GMG Classical Music Forum

The Music Room => Composer Discussion => Topic started by: Guido on October 08, 2008, 12:22:25 PM

Title: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Guido on October 08, 2008, 12:22:25 PM
Intrigued by this composer, I was surprised that no thread had been created for him yet. I know absolutely nothing about him beyond the wikipedia page, so would welcome any and all recommendations. Which pieces are his best/ most representative?
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Brewski on October 08, 2008, 12:37:34 PM
Thanks for creating this thread.  Although I don't seem to have much of his work in my collection (have to fix!), I can recommend this CD very highly.  Gianandrea Noseda (b. 1964) is a relatively young conductor who has made a big splash in Prokofiev and other composers, and he clearly likes Dallapiccola, too.  An Amazon comment is here (http://www.amazon.com/Dallapiccola-Tartiniana-Variazioni-Orchestra-Frammenti/dp/B000632POU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1223497891&sr=1-2).

Edit: If you like opera, I have also heard raves about this recording of Il Prigioniero, conducted by Salonen.

--Bruce
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: lukeottevanger on October 08, 2008, 02:21:12 PM
No contest - his Lyriche Greche, which is made up of three smaller groups of settings of ancient Greek poetry. Utterly superb, and by the by possibly the single best advertisment for the 12 tone technique (without Bergian tonal references to muddy the waters  ;D ). It's a cliche, but Dallapiccola like some of his Italian contemporaries had a true lyric gift, and in these exquisite, delicate songs it's evident in abundance. One of the most striking of these songs is about a seashell, and like a seashell all the songs are delicate, irridescent - and yet incredibly strong, because of Dallapiccola's intensely contrapuntal writing.*  As the cycle progresses the strongly contrapuntal nature of the songs becomes more and more apparent, and instead of being named after their tempi, they become 'Canoni', 'Variazione', 'Canon perpetuus', 'Canones diversi', 'Canon contrario motu' and so on. All very consciously Bachian, specifically very Musical Offering-y - and of course Dallapiccola has his own Musical Offering in the gorgeous Quaderno Musicale per Annalibera - but the Mediterranean warmth of the sound isn't Bachian!

One of the most beautiful experiences of my life was sitting in a cold, grey lecture room at Cambridge listening to Hugh Wood talk about Dallapiccola's life, and then put on an LP of these songs. It had me spellbound. Later, I found the score in the college music library - the strong canonic threads of the music were clearly there to see, but so was the delicacy. One of my favourite, touchstone 20th century works without a doubt, as you can see!

*This combination of vulnerablity and contrapuntal strength reminds me of late Brahms, such as op 119/1, which I think is the one Clara Schumann (no, maybe it was Brahms himself) described as a 'grey pearl', which brings us back to things marine and nacreous!.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Brewski on February 19, 2009, 10:20:17 AM
Bumping up this thread since tomorrow night I'm seeing two Dallapiccola operas in concert, with the American Symphony Orchestra conducted by Leon Botstein.  He isn't the most incisive conductor, but there is no doubt about his superb programming.  I am not expecting to hear either of these scores again live for a very long time.

Luigi Dallapiccola: