K8FML._SY300_.jpg)
This one has a "banjo-ish" sound that I usually don't favor. But here, it's really grown on me. It's rustic - as is the music. It's not gourmet French but more like country cooking but retaining that every-day-is-a-rainy-day French mentality.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 15, 2018, 06:08:08 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51qPlSMtlBL.jpg) This music is surprisingly rich and evocative. This is my first exposure to Piccinini. There's a lot to love in his music. It's varied and inventive. He must have been greatly respected. I don't think I've heard much of North even though I know he's a bigwig. I have to say he really expresses something in every moment. I think he's a great musician. I'm not sure what to call his style but he seems to deeply understand this music.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on February 15, 2018, 06:09:06 AM
(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)
I think the Ozmo recording has an obsessive quality that may not appeal to everyone.

I am going to give this recording another shot. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 15, 2018, 06:23:39 AM
I am going to give this recording another shot.
It's a little dry. I listen to it almost as a fetish. I fall asleep to it because it almost lacks a strong sense of personality to be jarring. I've been collecting lots of lute stuff lately and I can't say I have anything quite like it. Still, I like something about it. It's remote. Some might find it boring. The playing is very direct and without much variation.     
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 15, 2018, 06:31:07 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51J143K8FML._SY300_.jpg)
This one has a "banjo-ish" sound that I usually don't favor. But here, it's really grown on me. It's rustic - as is the music. It's not gourmet French but more like country cooking but retaining that every-day-is-a-rainy-day French mentality.

This one has really grown on me with repeated listening, I hope you have the same positive experiences with it. Initially I was repelled by the banjo, and the slight sense of banjo in a bathroom,  but now I think it's absolutely right for style brisé. The timbres of the different strings are so distinct, the way that phrases are spread across the strings, it's like the Gaultier anticipated Webern's Klangfarbenmelodie.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 15, 2018, 06:35:07 AM
This one has really grown on me with repeated listening, I hope you have the same positive experiences with it. Initially I was repelled by the banjo, and the slight sense of banjo in a bathroom,  but now I think it's absolutely right for style brisé.
Yes. It's really grown on me. This lutenist doesn't seem to have any or many other recordings. I think he's hit the mark. But it took me a while to feel this way about it. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 15, 2018, 06:36:49 AM
Yes. It's really grown on me. This lutenist doesn't seem to have any or many other recordings. I think he's hit the mark. But it took me a while to feel this way about it.

He has excellent recordings of Dufaut and Denis Gaultier, I can upload them for you if you want. His website's interesting, I get the impression he's very respected indeeed in the world of French lute.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 15, 2018, 11:20:42 PM

By edit, I've added this one too:
(http://www.centaurrecords.com/store/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/2/3/2359fc_1.jpg)

I very much like the lute and harpsichord duet Catherine Liddell recorded with Linda Burman-Hall for Wildboar, the whole CD is great IMO, and the music is rare and too quality.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 15, 2018, 11:44:30 PM
I very much like the lute and harpsichord duet Catherine Liddell recorded with Linda Burman-Hall for Wildboar, the whole CD is great IMO, and the music is rare and too quality.
That sounds like an attractive pairing. I sent you a pm BTW.  :) I wonder if I need more French Lute music. Or, if I should try to remedy my aversion to the English (like Dowland). I always have an initial resistance to English much which I can overcome.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 16, 2018, 12:07:43 AM
That sounds like an attractive pairing. I sent you a pm BTW.  :) I wonder if I need more French Lute music. Or, if I should try to remedy my aversion to the English (like Dowland). I always have an initial resistance to English much which I can overcome.

I think you need Bakfark.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 16, 2018, 02:02:04 AM
I think you need Bakfark.
Transylvanian? Sounds exotic. I'll take a look! What do you recommend? Edit: Looks like Daniel Benko is the one...
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 16, 2018, 03:08:46 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41AFM6SYA3L.jpg)
I decided to listen to this today and it's growing on me, slowly, as English music does. One thing that perplexes me about this is that on some tracks O'dette's lute has different sound, a unique sound from both the sound on other tracks and all my other lute recordings. There are a few tracks on which the lute has a pleasingly resonant timbre that seems curious to me. Can someone explain this? I shall try Nigel North's Dowland as well.
 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 16, 2018, 06:03:37 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41AFM6SYA3L.jpg)
I decided to listen to this today and it's growing on me, slowly, as English music does. One thing that perplexes me about this is that on some tracks O'dette's lute has different sound, a unique sound from both the sound on other tracks and all my other lute recordings. There are a few tracks on which the lute has a pleasingly resonant timbre that seems curious to me. Can someone explain this? I shall try Nigel North's Dowland as well.

I don't know that one, but let me take the liberty of mentioning an English banjo  lute CD which I like very much

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51GLorjakSL.jpg)

Rooley is like the young Egarr in my opinion, the Egarr of Froberger - a sort of unaffected commitment, flat but beguiling, he just seems to lead you gently and firmly  through the music with no shenanigans or monkey business. Once I start listening to this one I can't stop!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 16, 2018, 06:52:34 AM
I don't know that one, but let me take the liberty of mentioning an English banjo  lute CD which I like very much

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51GLorjakSL.jpg)

Rooley is like the young Egarr in my opinion, the Egarr of Froberger - a sort of unaffected commitment, flat but beguiling, he just seems to lead you gently and firmly  through the music with no shenanigans or monkey business. Once I start listening to this one I can't stop!
I'll give it a shot. It's hard for me to stick with the English. The French, Italian and Germans suck me in. The English just seem pleasant. But let me keep at it. And try your suggestion.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 16, 2018, 07:45:15 AM
Well I don't say that the music's as good as Froberger's!

Some people think that there was a big influence of French music on English, via Mesangeau. There's a CD which explores this idea a bit by Bailes, called Old Gaultier's Nightingale (I'm not keen on his soft and I think egotistical style, but other people seem to like what he does!) The key English lute composer as far as Bailes is concerned is Thomas Mace. He may be someone well worth checking out, though I'm not sure there's anything outstanding performance wise on record. I can tell the music's rather good though.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 16, 2018, 09:01:14 AM
Well I don't say that the music's as good as Froberger's!

Some people think that there was a big influence of French music on English, via Mesangeau. There's a CD which explores this idea a bit by Bailes, called Old Gaultier's Nightingale (I'm not keen on his soft and I think egotistical style, but other people seem to like what he does!) The key English lute composer as far as Bailes is concerned is Thomas Mace. He may be someone well worth checking out, though I'm not sure there's anything outstanding performance wise on record. I can tell the music's rather good though.
It's important for me to get around to it. Suddenly I feel Lute music is a vast ocean well-worth traversing.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 16, 2018, 10:54:11 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51qPlSMtlBL.jpg) This music is surprisingly rich and evocative. This is my first exposure to Piccinini. There's a lot to love in his music. It's varied and inventive. He must have been greatly respected. I don't think I've heard much of North even though I know he's a bigwig. I have to say he really expresses something in every moment. I think he's a great musician. I'm not sure what to call his style but he seems to deeply understand this music.

 
I'd say Paul Beier's Piccinini is as revealing as his Reusner. I'm coming to the conclusion that Beier is a very great musician.

I've managed to find it on Spotify, but not losslessly either as a download or as a CD. If anyone sees it losslessly at an affordable price please let me know.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 17, 2018, 06:27:04 AM
(http://www.exando-music.com/media/image/4b/19/3b/cd-16278_cover_highres.jpg)
Trying this one out presently. Edit: Corbetta is an interesting character. He travelled very widely and taught de Visee. I think Conte is a fine musician. This is rather serene music and played with sensitivity on an historic beautiful sounding guitar.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 17, 2018, 09:31:25 PM
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/p2l_gw8Augo/maxresdefault.jpg)
Another one I'm checking out today. This is mostly from a book of guitar music by de Murcia that was only discovered in 2006. I didn't know this ensemble but the sound is excellent and the spirit of the arrangements is not so different from what one might expect from Lislevand. It's got different unique and raucous-sounding period-percussion throughout. Pitzl is playing a copy of the a Stradivarius guitar.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 17, 2018, 11:43:37 PM
(http://www.exando-music.com/media/image/4b/19/3b/cd-16278_cover_highres.jpg)
Trying this one out presently. Edit: Corbetta is an interesting character. He travelled very widely and taught de Visee. I think Conte is a fine musician. This is rather serene music and played with sensitivity on an historic beautiful sounding guitar.

Good find, there aren't many Corbetta recordings, and I agree that this one is seductively calm and refined and poetic. I knew the name Roadario Conté because I'd heard a Piccinini recording of his, which hadn't really impressed me, maybe I should reevaluate.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 18, 2018, 04:03:37 AM
Good find, there aren't many Corbetta recordings, and I agree that this one is seductively calm and refined and poetic. I knew the name Roadario Conté because I'd heard a Piccinini recording of his, which hadn't really impressed me, maybe I should reevaluate.
The Corbetta is certainly fine artistry. I like it more with every listen.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 18, 2018, 07:45:38 AM
(https://is4-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music127/v4/66/93/2c/66932c99-b74b-6078-b1f1-835ef0ed747f/cover.jpg/268x0w.jpg) For some reason, when I listen to the cello suites on the guitar or lute, they start to sound like a collection of notes after a while - not really idiomatic. Yet this recording of the French Suites almost seems like it was written for the lute. Somehow, the left and right hand of the French Suites correspond well to chords or several strings in tandem. Yet, perhaps non-intuitively, the single lines (I guess with an effect of counterpoint through composition and performance techniques?) of the cello begin to sound repetitive on the lute/guitar. Does that make sense?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on February 19, 2018, 08:26:42 AM
Listening to this and enjoying it:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61Hnke1f7UL._SS500.jpg)

Nicolas Vallet: Le secret des muses
Paul O'Dette
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on February 19, 2018, 09:03:03 AM
This is excellent, as are his two recordings on Channel Classics.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61nlShUQAiL.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 19, 2018, 09:56:40 PM
(https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a3330006547_10.jpg) Something else I've dug up. Not sure what to make of this one yet: this is mixed with a very close-miked sound. No reverb. Very dry. The guitar is a copy of a baroque guitar. Yamaya studied with many prominent Lutenists including Beier, Stubbs, Schneiderman and Barto. I'm not sure what to make of this music yet. I'll say one thing, this music has some unique aspects to it but I'm not sure if these quirks will come to annoy me. Seems like every "lick" ends with a one-strum. This ends up being kind of tedious to my ears. The musician, Yamaya, presents a kind of angular sounding style. Has anyone else heard this composer or this performer? 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 20, 2018, 06:11:24 AM
(https://primephonic-live.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/albummedia/ANAA428/cover_thumb.jpg)
This is another good find: this recording contains a very interesting repertoire of (late?) renaissance composers such as Josquin Des Prez. According to the booklet, the idea for the duos comes from an "anthology that we have inherited from Enríquez de Valderrábano," i.e. the one existing Spanish text for two vihuelas. This recording represents a sort of "parallel" to this musical text - meaning they drew from other sources as well. The playing is serene and clear and the sound of the alto and bass vihuelas together is quite pleasing. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 21, 2018, 05:26:32 AM
(http://www.exando-music.com/media/image/4b/19/3b/cd-16278_cover_highres.jpg)
Trying this one out presently. Edit: Corbetta is an interesting character. He travelled very widely and taught de Visee. I think Conte is a fine musician. This is rather serene music and played with sensitivity on an historic beautiful sounding guitar.
For me, this has turned out to be quite a find. Lovely music, played with sensitivity and intelligence and the sound of the instrument and recording is also quite good.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 22, 2018, 05:53:44 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Qzh5EzdJL._SX425_.jpg) This is music is from Luys Milán's Viheula book, perhaps the first book of its kind. I have another recording of this composer, a duo by Jose Miguel Moreno and Eligio Quinteiro that's very good, but I don't really understand if this is from the same book as the one from which Escobar plays. José Antonio Escobar, solo on Vihuela, goes through the text linearly (through the numbered fantasias and Pavanas), from start to finish, so one can hear the progression of this didactic music with its increasing complexity. Anyway, I appreciate Escobar's mastery of the music. It's much mellower than the duet recording and the instrument sounds a bit more like a modern guitar. While the information clearly indicates a viheula, a commenter on Amazon wrote that he was convinced this is not a vihuela because the courses sound like single strings instead of doubled. I can't answer this question although I believe this is clearly not a modern guitar. Anyway, it's beautiful music and Escobar nicely brings out the details and nuance. Nothing is blurred or slurred.     
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 22, 2018, 06:04:35 AM
(http://e-cdn-images.deezer.com/images/cover/ebabc39d965426dc9c99f4824922e26f/500x500.jpg) This is the duet recording by Jose MORENO and Eligio Quinteiro of Milan's music that I mentioned in a previous post. I would have to give this a very high rating. I love this recording. These instruments are identifiably NOT guitars = they're lovely Vihuelas. There's a lot of spirit in this music. I'm kind of intrigued about how much music is in Milan's Vihuela book and if these pieces are really written for two instruments.   
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 22, 2018, 06:22:56 AM
(http://e-cdn-images.deezer.com/images/cover/ebabc39d965426dc9c99f4824922e26f/500x500.jpg) This is the duet recording by Jose MORENO and Eligio Quinteiro of Milan's music that I mentioned in a previous post. I would have to give this a very high rating. I love this recording. These instruments are identifiably NOT guitars = they're lovely Vihuelas. There's a lot of spirit in this music. I'm kind of intrigued about how much music is in Milan's Vihuela book and if these pieces are really written for two instruments.

Que likes this one. Moreno is very good at making the instrument sing. I've started to listen to Massimo Londardi's Vihuela CD, which contains quite a bit of Luys Milan. The music making is nonchalant and fluid.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 22, 2018, 06:50:41 AM
Que like this one. Moreno is very good at making the instrument sing. I've started to listen to Massimo Londardi's Vihuela CD, which contains quite a bit of Luys Milan. The music making is nonchalant and fluid.
The samples of this immediately sound better than Escobar. I'm not sure why yet. I think the instrument has more presence, for one. Thanks! More drama maybe too, maybe.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 22, 2018, 09:02:50 AM
The samples of this immediately sound better than Escobar. I'm not sure why yet. I think the instrument has more presence, for one. Thanks! More drama maybe too, maybe.

Oh I forgot to mention something, there's a Narvaez CD by Lex Eisenhardt which you may like, it's quite challenging, not accessible like Hopkinson Smith, he plays the fantazias like contrapuntal ricercari by Sweelinck or something, but it has an intensity which makes me think you may find it rewarding.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 22, 2018, 03:05:37 PM
Oh I forgot to mention something, there's a Narvaez CD by Lex Eisenhardt which you may like, it's quite challenging, not accessible like Hopkinson Smith, he plays the fantazias like contrapuntal ricercari by Sweelinck or something, but it has an intensity which makes me think you may find it rewarding.
Thanks I'll check it out! ETA: I'm loving this. Yes: intensity. I'm a sucker for this kind of thing. I have to compare it to Smith but I'm convinced by the authentic feeling of Eisendardt. He know what he's doing. But Smith is also great: quite moving and beautiful.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 22, 2018, 10:01:01 PM
It's just two different approaches,  I like Smith's poise and melodiousness, I like Eisenhardt's depth.

There are two lute dominated recordings by Rooley that I know, The Cozens Lute Book and a selection of Renaissance Duets with James Tyler. There are three or four CDs dedicated to Dowland in the complete Dowland he recorded, can someone say who's playing? Is it really Rooley?

Are there any more? I like Rooley's style very much.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 22, 2018, 10:23:58 PM
Hmm...why can't I get into Dowland? Should I try harder?

Yes, you should hear Nigel North. More than anyone else I've heard, apart maybe from Thomas Dunford (who hasn't recorded anywhere near as much of Dowland's solo lute music), he makes the music expressive, he makes the music human.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 23, 2018, 01:11:02 AM
Yes, you should hear Nigel North. More than anyone else I've heard, apart maybe from Thomas Dunford (who hasn't recorded anywhere near as much of Dowland's solo lute music), he makes the music expressive, he makes the music human.

I would definitely recommend Nigel North. Nicely flowing, dance like rhythms.


Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: (: premont :) on February 23, 2018, 01:18:34 AM
There are three or four CDs dedicated to Dowland in the complete Dowland he recorded, can someone say who's playing? Is it really Rooley?
The Dowland lute pieces are shared between:

Anthony Bailes (lute), Jakob Lindberg (lute), Nigel North (lute), Christopher Wilson (lute), Anthony Rooley (lute)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 23, 2018, 02:17:40 AM
Yes, you should hear Nigel North. More than anyone else I've heard, apart maybe from Thomas Dunford (who hasn't recorded anywhere near as much of Dowland's solo lute music), he makes the music expressive, he makes the music human.
I realized I have vol. 2 of North so I'm giving it a listen. I do find myself being won over by this. More than O'dette for some reason.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 23, 2018, 07:57:32 AM
The Dowland lute pieces are shared between:

Anthony Bailes (lute), Jakob Lindberg (lute), Nigel North (lute), Christopher Wilson (lute), Anthony Rooley (lute)

That explains a lot, thank you!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 24, 2018, 05:56:33 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/oG6ruckYTFIVrFca9dv14-P8wLI=/fit-in/500x500/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-6466518-1419938530-7496.jpeg.jpg)
Koch plays a program with Vihuela and baroque guitar. The vihuela playing didn't grab me (and it's recorded with a lot of reverb and distance) but the baroque guitar stuff on this album by Koch is stunning. He has a very soft smooth touch which some may not like but I find beautiful.
There's this Vihuela recording as well:
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol29/1033/1033156/2896064-big/AL-COMPAS-DE-LA-VIHUELA-Rafael-Bonavita-cover.jpg) The sound is really good on this one - much better than the Vihuela tracks on the Koch - and Bonavita has a jazzy style in playing early Spanish music. He makes it sound very modern. I'm wasn't sure what I though about that at first, but it's won me over a bit. Bonavita is very expressive/demonstrative and liberal with agogics if that's the right way to put it.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 24, 2018, 08:32:45 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Qzh5EzdJL._SX425_.jpg)   
I've gone back and fourth on this one but, listening to this today, this is quite a good portrayal of Milan's book in linear order.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 25, 2018, 05:06:31 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61wirafs5iL._SX342_QL70_.jpg)
I'm impressed with this one. I'm always eager to find something I haven't heard, and something a little different. This is early French and Italian music on the chitarra rinascimentale, something like an Italian vihuela? Anyway, there's lots of Adrian Le Roy on here which I think is quality early composition.

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/bCKqN0Q7i2Q/hqdefault.jpg)
I got this one a while back and find it's full of engaging music. This is a very reverberant recording but I find it works well with Wilson's style and program.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on February 25, 2018, 05:14:00 AM
I assume this composer (and recording, too) have been mentioned before, but this morning I was listening to it for the first time.  The coincidence of the composer's name being the same as the famous Delta blues man caught my fancy.

(https://cdn.naxos.com/SharedFiles/images/cds/others/8.572178.gif)

"Playing a golden-toned 10-course lute and using original manuscript sources or his own sensitive reconstructions, British lutenist Nigel North presents a delightful recital of dances by Robert Johnson, a contemporary of Shakespeare for whose plays he wrote songs and incidental music. Although they use the old forms of pavan, galliard, almain and fantasie, Johnson’s exquisite works tend towards the more expansive, lyrical style that would later flourish in the Baroque period."
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 25, 2018, 06:17:03 AM
I assume this composer (and recording, too) have been mentioned before, but this morning I was listening to it for the first time.  The coincidence of the composer's name being the same as the famous Delta blues man caught my fancy.

(https://cdn.naxos.com/SharedFiles/images/cds/others/8.572178.gif)

"Playing a golden-toned 10-course lute and using original manuscript sources or his own sensitive reconstructions, British lutenist Nigel North presents a delightful recital of dances by Robert Johnson, a contemporary of Shakespeare for whose plays he wrote songs and incidental music. Although they use the old forms of pavan, galliard, almain and fantasie, Johnson’s exquisite works tend towards the more expansive, lyrical style that would later flourish in the Baroque period."
I have to fill myself in on this Johnson

I'm listening to this at the moment. I do believe Francisco Guerau has written lovely and very melodic baroque guitar music.
(https://www.lacg.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/cds-smith-guerau-poema-harmonico.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 27, 2018, 12:05:14 AM
Toyohiko Satoh is, IMO, the greatest of lutenist.
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qbRlpbqiSEk/maxresdefault.jpg)
This is the earlier de Visee release by Satoh. I'm starting to realize why you regard him so highly.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 27, 2018, 09:22:55 PM
(https://www.mdt.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/C/K/CKD185.jpg)
I think William Carter is the best there is in this genre. He's got something special. He really understands this music deeply. I have to say that the sound quality on his recordings are the best I've heard for solo baroque guitar. This is from Corbetta's last book and the music is charming. I think this and Carter's de Murcia are must have recordings for any collector of early guitar music. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 28, 2018, 10:16:07 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51hHSuwu3bL.jpg)

The Sabionari guitar is by Stradivari, it sounds unbelievably refined and delicate, astonishing really. Angelo Michele Bartolotti's Bk 2 is rather fenchified music and not at all unattractive or uninteresting. Krishnasol Jimenez Moreno can drive a guitar - he plays in an attractive nonchalant way.

Moreno also recorded some Visée on the same guitar for Brilliant, but I find it totally unbearable because they've added a whole lot of reverberation, making this gossamer light masterpiece of an instrument sound like a théorbe on steroids.

I notice that Moreno chose an audiophile label for his Bartolotti - a case of once bitten twice shy maybe.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 28, 2018, 06:59:05 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51hHSuwu3bL.jpg)

The Sabionari guitar is by Stradivari, it sounds unbelievably refined and delicate, astonishing really. Angelo Michele Bartolotti's Bk 2 is rather fenchified music and not at all unattractive or uninteresting. Krishnasol Jimenez Moreno can drive a guitar - he plays in an attractive nonchalant way.

Moreno also recorded some Visée on the same guitar for Brilliant, but I find it totally unbearable because they've added a whole lot of reverberation, making this gossamer light masterpiece of an instrument sound like a théorbe on steroids.

I notice that Moreno chose an audiophile label for his Bartolotti - a case of once bitten twice shy maybe.
Excellent! I'm loving this! ETA: question: what do they string this with? Some kind of specially-made gut strings?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on February 28, 2018, 07:30:53 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51hHSuwu3bL.jpg)

The Sabionari guitar is by Stradivari, it sounds unbelievably refined and delicate ...

Very nice, this CD is on Amazon Music and you're right the guitar sounds really nice.  The music is also enjoyable from a composer I've not heard of before now.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 28, 2018, 10:06:12 PM
I'm very impressed by Bartolotti's music, it's interesting contrapuntally as well as melodically I think. There's another recording by Lex Eisenhardt which is less accessible than Jamenez Moreno's - but I have an intuition that it's worth persevering with.

Such a shame that the Visée recording on Brilliant using the Stradivari was cocked up by the sound engineers.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 02, 2018, 02:12:00 AM
I'm very impressed by Bartolotti's music, it's interesting contrapuntally as well as melodically I think. There's another recording by Lex Eisenhardt which is less accessible than Jamenez Moreno's - but I have an intuition that it's worth persevering with.

Such a shame that the Visée recording on Brilliant using the Stradivari was cocked up by the sound engineers.
The newer Moreno recording is the most natural, driest, sounding recording of guitar that I own. I think it's good in this case because you can hear everything about the instrument. It's really right in the room.
Have you seen this:

https://www.youtube.com/v/yGKan6eX5ug
?
I mentioned this before but I really recommend people have a listen to Bonavita's standout style. I'm curious what others will think of it. I've come to love it but he can be a bit flashy.
(https://www.music-bazaar.com/album-images/vol29/1033/1033156/2896064-big/AL-COMPAS-DE-LA-VIHUELA-Rafael-Bonavita-cover.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 04, 2018, 08:05:59 AM
Something interesting:
(https://direct.rhapsody.com/imageserver/images/Alb.266803008/500x500.jpg)
French baroque music. Seems like high quality compositions so far. Some intricate fugues. He plays an original guitar attributed to Matteo Sellas (1599-1654). Somehow the sound is lute-like, even though it's still got the guitar twang. Or maybe it's just the music. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 05, 2018, 12:58:58 AM
Very good essay on Luys Milan by Massimo Lonardi here, taken from his recording of "El Maestro" on Agaora Music. I particularly enjoyed the biographical information, which helps set the context of the music rather well - he was a jew by birth, a christian by faith, a poet, a composer, a virtuoso performer, someone who aspired to affect the airs of a nobleman. In short, he was a renaissance man! All this needs to come out in the performance.

Quote
In sixteenth-century Spain the term vihuela was used generically for various plucked or bowed string instruments; the different types were then distinguished by names indicating the manner in which they were played: thus vihuela de mono for instruments whose strings were plucked with the fingers, vihuela de petola (or de pica) for plectrum instruments and vihuela de arca (de gamba or de brat) for bowed string instruments.

Various books of tablature, containing compositions of great artistic value, show us that the Spanish musicians of the "Siglo de ore" found an ideal means of expression in the polyphonic and timbric capacities of the vihuelo.

The instrument, with its flat back and figure-of-eight shape like that of the guitar, has six courses of strings (the first and highest is generally single whilst the others are doubled at unison) tuned using the some intervals as the lute: fourth-fourth-third-fourth-fourth. The pitch of the sounds was determined by the dimensions of the instrument and the quality of the strings available.

Information about the origin and development of the vihuela is somewhat scarce, but one interesting fact is that the Spaniards, and only they in Europe, preferred it to the lute which, perhaps an account of its Arabian origins, was always considered a foreign instrument in the Iberian peninsula - the instrument of the "Moorish" invaders who had been definitely defeated with the fall of Granada in 1492.

Yet the vihuela had a rather short life; little more than half a century separates the publication of "El Maestro" (the first tablature published in Spain) from the disappearance of the instrument.

Here is the complete list in chronological order of the composers and works for the vihuela that have survived to our day:

• Lays Milon: "Libro de musica de vihuela de mono. Intitulado El Maestro". (Valencia, 1535-1536).
• Luys de Narydez: "Los seys libros del Delphin de musica de cities pare tarter Vihuela". (Valladolid, 1538).
• Alonzo Madam: "Tres libros de musica en «has pare vihuela". (Sevilla, 1546).
• Enriquez de ValderrObano: "Libra de musics de vihuela, intitulado silvo de sirenos". (Valladolid, 1547).
• Diego Pisador: "Libro de musica de vihuela". (Salamanca, 1552).
• Miguel de FuenIllana: "Libro de musica pore Vihuela, intitulado Orphenica lyre". (Sevilla, 1554).
• Juan Bermuda: "Declaration de instrumentos musicales". (Ossuna, 1555). • Luys Venegas de Henestrosa: "Libra de cifra nueva para tecla, harps y vihuela". (Alcalb, 1557). • Thomas de Sancta Maria: "Libra llamado Me de toter Fantasia". (Valladolid, 1565).
• Esteban Daza: "Libra de musica en &as para Vihuela, intitulado el Parnasso". (Valladolid, 1576).
• Antonio de Cabezon: "Obras de musica para tecla arpa y vihuela. (Madrid, 1578).
• Various authors: "Ramillete de Flares, manuscript work, 1593 (Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid Mss. 6001).

As the "Viola de mono", or simply "Viola", the Vihuela was also widely known in Italy, especially in the south of the country. (The iconography does not reveal any substantial differences between the Spanish instrument and the model used in Italy.) The "Intavolatura de viola o vero !auto" by Francesco da Milano was published in Naples in 1536; since the complex polyphony of the great lutanist cannot be performed by a single string instrument, "da gamba" or "da bra«io", the "viola de mono" represents the only viable alter-native to the lute.

There may be various reasons for the disappearance of the vihuela, both in Spain and in Italy; the most likely explanation would seem to lie in the growing popularity of the five-course guitar towards the end of the sixteenth century. The older "chitarrino" with four courses was quite similar to the vihuela; indeed, in his "Orphenica lyre of 1554, Miguel de Fuenllana defines it as "vihuela de quatro ordenez que dizen guitarra" [vihuela with four courses that they call guitar]. The new five-course instrument, on the other hand, known as the "Spanish guitar" on account of its popular character and manner of playing called "toner rasqueado" (consisting in rhythmically repeated chords), soon replaced the aristocratic vihuela.

In order to understand the spirit that fires the music of the vihuelists we should remember that in the space of a few centuries the history of Spain had seen peoples of different religions: Christians, Jews, Muslims, and that despite the wars, tensions and tragedies that we know all too well the traditions and cultures of these peoples contributed, with the further addition of Italian and French influences, to creating the identity of the world in which these musicians worked.

In his splendid study "Luys Milan on Sixteenth-Century Perfor-mance Practice" (Indiana University Press, Bloomington 8, Indianapolis 1996), Luis Gasser suggests that Milan was a "Converso" - a new Christian of Jewish origin. The title of "Don" which stands proudly before his name and the research carried out by Roberto Leonardi in "La vihuela in Espana y su pasaje al territorio ame-ricano" (doctoral thesis, academic year 1995-96, University Ca' Foscari of Venice) indicate the noble status, albeit through illegitimate descent of our composer Don Luys Milan, who apart from being a virtuoso player of the vihuela and excellent composer was also a poet and a man of letters.

We do not know his dates of birth and death but do know the dates of publication of his three books, only the first of which concerns his musical activity: "Libro de musica de vihuela de mono" (Valencia, 1535-36), "Libro de motes de darns y caballeros, intitulado el juego de mandar" (Valencia, 1535) and the "Libro intitulado El Cortesano" (Valencia, 1561) a work inspired by the "Libro del Cortigiano" (1528) by Baldesar Castiglione. A number of his poems,  moreover, are included in "Las Obras de Don Joan Fernandez de Heredia" (Valencia, 1562). These dates lead us to suppose that Milan was born towards the end of the fifteenth century or at the beginning of the sixteenth, and that he died after 1561. As yet no documents have been found regarding his studies and musical education, but in the prologue to "El Maestro" we find the following significant statement: "... siempre he sido tan inclinado a la musica que puedo afirmar i dezir: que nunca tuve otro maestro sino a elle misma." I"... I have always been so inclined to music that I may state and say: never did I have any master save music itself."] This proud knowledge of being one of the finest musicians of Iris day is reaffirmed in the verses set in the margin of a print portraying Orpheus playing the vihuela: "El grande Orpheo, primero inventor / Por quien la vihuela paresce en el mundo / Si el fue primero, no fue sin secundo." [Great Orpheus, first inventor / Through whom the vihuela appeared in the world / was the first but was not without a second."]

Milan lived mainly in Valencia and was in the service of the Viceroy Hernando de Aragon and his wife Germaine de Foix, queen of Aragon and of Naples. Milan appears to have spent a period of his youth in Portugal, for John III, the king of Portugal, admired him so much as to grant him a stipend of 7000 cruzados. Milan's gratitude towards the generous sovereign is witnessed by the dedication of "El Maestro" and by six beautiful villancicos on Portuguese texts.

A number of scholars have also suggested that Milan may have spent some time in Italy. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of vihuela compositions based on Italian vocal pieces (for example, the Pavana V, composed on the aria "Qua In belle Franceschina") of sonnets for song and vihuela on Italian texts and the use of Venetian characters in the printing of "El Maestro". Milan's musical and poetical talents were highly appreciated and generously recompensed at the court of Valencia, theatre of splendid celebrations and receptions, until the death of the duke and the appointment of Bernardino de Gardenas as viceroy brought an end to the court's splendours in 1550. Only a few years later, in 1557, the death of the king of Portugal deprived Milan of his stipend. After the publication of "El Cortesano" and of a number of poems in Fernandez de Heredia's book no further trace can be found of Milan.

"El Maestro" was the first book of tablatures to be published in Spain. The date on the frontispiece, 1535, conflicts with the date of 1536 found at the end of the book, in the colophon of the publisher Francisco Diaz Romano. The earlier date probably corresponds to the date of the manuscript; the printer did not finish his work until the following year and did not think to correct the date of the frontispiece which had probably already been prepared for printing.

The complete translation of the title is as follows: "Book of music for hand vihuela. Entitled "El Maestro", which proceeds with the same style and order as a teacher would use with a beginner: showing him in an orderly manner from the beginning all those things that he might not know to understand the present work. Composed by don Luys Milan. Dedicated to the most eminent, authoritative and admired prince Don Juhan: by the grace of God King of Portugal and the islands, etc. Anna MDXXXV. By Royal privilege."

The book opens with a long dedication to King John III of Portugal, followed by an explanatory section (declaracion) concerning the tuning of the instrument, the quality and gauge of the strings, the system used in tablature and the mariner of playing. In this preface Milan states his intention to create a "vihuela musician" who should be both a virtuoso performer and an expert composer for the instrument. The volume, which is divided into two parts (libros), contains 40 fantasias, 6 pavanes and four tentos for solo vihuela; six villancicos in Spanish, six villancicos in Portuguese, four romances in Spanish and six sonnets in Italian for voice and vihuela. Each piece is preceded by an explanation (declaracion or regla) indicating its speed expressed with the following recurrent terms:

"Compas apressurado o batido" = quick movement

"Compas a espacio" = slow movement "Compas algo apressurado" = fairly quick movement
"Algun tanto apriessa" = a little quick
"Ni muy a espacio ni muy apriessa" = neither very slow nor very quick

At the end of the second part we find the "Intelligencia y declaration de los tonos que en la musica de canto figurado se usan" (Knowledge and declaration of the notes used in the music for figured song) which contains the rules for identifying the modes in which the pieces are composed. The book, "A honor de Dios, todo podero-so", closes with the colophon of the publisher and the "Correcion de Auctor en lo herrores de In Emprenta" (Author's correction of the printing mistakes). The term "Fantasia" was used for the first time and in the same year both in "El Maestro" and in the anthology of lute compositions by Francesco da Milano, Petro Paulo Borrono, Jacopo Albutio, Alberto do Mantua and Marco do laquila, published in Milan by Casteliono ("Intabolatura de leuto de diversi autori", 1536).

The Fantasias included in "El Maestro" may be subdivided into three types: contrapuntal compositions in which the initial subject, imitated by the various voices, is followed by other subjects punctuated with free sections; Fantasias based on free harmonic and melodic successions, interspersed with brief imitative passages; and "Fantasias de consonancias y redobles". The composer provides performance indications for the latter type, the most interesting and original: the chordal or contrapuntal sections (consonancias) are to be played slowly (espacio) and the monodic passages, made up of embellishments or diminutions of varying length (redobles), quickly (apriessa). Milan further points out that to ploy these pieces the performer needs "mos respecto a toner de gala que no a servar compas" (more consideration for the elegance of performance than for observance of tempo).

This style, which hails back to the practice of improvisation, has quite ancient origins traces of which may be found in the first tablatures published in Venice by the printer Ottaviano Petrucci, in some of the "Recercari" contained in the "Libro primo" and in the "Libro secondo" by Francesco Spinacino (1507) and especially in some of the "Tastar de corde" of the "Libro quarto" by Joan Ambrosio Dalza (1508), characterised by the alternation of slow and chordal sections and more fluid phrases with rapid monodic embellishments.

For the composition of his Pavans MilOn claims to have been inspired "a las mesmas pavanas que en Ytalia se tonen" (by the some Pavans as ore played in Italy). In reality his compositions have quite different rhythmic and melodic features compared to those of the coeval Italian dances (we need only think of the Pavans by Petro Paulo Borrono, published in Milan in 1536) which are characterised by slow rhythm and duple time; Mildn's idealised dances constantly indicated a fairly quick rhythm (algo apressurado) and one of them, nc6, is in triple time. The inspiration for these compositions is probably to be sought in vocal pieces of popular origin like the "Villotte alio Padoana"; MilOn himself declared the vocal origin of the theme of the Pavane n°5 and also provided the first phrase of the text: "Qua la bella Franceschina".

Although our recording is devoted entirely to compositions for solo vihuela, I have chosen to quote at least one of Mildn's Villancicos originally written for voice and vihuela (Agora viniesse un viento), offering a version for vihuela solo and elaborating the repetitions with embellishments, as indeed I have done in a number of the Pavans and Fantasias, in accordance with a usage that is well documented in various treatises of the time.

Since Milan's book contains neither transcriptions of polyphonic works nor "Diferencias" (variations) on well-known tunes of dance basses, I have added to this work a few pieces taken from "Los seys libros del Delphin" (Valladolid, 1538), which was the second vihuela tablature to be published in Spain. Its author, Luys de Narvaez, was probably born in Granada at the beginning of the sixteenth century.
10 
He was in the service of Francisco de los Covos "Comendator mayor de Leon", to whom he dedicated his vihuela book, and of Prince Felipe (later King Felipe II) whom he accompanied on various journeys to Flanders, Italy and Germany. In his book "Comienca el libro Ilamado DeclaraciOn de Instrumentos musicales" (Osuna, 1555), Juan Bermuda includes Narvaez amongst the finest vihuela players of the time.

The "Cancion I, del Emperador" is based on the famous four-part song "Mille regretz" by the French-Flemish composer Josquin Despres. Narvaez transcribed the polyphonic composition, elaborating it with embellishments (glosas) of unequalled beauty and expressive force. The "Cuatro diferencias sobre GuOrdame las vacas" and the "Otras tres diferencias hechas par otro parte" belong to the genre of compositions in which a theme, probably of popular origin, or a dance bass, is embellished, developed and elaborated in various ways. The "Ban de contrapunto - El canto lino Ileva el tiple" is a fanciful translation into Spanish style of the "Basse-dance". Lastly I have also chosen to quote at least one of Narvaez's original compositions for voice and vihuela (Paseabase el Rey morn - Romance II) in a version for solo vihuela.
 
Massimo Lonardi (Translation: Tim Shaw)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 06, 2018, 10:20:13 AM
An well thought out definition of style brisé here

Quote from: Manfred F Bukofzer, Music in the Baroque Era
The quickly fading sound of the lute did not lend itself to polyphonic voice leading and called for specific techniques that compensated for the limitations of the instrument. The "broken style" of lute music, a most ingenious and consistent application of such a technique, may be called a glorification of the simplest lute figure: the arpeggio, That broken style is characterised by rapidly alternating notes in different registers that supply, in turn, melody and harmony. Seemingly distributed in arbitrary fashion in different registers, the notes produced, in their composite rhythm, a continuous strand of sound. The lute composer was able to articulate the even flow by means of double and triple stops which suggested the rhythmic patterns, essential to the dance. The texture of lute music was necessarily free voiced since no voice could be carried through and since notes that hinted at one voice at the beginning of the measure dropped out as soon as they had appeared.

It's interesting to compare Anthony Bailes and Louis Pernot in the light of this analysis, though unfortunately none of Apollon Orateur is on youtube, and neither is any Denis Gaultier by Pernot. But you'll see the issues I think.

https://www.youtube.com/v/o0y2Ug_j_ck

https://www.youtube.com/v/0z8GS-76YZY
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 07, 2018, 10:42:10 AM
I don't know that one, but let me take the liberty of mentioning an English banjo  lute CD which I like very much

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51GLorjakSL.jpg)

Rooley is like the young Egarr in my opinion, the Egarr of Froberger - a sort of unaffected commitment, flat but beguiling, he just seems to lead you gently and firmly  through the music with no shenanigans or monkey business. Once I start listening to this one I can't stop!
Many thanks, Mandryka !  I didn't know Rooley had registered a solo lute album, I've found it on Amazon, ordered it out of curiosity ...... really magnificent, and the sound seems to me much more natural than in more modern, digital DDD, recordings,  simple music drops decorating the silence  8) 8) 8)  Pity the playing time is so short ....and pity Rooley have not made other albums.  The ideal Cd for helping me to recover from the very heavy 'influenza' that rages Italy in these weeks  :) :) :) :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 07, 2018, 11:09:11 AM
Glad you like it, and I hope you get through the flu soon, flu is a nasty disease!

Rooley recorded a CD of Renaissance duets for L'oiseau Lyre, and he also recorded some Dowland in the Complete Dowland. I've been quite enjoying the Dowland recently, but it's not as well done as the Cozens Lute Book!

There is another Rooley recording I know which has a wonderful warm and natural sound, but it's not lute - it's his recording of consort music by Anthony Holborne.  And  Musicke of sundrie kinds  has this quality I think.

These are really life enhancing recordings!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 08, 2018, 04:55:08 AM
(https://f4.bcbits.com/img/a3330006547_10.jpg)
I'm giving this a listen again to see what I can make of it. I do like the sound of this instrument and the dry acoustics. It's pleasing. I'm just trying to see if I can enjoy this music. The interjected strumming, a quirk of the composition, is a little annoying but let's see if I can get past it. I'm kind of obsessed with finding more baroque guitar recordings but I feel I'm running out of examples of the genre.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on March 08, 2018, 08:54:38 AM
All,

This is such a great thread.  I thank you; my wallet does not.  I keep an amazon tab open while reading this thread.  Thank you all for contributing, and please do continue.

Regards,
-09
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 08, 2018, 09:11:26 AM
All,

This is such a great thread.  I thank you; my wallet does not.  I keep an amazon tab open while reading this thread.  Thank you all for contributing, and please do continue.

Regards,
-09
There's fantastic stuff here. :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 08, 2018, 09:40:36 AM
(https://is1-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Features/1e/46/0b/dj.zxqdkejv.jpg/268x0w.jpg)

Another interesting Rooley lute album, I've only just discovered it, and my first impressions are rather positive. English music.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 09, 2018, 12:04:29 AM
Morning listening:


I have the original issue on Symphonia (now defunct),
but posting this reissue on Pan Classics is more convenient for those interested.  :)

Q

A very nice recording, what impressed me most was the variety of the music, sometimes introspective, sometimes dancing in an naive outdoors peasant style, sometimes lyrical. The instruments are attractive too, especially the sunny sounding Italian vihuela.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on March 09, 2018, 01:28:02 AM
A very nice recording, what impressed me most was the variety of the music, sometimes introspective, sometimes dancing in an naive outdoors peasant style, sometimes lyrical. The instruments are attractive too, especially the sunny sounding Italian vihuela.

Fully agree.  :) A happy marriage of great original music and excellent performance. One of my favourite lute recordings.

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 09, 2018, 07:25:16 AM
(https://is1-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music/54/e4/9f/mzi.khavytds.jpg/268x0w.jpg) Something I'm checking out but, disappointingly, there's no pdf with the digital download. This has a lot of anonymous music on it and familiar music as well. I really like this performer who is new for me. He's very mellow, yet he also has, I think, that "broken style" that's been discussed here. At least I think that's what I'm hearing.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 10, 2018, 06:32:43 AM
Lex Eisenhardt's notes on Angelo Michele Bartolotti, with some evident comments on the difference between French and Italian music, and the dumbing down effect of Louis XIV style.

Quote
BARTOLOTTI SUITES FOR GUITAR


Little is known about the life of Angelo Michele Bartolotti. There are three surviving publications from his hand, two books with guitar music, one from 1640 and the other from c.1655-56 and a short instruction book for the theorbolrom 1669. The books for the guitar were probably engraved by the composer himself and their distribution must have been very limited. The portrait in the 'Ebro secondo' could even be a self-portrait.

Bartolotti lived for a long period in Bologna and was possibly born there. In the middle of the 17th century there was an important Bolognese guitar-school, consisting of Francisco Corbetta, Giovanni Battista Granata and Bartolotti as the leading figures. Around the years 1655-1656 Bartolotti was in Rome, where he dedicated his 'libro secondo' to Christina, the queen of Sweden (the 'Sybil of the North'). After her abdication Christina lived in Rome for some years where she gathered a circle of renowned artists around her, of whom Johann Jacob Froberger is amongst the best known today. Bartolotti in this period played the theorbo in continuo groups in the oratoria and operas of composers like Cavalli.

In 1656 Bartolotti, like many Italian musicians moved to France where he was employed at the wealthy court of France under Louis XIV, in His Majesty's Cabinet, together with other Italian virtuosi. In place of the music for the guitar, which became very much in vogue, the most attention was attracted by the Virtuoso Francisco Corbetta, who was very successful at the Royal Courts both in London and Versailles and published, amongst others, two different books under the title "La Guitarre Royalle", in 1671 and 1674.


Why is it that Bartolotti is so little known? Here we see the uncertaintities that surround his life. Although he was held in very high esteem by some of his contemporaries for his continuo-playing (he was called the best theorbist of Italy and France, practically the whole musical world at the time),-after his departure to France no attention was given to his guitar music anymore, despite the fact that the guitar became as popular as the lute. Where Corbetta wrote elegant menuettes and gavottes, Bartolotti's music was often much more complex. Bartolotti's use ofthe instrument was really unconventional and difficult, and it asks for a very good technical and musical knowledge to be fully understood. The 'guitaromanie' was mainly for amateur players (to whom his music must have appeared too complicated). Nothing is known of Bartolotti's attempts to adapt his guitar style to the more elegant French taste of that t'u'ne, and it is surprising that nothing further was heard of him as a guitarist.

One possible answer is to be found in the style of his guitar works. French music, dominated by (the Italian) Lully, was very much directed to agreeable melodic lines, easily sung. The capricious virtuoso Italian style, with many extravagant effects, that was developed in the first decades of the century did not please the French so much. And the music of Bartolotti, the 'Miquelange Italienc though influenced by the famous French lutenists like Denis ('vieux') Gaultier and Dufault was, on the other hand, sometimes very capricious and Italian. The d minor prelude for example is set up as a toccata in which there are free virtuoso passages altemated by more straight, imitative polyphonic writing and some short homophonic sections. Forms like this are to be found in Frescobaldi's music for harpsichord. As a contrast to this, most allemandes and courantes are in the French style, whereas the finely crafted gigues, little balanced gems, are foreshadowing the 'gouts reunis' and the intemational style of the later baroque.

The influence of the French lutenists is to be seen in some of the preludes (e.g. that in D major) and allemandes, written in the 'style brisee' the broken lutestyle, that also influenced the harpsichord music of the Couperins. Another mark of the French influence is to be seen in the exclusive use of dance forms in the 'libro secondo', yet the Italian Bartolotti was one of the very first composers writing complete baroque suites with the sequence: prelude, allemande, courante, sarabande and gigue. In fact, these suites are among the earliest known examples of the kind, earlier even than those of Froberger.

The music is written for an instrument which was usually called the Chitarra Spagnola, the Spanish guitar. Still there was almost no repertoire from Spain and in the first half of the 17th century most of the music came from Italy, starting with the strummed chords practice that was in use in the accompaniment of vocal music. The guitar was frequently mentioned as one of the possible instruments to be used in a continuo group. In Art music it was an accepted suppletion of the continuo, while it was considered to be too limited to fulfill the needs of a continuo part on its own. But one can suppose that in the homes of the people and on the streets the guitar played a similar part in song accompaniment as it does today.


For the more refined, composed music some tunings were developed that had no low bass-strings at all. The most important composers like Corbetta, de Visee and also Bartolotti chose for their music the tuning (see example) which allowed them to use the fourth course (pair of strings) both for lower notes and for the upper voice. In fact, this is one of the mysteries in the history of the instrument and with these tunings the ambitus of the instrument becomes very limited. Here we meet a third, probably determining reason for the oblivion into which this music has fallen: it is impossible to play it properly on any other instrument, and the baroque guitar did not survive the 18th century. Yet this tuning is advantageous in the so-called 'campanelas', (small ringing church-bells). This technique consists of the use of the higher sounding - and lower placed - fourth and fifth courses. Played like an arpeggio, this results in faster scale sections. Bartolotti's music is, possibly more than anyone else's, characterised by a constant use of the lower courses in the upper voices. Often even within the space of one bar the fourth course is used for both the bassline and the melody.

© 1994 Lex Eisenhardt
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 13, 2018, 04:36:10 AM
(http://e-cdn-images.deezer.com/images/cover/f77c1f2731136c9b24d03a225c22d5f3/500x500.jpg)
I wanted to reaffirm what a really great recording this is. The sound is pleasing, the playing is engaging, and the program is interesting.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 13, 2018, 06:53:40 PM
I feel like I need some sort of intervention. Recently I've become addicted to Spanish early guitar and vihuela music. But, this genre is kind of limited. There's just only so much of it. I'm caught in a loop that I know I'll have to get out of eventually. I do listen to a lot of lute music too. I also find myself less and less tolerant of romantic music so I don't like romantic guitar much. Maybe I need deprogramming.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 13, 2018, 10:33:32 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71OaJ9w2UlL._SL1200_.jpg)

A thumbs up from me for the Holborne component of this release by Yavor Genov.

Genov knows how to let the music respire by punctuating it with pregnant pauses. The result is music which is imbued with mystery, Genov reveals Holborne to be the at the top of the tree of English Renaissance lute composers, at least from the point of view of poetry.

Recording too close but listenable, rich, muscular and resonant lute, I don't have details, and to his credit Genov doesn't over-indulge in the resonances.

I haven't heard the music by Johnson yet.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 14, 2018, 10:53:50 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Yf4iEIkWL._SL1200_.jpg)

And another big thumbs up for this Holborne Cd from Federico Marincola, who plays a more delicate lute than Genov's. The performances are natural and self effacing, he has a feel for the mystery and complexity of the music - the aspect which so impressed me about Genov. With Marincola as with Genov, the music is always much more than a bunch of sweet melodies - I wish these guys would play Dowland!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 15, 2018, 04:43:51 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Yf4iEIkWL._SL1200_.jpg)

And another big thumbs up for this Holborne Cd from Federico Marincola, who plays a more delicate lute than Genov's. The performances are natural and self effacing, he has a feel for the mystery and complexity of the music - the aspect which so impressed me about Genov. With Marincola as with Genov, the music is always much more than a bunch of sweet melodies - I wish these guys would play Dowland!
If you like Holborne's music played on lute ( Holborne himself was a lute player, but he transcribed a lot of his music for consort of viols  :  well worth listening is Savall moving performance , among others )  you could have a look on a Hopkinson Smith CD  titled  "Mad Dog"  :  he puts together pieces by Holborne, John Johnson, Byrd and Dowland.  But  mainly by Holborne.  There is the Fantasy written by the enigmatic Gregorio Huwet , as well !!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 16, 2018, 12:05:24 AM
If you like Holborne's music played on lute ( Holborne himself was a lute player, but he transcribed a lot of his music for consort of viols  :  well worth listening is Savall moving performance , among others )  you could have a look on a Hopkinson Smith CD  titled  "Mad Dog"  :  he puts together pieces by Holborne, John Johnson, Byrd and Dowland.  But  mainly by Holborne.  There is the Fantasy written by the enigmatic Gregorio Huwet , as well !!

Yes I'm strarting to explore that one. What do you make of Christopher Wilson's Holborne? A friend of mine raves about it but so far I find it a bit elusive, but this is probably just my mood.

Savall's Holborne reminds me in a way of the recent Gibbons recording by L'acheron, it has  the same sort of seriousness.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on March 16, 2018, 12:36:50 AM
Yes I'm strarting to explore that one. What do you make of Christopher Wilson's Holborne? A friend of mine raves about it but so far I find it a bit elusive, but this is probably just my mood.

Speaking of Christopher Wilson, I enjoy this one -

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/516ieAmyAbL._SS500.jpg)

Fantasia de Mon Triste - Renaissance Lute Virtuosi of Rome and Venice
Christopher Wilson
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 16, 2018, 05:00:02 AM
Yes I'm strarting to explore that one. What do you make of Christopher Wilson's Holborne? A friend of mine raves about it but so far I find it a bit elusive, but this is probably just my mood.

Savall's Holborne reminds me in a way of the recent Gibbons recording by L'acheron, it has  the same sort of seriousness.
  By the way .... my very first Holborne cd was "The fruit of love"  by L'acheron , on Ricercare label. 
I have some discs by Christopher Wilson ( among which the Naxos edition with pieces by Holborne and Thomas Robinson) :  well , in my opinion , Wilson is one of those players whose qualities are brought into focus after several listening , not immediately .  For instance, I have not immediately enjoyed "Fantasia de mon triste"  , quoted here above by Marcabru , but when I took it off the shelf after several weeks and put it for the second time on the cd player ..... oh, it was very clear to me :  Christopher Wilson is a great lute player !!   Another thing, related to this one : I am NOT ALWAYS a  great listener !!   :D :D :D     
( probably a day will come when I'll be able to fully appreciate Paul Beier's  Reusner  )
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 16, 2018, 06:39:59 AM
Growing older ( I'm 67 ) I more and more appreciate and NEED abstract music more than any other kind of music .
I mean absolute music , pure music ,  without extramusical references,  like the  Fantasias by Byrd, Gibbons or Purcell, or The Art Of Fugue ...... well, The Art Of Fugue for me is the Everest in music.
So, exploring the world of lute music I have been in search for something of that kind , and I am still in search.  Some pieces by Dowland, or Johnson adapt to my needs , and some beautiful pieces by Francesco da Milano or Alberto da Mantova (alias Albert de Rippe) as well .
But  JSB  Art of Fugue is still far away.   :-[    (Nevertheless I am immensely grateful to Nigel North for his magnificent transcriptions of the cello suites and the violin partitas & sonatas ,  Linn label, 4 CDs)
I apologize for going off topic (and for my poor English) 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on March 16, 2018, 06:42:35 AM
Growing older ( I'm 67 ) I more and more appreciate and NEED abstract music more than any other kind of music .
I mean absolute music , pure music ,  without extramusical references,  like the  Fantasias by Byrd, Gibbons or Purcell, or The Art Of Fugue ...... well, The Art Of Fugue for me is the Everest in music.
So, exploring the world of lute music I have been in search for something of that kind , and I am still in search.  Some pieces by Dowland, or Johnson adapt to my needs , and some beautiful pieces by Francesco da Milano or Alberto da Mantova (alias Albert de Rippe) as well .
But  JSB  Art of Fugue is still far away.   :-[
I apologize for going off topic (and for my poor English)

This recording has been discussed here -

(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)

It might be what you're looking for.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 16, 2018, 07:40:20 AM
Growing older ( I'm 67 ) I more and more appreciate and NEED abstract music more than any other kind of music .
I mean absolute music , pure music ,  without extramusical references,  like the  Fantasias by Byrd, Gibbons or Purcell, or The Art Of Fugue ...... well, The Art Of Fugue for me is the Everest in music.
So, exploring the world of lute music I have been in search for something of that kind , and I am still in search.  Some pieces by Dowland, or Johnson adapt to my needs , and some beautiful pieces by Francesco da Milano or Alberto da Mantova (alias Albert de Rippe) as well .
But  JSB  Art of Fugue is still far away.   :-[    (Nevertheless I am immensely grateful to Nigel North for his magnificent transcriptions of the cello suites and the violin partitas & sonatas ,  Linn label, 4 CDs)
I apologize for going off topic (and for my poor English)

I think Lex Eisenhardt has a way of making the music sound abstracted from flesh and blood.

(and for my poor English)

But your English is perfect  :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 16, 2018, 08:14:14 AM
This recording has been discussed here -

(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)

It might be what you're looking for.
Vincenzo Galilei ?  mmmm, he was Galileo's father !  Well, thank you, I will investigate in that direction.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on March 16, 2018, 11:50:50 AM
Vincenzo Galilei ?  mmmm, he was Galileo's father !  Well, thank you, I will investigate in that direction.

Go back to page 8 for some comments:

http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,6895.msg1126629.html#msg1126629

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 22, 2018, 04:53:36 AM
Sigrun Richter on Esias Reusner

Quote
1654 Reusner returned to Breslau, and in 1655 he was appointed lutenist at the court
of Brieg (Brzeg). In 1660 he married Maria Bohm, the daughter of a councilman in
Breslau. In 1672 he became chamber lutenist at the court of the Elector Friedrich
Wilhelm of Brandenburg. On 1st May 1679 Reusner died at the age of 44, leaving
behind his wife and three sons.


Reusner's Suites for solo lute are preserved in two printed sources: Delitiae
Testudinis, also known as Erfreuliche Lautenlust (Pleasant Lute Delights), was
published in 1667 and 1668 in Breslau, and posthumously in 1697 in Berlin. His
second opus, Neue Lautenfruchte (New Fruits of the Lute), was published in 1676 in
Berlin. The two books differ not only stylistically but also visually. The typography
used for the tablature in Delitiae Testudinis is extremely ornate, making it difficult
to read. In contrast, the writing in Neue Lautenfruchte is very clear; also useful for
the interpretation are the added right hand fingerings. The second book contains
the scordatura suites in B flat major and D minor recorded on this CD.


The significance of Esaias Reusner the Younger's lute suites


Esaias ReusnerJunior is regarded as the first prominent German master of the lute
suite. Although his musical language was very much influenced by the prevalent
French style (he adopted the French style brise and placed a prelude non mesure at
the beginning of some of his suites), it also deviated from it. His music can be
described as an attempt to combine the elegance of the French style with a more
colourful harmonic language and a clear taste for the cantabile. It is not surprising
that he insisted in the prologue to his Neue Lautenfruchte on the importance of a
vocal-like and rhetorical approach to playing his music:


„One must pay close attention to the inflexion of the tones when playing the lute,
that they not always be played loudly, but rather at times in a little more restrained
and mild manner, in an oratorical way, so that one may more fully apply oneself to
the sweetness [of the sound], rather than merely attacking the great lute, in order that everything be well expressed and clea rly stated." ' (Neue Lauten-Fruchte, 1676)


The influence of Reusner's music lasted beyond his death. Proof of this can be seen in the posthumous publication of the print Erfreuliche Lautenlust in 1697. His name also appears next to the names of French lutenists/composers; e.g. in a Parisian manuscript MS Rene Milleran, from ca. 1690 - his named is stated as: „Mr. Reusner de Brandenburg". Most of the pieces in this manuscript give the name of the composer together with the title of the movement. Others, especially near the end of the book, fail to mention the composer. It has not been determined which of these movements were in fact written by Reusner. A further manuscript from ca. 1700 (MS AUS-LHD 243) is preserved today in Melbourne, Australia. It contains works by Bohemian lutenists as well as pieces by Gaultier, Pinel and Reusner. Once again, we find Reusner in company of French musicians. Noteworthy is the fact that the manuscript calls for a lute tuned in A-d-f#-a-d'-f#'. It contains only pieces in D major. The movements from Reusner's Suite in D major from Neue Lautenfruchte are arranged here for this scordatura and provided with additional variations - Double or Separation. This is an example of how freely music from the past was often handled. (On this recording, Reusner's D major Suite is presented in its original version, as it appeared in in 1676 in Neue Lautenfruchte.)

 Ernst Gottlieb Baron underscores the influential role of Esaias Reusner Junior for the development of a musical language specific to the lute. In his Historisch-Theoretische und Practische Untersuchung des Instruments der Lauten, Mit Flei3 aufgesetzt und alien rechtschaffenen Liebhabern sum Vergnugen heraus gege-ben,2 Nuremberg, 1727, he writes:

„Let us now turn to those who have already begun to unite the harmonious with the cantabile, and who have been able to choose less constrained and more elegant melodies. The two Reusners, father and son, of Silesian origin, were without a doubt the first ones who strived to compose free-flowing melodies that agreed with the spirit of the instrument; ..."


Sigrun Richter (Translation: Milo Machover )
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 22, 2018, 07:26:04 AM
Sigrun Richter on Esias Reusner
Interesting. I'm listening to the Beier now.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 23, 2018, 12:33:51 AM
Interesting. I'm listening to the Beier now.
Don't forget Konrad Junghaenel on DHM Baroque Esprit (1 cd) , in particular the Suite in D major , which is not included in the Beier collection because it doesn't belong to  "Deliciae Testudinis" , but is part of  "Neue Laute-Fruechte" .
Strangely it doesn't exist a complete recording of the "Neue Laute-Fruechte" , which is widely considered Reusner's masterpiece !
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 23, 2018, 01:10:54 AM
Don't forget Konrad Junghaenel on DHM Baroque Esprit (1 cd) , in particular the Suite in D major , which is not included in the Beier collection because it doesn't belong to  "Deliciae Testudinis" , but is part of  "Neue Laute-Fruechte" .
Strangely it doesn't exist a complete recording of the "Neue Laute-Fruechte" , which is widely considered Reusner's masterpiece !
I decided to go for Satoh's partial recording of Neue Laute-Fruechte. This was easier to find as a download. Satoh's lute sounds similar to the one's he's used previously. I like his choice but it might not be for everyone.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 23, 2018, 02:38:21 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/713/MI0003713956.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
I'm giving this a go...
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 23, 2018, 04:49:11 AM
Don't forget Konrad Junghaenel on DHM Baroque Esprit (1 cd) , in particular the Suite in D major , which is not included in the Beier collection because it doesn't belong to  "Deliciae Testudinis" , but is part of  "Neue Laute-Fruechte" .
Strangely it doesn't exist a complete recording of the "Neue Laute-Fruechte" , which is widely considered Reusner's masterpiece !

I like Junghaenel's Reusner very much.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 23, 2018, 06:26:48 AM
I decided to go for Satoh's partial recording of Neue Laute-Fruechte. This was easier to find as a download. Satoh's lute sounds similar to the one's he's used previously. I like his choice but it might not be for everyone.
I think it is the same instrument he uses in his DeVisee recording : a Laurentius Greiff lute built in 1611 (but in the DeVisee disc they write '1610')
No doubt Satoh is a great artist , but you have to get used to his tempi (and his silences between the notes) and the particular tone of this very old instrument :  I remember having a great difficulty when listening to Satoh in the DeVisee CD : then I resolved myself to open a bottle of a red wine named "Giuseppe Verdi" and drink a glass of it.  Well, I must admit that , since then, Satoh began to appear to me more and more interesting, and friendly  :P :P :P :P :P :P
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on March 23, 2018, 06:36:33 AM
Pretty sure this recording has already been mentioned here.  I am listening to it right now and enjoying it.

(http://northpacificmusic.com/NPM-M005-Roncalli-Yamaya/baroque_guitar_M005.web.jpg)

Ludovico Roncalli : Works for Guitar
Hideki Yamaya, baroque guitar

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 23, 2018, 08:19:43 AM
I like the Reusner by Satoh, Beier, Junghaenel and Richter very much. Has anyone had a chance to form a view of the complete Reusner from William Waters in Brilliant Classics?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 27, 2018, 08:56:45 AM
I like the Reusner by Satoh, Beier, Junghaenel and Richter very much. Has anyone had a chance to form a view of the complete Reusner from William Waters in Brilliant Classics?
I've ordered it from Ebay , after some positive listening on Deezer.  Of course it is difficult to evaluate the sound quality with the built-in speakers of the PC , but it seems not bad to me.  These suites were first published as "Deliciae testudinis" and reprinted later with another title. Then  there is  the other Reusner's opus named  "Neue Laute Fruchte"  (13 suites)  not included in this Brilliant double.  Great music this man gave to us !!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 27, 2018, 09:33:57 AM
  Great music this man gave to us !!

This is so very true!

By the way I downloaded this yesterday, it's not well recorded but his approach is not uninteresting. He enjoys letting the strings resonate, he plays poetically, I mean expressively, with lots of emotional sensitive and marked differences in feeling  between fast and slow movements. Mouton also gave us great music!

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51Nhk-iJRfL._SX355_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on March 27, 2018, 11:19:43 AM
This is so very true!

By the way I downloaded this yesterday, it's not well recorded but his approach is not uninteresting. He enjoys letting the strings resonate, he plays poetically, I mean expressively, with lots of emotional sensitivity between fast and slow movements. Mouton also gave us great music!

I have the CD and never noticed any issue with the recording quality... great performance!  :)


Opening the year with lute music by Charles Mouton (1626-1710). History tells us that he was one of the greatest French lutenists ever. Well, his music is accordingly and the performance by Italian Franco Pavan is amazing.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41PJ0h3bIdL.jpg)  (http://www.lutesandguitars.co.uk/images/Mouton.jpg)

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 27, 2018, 12:01:01 PM
I have the CD and never noticed any issue with the recording quality... great performance!  :)

I wonder what's going on with me, I seem to be becoming over sensitive about sound. I never used to be like that.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 27, 2018, 10:24:14 PM
I suspect it's the quality of the downloads....  ::)

Contrary to general wisdom any degree of compression affects the quality. Only lossless fomats will do IMO.

Q

I have a lossless download. I think part of it is that it's too closely recorded for me, as if my perspective is the performer's. The issue is exacerbated because Pavan likes to let is hear the lute strings sustain. I like the performances, by the way.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on March 27, 2018, 11:39:57 PM
I suspect it's the quality of the downloads....  ::)

Contrary to general wisdom any degree of compression affects the quality. Only lossless fomats will do IMO.

Q
This thing terrifies me :  the "physical" CD is in danger of extinction ??  I even sent a mail to Franco Pavan asking where could I find a copy of this disc (beautiful IMO) , he told me he would do research ......... nothing.   Very sad  :( :( :( :( 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on March 28, 2018, 08:00:17 AM
This thing terrifies me :  the "physical" CD is in danger of extinction ??  I even sent a mail to Franco Pavan asking where could I find a copy of this disc (beautiful IMO) , he told me he would do research ......... nothing.   Very sad  :( :( :( :(

I have the CD, and have now and then seen it offered on Amazon or ebay.

But the label tiny with a very low degree of proliferation.... I'll keep an eye out... :)

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on March 29, 2018, 08:31:52 PM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0003/713/MI0003713956.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
I'm giving this a go...
This is a treasure trove of music - lovely for a sunny afternoon. Xavier Díaz-Latorre is a sensitive musician and he gives us over 3 hours of music. It's nice to have so much of Francisco Guerau, who wrote such quality guitar compositions. For me, the best of baroque guitar consists of De Murcia, Sanz and Francisco Guerau.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on April 01, 2018, 03:48:12 AM
This recording has been discussed here -

(https://pxhst.co/avaxhome/2a/4b/003e4b2a.jpg)

It might be what you're looking for.
I was looking for some interesting contrappunti or ricercari. I found some in a CD from Agorà label :  https://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/vincenzo_galilei/works_for_lute__massimo_lonardi___ugo_nastrucci_/
The registered sound is not first class , for my taste ,  and there is not a fair balance between the two instruments (when two lutes are requested to play together) -
Performances could be more lively and exciting .... but perhaps Vincenzo Galilei did not want to give listeners liveliness and excitement !!!
The more contrapunctal works are surely worth listening.
 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 01, 2018, 05:34:56 AM
I was looking for some interesting contrappunti or ricercari. I found some in a CD from Agorà label :  https://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/vincenzo_galilei/works_for_lute__massimo_lonardi___ugo_nastrucci_/
The registered sound is not first class , for my taste ,  and there is not a fair balance between the two instruments (when two lutes are requested to play together) -
Performances could be more lively and exciting .... but perhaps Vincenzo Galilei did not want to give listeners liveliness and excitement !!!
The more contrapunctal works are surely worth listening.

I'd very much like to hear that Lonardi CD, I like his poetic style. For Vincenzo Galilei I like the CD by Andrea Damiani most.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 01, 2018, 01:14:24 PM
I'd very much like to hear that Lonardi CD, I like his poetic style. For Vincenzo Galilei I like the CD by Andrea Damiani most.
I didn't know about Damiani. I'm looking forward to this. I want to see what someone else does with Vincenzo. E.T.A: yes this is wonderful. I like the abstract. etherial, quality to this music, but Damiani also brings an earthiness to it. Compared to Ozmo, there's more vulnerability and love in Damiani.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 10, 2018, 11:07:08 PM


(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/rc/yq/izx70a0a2yqrc_600.jpg)


Toru Sakurada is an angel, this is a recording of an angel playing a vihuela.

Sometimes you find a performance which totally disarms all criticism. That is the case for Toru Sakurada's Narváez. He has the knack of getting to the very cantabile heaven of the music, and his extraordinary skill at making the vihuela sing is what is so disarming. This siren song, seductive siren song, is just soooooooooo beautiful that all the knee jerk critical responses (over-simplify, well behaved . . . ) are just words, words, words in the face of this angelic purity.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 11, 2018, 01:07:48 AM

(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/rc/yq/izx70a0a2yqrc_600.jpg)


Toru Sakurada is an angel, this is a recording of an angel playing a vihuela.

Sometimes you find a performance which totally disarms all criticism. That is the case for Toru Sakurada's Narváez. He has the knack of getting to the very cantabile heaven of the music, and his extraordinary skill at making the vihuela sing is what is so disarming. This siren song, seductive siren song, is just soooooooooo beautiful that all the knee jerk critical responses (over-simplify, well behaved . . . ) are just words, words, words in the face of this angelic purity.
I'm game! I certainly can't resist that kind of report!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 11, 2018, 07:18:04 AM
You won't be surprised to learn that Toru Sakurada studied with Toyohiko Satoh. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 12, 2018, 01:17:27 AM
You won't be surprised to learn that Toru Sakurada studied with Toyohiko Satoh.
Makes sense. Have you ever seen a lute performance live?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 12, 2018, 01:43:30 AM
Makes sense. Have you ever seen a lute performance live?

Yes but not solo, at least not that I remember. The last time I saw a lute it was part of a staging of Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme with Lully's music, the lutenist in the band was Thomas Dunford. It was memorable because the instrument was so weird, with its long neck.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 12, 2018, 02:03:57 AM
Yes but not solo, at least not that I remember. The last time I saw a lute it was part of a staging of Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme with Lully's music, the lutenist in the band was Thomas Dunford. It was memorable because the instrument was so weird, with its long neck.
Some day I'd like to see some early music, early Spanish music, guitar and/or lute performances. I'm sure Jordi Savall would be a fund concert but of course it's hard to find in Japan where I live. And stuff sells out rather fast here too. Satoh is bopping around Europe I'm sure.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on April 12, 2018, 02:24:17 AM
A bunch of pieces attributed to Ennemond Gaultier and other lutenists of the same period.  Easy listening. Good sound and nice performances.
But the timing is shamefully short ( a bit more 40' )   
Nevertheless a worthy addition to the CD library
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on April 13, 2018, 02:16:37 AM
In short ,  two desert island discs !!!!
I cannot find weaknesses , this music is beautiful from beginning to end, a quiet but not soporific proceeding from Waters, and the alternation of major and minor keys helps prevent ( unlikely ) falls in attention from the listener.
Only a minus :  in the editing process they have brutally cut the resonance of the last chord in some number (really very few , see the Gavotte track 22 in CD 1 )
I hope William Waters is projecting to record the remaining Reusner's output , so I could take it with me on the desert island , together with these two.
 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 13, 2018, 11:26:26 AM
Thanks for these comments, it looks like there are two recordings I'll have to check out soon, the Winters and the Poirier. At the moment I'm enjoying very much Sigrun Richter's Pierre Gaultier.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 21, 2018, 05:07:52 AM
(http://www.fineav.com/Proimg/ac/1202/ac120263.gif) This is the music of François Campion on baroque guitar played by Michel Amoric. The recording sound and instrument are much better here than on Bernhard Hofstötter's recording of Campion. I don't know anything about Amoric but his performance is convincing. 

I'd like to plug this:
(http://e-cdn-images.deezer.com/images/cover/1dc26b3d86e32aebc4e8a0219877149d/200x200-000000-80-0-0.jpg)
That's "Nunca Más Verán Mis Ojos" by Alfred Fernández. It's vocal music transcribed for vihuela. I think Fernández is quite good.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 21, 2018, 12:49:49 PM

(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/rc/yq/izx70a0a2yqrc_600.jpg)


Toru Sakurada is an angel, this is a recording of an angel playing a vihuela.

Sometimes you find a performance which totally disarms all criticism. That is the case for Toru Sakurada's Narváez. He has the knack of getting to the very cantabile heaven of the music, and his extraordinary skill at making the vihuela sing is what is so disarming. This siren song, seductive siren song, is just soooooooooo beautiful that all the knee jerk critical responses (over-simplify, well behaved . . . ) are just words, words, words in the face of this angelic purity.
Like Satoh, Sakurada chooses a very tasty sounding instrument. I like this more and more.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 22, 2018, 08:43:48 AM
Like Satoh, Sakurada chooses a very tasty sounding instrument. I like this more and more.

It's the tempos which make it so interesting, he has the courage to play slowly, so that any taint of virtuosity is eradicated. I think he has the skill to pull it off too, or nearly.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on April 22, 2018, 09:24:10 AM
In short ,  two desert island discs !!!!
I cannot find weaknesses , this music is beautiful from beginning to end, a quiet but not soporific proceeding from Waters, and the alternation of major and minor keys helps prevent ( unlikely ) falls in attention from the listener.
Only a minus :  in the editing process they have brutally cut the resonance of the last chord in some number (really very few , see the Gavotte track 22 in CD 1 )
I hope William Waters is projecting to record the remaining Reusner's output , so I could take it with me on the desert island , together with these two.

Agreed.  My copy arrived a couple of weeks ago, and it is beautiful.  Well-recorded, and Reusner's work is baroque; yet lyrical.   A must-have set for lute fans.

-09
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on April 22, 2018, 09:26:31 AM
In short ,  two desert island discs !!!!
I cannot find weaknesses , this music is beautiful from beginning to end, a quiet but not soporific proceeding from Waters, and the alternation of major and minor keys helps prevent ( unlikely ) falls in attention from the listener.
Only a minus :  in the editing process they have brutally cut the resonance of the last chord in some number (really very few , see the Gavotte track 22 in CD 1 )
I hope William Waters is projecting to record the remaining Reusner's output , so I could take it with me on the desert island , together with these two.

Agreed.  My copy arrived a couple of weeks ago, and it is beautiful.  Well-recorded, and Reusner's work is baroque; yet lyrical.   A must-have set for lute fans.

-09
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 23, 2018, 01:43:59 AM
It's the tempos which make it so interesting, he has the courage to play slowly, so that any taint of virtuosity is eradicated. I think he has the skill to pull it off too, or nearly.
I think so too. It's a complaint I have with some of the baroque guitar music I've been listening to lately (Carter is the only great solo De Murcia recording - I found out the hard way): too much virtuosity.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 23, 2018, 02:24:19 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/5hy4JTmWVgkWnva4d948TOVt6mF3DJ-oFeDZ-cfxXnrjbYDp3bZ0ep11WrZqDzMBT-pkMVvPrwfM7cjpCqZqBLOWsWzVLRVc69kyyLaNFNCB82snGGSSdUQjRkMXGpP9=w354-h355-nc)
This performer makes de Murcia sound like a chore IMO. Recordings by Carter and Liselevan are much better. Lindberg’s solo recording of de Murcia is spotty but has some moments. Bonavita is better too, though nowhere near Carter. William Waters has an old recording with absurdly bad sound. That’s a shame because I sense his approach to the music is interesting. ETA: the Waters’ sound isn’t so bad and worthwhile. Not close to ideal though: too much reverb. Sounds like a lute.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 23, 2018, 02:25:14 PM
What are your favorite ensemble recordings that feature lute, Vihuela or guitar?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on April 24, 2018, 09:58:41 PM

Well, here we have a small ensemble that features a baroque guitar, an archlute and a theorbo , and no other instruments !!   8) 8) 8) 8)
And they play very well together.  Music by Andrea Falconieri and others.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 25, 2018, 02:57:53 AM
Well, here we have a small ensemble that features a baroque guitar, an archlute and a theorbo , and no other instruments !!   8) 8) 8) 8)
And they play very well together.  Music by Andrea Falconieri and others.
I'm going to check this out!!!!
Meanwhile, for solo baroque guitar, this 20-year old recordings is really something special. I don't know how to explain it exactly but there's a real difference between Smith, who really makes magic and has a strong view of the music and a natural feel, and some of the lesser known players who approach this repertoire more like "guitarists" and, IMO, fail by doing so. When I hear someone showing off I get turned off. But Smith is a true artist I think.   
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41HHF6SPEGL.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on April 25, 2018, 07:36:21 PM
Like Omicron9 said earlier, I've really been enjoying reading this thread. I love the sound of the lute and these other similar-sounding instruments. I have a feeling my credit card company is going to love the sound of the cash register ringing with the purchases I'll be making as a result. :)

And milk, I'm glad to see that you're still around and posting! I know you've been having quite a time being able even to see GMG since the server changeover.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 26, 2018, 04:42:37 AM
Like Omicron9 said earlier, I've really been enjoying reading this thread. I love the sound of the lute and these other similar-sounding instruments. I have a feeling my credit card company is going to love the sound of the cash register ringing with the purchases I'll be making as a result. :)

And milk, I'm glad to see that you're still around and posting! I know you've been having quite a time being able even to see GMG since the server changeover.
I can get on about once a day on the macbook. I love this thread in particular. When I'm working, I use my ipad. Anyway, thanks! It's interesting how unpredictable musical tastes can be. I suddenly got interested lute-related stuff and now I'm obsessed!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 26, 2018, 01:38:10 PM
(https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VLPLjNrPYCQ/Vr9ShnYJ48I/AAAAAAAAA5k/o4D86-BIpG8/s1600/laberintos08.PNG)
Diaz-latorre is a really imaginative musician. For an ensemble rendering of Sanz, I think this is as fine as any. Actually, it’s a duo. This is as good as anything Liselevand has done. It’s got a great improvisatory feel. Very stirring.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 29, 2018, 01:11:14 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/E633eNiId0v-8YdyjP11VnFDXVA=/fit-in/600x598/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-2780420-1300719926.jpeg.jpg)
Seems like GMG is finally working for a few minutes tonight. I purchased Rumsey's Spanish and Italian renaissance recordings. Excellent. It's the kind of singing I can put up with (I hate opera). I'm liking it more and more.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 29, 2018, 02:51:29 AM
(https://img.discogs.com/E633eNiId0v-8YdyjP11VnFDXVA=/fit-in/600x598/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-2780420-1300719926.jpeg.jpg)
Seems like GMG is finally working for a few minutes tonight. I purchased Rumsey's Spanish and Italian renaissance recordings. Excellent. It's the kind of singing I can put up with (I hate opera). I'm liking it more and more.

There's a lightness, subtlety and delicacy about her lute playing which I like a lot. Maybe you'll enjoy her Francesco de Milano with Christopher Wilson, I do.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on April 29, 2018, 04:08:42 PM
There's a lightness, subtlety and delicacy about her lute playing which I like a lot. Maybe you'll enjoy her Francesco de Milano with Christopher Wilson, I do.
I want to get that too. Would her style be termed “cantabile”? Yes: very soft. I think I like “flatness” as a musical quality. Like a fresco.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 05, 2018, 08:33:18 AM
I'm going to check this out!!!!
Meanwhile, for solo baroque guitar, this 20-year old recordings is really something special. I don't know how to explain it exactly but there's a real difference between Smith, who really makes magic and has a strong view of the music and a natural feel, and some of the lesser known players who approach this repertoire more like "guitarists" and, IMO, fail by doing so. When I hear someone showing off I get turned off. But Smith is a true artist I think.   
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41HHF6SPEGL.jpg)
You think well right. Smith stands in a category apart.  Looking around, from Francesco da Milano to Weiss, he excels in everything he does . We don't have, up to now, his version of Reusner's music.  But this guy Joel van Lennep builds instruments for Hopkinson only ?  No other player uses his (beautiful) instruments, I see !!

P.S.  I have some difficulties in connecting to this site, sometimes it is impossible.  Is it just a problem of mine ?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 13, 2018, 02:11:13 AM
Has anyone tried this CD  ?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 13, 2018, 03:27:00 AM
Has anyone tried this CD  ?
I can only get on this site about 5 minutes a day via macbook.
For Dufaut, I have Louis Pernot. It’s quite good but I haven’t heard the one you’re asking about.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Moonfish on May 13, 2018, 09:52:15 AM
I can only get on this site about 5 minutes a day via macbook.
For Dufaut, I have Louis Pernot. It’s quite good but I haven’t heard the one you’re asking about.

Milk,
Change your DNS to 8.8.8.8 in the network settings on your macbook.
It worked perfectly for me - I haven't seen a "cannot find the site" screen since then.  0:)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Moonfish on May 13, 2018, 10:06:47 AM
Whatever happened to Robert Barto's longterm recordings of Weiss' Lute Sonatas? The last volume (#11) was released in 2012 and there has been no new recordings since then.  His Weiss albums have been a revelation and opened up some fantastic music for me. They have been a staple in my home ever since the first volume more than ten years ago. Is he still recording?



https://www.youtube.com/v/nVyI-lm_qlE
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 13, 2018, 12:45:41 PM
Milk,
Change your DNS to 8.8.8.8 in the network settings on your macbook.
It worked perfectly for me - I haven't seen a "cannot find the site" screen since then.  0:)
I have a catch - which is that I live in Japan and use a proxy service to enable me to access certain things. That service claims GMG should work. I cannot change my DNS because of this service. I do find that GMG is hard to access in Japan at other locations too.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: North Star on May 13, 2018, 01:15:22 PM
I have a catch - which is that I live in Japan and use a proxy service to enable me to access certain things. That service claims GMG should work. I cannot change my DNS because of this service. I do find that GMG is hard to access in Japan at other locations too.
Often (as right now) when the site isn't working for me, turning on virtual private network on my browser (Opera) works. Could be worth a try for you too maybe?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 13, 2018, 01:31:39 PM
Often (as right now) when the site isn't working for me, turning on virtual private network on my browser (Opera) works. Could be worth a try for you too maybe?
Thanks! I'll look into it!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Spineur on May 14, 2018, 06:28:01 AM
Mr Avi Avital got an Echoclassic award for this Vivaldi disc



It may be a commercial affair, but I thought it may be worth checking and I ordered it.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 14, 2018, 06:53:00 AM
I'm listening just now this very pleasant CD .
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 14, 2018, 09:03:33 AM
Has anyone tried this CD  ?

I shall listen soon, and post any ideas, but I'm tempted to say that Pernot's so good it's the only Dufaut I really need! In fact I started to listen to Heinrich and switched after a couple of tracks to Pernot - not that that means anything negative about Henrich.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Moonfish on May 14, 2018, 04:50:55 PM
Lately I have very much been enjoying Miguel Serduora (aka Miguel Yisrael) as a soloist.

https://www.youtube.com/v/gAZneMKVHIw
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 15, 2018, 07:11:52 AM
I shall listen soon, and post any ideas, but I'm tempted to say that Pernot's so good it's the only Dufaut I really need! In fact I started to listen to Heinrich and switched after a couple of tracks to Pernot - not that that means anything negative about Henrich.
Louis Pernot 's  Dufaut and Denis Gautier are absolute benchmarks.  Considering that Dufaut was Reusner's teacher (they say) I asked myself why Pernot has never faced Reusner's music.  (Yes, I know, I am a bit fixed on Reusner  :D :D :D :D )
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 16, 2018, 08:38:13 AM
Perhaps I'm going off-topic , but would like to signal this CD of transcriptions for guitar duo of beautiful music by Frederic Mompou .  The originals are for piano, which I also like , but this is even better !! 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 16, 2018, 08:14:47 PM
And I've started to explore the delicate, subtle music of Guillaume Morlaye

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51js0GmUAYL._SS500.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 18, 2018, 01:19:18 AM
And I've started to explore the delicate, subtle music of Guillaume Morlaye

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51js0GmUAYL._SS500.jpg)
This is a great pick. Wonderful clarity in the playing and the sound quality is nice despite how old this is. I think I like this composer better than Mudarra even.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 20, 2018, 08:17:16 PM
This is a great pick. Wonderful clarity in the playing and the sound quality is nice despite how old this is. I think I like this composer better than Mudarra even.

There are three solo things on Qobuz from Marincola: Morlaye, Holborne and Capirola - he makes all three sound like they wrote top class music.

Does anyone have Paul Odette's recording of Guillaume Morlaye, called Tablatures de Leut?  If so, I'd appreciate it if they'd upload it for me, it's very hard to get at a reasonable price.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 20, 2018, 09:15:01 PM
There are some fine pieces by Morlaye in this CD of Charles-Edouard Fantin ( Societè Francaise de Luth )
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 21, 2018, 04:13:24 AM
(http://www.simonevallerotonda.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/zamboni-lultimo-romano-simone-vallerotonda.png) revisiting this one...the compositions and performance are both lovely.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on May 23, 2018, 08:05:52 AM
 A big +1 here.  Still hoping for more volumes in this collection.

Whatever happened to Robert Barto's longterm recordings of Weiss' Lute Sonatas? The last volume (#11) was released in 2012 and there has been no new recordings since then.  His Weiss albums have been a revelation and opened up some fantastic music for me. They have been a staple in my home ever since the first volume more than ten years ago. Is he still recording?



Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on May 23, 2018, 11:30:47 AM
(http://www.simonevallerotonda.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/zamboni-lultimo-romano-simone-vallerotonda.png) revisiting this one...the compositions and performance are both lovely.

I've greatly enjoyed this recording  by Luciano Contini (previously on Symphonia):



Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 25, 2018, 03:11:43 AM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/proxy/3tLjUL_i4lXmnmCuzF-xTNMbQkZpFp4OqVQDbklvjA9sxyBBnKaOpqwov0SPGAo5YjrG-eXZenFgxp4ROWvmsXDTdOWNjlFPG95hFLKiG6ESq8RDCXtU-MP4vtgGZVM=w384-h384-nc) This is excellent!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 25, 2018, 03:53:15 AM
(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTbeAjLcwpqsVx1-kNtGAO79sSQdc8AhQ0QPkL69VzBFBi_5t4_evjIkQ3XPw)
Absolutely mesmerizing music. I think this is the first English music I’ve immediatly loved.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on May 25, 2018, 06:57:52 AM
(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTbeAjLcwpqsVx1-kNtGAO79sSQdc8AhQ0QPkL69VzBFBi_5t4_evjIkQ3XPw)
Absolutely mesmerizing music. I think this is the first English music I’ve immediatly loved.

Love that recording.! :)

And this.... (even more)


Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 25, 2018, 11:14:44 AM
(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTbeAjLcwpqsVx1-kNtGAO79sSQdc8AhQ0QPkL69VzBFBi_5t4_evjIkQ3XPw)
Absolutely mesmerizing music. I think this is the first English music I’ve immediatly loved.

His touch (or do lutenists say pluck?) is so sweet, that combined with the serious manner, and a way of avoiding any sentimentality, makes the Holborne part of this pretty special. I've not so far managed to get into the Robinson.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 25, 2018, 11:22:19 AM
Love that recording.! :)

And this.... (even more)


Q

 I started to listen to this recording today when I say your post, and once again I was impressed by Christopher Wilson's sweet touch, and his modest, natural, unintrusive way with the music. The only other Johnson I've heard is from Yavor Genov, on an interesting Brilliant release. Genov is more dramatic than Wilson, and he plays the silences more.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 26, 2018, 06:28:12 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/proxy/tt-zy67IHtfBYsSYtWumGRroCRzZnJwNOdmycDeqOmiURD-aVSwgpFINXVXtUIRCaijVmFc2F3K_C6PeXkhQ0KFHMSVvZiM9wHhhF9cGueRl9VUpPWuJRStZTlKdEx4=w384-h384-nc) this is a sensitive performance by Cherici. I’m a little surprised by how good the work of Francesco Canova is. It’s very mournful and moving music. I’m confused about the justification for some of da Milano on vihuela though I love how it sounds. Actually, the lute on this has quite a “guitarish” timber. All in all, this is a good find.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on May 27, 2018, 02:35:05 AM
I started listening to this CD .
Transcriptions of vocal music for lute duo .
Spinacino's pieces are instead intended for lute duo.
Registered sound of good quality, not over-inflated.
I like it very much !
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on May 30, 2018, 12:43:09 AM
New from Brilliant, John Johnson and Anthony Holborne

(https://cdn.naxosmusiclibrary.com/sharedfiles/images/cds/hires/BC95551.jpg)

Yavor Genov, lute
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Brian on May 30, 2018, 11:07:14 AM
Listening to Axel Wolf's new Michelangelo Galilei recital right now. It is delightful, intricate music, as one would expect from someone whose brother was Galileo. The music takes lots of little twists and turns. There is an awful lot of performance noise, squeaks, finger sounds, etc., so potential buyers should be aware of that caveat.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on May 31, 2018, 12:20:10 AM
I started listening to this CD .
Transcriptions of vocal music for lute duo .
Spinacino's pieces are instead intended for lute duo.
Registered sound of good quality, not over-inflated.
I like it very much !
Thanks. I’m enjoying this. I have to say I’ve also been enjoying all the output of Christopher Wilson I could get my hands on.
This, for example:
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/vx4_O9UGuxu1gi3UDPfmPatxtmkpaheq5koF9I9PtJlfLmJa17B9RCLByAkqkHOWkI7w1jFI6boGh70W5AEfCjD-FUBHPULAC1p06F9Lw00CoNaP9S7HCxWHsI4-u_TvPUyRqp2s0xZVFJomGg6EA00u=w529-h278-nc)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on June 01, 2018, 02:20:39 AM
This guy named Pascal Monteilhet , after a series of remarkable (IMO) discs ,  retired from the scenes and established himself in a tropical island , Philippines or so.  A desert island ?  I don't think  :D     
His Bach suites performed on the theorbo made me happy some time ago, and his De Visee as well.
Didn't know this CD with music by Gallot ,  wonderful music performed in a evocative way, and very well recorded.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 02, 2018, 04:30:05 AM
This guy named Pascal Monteilhet , after a series of remarkable (IMO) discs ,  retired from the scenes and established himself in a tropical island , Philippines or so.  A desert island ?  I don't think  :D     
His Bach suites performed on the theorbo made me happy some time ago, and his De Visee as well.
Didn't know this CD with music by Gallot ,  wonderful music performed in a evocative way, and very well recorded.

I have this I think, on a CD with some music my Dufault, it’s really dreamy. Have you heard Hopkinson Smith’s Gallot CD? To me, he makes Gallot sound like Denis Gaultier! 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 02, 2018, 04:41:01 AM
Thanks. I’m enjoying this. I have to say I’ve also been enjoying all the output of Christopher Wilson I could get my hands on.


Do you like music for voices? If so, you may enjoy the CD called The Castle of Fair Welcome from Gothic Voices, which features Christopher Wilson. I love it!

(https://img.discogs.com/xdEWVhutiVtw1KrkFjf-ZfgsBCk=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-3727516-1341953020-4122.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 02, 2018, 03:38:52 PM
Do you like music for voices? If so, you may enjoy the CD called The Castle of Fair Welcome from Gothic Voices, which features Christopher Wilson. I love it!

(https://img.discogs.com/xdEWVhutiVtw1KrkFjf-ZfgsBCk=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-3727516-1341953020-4122.jpeg.jpg)
Thanks! I will look into this.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 03, 2018, 12:14:20 PM
Do you like music for voices? If so, you may enjoy the CD called The Castle of Fair Welcome from Gothic Voices, which features Christopher Wilson. I love it!

(https://img.discogs.com/xdEWVhutiVtw1KrkFjf-ZfgsBCk=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-3727516-1341953020-4122.jpeg.jpg)
I have a hard time with choral music or music focused around voices. On the other hand, I love the Rumsey recordings. I wonder if there’s anything else like Rumsey. I have, of course, seen available recordings of voice w/vihuela and lute. I’m not sure what I’d like. I prefer simplicity. Any hint of opera training turns me off and I need the sound of a pluck continuo.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on June 14, 2018, 07:43:01 AM
I'm happily forced to modify my previous judgement of this disc .  Listening to it after some time , I find it really satisfying .  Beautiful music (track 2 is a jewel)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on June 14, 2018, 09:11:01 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/121/MI0001121191.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Weiss: Sonatas played on the unique 1590 Sixtus Rauwolf Lute
Jakob Lindberg



I looked around for alternatives to the Barto series and found a bunch by the greats.  This one is really enjoyable, a nice selection of the sonatas played on a magnificent instrument.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 14, 2018, 12:18:20 PM
I'm happily forced to modify my previous judgement of this disc .  Listening to it after some time , I find it really satisfying .  Beautiful music (track 2 is a jewel)

Some, maybe all, this CD  is on youtube and I think it's fabulous, thanks for pointing it out. I have ordered the CD.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 14, 2018, 12:37:00 PM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61BbllFJ8mL._SR600%2C315_PIWhiteStrip%2CBottomLeft%2C0%2C35_PIAmznPrime%2CBottomLeft%2C0%2C-5_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg)
Just starting to listen to this and finding wonderful sounding instruments and also a unique sort of program: virginals (Pierre Hantai) and lutes (and more)! I really haven't heard anything quite like this before.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 19, 2018, 02:07:42 AM
I'm happily forced to modify my previous judgement of this disc .  Listening to it after some time , I find it really satisfying .  Beautiful music (track 2 is a jewel)

Not just track 2! I very much like this CD, which I think was the last Agora produced before biting the dust, and hence had a limited distribution. But it’s wonderfully recorded and the music is a revelation, the interpretation totally captivating and sympathetic.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 19, 2018, 12:09:44 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51K6yC3TX1L._SX355_.jpg)
Moreno is a fine artist.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: bwv 1080 on June 19, 2018, 12:17:49 PM
Cool, as you probably know, its a setting of a Josquin chanson

https://www.youtube.com/v/uyiPWSqJJo8
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 21, 2018, 10:44:00 PM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRTUso-GvRe5BaWHGyO9EmDtp0Q2S4-B_P77T3mQ84bA2PGC0y5)
This one maybe has an unfortunate title. But, I like the sound, repertoire and the performance. I find it engaging all the way though. I don’t know anything about person.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mookalafalas on June 22, 2018, 11:26:29 PM
This disk favors the recorder as the real soloist, with the lute as accompaniment most of the time.


It mixes baroque compositions with modern ones.  So far (I'm only half way through it) uniformly excellent. Probably the most thrilling recorder playing (it seems silly to even write that ::)) I've ever encountered.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on June 24, 2018, 03:58:33 AM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRTUso-GvRe5BaWHGyO9EmDtp0Q2S4-B_P77T3mQ84bA2PGC0y5)
This one maybe has an unfortunate title. But, I like the sound, repertoire and the performance. I find it engaging all the way though. I don’t know anything about person.
A friend of mine told me Kirchhof is not considered by the purists because he uses fingernails when playing.
Nevertheless I like very much his double CD with JSB's music for the lute ( including the beautiful Prelude-Fugue-Allegro Bwv 998 )  :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 25, 2018, 02:29:55 AM

Anders Ericson, . . .   12 string lute, I have but it's so far proving difficult to "get into" for me.

And what do you know? I started to play this last night and I find myself completely addicted to the music and the performances.

(https://www.highresaudio.com/imgcache/0cf784d79dfb00389b4c51cab736845f/22j796-lyrasonora-preview-m3_550x550.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on June 25, 2018, 08:25:52 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/121/MI0001121191.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

Weiss: Sonatas played on the unique 1590 Sixtus Rauwolf Lute
Jakob Lindberg



I looked around for alternatives to the Barto series and found a bunch by the greats.  This one is really enjoyable, a nice selection of the sonatas played on a magnificent instrument.

A big +1 for this, and all of Jakob Lindberg's CDs.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on June 25, 2018, 08:35:21 AM
And what do you know? I started to play this last night and I find myself completely addicted to the music and the performances.

(https://www.highresaudio.com/imgcache/0cf784d79dfb00389b4c51cab736845f/22j796-lyrasonora-preview-m3_550x550.jpg)

Listened to a bit of this on YT, and into my amazon shopping cart it went.  Nice!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 26, 2018, 02:12:30 AM
And what do you know? I started to play this last night and I find myself completely addicted to the music and the performances.

(https://www.highresaudio.com/imgcache/0cf784d79dfb00389b4c51cab736845f/22j796-lyrasonora-preview-m3_550x550.jpg)
I'm going for this as well. One thing I like is the character of the lute and it makes me wonder why so many of my lute recordings have a generic-sounding lute. This seems especially true of older recordings. Maybe I'm wrong. But you can really here the sound of the instrument on this. Let's see about the playing. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 26, 2018, 02:30:32 AM
One thing that recording made me realise, is how much really fabulous early music there is which is anonymous, or where the attribution is unclear, or where the attribution is to a very obscure composer. Lydia Maria Blank’s Göttweig Manuscript recording is further proof.

The other thing it made me see is how I can’t trust my own judgement, when I bought it I found it really inaccessible, but that was just me, my mood etc.

As far as generic sounding lutes are concerned, I bet it’s got something to do with old recording techniques. I think the same is true of harpsichord, I tried to listen to an excellent recording of Bach stuff by Emer Buckley recently, but the harpsichord sound as captured in the 1980s is just no good!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on June 29, 2018, 01:53:50 AM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61BbllFJ8mL._SR600%2C315_PIWhiteStrip%2CBottomLeft%2C0%2C35_PIAmznPrime%2CBottomLeft%2C0%2C-5_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg)
Just starting to listen to this and finding wonderful sounding instruments and also a unique sort of program: virginals (Pierre Hantai) and lutes (and more)! I really haven't heard anything quite like this before.
Beautiful !!  really stimulating mixing of tone colours ! The sound of the virginals played by Pierre Hantai is simply lovely. And among the authors of the pieces Holborne stands out .  An ideal listening for a sunny summer afternoon. Thanks for having signalled it.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on July 07, 2018, 12:17:07 PM
Beautiful playing, sound, and music. I think I prefer Britten's "Nocturnal" on guitar even though his first thought was to write it for the lute. Still, Lindberg plays it wonderfully, and it must be terribly difficult on the lute.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/716AKUgJaXL._SL417_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71FG48yR8ML._SL500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on July 07, 2018, 01:07:34 PM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61BbllFJ8mL.jpg)

Just starting to listen to this and finding wonderful sounding instruments and also a unique sort of program: virginals (Pierre Hantai) and lutes (and more)! I really haven't heard anything quite like this before.

Definitely interesting!  :)

Found a review: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Oct/Love_strange_305.htm

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Omicron9 on July 09, 2018, 05:44:36 AM
Beautiful playing, sound, and music. I think I prefer Britten's "Nocturnal" on guitar even though his first thought was to write it for the lute. Still, Lindberg plays it wonderfully, and it must be terribly difficult on the lute.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/716AKUgJaXL._SL417_.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71FG48yR8ML._SL500_.jpg)

Thank you for posing this.  Lindberg's CDs are an auto-buy for me; added to amazon cart.  :)

-09
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: bwv 1080 on July 09, 2018, 08:52:29 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/416WEG08NVL.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41RVYRJNWBL.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 09, 2018, 10:48:53 AM
Dowland, John - Solo Lute Music w/ Jakob Lindberg - three instruments are used: 1) 8-course lute by Michael Lowe, Oxford 1980; 2) 10-course lute, same in 1977; and 3) 8-course orpharion by Lars Jönsson, 1994 - the latter is flat-backed and wire strung (one 9-course shown below but not the one used in these performances) - the lutes are strung w/ 'gut bass' strings; Lindberg feels these are more 'authentic' to the times of the compositions; BTW, he also wrote the booklet notes.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51x9QIv34JL.jpg)  (https://earlymusicmuse.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/PalmerOrpharion1.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 11, 2018, 08:21:24 AM
Francesco da Milano (1497-1543) - Lute Works w/ Paul Beier - new acquisition of an early lutenist/composer; although I have a LOT of lute/guitar/related string instruments music, this is my first CD dedicated solely to Francesco Canova - boy, this musician dates from the time of Columbus and worked mainly for the papal court (short intro bio below) - he's been discussed occasionally in this thread - was not sure which 'starter' performance to obtain (others by Smith, O'Dette, and so forth) - Paul Beier used a six-course lute strung in gut.  Not sure 'how many' of Francesco's compositions are extant w/o a source - and there is one, i.e. the book of Arthur J. Ness, published in 1970 (see below) - appears that most of these works were called 'Ricercars' or 'Fantasias' (distinction not clear), plus others - the majority are Ricercars in my CD w/ low Ness numbers - will explore some other recordings - comments appreciated.  Dave :)

Quote
Francesco Canova da Milano (Francesco da Milano, also known as Il divino, Francesco da Parigi, etc.) (18 August 1497 – 2 January 1543) was an Italian lutenist and composer. He was born in Monza, near Milan, and worked for the papal court for almost all of his career. Francesco was heralded throughout Europe as the foremost lute composer of his time. More of his music is preserved than of any other lutenist of the period, and his work continued to influence composers for more than a century after his death. (SOURCE (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_Canova_da_Milano))

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51vQxU79-UL.jpg)  (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2e/Francesco_Canova_da_Milano.jpg)  (https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-SsZLdNv/0/31492c87/O/Francesco_Ness.png)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 11, 2018, 08:58:02 AM
Francesco da Milano (1497-1543) - Lute Works w/ Paul Beier - new acquisition of an early lutenist/composer; although I have a LOT of lute/guitar/related string instruments music, this is my first CD dedicated solely to Francesco Canova - boy, this musician dates from the time of Columbus and worked mainly for the papal court (short intro bio below) - he's been discussed occasionally in this thread - was not sure which 'starter' performance to obtain (others by Smith, O'Dette, and so forth) - Paul Beier used a six-course lute strung in gut.  Not sure 'how many' of Francesco's compositions are extant w/o a source - and there is one, i.e. the book of Arthur J. Ness, published in 1970 (see below) - appears that most of these works were called 'Ricercars' or 'Fantasias' (distinction not clear), plus others - the majority are Ricercars in my CD w/ low Ness numbers - will explore some other recordings - comments appreciated.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51vQxU79-UL.jpg)  (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2e/Francesco_Canova_da_Milano.jpg)  (https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Classical-Music/i-SsZLdNv/0/31492c87/O/Francesco_Ness.png)


What you have is Beier’s first Milano recording. He did a second one with lots of fantasias. I like the second one very much.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on July 11, 2018, 09:35:30 AM

What you have is Beier’s first Milano recording. He did a second one with lots of fantasias. I like the second one very much.

Thanks - I'll do some more searching - believe the booklet notes suggested Beier was starting a series but my recording dates to 1999?  Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on July 11, 2018, 08:47:55 PM
Francesco da Milano (1497-1543) - Lute Works w/ Paul Beier - new acquisition of an early lutenist/composer; although I have a LOT of lute/guitar/related string instruments music, this is my first CD dedicated solely to Francesco Canova - boy, this musician dates from the time of Columbus and worked mainly for the papal court (short intro bio below) - he's been discussed occasionally in this thread - was not sure which 'starter' performance to obtain (others by Smith, O'Dette, and so forth) - Paul Beier used a six-course lute strung in gut.  Not sure 'how many' of Francesco's compositions are extant w/o a source - and there is one, i.e. the book of Arthur J. Ness, published in 1970 (see below) - appears that most of these works were called 'Ricercars' or 'Fantasias' (distinction not clear), plus others - the majority are Ricercars in my CD w/ low Ness numbers - will explore some other recordings - comments appreciated.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51vQxU79-UL.jpg)

What you have is Beier’s first Milano recording. He did a second one with lots of fantasias. I like the second one very much.

I have it as well, great disc!  :)

I didn't know there was a sequel, love to have it....

Could you fill us in on the details? Was it also issued on Stradivarius?

Q

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 11, 2018, 09:49:32 PM
I have it as well, great disc!  :)

I didn't know there was a sequel, love to have it....

Could you fill us in on the details? Was it also issued on Stradivarius?

Q

Yes Stradivarius

Perino Fiorentino was a pupil of Francesco da Milano, he died young,  his muisc's good.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51vp5dSUOBL.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on July 12, 2018, 01:39:26 PM
Found it - thanks!  :)


Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on July 12, 2018, 01:40:00 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61%2BIhIlhB7L._SX355_.jpg) Listening to this today. The instruments sound wonderful and Cherici infuses the music with an “in the moment” sense of drama. Very rewarding listen. Good selection of pieces too.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: North Star on July 15, 2018, 07:43:46 AM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61BbllFJ8mL.jpg)
Definitely interesting!  :)

Found a review: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2015/Oct/Love_strange_305.htm

Q
It's a delightful disc for sure!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on July 15, 2018, 02:05:17 PM
I just bought this as a hi-res FLAC--wonderfully played and recorded.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91dg4iKpKIL._SL500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on July 16, 2018, 08:32:22 PM
I just bought this as a hi-res FLAC--wonderfully played and recorded.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91dg4iKpKIL._SL500_.jpg)

It look very interesting!  :) And it says "vol. 2"...

Not available on CD, I presume?  :-[

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 16, 2018, 08:52:26 PM
I've been having my own private Joachim Held retrospective festival, I think he’s very good, especially in Italian Renaissance music. But really it’s all good - including the British music he’s recorded. This guy Held must be one of the top lute players around these days. He’s got a way of making the music sound lyrical and balanced, harmonious, which seems to be just the ticket for renaissance stuff.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on July 17, 2018, 02:17:12 PM
It look very interesting!  :) And it says "vol. 2"...

Not available on CD, I presume?  :-[

Q

Amazon has it: https://www.amazon.com/Decoration-Silence-Divino-Francesco-Canova/dp/B07C8F2RDZ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1531865645&sr=8-1&keywords=nigel+north
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on July 18, 2018, 09:33:50 AM
Amazon has it: https://www.amazon.com/Decoration-Silence-Divino-Francesco-Canova/dp/B07C8F2RDZ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1531865645&sr=8-1&keywords=nigel+north

Great! :)

For some reason not in Europe, unlike vol.1... Perhaps a European release hasn't taken place yet.

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 18, 2018, 12:22:36 PM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/015/MI0001015149.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)


I first got to know about David Kellner through a famous recording by Eugen Dombois, a very beautiful recording which showed me clearly, if only by means of two short pieces, that Kellner is a musician of great stature.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51U4vEm1l4L.jpg)

In the booklet to this recording which is dedicated to Kellner Jose Miguel Moreno reveals what inspired his extraordinary approach

Quote
What is particular about this music is that it doesn’t come over as having been written by a typical lutenist of the time – somebody who played solo and ensemble music in the courts, for example. Instead, you sense a composers who was an organist, a clavichordist and also, perhaps, a player of the cembal d’amour.

There is, apparently, no clear evidence that Kellner was a lutenist to any significant degree, while there’s plenty of evidence that he was a keyboard player, if a keyboard player manqué.

And the approach of Moreno: lyrical, poetic and intimate, never forceful or energetic or sharply accented. It’s more like what  you’d expect from clavichord music than from lute. Moreno, better than anyone else I’ve heard, can make the lute sing, and this sounds very good in this music.

But most of all, this is the real exciting things, Moreno makes Kellner’s music autumnal.  Just as Beyer’s Reusner makes me think of Froberger, Moreno’s Kellner makes me think of . . . Brahms.

Basically this is beautiful stuff, full of sweet nostalgia.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Vinbrulé on July 19, 2018, 02:53:32 AM
Great! :)

For some reason not in Europe, unlike vol.1... Perhaps a European release hasn't taken place yet.

Q
https://www.bgsrecords.com/shop/
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on July 19, 2018, 08:14:30 AM
I just ordered this CD from Poland--based on some Youtube videos, they are wonderful musicians.

(http://luteduo.com/LUTEDUO/img/cd/sncpd.jpg)
(http://luteduo.com/LUTEDUO/img/cd/snctd.jpg)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiWQRnABzPY


Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Rhymenoceros on July 22, 2018, 03:36:18 AM
I really enjoy this Bach album by Paulo Martelli, played on an 11 string alto guitar:

https://www.guitarsalon.com/store/p5320-paulo-martelli-a-bach-recital.html
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 24, 2018, 11:51:39 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/013/MI0001013550.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

A dancing and outgoing performance of music by the great David Kellner from Stephen Stubbs, a real contrast with José Miguel Moreno’s autumnal interpretation, but in its own way no less interesting I’d say.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on August 02, 2018, 02:12:03 PM
This CD arrived today, and it is simply a stunning recording. They play transcriptions of organ, harpsichord, and even orchestral pieces! Fantastic sound, too. Very reverberant, probably recorded in a cathedral, but it doesn't muddy the often busy textures and adds a lovely glow to the proceedings.

(https://lutesocietyofamerica.wildapricot.org/resources/Pictures/Member%20CD%20Pics/luteduo%20bach.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 02, 2018, 03:33:00 PM
This CD arrived today, and it is simply a stunning recording. They play transcriptions of organ, harpsichord, and even orchestral pieces! Fantastic sound, too. Very reverberant, probably recorded in a cathedral, but it doesn't muddy the often busy textures and adds a lovely glow to the proceedings.

(https://lutesocietyofamerica.wildapricot.org/resources/Pictures/Member%20CD%20Pics/luteduo%20bach.jpg)

Sounds like a disc I'd enjoy but not available on Amazon USA - don't recognize the label - any info that might help?  Is there a MP3 download somewhere?  Thanks - Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on August 02, 2018, 05:42:14 PM
https://www.bgsrecords.com/shop/

And, if it's any additional help to Que or anyone else interested, here's the cover:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/518ziCTy91L._SS500.jpg)

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on August 02, 2018, 06:18:44 PM
Sounds like a disc I'd enjoy but not available on Amazon USA - don't recognize the label - any info that might help?  Is there a MP3 download somewhere?  Thanks - Dave :)
I bought mine from them (located in Poland). It was $22 including airmail postage--got it in about 9 or 10 days.  Here's link: http://www.luteduo.com/en/product/luteduo-plays-bach-2/
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 02, 2018, 07:44:05 PM
I bought mine from them (located in Poland). It was $22 including airmail postage--got it in about 9 or 10 days.  Here's link: http://www.luteduo.com/en/product/luteduo-plays-bach-2/

Thanks for the link - took a look and seems to be the Luteduo's own website - assume the CD you received is a standard one, i.e. not a CD-R, and w/ a booklet?  Just curious - Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on August 02, 2018, 08:12:21 PM
Thanks for the link - took a look and seems to be the Luteduo's own website - assume the CD you received is a standard one, i.e. not a CD-R, and w/ a booklet?  Just curious - Dave :)
Yes, it's a real CD in a nice digipak with informative notes and attractive photos. All very professional.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 03, 2018, 06:07:06 AM
Yes, it's a real CD in a nice digipak with informative notes and attractive photos. All very professional.

(https://emojipedia-us.s3.amazonaws.com/thumbs/120/htc/37/thumbs-up-sign_1f44d.png) - Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on August 04, 2018, 12:19:40 PM
This 4-CD set is now out of print and rather pricey ($150 or so), but Linn offers the individual discs as hi-res FLAC for just $13ea, so I bought all 4 today. Started with disc one. He plays wonderfully and the sound is superb--very present and detailed but not dry.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51O0YC58CtL.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51764V1SETL.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on August 04, 2018, 12:40:42 PM
This 4-CD set is now out of print and rather pricey ($150 or so), but Linn offers the individual discs as hi-res FLAC for just $13ea, so I bought all 4 today. Started with disc one. He plays wonderfully and the sound is superb--very present and detailed but not dry.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51O0YC58CtL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71n3HiJoQ4L._SL1200_.jpg)


Yep, those OOP CDs or sets can be listed at ridiculous prices - I bought the Nigel North 4-CD digipack (second pic above) in 2008 from Amazon - the order did not come up so not sure of the price back then but I would suspect $40 or less?  Dave :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on August 04, 2018, 02:41:00 PM
Yep, those OOP CDs or sets can be listed at ridiculous prices - I bought the Nigel North 4-CD digipack (second pic above) in 2008 from Amazon - the order did not come up so not sure of the price back then but I would suspect $40 or less?  Dave :)

That sounds about right. I like the original cover better. The main downside to the FLAC files is the lack of a  booklet, but I'm quite familiar with the music (I have played several of them in guitar transcriptions), so I can tell what alterations he made. The hi-res version each have the original single-disc cover.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on August 04, 2018, 10:07:08 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71n3HiJoQ4L._SL1200_.jpg)

Also have this set, love it!  :)

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on August 22, 2018, 11:29:46 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514MJYyXGoL._SX342_QL70_.jpg)
This is worth posting. Lots of stuff listed as "public domain" here. Some of the tracks have vocals and some not. The singing is fine too.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on August 23, 2018, 05:45:29 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71n3HiJoQ4L._SL1200_.jpg)

Also have this set, love it!  :)

Q

As I posted in the Purchases Today thread, I finally found a copy of this at a non-ridiculous price and snapped it up. Looking forward to hearing it!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: JBS on August 23, 2018, 06:26:48 PM
As I posted in the Purchases Today thread, I finally found a copy of this at a non-ridiculous price and snapped it up. Looking forward to hearing it!
I think you would like his Dowland set (Naxos 4 CDs)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on August 23, 2018, 06:31:08 PM
I think you would like his Dowland set (Naxos 4 CDs)

I think I probably would, too. I already have my eye on it. :) And fortunately it seems to be much easier to come by than the Bach set.

Thanks, Jeffrey!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on August 23, 2018, 09:37:50 PM
As I posted in the Purchases Today thread, I finally found a copy of this at a non-ridiculous price and snapped it up. Looking forward to hearing it!

Nice!  :) Pretty sure you'll enjoy it.

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on August 24, 2018, 11:02:20 AM
(https://www.popsike.com/pix/20100619/190406812290.jpg)

This CD from Paul O’Dette of French renaissance  music has been rereleased. It contains amongst other things some pieces by a composer called Jean-Paul Paladin which O’Dette plays very well indeed. It’s one of those recordings which is well worth catching on a streaming service I think.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: bwv 1080 on August 24, 2018, 11:07:55 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51u-Q-Q4Z0L._SS500.jpg)

4   Sacrifice
Conductor – Hiroshi Wakasugi
Flute [Alto Flute] – Ryu Noguchi
Lute – Mitsuhiko Hamada
Vibraphone, Cymbal [Antique Cymbal] – Keiko Abe
6:21
5   Ring
Conductor – Hiroshi Wakasugi
Flute – Ryu Noguchi
Guitar [Terz Guitar] – Harumi Ibe
Lute – Mitsuhiko Hamada
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on August 24, 2018, 07:20:31 PM
(https://img.discogs.com/wp5zvtYA0zeyWVB9__UYnXfJWwA=/fit-in/572x480/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-8794799-1468917351-8813.jpeg.jpg)

The music on the disc predates the invention of style brisé. It is utterly charming for its simple song like qualities and  delicate rhythms. I find the way he plays Morlaye a real siren song. Like Gallon’s and Brosse’s recording of music from the French renaissance, I can’t stop listening once I start.  It will appeal to anyone who enjoys the music in the Attaingnant anthology, or who is curious about music from the time of François 1er.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on August 27, 2018, 06:15:08 AM
As I posted in the Purchases Today thread, I finally found a copy of this at a non-ridiculous price and snapped it up. Looking forward to hearing it!

Don't you love it when that happens? I have searched for this LP for quite a while (it fell victim to the great LP purge years ago) but could never find it, or if I did, it was over $100. I bought a mint copy on ebay for just $15 a few weeks ago. (The David Kellner pieces were originally written for the lute.)

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/vusAAOSw6IRalV3O/s-l1600.jpg)

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on August 27, 2018, 04:56:36 PM
Don't you love it when that happens? I have searched for this LP for quite a while (it fell victim to the great LP purge years ago) but could never find it, or if I did, it was over $100. I bought a mint copy on ebay for just $15 a few weeks ago. (The David Kellner pieces were originally written for the lute.)

I do, indeed! In fact, it arrived today. Sometimes (often?) the thrill of the hunt is a pleasure in itself. ;)

Congratulations on your find. (The picture on the cover - presumably Käppel in various poses - makes me think of a photo of the Beatles you might see on the back of one of their mid-60s albums.)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on October 07, 2018, 10:16:26 PM
(https://media1.jpc.de/image/w600/rear/0/4032324163174.jpg)

New release by Toyohiko Satoh here. All new composers for me, I think. The booklet essay by Satoh is inspiring, for me at least, for example

Quote
This recording begins with music by Francois Ginter (1671-1706), whose real name was Adam Franz Ginter, a soprano singer at the royal boys’ choir of Vienna. Ginter,
who was born in Vienna and had a beautiful voice since
he was a young boy, became a castrato when he was around fifteen years old. As he was not a very pretty
boy, people around him disapproved of this idea, but
his father decided to have the castration be carried out anyway. Almost no records are left of Ginter’s activities as a castrato, but it seems that he also was a lute player. From the fact that the back-then very famous Viennese lutenist Saint-Luc dedicated a Tombeau to Ginter, we can conclude that he must have been a noticeable lutenist in his own right. Only a few of Ginter’s compositions have remained to the present day, and among them only one complete suite survived; the Suite in E minor. The bodies of castrates generally grew abnormally large due to the hormonal imbalances, and they were said to often have short lives. Ginter died at the age of 35. He probably wrote this suite in his final years, even though he was actually still quite
young. As a human who had to bear the heavy fate of being a castrate, this suite is a deeply touching composition with profound and complex ideas. To me it does not sound at all like the composition of a 35-year old musician, but rather like the work of a 70-year old lutenist. if Ginter
would not have become a castrate but a lutenist instead, maybe he would have lived much longer and might have composed many more of these wonderful suites. This suite is composed of six dances: Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Menuet, Bourée and Gigue. The last piece is a so-called
“Allemande giguée” – a Gigue in Allemande style, which is basically a Gigue in a slower tempo. Similarly to the well- known Gigue “Testament de Mesangeau” by Vieux Gaultier (Ennemond Gaultier), this Gigue might have represented Ginter’s own testament.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on October 10, 2018, 07:44:58 PM
New release by Toyohiko Satoh here. All new composers for me, I think. The booklet essay by Satoh is inspiring, for me at least, for example [...]

Thanks for that, Mandryka - interesting read.

Here's the cover, for anyone who (like me) might be interested -

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71mcpmQwhuL._SL1200_.jpg)

- though I must say, I'm not fond of it (the cover, I mean). Carpe Diem's covers often have a pleasingly spare look to them, but I'm not sold on this one. Of course, that doesn't matter if the music's good.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on October 16, 2018, 02:48:08 AM

(https://static.qobuz.com/images/covers/rc/yq/izx70a0a2yqrc_600.jpg)


Toru Sakurada is an angel, this is a recording of an angel playing a vihuela.

Sometimes you find a performance which totally disarms all criticism. That is the case for Toru Sakurada's Narváez. He has the knack of getting to the very cantabile heaven of the music, and his extraordinary skill at making the vihuela sing is what is so disarming. This siren song, seductive siren song, is just soooooooooo beautiful that all the knee jerk critical responses (over-simplify, well behaved . . . ) are just words, words, words in the face of this angelic purity.

Listening to this again for the first time since April, I feel exactly the same, so I guess that’s not a bad sign.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: pjme on October 16, 2018, 03:24:04 AM
(https://s.s-bol.com/imgbase0/imagebase3/large/FC/3/0/3/9/1000004003219303.jpg)

A 2004 cd that I cherish. Elegant, refined music making.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 17, 2018, 03:54:13 AM
General question about lutenists if anyone knows: so, masters like Hopkinson Smith make recordings on lute, vihuela, Baroque guitar and modern guitar, etc. The fretboards on these are completely different and notes and chord formations require different fingering. Right? Doesn't that make this a harder field of music? I mean even if you're switching from clavichord to piano to harpsichord, at least the notes/keys are arranged in basically the same way. Seems like a special obstacle? I've always wondered about this.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Toccata and Fugue on October 17, 2018, 08:17:16 AM
General question about lutenists if anyone knows: so, masters like Hopkinson Smith make recordings on lute, vihuela, Baroque guitar and modern guitar, etc. The fretboards on these are completely different and notes and chord formations require different fingering. Right? Doesn't that make this a harder field of music? I mean even if you're switching from clavichord to piano to harpsichord, at least the notes/keys are arranged in basically the same way. Seems like a special obstacle? I've always wondered about this.
Yes, and the right hand plucking techniques are also different, especially between the older instruments and a modern guitar.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on October 17, 2018, 10:18:32 PM
(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/8717774570524.jpg?1538468114)

Just been listening to this. It is a disk of music from English lute MSS that the lutenist reckons are in fact more unattributed Dowland.

I don't agree, the pieces don't sound very Dowland to me, except for a few little features here and there. I'd say they are probably 'School of Dowland'. But they are very pleasant none the less and, let's face it, you can never have too much lute music.

 ;D

Whose heart would not melt on hearing the fantasias, which to me are redolent of Italian style, of Francesco da Milano? The booklet essay is an interesting glimpse into the work of an archivist. Beautifully recorded and played with feeling, tenderness and reticence.  For what it’s worth, this recording had me strapped to my seat.

As far as attribution is concerned, Mike Fentross comments

Quote
The pieces, recorded here, form merely the tip of a fascinating iceberg. When André Nieuwlaat initially shared his discoveries with me two years ago, I realised immediately their importance. But at the time, I was actually unable to foresee the enormity of the project. I have been riveted observing how André has been able, by thinking ‘outside the box’, to make one revelation after another. All too often, it is easy to follow and accept the conclusions of people that have paved the way in research, rather than dare to pursue innovative horizons.


Every composer has his own musical signature. Trusting the experience that I have gained throughout my thirty-year career as a professional lute player, and as Professor of Lute at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague for the last 15 years, I started to make a selection from all the pieces in the pertinent manuscripts. I let myself be guided by musical intuition, by the essence and beauty of the pieces, and by constantly asking myself the question: do I recognise Dowland’s hand in this? The overall quality of the pieces to choose from was very impressive, and the answer to my question was: yes, I recognise Dowland in these works, without a shadow of a doubt.


In my opinion, André’s research has opened up a musical treasure-trove that can be a source of immense joy for both lutenists and their audiences. I feel blessed that I have had the privilege of being the first lute player to record a minuscule part of this wealth of repertoire.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 18, 2018, 04:18:59 AM
Yes, and the right hand plucking techniques are also different, especially between the older instruments and a modern guitar.
This amazes me. It seems like a tall order.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 22, 2018, 04:46:55 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51B-6FT0P1L._SY400_.jpg)
I can recommend this relatively new one. He really shines in the therbo stuff, in my opinion. He's more "pretty" than Satoh I think, while Satoh is a great contrast - being more serious and austere sounding, perhaps. On the guitar, Díaz-Latorre seems more baroque, atmospheric, sweet (would we say lyrical here?). It's good to have these two very different takes on De Visee. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 22, 2018, 11:50:37 PM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcR7QvRAghR4jEYmohrl9TX3-TsBCtPG6KEfZTg6n__V_DN94g1m)
Intricate early baroque. Maybe for a cloudy afternoon.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on October 23, 2018, 09:18:17 PM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcR7QvRAghR4jEYmohrl9TX3-TsBCtPG6KEfZTg6n__V_DN94g1m)
Intricate early baroque. Maybe for a cloudy afternoon.

It’s well worth reading Lex Eisenhardt’s essay on Bartolotti on post 245. There are some comments there about lyricism and the Versailles style which may bear on Rousset’s new recording of Louis Couperin. Seeing Louis Couperin as a sort of Lully for keyboard avant la lettre seems daft to me.

I’ve dipped into this new Bartolotti CD, I’m not sure what I think,
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 24, 2018, 12:22:53 AM
It’s well worth reading Lex Eisenhardt’s essay on Bartolotti on post 245. There are some comments there about lyricism and the Versailles style which may bear on Rousset’s new recording of Louis Couperin. Seeing Louis Couperin as a sort of Lully for keyboard avant la lettre seems daft to me.

I’ve dipped into this new Bartolotti CD, I’m not sure what I think,
There's the one by Krishnasol Jimenéz Moreno too but he maybe has more in common with Bock than Eisenhardt. Bock and Eisenhardt sound very rough to me, but not in a bad way. The music sounds archaic and frail. Eisenhardt seems to have much more control and style.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 24, 2018, 12:38:03 AM
(https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51NpmXwp9lL._SS500.jpg)
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Pga9hVQIL._SX355_.jpg)
Two very different takes on both Mr. Campion and the baroque guitar. Michel Amoric has a very dry intimate sound design. Hofstötter a reverberating stage. Seems like we get more drama and counterpoint with Hofstötter.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on October 24, 2018, 01:06:52 AM
Lex Eisenhardt's notes on Angelo Michele Bartolotti, with some evident comments on the difference between French and Italian music, and the dumbing down effect of Louis XIV style.
Thanks for posting this. It's very informative and I've gone back to Eisenhardt's recording which is indeed very good, superior. It's not as rustic as the other two recordings that I've heard and I think there's better control and contrasts in the music. There's something subtle in Eisenhardt that I don't hear in KJ Moreno. This has made me listen to Bartolotti more closely. I think Bock and Moreno may be lost in their virtuosity or something but I also wonder if this is a kind of problem with guitarists. Reading this, I can hear how this music might connect to a Couperin and maybe how Louis Couperin is influenced by Style brisé on plucked instruments? 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on November 12, 2018, 04:47:37 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/771/MI0003771125.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
invigorating!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on November 12, 2018, 05:32:16 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51D66ptKCdL._SS500.jpg)
These Cherici recordings are really great stuff! Real diamonds!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on November 12, 2018, 10:39:24 AM
Paolo Cherici is a great lutenist!  :)

Another favourite:



And the recordings in which he accompanies Claudine Ansermet (on Glossa & Tactus).

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 12, 2018, 01:19:52 PM
Paolo Cherici is a great lutenist!  :)

Another favourite:



And the recordings in which he accompanies Claudine Ansermet (on Glossa & Tactus).

Q

This Cherici CD is very good.

This has just been released, I'm listening to it for the first time now

(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQGKT27mC7ogU2wEB8XwRd4SG7oM-Sa6hWp2V99__LJqcTV-g)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on December 20, 2018, 01:40:44 AM
It's just two different approaches,  I like Smith's poise and melodiousness, I like Eisenhardt's depth.

There are two lute dominated recordings by Rooley that I know, The Cozens Lute Book and a selection of Renaissance Duets with James Tyler. There are three or four CDs dedicated to Dowland in the complete Dowland he recorded, can someone say who's playing? Is it really Rooley?

Are there any more? I like Rooley's style very much.

In fact there’s a third Rooley lute CD apart from what’s in the Dowland box, this, which I got in the post yesterday

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91oeHkXJFtL._SX355_.jpg)

First impressions - introspective, soft and gentle.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 10, 2019, 10:54:32 PM
(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTbeAjLcwpqsVx1-kNtGAO79sSQdc8AhQ0QPkL69VzBFBi_5t4_evjIkQ3XPw)
Absolutely mesmerizing music. I think this is the first English music I’ve immediatly loved.

Revisiting this recording this morning, I continue to have a lot of trouble with it, or at least the Holborne part. To me, Wilson seems to play up the naive, folksy and four square aspect of the music and play down the emotional, melancholic mysterious aspect. Top choice for Holborne for me rests Marincola, though I haven’t heard Heringman yet.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 11, 2019, 04:54:12 AM
though I haven’t heard Heringman yet.

Just heard it

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/987/MI0000987489.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

And jolly nice it is too. Expressive, fluid and lyrical, without collapsing into some naive folksy song-book type style. The USP is that in addition to a lute he sometimes uses a cittern and a bandora, which are very characterful. The cittern seems to me to lack delicacy, the bandora is rather nice and quiet. There’s even a couple of songs with cittern and some sort of bowed bass instrument together. I’d appreciate suggestions for other recordings of bandora. Anyway, it’s not a bad thing to leave the beaten path and to listen to unexpected ways with familiar tunes.

Holborne is one of these cusp composers - renaissance simple balanced  lyricism, or baroque emotional convoluted expressiveness? That makes him interesting.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 13, 2019, 10:20:17 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71ItWJC94JL._SL1000_.jpg)

This is extraordinary, I'm not sure I like it, I know lovers of guitar will like it, it is totally extraordinary. Actually no, it's so unexpected that it's impossible not to like respect   be glad that it exists. . I don't like it.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 13, 2019, 11:01:15 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51qPlSMtlBL.jpg)

This is not a bad Piccinini recital from Nigel North. It's very "Apollonian", you know, there's zero feeling of improvisation, spontaneity. He doesn't overstate the affects, which is probably right for Renaissance music like this. The beauty comes mainly from the balance, the level headedness of it. And the catchy tunes and the cool sounding instrument. Nigel North's style here makes me think of finely carved marble. Good sound, nice lute which is both quite  muscular and quite sweet at the same time, paradoxically maybe. It's always nice to hear a chittarrone too, though I maybe have heard ones with more personality, I'm not sure.

Listening to this again, I felt that my earlier comments are fair but one sided. That’s to say, Nigel North is indeed very level headed in the performances, but he is nontheless very inspired and communicative. There’s no sense of anything being telephoned in, his committment is palpable.

And what wonderful music! I can imagine a young Froberger hearing this and being inspired.

Great sound quality too, and a lovely lute too. This is perhaps Nigel North’s prime time, and Michel Bernstein’s too.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 18, 2019, 05:26:16 AM
(https://is1-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music/5a/cd/44/mzi.uzbjmzmk.jpg/600x600bf.png) (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71j3mgugnvL._SX355_.jpg)

These recordings have a composer in common, the former was made in 1987 when it was released on Hyperion as an LP called La compagna, the latter was made in 1994 for Naxos. And maybe not surprisingly there are some quite basic differences. In the earlier recording the music making has a naive song book like quality which makes it instantly appealing -- it's one of those rare recordings which just exudes good will and well being and I find it hard to stop listening once I start - he remonds me of Tilney (in Elizabethan Songs and Dances.) The latter is more introverted (or is it the sound take which makes it sound more introverted), and seems to me to delight in the delicate, quiet, complex textures of the music, music like an intricate piece of lacework.The Naxos is more challenging, less catchy, more cerebral, but no less a pleasure and no less rewarding.

What both recordings do is show offf Christopher Wilson's strengths, in my opinion he has two strengths.  One is rhythm -- he knows how to make the music have a pulse without overstressing the strong beats -- in that way he reminds me of Hogwood at his best (in Byrd.) And second in touch, the variety of attacks and liasons is fabulous -- there he reminds me of Stembridge (in Frescobaldi)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Florestan on February 18, 2019, 07:47:36 AM
Listening to this again, I felt that my earlier comments are fair but one sided. That’s to say, Nigel North is indeed very level headed in the performances, but he is nontheless very inspired and communicative. There’s no sense of anything being telephoned in, his committment is palpable.

And what wonderful music! I can imagine a young Froberger hearing this and being inspired.

Great sound quality too, and a lovely lute too. This is perhaps Nigel North’s prime time, and Michel Bernstein’s too.

I'm quite fond of the performance below --- not that I've heard any other but the music is indeed wonderful.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/5028421933535.jpg?1405596017)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 18, 2019, 09:01:06 AM
I'm quite fond of the performance below --- not that I've heard any other but the music is indeed wonderful.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/5028421933535.jpg?1405596017)

yeah fabulous in Book 1 there, the chaconne type thing on a chitarrone on track 4 is amazing!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 18, 2019, 09:03:24 AM
(https://d24jnm9llkb1ub.cloudfront.net/icpn/3760195731017/3760195731017-cover-zoom.jpg)

Sensational delicate ornamentation in this Zamboni CD by Simone Vallerotonda
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on February 22, 2019, 06:56:50 AM
(https://d29ci68ykuu27r.cloudfront.net/product/Look-Inside/large/19780323_01.jpg)

A very satisfying of Dutch renaissance music by Anthony Bailes. One reason it succeeds is that the programme is art fully balanced between contemplative music and lively music, so that you never really grow tired of the style. Bailes also plays with good judgement about how much to of the instruments resonances to let us savour, so we can enjoy the sounds, smell the roses, without feeling that the performer is being self indulgent. The music itself is a joy, that goes without saying. The only coposer I knew before was Nicolas Vallet, so for me this recording is a voyage of discovery, with pride of place given to the thoroughly baroque Joachim van den Hove.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 10, 2019, 12:06:46 AM
Just heard it

(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0000/987/MI0000987489.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

And jolly nice it is too. Expressive, fluid and lyrical, without collapsing into some naive folksy song-book type style. The USP is that in addition to a lute he sometimes uses a cittern and a bandora, which are very characterful. The cittern seems to me to lack delicacy, the bandora is rather nice and quiet. There’s even a couple of songs with cittern and some sort of bowed bass instrument together. I’d appreciate suggestions for other recordings of bandora. Anyway, it’s not a bad thing to leave the beaten path and to listen to unexpected ways with familiar tunes.

Holborne is one of these cusp composers - renaissance simple balanced  lyricism, or baroque emotional convoluted expressiveness? That makes him interesting.

These comments do not do justice to these performances. Heringman here is like a paragdigm of certain type of performer whose art is about good taste and sobriety. He shuns ostentatious virtuosity and audacity; the pulse is never marked with forceful strong beats; the music is embellished so organically that you don’t notice.

To appreciate this sort of music making you have to be willing and able to enter into its classical spirit. For my part I love it, it’s one of those CDs I can’t stop listening to, and I’ve even once found myself playing it twice on the trot.  I intend to explore more of Heringman’s work.

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 10, 2019, 09:02:08 AM
(http://he3.magnatune.com/music/Jacob%20Heringman/Black%20Cow/cover.jpg)

Matthäus Waissel is a new composer for me, my first impression is that the music is very attractive in its naivety. Valentin Bakfark is a composer I'm slightly familiar with, though only through Dániel Benkö's recordings, and, of course, listening to the two side by side, is interesting.

The same issues which arise in organ music arise in lute music. Do you play like a symphony orchestra, with the music's components distinguished by clearly different, maybe even contrasting, colours, tempos and articulations. Or do you play with subtly varying shades and nuances?

Heringman has chosen a lute where the strings' colours resemble each other. He does not mark the sections of the music with dramatic changes in articulation or tempo. The result is very coherent and repays attention. It isn't dramatic and it doesn't grab attention.

And as with the Holborne CD, the embellishment make the music plastic and organic. Organic plastic, what could be greener than that?! The overall feeling is sweet and introspective. 

I like it very much.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 12, 2019, 12:56:41 AM


(https://img.discogs.com/A44ysRn7Ptvd-6W6P5iC7O-RPfU=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-2759100-1299756317.jpeg.jpg)


This recording by Hopkinson Smith was . . .  in 1988 (Discogs again) and is dedicated to music by Ennemond Gaultier. . . .

There's a fluid lyricism, a sense of unpredictable rhythm, a variety of timbre and attack, a wide range of complex bitter-sweet emotions.

Very good experience returning to this recording while thinking of my favourite definition of the style

Quote from: Manfred F Bukofzer, Music in the Baroque Era
The quickly fading sound of the lute did not lend itself to polyphonic voice leading and called for specific techniques that compensated for the limitations of the instrument. The "broken style" of lute music, a most ingenious and consistent application of such a technique, may be called a glorification of the simplest lute figure: the arpeggio, That broken style is characterised by rapidly alternating notes in different registers that supply, in turn, melody and harmony. Seemingly distributed in arbitrary fashion in different registers, the notes produced, in their composite rhythm, a continuous strand of sound. The lute composer was able to articulate the even flow by means of double and triple stops which suggested the rhythmic patterns, essential to the dance. The texture of lute music was necessarily free voiced since no voice could be carried through and since notes that hinted at one voice at the beginning of the measure dropped out as soon as they had appeared.

What I saw this time round is the independence of the lower notes, the bass voice, in Hopkinson Smith's recording, like baroque basso continuo almost. I was also impressed by the way that Hopkinson Smith psychologises the music, like some people do with Chopin's nocturnes: we're presented with a music which is dark, deeply troubled. And indeed the accuracy of the technique especially in faster music, and the beauty of the one, the soft tone. I think of its style -- i.e. soft and lyrical rather than lively and articulated - then this is a real success.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 12, 2019, 03:52:48 AM
(https://shop.new-art.nl/content/img/new_products/1475653754.jpg)

Ferdinand Fischer (1656-1746) is a composer whose work was unknown until Hubert Hoffmann discovered their manuscripts in Abbey of Kremsmünster in Austria. He immediately and rightly recognised the high quality of the music. With the help of Gunar Letzbor, he persuaded Challenge Classics to allow him to make the recording, which he calls  a monument in sound both to the music and its creator.

Too soon to for me to comment on the music other than to say that my intuition is that its high quality and contrapuntal, the booklet cites Biber and Muffat as influences, though points out that Ferdinand Fischer was well known as a lutenist in his day, he would have been aware of the latest music, and he was his own man too -- an autodidact maybe.

It is brilliantly recorded.

Quote
. In one of the quietest
recording studios in all of Europe – the Galaxy studios in Mol, Belgium -
we finally brought the long since faded lute-poems of Pater Ferdinando
back to life. Through the wonderfully delicate sound of my lute, Bert’s
immeasurable sensitivity and the most advanced recording technology
that I have ever had the privilege of using, the lutenist-pater began
speaking to us once more.

I can't help but reflect on two things. First, how lively the area of baroque music is -- think of this, the Tellemann solo viol music, the Goettweig Partitas . . .

And second how wonderful steaming is, in how it lets the interested listener find the music, hear it, read the booklet.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 14, 2019, 01:45:39 AM
(http://www.sf-luth.org/images/couv_cd_claire.jpg)

One of the most riveting anthologies of French lute music that I've heard, mainly because Claire Antonini projects a love and commitment to the music. Tons of rubato, but to me it all sounds quite natural. One highlight of the recording for me is the sequence of pieces by François Dufaut.

Just to echo this, which I've been revising with enormous pleasure. The sense of commitment is palpable. This may be the best French baroque lute recording for someone who wants to dip their toe in the water.

One problem. I have it through spotify -- can anyone find a CD or a lossless download for me. I've spoken to Claire Antonini and she can't help.

(A similar thing happened with Jinathan Dunford's second recording of Ste. Colombe (senior), he couldn't help either. There is a definite tension in the market between a trend to mp3 and a trend to High Res. )
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 16, 2019, 08:30:58 AM
A bunch of pieces attributed to Ennemond Gaultier and other lutenists of the same period.  Easy listening. Good sound and nice performances.
But the timing is shamefully short ( a bit more 40' )   
Nevertheless a worthy addition to the CD library

(http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6895.0;attach=54832;image)

I've been listening to a lot of Ennemond Gaultier over the past couple of weeks and this recording has grown on me more and more each time I revisit it. I think it's very well judged -- I mean the tempos feel right when you listen in an unencumbered frame of mind, and I like especially the way he gives the bass voice quite a bit of independence, we're in real polyphonic music here, not just a bass accompaniment! My feeling is that his approach in Vieux Gaultier is a sort of middle ground between the two extremes of Hopkinson Smith and Louis Pernot 

I haven't had a chance to get my head round the Charles Lespine and the Denis Gaultier  properly yet, it seems very nice though!

Jean Marie Poirier put together a little ensemble with vocalists and instrumentalists called Ensemble Wallsingham, my guess he did it specifically for BNL (which was an interesting label, very interesting.) Anyway they have this recording, which I've started to dip in to, without yet having the time to have a strong idea of what their approach is about.

(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/91TW+mnPMQL._SS500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 18, 2019, 11:35:34 AM
Alberto de Mantua is best known as Albert de Rippe, the Frenchified name he adopted when he was active  in the court of Francois 1er, bringing Italian music to the king who was a well known lover of all things Italian. He stood to Francois 1er as Lully stood to Louis XIV.

Despite his stature, as far as I know there are only two recordings which are dedicated to him, these

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5101uP5G9YL.jpg)  (https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71NVrfWrn9L._SS500_.jpg)

I find myself very much enjoying the one by Peter Söderberg, who has a gift for finding the logic in the fantasias: Peter Söderberg makes me think that although de Rippe may not be as interesting as his contemporary Francesco Milano, he is well worth exploring nevertheless. In a way I think what Söderberg has done with de Rippe's music is revealing because it shows that French music from the early C16 wasn't all naive, it had a sophisticated side.

I've yet to get my head around Hopkinson Smith's recording.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 19, 2019, 02:05:28 PM
(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71NVrfWrn9L._SS500_.jpg)


I've yet to get my head around Hopkinson Smith's recording.

I've got my head around it now and I see that I was wrong to think this



de Rippe may not be as interesting as his contemporary Francesco Milano,

Hopkinson Smith shows us a de Rippe whose music goes far beyond the spirit of the brasnle -- I mean the jaunty naive tuneful style that I associate with a show for tourists in a medieval festival in a market place in the south of France. Instead most of the music is full of subtle and organic changes in tempo and rhythm, rich in expressive variety  and interesting, far from straightforward polyphony, yielding surprising textures. He does all this without losing a sense of direction or of inevitable flow or coherence in the transitions. He's wonderful in the fantasias, which seem to be brimming over with inventive surprises. 

Two tangy instruments, a lute and a guitar, well recorded. This is one of those recordings which I can't stop listening to once I start. 

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 20, 2019, 10:23:49 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81VwQd2sPNL._SY355_.jpg)

A Dall'Aquila recording by Paul O’Dette with poor sound. It think the interpretations are excellent but spoilt by reverberation. Someone told me that an earthquake necessitates a last minute change of recording venue, and the this is the result.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on March 20, 2019, 10:31:27 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81VwQd2sPNL._SY355_.jpg)

A Dall'Aquila recording by Paul O’Dette with poor sound. It think the interpretations are excellent but spoilt by reverberation. Someone told me that an earthquake necessitates a last minute change of recording venue, and the this is the result.

Unfortunately you're right on the sound... Couldn't handle it.  ???

But I actually also wasn't wowed by the interpretations.

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 20, 2019, 11:08:45 PM
Unfortunately you're right on the sound... Couldn't handle it.  ???

But I actually also wasn't wowed by the interpretations.

Q

You may be right, you’ve probably given it more attention than I did, I was so disappointed by the sound!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 23, 2019, 01:35:17 PM
(https://i.scdn.co/image/926724d80d80c437f06444ec705321149a5f4e25). (https://img.cdandlp.com/2016/05/imgL/118164850.jpg)

Luís Gasser plays fantasies by Lluís del Milà (Luys Milan)  These are the best performances of the untranscribed instrumental pieces I have ever heard. The poetry and gentleness and humility of what Gasser does is sensational - his approach leans towards the contemplative,  but in my opinion there's nothing contrived or baroque (in the pejorative sense) about his style.

A lot of the credit is due to the beauty of Gasser's vihuela, and the sound take. The ambience is never forceful or dramatic, always quiet and intimate. This is a contrast and a revelation compared to the feeling that Hopkinson Smith and the sound engineers for Astrée created with the same music. Evidently not all vihuelas are the same! I would also say that Gasser's approach is is less preoccupied about creating effects than Hopkinson Smith's, less stylised.

I just wonder if Lluís del Milà isn't a sort of peak, a summit of the Renaissance. There's something natural, peaceful, at ease with itself,  about his music. His art is touching, without the slightest hint of sentimentality. The music is directly  communicative without ever being naive.

Revisiting Luis Gasser’s recording this evening and once again I’m knocked out by what he does, despite or because of the sound, which sites the listener firmly in the audience (where I think he should be) rather than sitting on the lute (which is where I often seem to find myself.) If I’m not misremembering Gasser hasn’t ever recorded anything else, and he’s written a book on Lluis del Mila, a specialist then.

I still haven’t paid any attention to the singing on the CD, except to sense that Paul Hillier is on very good form.

(Since I last played this recording, I’ve removed my preamp from the chain, so the source goes directly into the power amp. This particular recording has improved tremendously. Preamps are evil things!)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on March 29, 2019, 05:31:10 AM

( I'm not sure it's correct refer to the DeVisee's  writing as 'style brisè'    )

Well I think it’s pretty clear from this recording that Hopkinson Smith is sure that it isn’t!!!


(https://img.cdandlp.com/2016/05/imgL/118164407.jpg)

The vision is really quite lyrical, with the music in each voice very clearly separated like melody and basse continue sometimes. It works fine I think in the selection, especially in the slow movements, which in Smith’s hands have an amazing allure and intensity.

Good recorded sound and instrument.


It’s quite an achievement, this CD, I think, not least for his judgements about how long to let a note resonate, how long to let a pause rest in silence. It gives the pieces, or some of them, a sort of introverted drama which I rather like.
Title: Re: Recommended recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 14, 2019, 05:20:01 AM
Don´t know if this has been mentioned, but it´s oustanding in every possible way.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51eWRgZfwLL._SS280.jpg)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51WrepDG7VL.jpg)


I think I prefer the music by his dad, Hans. Bart Roose plays in a totally charming way too. Not that O'Dette is bad . . . for me in my current mood he's a bit too . . . plain Jane.

(Hans Neusilder makes me think of Bakfark for some reason. They both create a similar room ambience!

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 14, 2019, 05:20:22 AM
(https://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_500/MI0001/062/MI0001062288.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)

This is so much fun! Clean sounding lute, he plays in a way which is refined -- there's no pounding out the pulse at all, even in dances. And what's more it's revealing because it makes the music sound quite complex and interesting from a rhythmic point of view.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on May 31, 2019, 08:21:11 PM
Listening to this again for the first time since April, I feel exactly the same, so I guess that’s not a bad sign.

And listening again to the Hans Neusilder part of this, I feel exactly the same so I have, it seems, a consistent response to Toru Sakurada’s playing here! Toyohiko Satoh wrote a forward for the booklet so I guess he must rate his pupil hightly!
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 19, 2019, 07:51:31 AM
Alberto de Mantua is best known as Albert de Rippe, the Frenchified name he adopted when he was active  in the court of Francois 1er, bringing Italian music to the king who was a well known lover of all things Italian. He stood to Francois 1er as Lully stood to Louis XIV.

Despite his stature, as far as I know there are only two recordings which are dedicated to him, these

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5101uP5G9YL.jpg)  (https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71NVrfWrn9L._SS500_.jpg)

I find myself very much enjoying the one by Peter Söderberg, who has a gift for finding the logic in the fantasias: Peter Söderberg makes me think that although de Rippe may not be as interesting as his contemporary Francesco Milano, he is well worth exploring nevertheless. In a way I think what Söderberg has done with de Rippe's music is revealing because it shows that French music from the early C16 wasn't all naive, it had a sophisticated side.

I've yet to get my head around Hopkinson Smith's recording.

It’s strange to reread this post of a few months ago, having now spent more time with de Rippe’s music.

This latest assault started off while listeninh to this most attractive compilation by Charles-Edouard Fantin, which contains pieces by the usual suspects including Milano, Morley, d’Aquilla etc

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71m4ZBAkBGL._SX355_.jpg)

and then, as it was generally burbling along in a renaissance way, most pleasant, it’s like some magical thing played, like the music had suddenly reached a new level of imaginative polyphonic inspiration. It was a piece by Albert de Rippe.

So I went back to Söderberg and Hopkinson Smith. The former seemed too dry and the latter’s instruments are challenging. And casting around for other examples of de Rippe on record I stumbled across this fabulous one, by Gabriele Palomba,  full of the flights of fancy that I felt was lacking in Södeberg. Maybe here we have some performances of a large body of his work which really do him justice.


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61GqEBwbiQL._SY355_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 27, 2019, 08:00:04 AM
(http://www.carpediem-records.de/media/image/e6/0f/b8/Toyohiko-Satoh_De-Visee_lute_CD-16296_iTunes_Cover_small_600x600.jpg)

In Toyohiko Satoh's imaginative booklet essay, towards the end of his life, Robert de Visée reacted against the flamboyant, extrovert style which had come to dominate Versailles, and he fled to his native Portugal, to find a more reflective, slower, quieter, deeper way of life. And there, in his final years, he composed these  pieces  for lute, while listening to the birds singing and the river burbling. The way Satoh presents the music it sounds . . . reflective, slow, quiet, deep.

I have no idea if Satoh's postulates are true. I know that this music is rather good though - more contrapuntally interesting than I'd recalled from other performances of de Visée. And Satoh brings an attractive Zen feel - I mean reflective, slow, quiet, deep.


He's playing an authentic instrument (Laurentius Greiff in 1610) It would be seriously misleading  to say it sounds like a banjo, but it sounds a little bit more like a banjo than what people may expect to hear in French 17th century music. Love it.

I revisited this today, and felt exactly the same, apart from the silly and embarrassing comment about banjos. This style of high French baroque, classisism, is not really for me most of the time, not many performances get me to engage with the music, but Satoh does here.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: HIPster on June 27, 2019, 10:29:10 PM
I revisited this today, and felt exactly the same, apart from the silly and embarrassing comment about banjos. This style of high French baroque, classisism, is not really for me most of the time, not many performances get me to engage with the music, but Satoh does here.

You needn't be embarrassed by that banjo comment.  These ancient lutes have a folk quality to them.  One that I find very appealing.  In fact, what you wrote about the Satoh, inspired me to play this one, from Hubert Hoffmann:



Have you heard it?

I like this recording a lot.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 28, 2019, 12:45:04 AM
You needn't be embarrassed by that banjo comment.  These ancient lutes have a folk quality to them.  One that I find very appealing.  In fact, what you wrote about the Satoh, inspired me to play this one, from Hubert Hoffmann:



Have you heard it?

I like this recording a lot.

Not only have I heard it, and like the sound, the interpretation and the music, but also it inspired me to seek out this, which is equally satisfying

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71nbD-5GTFL._SX355_.jpg)

Both these recordings exemplify what attracts me most to music in performance: cutting edge research put into practice by an imaginative musician and engineering team who pay meticulous attention to instruments and sound.

All played back through a Krell , , , in the sunshine , , , with a glass of wine . . .
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 03, 2019, 08:50:44 PM
(https://res.cloudinary.com/reverb-lp/image/upload/c_fill,f_auto,g_center,h_450,w_450/v1/v2/images/e00ead2f-296e-4d2f-a4ae-fbf956efb431)

Listening to this recording from start to end, which struck me is how perfect and rich Mouton’s counterpoint is. Hopkinson Smith plays with unusual sobriety and accuracy, and paradoxically that seems to enhance the expressiveness of the music. I’m reminded of some of  Leonhardt’s Bach, where there can be a similar effect. Is this greatest recording of music by the greatest French baroque lute composer? Quite possibly. 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 08, 2019, 08:37:29 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81%2BRm8QEhLL._SL1500_.jpg)

In Lukas Henning’s  essay for this recording, we learn that the piece Tocha Tocha la canella is associated with this  poem in the second edition of Marco del’Aquila’s lute music

 
Quote
Posami questa gamba in su la spalla,
et levami dal cazzo anco la mano,
e quando vuoi ch’io spinga forte o piano,
piano o forte col cul sul letto balla.

E s’in cul dalla potta il cazzo falla,
dì ch’io sia un forfante e un villano,
perch’io conosco dalla vulva l’ano,
come un caval conosce una cavalla.

- La man dal cazzo no levarò io,
non io, che non vo’ far questa pazzia,
e se non vuoi così, vatti con Dio.

Ch’el piacer dietro tutto tuo saria,
ma dinanzi il piacer è tuo e mio,
sicché, fotti a buon modo, o vanne via.

- Io non me n’anderia
signora cara, da così dolce ciancia,
s’io ben credess campari il Re di Francia.



Can someone translate it for me? And apparently there’s an engraving illustrating the poem too - can anyone find it?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on July 08, 2019, 10:52:30 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81%2BRm8QEhLL._SL1500_.jpg)

In Lukas Henning’s  essay for this recording, we learn that the piece Tocha Tocha la canella is associated with this  poem in the second edition of Marco del’Aquila’s lute music

 
Can someone translate it for me? And apparently there’s an engraving illustrating the poem too - can anyone find it?
Brilliant sounding instrument and I’m really enjoying Henning. dall’Aquila is so inventive and engaging.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 09, 2019, 07:29:38 AM
Brilliant sounding instrument and I’m really enjoying Henning. dall’Aquila is so inventive and engaging.

Yes, each string with its own timbre, which makes the counterpoint come out. The music is very fine and indeed subtle and complex. Lukas Henning, who was a student of Hopkinson Smith, has some good friends - in the booklet he thanks Bjorn Schmelzer. Any friend of Bjorn’s is a friend of mine.

By the way, if you look carefully at the back cover you’ll see that some of the music is by Lukas Henning, I’m not sure what’s going on here, as far as I can see the booklet doesn’t explain.

The Stradivarius label is up to some good things - be sure to check the recording of music by Albert de Rippe that Gabriele Palomba made for them.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on July 13, 2019, 07:35:11 PM
(http://www.glossamusic.com/glossa/files/References/280/GCD_C80106_cover_HD.jpg)
I've been on a tear lately with buying lute/theorbo/vihuela/baroque guitar music. This one is a winner: very sensitive and soporific (in a good way). de Bethune is definitely a relaxant. I did not know him.   

I like the Béthune a lot, oneiric rather than soporific I think. The music’s so simple, and what Jose Miguel Moreno makes  of it is so beautiful, really a case of the performer transcending the composition.

But it’s only half the recording. The rest is by Visée mostly, and to me, though it’s perfectly listenable and it uses an unusual instrument, just isn’t as inspired performance wise as the Béthune. A nice recording though. 

This one he made, which is dedicated to de Visée, also doesn’t inspire my imagination. I know Visée isn’t a contrapuntal composer but this puts the emphasis too much on melody for me, more so than Hopkinson Smith does or Toyohiko Satoh. And someone Moreno’s style of plucking the strings gets boring for me quickly, there’s not enough variety of attack.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/514Te2p98IL._SY355_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on August 17, 2019, 07:16:02 AM
(http://resources.wimpmusic.com/images/8fe4519b/2962/4f29/ac61/af8cf3eb62e0/640x640.jpg)

Outstanding 16th century Italian Music CD here from Joachim Held: impressive  intonation (in the sense of the construction of phrases with relief, highs and lows), the way he manages silences feels natural, everything sounds simple without falling into naivety. Attractive coherent instrument well recorded.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on August 20, 2019, 03:20:26 AM
In fact there’s a third Rooley lute CD apart from what’s in the Dowland box, this, which I got in the post yesterday

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91oeHkXJFtL._SX355_.jpg)

First impressions - introspective, soft and gentle.

Over the past month or so I’ve become quite addicted to this recording, especially the music by Michelangelo Galilei. At first the extreme introspective approach made it hard to appreciate because it doesn’t impose itself, and in a world full of distractions that can mean that it gets ignored. It’s a case of a recording which has for me very much repaid repeated listening.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on August 26, 2019, 05:35:24 AM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGr1-QgIkWvaV5nwVcMAnkhCc4KKhoauY7CIdHQSclGQKUauA)

I like this Luys de Narváez recording by José Akel on Laúd very much, lively and imaginative and very contrapuntal and passionate. Can anyone help me to find a decent transfer, a lossless download or CD? I have it through spotify only, which I know is not a good thing.

Going back to this has proved a great pleasure. I still don't have a CD, I found a 320kbps download through Google Play which is better than spotify -- a more lively sound. Very fine music for a hot and sunny day in London.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on October 07, 2019, 07:24:38 AM
To my ears, the modern guitar sounds tonally/harmonically very dry and uninteresting compared to these instruments. Does this have something to do with construction or is it a matter of tuning? Or both?

Any thoughts on Jonas Nordberg?

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81CEoBpH%2BdL._SY355_.jpg)

I like this performance a great deal:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeUcGD4rRRc

The only mention of Jonas Nordberg I can find on GMG. He has a new Kapsberger recording, with an outstanding little essay by Anne Marie Drogsatis, emphasising the proximity of Frescobaldi to Kapsberger.

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_300/7318599924175.jpg?1567436551)

His theorbo (“after M. Tieffenbrucker”) is rather uniform in timbre, a rather beautiful timbre it is too; his style of playing is really special because it’s so easy going and laid back! He really does give the impression of someone just relaxing and amusing themselves. Anyway a disc like this is always a good excuse to reawaken interest in Kapsberger, who has been off my radar for a few months at least.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Moonfish on October 14, 2019, 10:14:05 AM
*cross-posting with New Releases*
(since it seems relevant in this thread)

A new compilation release from Note1Music

I'm very fond of Weiss. His compositions have been a delight via Barto's recordings on the Naxos label.


(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91-Ka-G-OLL._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on November 23, 2019, 10:49:51 PM

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-noD2tReL._SL1200_.jpg)

A performance remarkable for its clarity of the voices and its sureness of the rhythms. The mood of the music is an agreeable blend of melodiousness and seriousness. The guitar is warm and in terms of timbre, it is very uniform in all the registers. The music by Domenico Rainer, which dates from the late c17, has only recently been unearthed in a manuscript by Lex Eisenhardt. Outstanding sound engineering.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on December 14, 2019, 08:25:16 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-noD2tReL._SL1200_.jpg)

The fellow seen here strumming the guitar seems pretty vexed about something - anyone know the painting (of which, I'm sure, this is only a part)?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: North Star on December 15, 2019, 08:28:42 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-noD2tReL._SL1200_.jpg)

A performance remarkable for its clarity of the voices and its sureness of the rhythms. The mood of the music is an agreeable blend of melodiousness and seriousness. The guitar is warm and in terms of timbre, it is very uniform in all the registers. The music by Domenico Rainer, which dates from the late c17, has only recently been unearthed in a manuscript by Lex Eisenhardt. Outstanding sound engineering.
The fellow seen here strumming the guitar seems pretty vexed about something - anyone know the painting (of which, I'm sure, this is only a part)?
The bass player can't keep a steady beat to save his life, clearly.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: JBS on December 15, 2019, 04:15:37 PM
Google image search doesn't show the original (just Brilliant's CD cover) but it did suggest this as a similar image
(https://culturefly.org/sites/default/files/styles/event_detail/public/event-image/theodoor-rombouts-a-lute-player-web.jpg)

The URL identifies this artist as "Theodoor Rombouts".
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Alek Hidell on December 15, 2019, 08:28:52 PM
The URL identifies this artist as "Theodoor Rombouts".

Interesting, thanks. I did a Google Image search too and, like you, just got the album cover. I'd never heard of this Rombouts fellow but he appears to have been a Flemish painter of the early 17th century - a minor artist, apparently, but certainly not without talent. It appears he placed musicians in his paintings fairly often. But I haven't come across our angry guitarist in any of them.

But it's not a big deal, and I'm sending the thread off on a tangent. Carry on, all.  :)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on December 16, 2019, 01:43:59 PM
(https://www.wtju.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Ballard-Lute-1611.jpg)

Robert Ballard was a contemporary of Ennemond Gaultier. Richard Kolb plays an instrument which has a timbre which reminds me of the sort of lute which Louis Pernot favours for the style brisé : muscular with the sonority of each string possessing it's own characteristic sonority. This allows the contrapuntal nature of the music to come to the fore. He is much better recorded than Pernot, fortunately.

Ballard is one of these composers who sits midway between baroque complexity and renaissance charm -- I like that very much, it's easy to listen to, agreeable. Ballard's been pretty well ignored by musicians as far as I can see. That seems a shame, and it's a good thing IMO that this sad state of affairs is starting to be remedied.

Richard Kolb appears to be an experienced, mature  (I mean "of a certain age") and respected lutenist, at least that's what the interweb suggests. As far as I can see this is his only recording.

A new release, this month. Crowd funded.

This is worth checking out, for lovers of fine things in life.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on December 18, 2019, 03:52:28 AM
(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71nv9oKSh4L._SS500_.jpg)
I like Conte, on baroque guitar playing Corbetta. But here on the Piccinini, I wonder if some might think there's too much reverberation. Joachim Held is a bit more "normal" in his soundscape. It can be hard to hear what a musician is doing with the music if it has too much reverberation. 
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-4GwFgCrL._SY355_.jpg)

anyway, I really like Piccinini's music.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on December 18, 2019, 03:57:13 AM
(https://is2-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music/b5/da/fe/mzi.sjncywag.jpg/600x600bf.png)
Has anyone heard this? It's odd and interesting.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on December 20, 2019, 01:47:33 AM
(https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/71nv9oKSh4L._SS500_.jpg)
I like Conte, on baroque guitar playing Corbetta. But here on the Piccinini, I wonder if some might think there's too much reverberation. Joachim Held is a bit more "normal" in his soundscape. It can be hard to hear what a musician is doing with the music if it has too much reverberation. 
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-4GwFgCrL._SY355_.jpg)

anyway, I really like Piccinini's music.

I think you go too far saying that you can’t hear what he’s doing, though I prefer a dryer, cooler, sound myself. For Piccinini maybe see what you think of Mónica Pustilnic. Just found it myself, so it’s not a recommendation.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on December 20, 2019, 02:00:22 AM
(https://is2-ssl.mzstatic.com/image/thumb/Music/b5/da/fe/mzi.sjncywag.jpg/600x600bf.png)
Has anyone heard this? It's odd and interesting.

Which tracks does Gary Cooper play on?

On the first track, I thought it was pretty pointless because the organ just plays a bit of a supporting drone, but unexpectedly Gary Cooper takes the melody, and that made it more interesting. But just browsing through I haven’t found much else that seemed special, playing focussing on tunes rather than “inner life”, I could well have missed something.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on December 20, 2019, 04:30:00 PM
Which tracks does Gary Cooper play on?

On the first track, I thought it was pretty pointless because the organ just plays a bit of a supporting drone, but unexpectedly Gary Cooper takes the melody, and that made it more interesting. But just browsing through I haven’t found much else that seemed special, playing focussing on tunes rather than “inner life”, I could well have missed something.
I gave up on it. I'm always interested in odd pairings of instruments so that's what got my attention.
something like this
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91jEtvYoqNL._SX355_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: San Antone on December 21, 2019, 06:46:43 AM
Cross posting from the listening thread:

(http://www.glossamusic.com/glossa/files/References/350/GCD_922513_HD.jpg)

AMOURS AMOURS AMOURS
Lute Duos around 1500


Karl-Ernst Schröder, lute
Crawford Young, lute


I am enjoying this recording this morning.  Crawford Young is the highly regarded leader of two groups Ensemble Project Ars Nova (now inactive) and Ferrara Ensemble.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on December 22, 2019, 09:51:45 PM
Here is a question for the cognoscenti:

To me, in general, the guitar seems very dry and boring harmonically compared to the lute, theorbo, and such earlier instruments, as well as the modern ukelele. All of these sound harmonically much richer, sweeter, and more melodious to my ears. Why is this? Is there much of a difference in tuning systems--or is it something else? (Outside of very few favorite guitarists such as Joe Pass, Johnny Smith, and the world of flamenco, I find the guitar--both acoustic and electric--to be a pretty big bore.)

Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on December 23, 2019, 12:53:47 AM
Cross posting from the listening thread:

I am enjoying this recording this morning.  Crawford Young is the highly regarded leader of two groups Ensemble Project Ars Nova (now inactive) and Ferrara Ensemble.

Oh, that looks very nice indeed.  :)

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on December 23, 2019, 01:07:05 AM
Here is a question for the cognoscenti:

To me, in general, the guitar seems very dry and boring harmonically compared to the lute, theorbo, and such earlier instruments, as well as the modern ukelele. All of these sound harmonically much richer, sweeter, and more melodious to my ears. Why is this? Is there much of a difference in tuning systems--or is it something else? (Outside of very few favorite guitarists such as Joe Pass, Johnny Smith, and the world of flamenco, I find the guitar--both acoustic and electric--to be a pretty big bore.)

Maybe not all acoustic guitars are the same in this respect.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on December 23, 2019, 01:31:42 AM
Here is a question for the cognoscenti:

To me, in general, the guitar seems very dry and boring harmonically compared to the lute, theorbo, and such earlier instruments, as well as the modern ukelele. All of these sound harmonically much richer, sweeter, and more melodious to my ears. Why is this? Is there much of a difference in tuning systems--or is it something else? (Outside of very few favorite guitarists such as Joe Pass, Johnny Smith, and the world of flamenco, I find the guitar--both acoustic and electric--to be a pretty big bore.)
I like the Vihuela and baroque guitar though. I wonder if the innovation of the guitar and modern piano is achieving loudness, uniformity and more control? I could be wrong. This would have advantages. I like the roughness of baroque instruments.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: (: premont :) on December 23, 2019, 01:45:34 AM
Maybe not all acoustic guitars are the same in this respect.

It is clearly something about the tuning. A fast skimming of this article reveals it as one of the most comprehensive I have seen:

https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/2022/18424/Wead%2C%20Adam%20%28DM%20EMI%29.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: XB-70 Valkyrie on December 23, 2019, 05:03:30 PM
Thanks for the link; it looks like a great reference.

Possibly also the shape, surface area:volume ratio of the body (soundboard), length of neck relative to body, and the number of strings (some have sympathetic strings) also have an influence on this. I also find the viol family to be sweeter and richer in some respects than the modern violin family, although not to the same degree as that separating the modern guitar from its forbears.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on December 27, 2019, 06:39:16 AM

(https://d27t0qkxhe4r68.cloudfront.net/t_900/723385339229.jpg?1528286858)

I just post to alert lovers of Toyohiko Satoh to the series of three recordings he made with Walter van Hauwe, which I’ve only just discovered myself and which I think are very successful indeed.

I came across them while looking at the personnel on a lovely recording of Italian music, also very recommendable, not least for the extraordinary singer Lucia Meeuwsen. This


(https://rovimusic.rovicorp.com/image.jpg?c=0LopqrBpxx-koeDt9L4RGR_TZlp6n_cq-Emr2zx15tU=&f=5)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on February 09, 2020, 04:14:25 AM
this has been mentioned before:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51baHwp2KcL._SR600%2C315_PIWhiteStrip%2CBottomLeft%2C0%2C35_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg)

I just love it. I love the way it makes me feel.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on February 09, 2020, 05:13:07 AM
this has been mentioned before:

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51baHwp2KcL.jpg)

I just love it. I love the way it makes me feel.

Not that it really matters, other than to avoid duplication, but it seems a reissue of this recording from 2002:

(https://img.discogs.com/CdKmWq5GBeNNUgF2I-dJn1YLMuI=/fit-in/600x598/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-5109453-1384746988-9369.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on April 11, 2020, 10:29:39 AM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/8141WitYwrL._AC_SL1500_.jpg)

First, I don't understand the title of this recording -- Josquin & Antonello L'Abbraccio fra Nord e Mezzogiorno, Intavolature per liuto. (Josquin and Antonello. The embrace of the North and the South, tablatures for lute.) Who is Antonello in this context?

There is something very interesting about it though  -- the voice of Francesca Cassinari, known to me through her participation in Cantica Symphonica and indeed La Vexiana. It's a very powerful voice. The lutenist is a complete new name for me, and it's interesting to compare his intense style to the more lyrical and fluid Jacob Heringman, I am very keen on Heringman. Michele Cinquina, who was a student of Franco Pavan (and I think you can hear that in the sound he makes)  enjoys the resonances of the lute, he produces a sound which is rich in overtones, he uses expressive rubato in spades and he seems to enjoy playing the silences in the music. You get the picture.

Released in 2019, the middle of last year, I'd missed it completely.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51KeAUbgLrL._AC_.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on April 11, 2020, 10:56:41 AM
Here is a question for the cognoscenti:

To me, in general, the guitar seems very dry and boring harmonically compared to the lute, theorbo, and such earlier instruments, as well as the modern ukelele. All of these sound harmonically much richer, sweeter, and more melodious to my ears. Why is this? Is there much of a difference in tuning systems--or is it something else? (Outside of very few favorite guitarists such as Joe Pass, Johnny Smith, and the world of flamenco, I find the guitar--both acoustic and electric--to be a pretty big bore.)

Guitars can make only 4 notes simultaneously at maximum. Besides, four fingers can play only limited choice of notes and movement. However, acoustic guitars, made by cedar or spruce, can maximize significant variation in tone. Some recordings proffer dark, decadent atmosphere generated by nylon guitars. Overall, Guitar may sound colorful when it is played for a single-note melody like violin or horns, rather than multi-notes like piano.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 05, 2020, 03:10:54 AM
I'm not sure if I posted this - I thought I did but I don't see it now. Anyway:
I've been listening to Paul O'Dette's Dowland series. For a long time I didn't get into Dowland but now I can experience how wonderful his lute music is. And, though O'Dette's recordings are a bit old, they sound great.
So, what about other Dowland recordings like Lindberg? What should I hear and what should I be listening for also? I'm not sure how to understand the differences in approaches to lute music.
(https://img.discogs.com/WmV-QS77tabPdplWOko3mILiJJw=/fit-in/600x529/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-4038991-1355129200-2643.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 05, 2020, 10:20:14 AM
What should I hear


Mike Flentross.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on June 05, 2020, 10:31:10 AM
I'm not sure how to understand the differences in approaches to lute music.


One thing I like to think about is how they use the silences, do they make it flow forward or do they enjoy the resonances.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Que on June 05, 2020, 10:58:41 AM
I'm not sure if I posted this - I thought I did but I don't see it now. Anyway:
I've been listening to Paul O'Dette's Dowland series. For a long time I didn't get into Dowland but now I can experience how wonderful his lute music is. And, though O'Dette's recordings are a bit old, they sound great.
So, what about other Dowland recordings like Lindberg? What should I hear and what should I be listening for also? I'm not sure how to understand the differences in approaches to lute music.
(https://img.discogs.com/WmV-QS77tabPdplWOko3mILiJJw=/fit-in/600x529/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(90)/discogs-images/R-4038991-1355129200-2643.jpeg.jpg)

I have Nigel North's complete Dowland and some of O'D'ette's, and I like both.
To my mind O'Dette is the bolder, lively and expressive approach.
North is a bit more low key, but also more poetic and expresses more of Dowland's melancholy.
Lindberg I don't like, I find it detached and static, unengaging.

Outside the complete cycles I have been pleasantly surprised by Anthony Rooley.

Q
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 17, 2020, 03:36:46 AM
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcSjL3wA3NYF7uNp28RO5JMl02dEkn4oLc2FZLNgNu8eSlh2ySqUOyMgVSR8Ypt3r55Rx0wYq9EO4wMFvpAHAEqY&usqp=CAU)

New Marco DALL’AQUILA recording by Lukas Henning
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on June 24, 2020, 07:17:51 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61TzRDJWfsL.jpg)
I’m really enjoying this. Bream’s lute is different though. It doesn’t sound like the lutes I hear on very up-to-date recordings. I’m not sure it’d be my recommendation for what Dowland should be - as far as I know what’s what. I’d like to know more background on how people are playing this differently. Anyhoo, this is very touching and melancholy and beautiful.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: vers la flamme on October 12, 2020, 04:42:22 PM
Thoughts on the complete Dowland lute music sets out there? I'm torn between Jakob Lindberg and Nigel North. They both sound great and both are quite cheap.

While I'm in this thread I may as well ask for recommendations for two lute composers I've been meaning to check out: Robert de Visée and Sylvius Leopold Weiss. What are some great discs dedicated to these composers?
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Dry Brett Kavanaugh on October 13, 2020, 01:54:33 PM
Thoughts on the complete Dowland lute music sets out there? I'm torn between Jakob Lindberg and Nigel North. They both sound great and both are quite cheap.

While I'm in this thread I may as well ask for recommendations for two lute composers I've been meaning to check out: Robert de Visée and Sylvius Leopold Weiss. What are some great discs dedicated to these composers?

I don’t listen to Dowland, but I have a good opinion about Lindberg in general. How about buying the both anyway? Also, I often hear good things about O’Dette’s recordings. I haven’t explored Weiss much either. But I like Kirchhof and Junghanel.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on October 13, 2020, 03:09:52 PM
Thoughts on the complete Dowland lute music sets out there? I'm torn between Jakob Lindberg and Nigel North. They both sound great and both are quite cheap.

While I'm in this thread I may as well ask for recommendations for two lute composers I've been meaning to check out: Robert de Visée and Sylvius Leopold Weiss. What are some great discs dedicated to these composers?

Well for Dowland, I currently have Nigel North, but had some Paul O'Dette which I culled out just to save some room - both well done; as to Lindberg own him w/ other composers so would suspect his Dowland is quite good - you simply need to decide on how many different performers will fit your needs; if just one, then any of these guys should please - if two, then decide!

As to Weiss, there is a LOT of music - I have 3-4 lutenists including Jakob Lindberg, but if you like 'one-stop' shopping, then the 12-CD box w/ Michel Cardin is hard to beat.  Finally, Robert de Visée who fascinates me but just collecting some recordings, including the discs below (one an MP3 DL w/ Smith) w/ theorbo - BTW, if you've not explored Hopkinson Smith on the lute, start w/ some of his Bach recordings.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51AsdPZXgBL.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51aYE5oIM0L.jpg)  (https://img.discogs.com/g6PPEbDrv-5kE1fenmqV-P_mNaI=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb():quality(40)/discogs-images/R-8244702-1457860451-5347.jpeg.jpg)
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: JCBuckley on October 15, 2020, 05:28:54 AM
For de Visée, I very much like Fred Jacobs' recordings, and this:

 
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: Mandryka on October 25, 2020, 08:25:17 PM
(https://i.scdn.co/image/ab67616d00001e029818778a71619a47ec758bec)

An attractive performance by Walter Gerwig of a suite attributed to Johann Jakob Hoffer, it makes me hungry to hear more. But who is he? I can’t find anything out about him, and this appears to be the only recording of anything. There is this

(https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/wacAAOSwAC1aHYIg/s-l300.jpg)

But this appears to be music by a different Hoffer - Wolfgang Adam.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: milk on December 04, 2020, 04:04:29 AM
I’m just wading through all of Jose Miguel Moreno’s output, some of it solo and some of it with Eligio Quintero. He plays therbo, lute, vihuela and baroque guitar on these recordings which range from De Visee to Luys Milan to Downland. I find his recording pleasing, like a soft warm blanket on a cold winter night. It makes me want to make some hot chocolate. Oh, and the album covers are exceptionally pleasing.
Title: Re: Recordings for lute and related instruments
Post by: SonicMan46 on December 04, 2020, 08:41:39 AM
Just a repost from the 'Listening Thread' for those who like Robert de Visée -   8)

Quote
Robert de Visée (c. 1655 - c. 1733) - Chamber & Guitar Music - de Visée was a lutenist, guitarist, theorbist and viol player at the court of the French kings Louis XIV and Louis XV, as well as a singer and composer for lute, theorbo and guitar. Short Wiki bio HERE (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Visée) w/ a list of his works, which are somewhat confusing on the 4-CD Brilliant set (explained better in the attached reviews) - I own this box + several theorbo CDs, one w/ Hopkinson Smith.  The guitar recordings are from Spotify listened to yesterday.  Dave :)

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Td1BxX94L._SL1000_.jpg)  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61Vhl96oLHL.jpg)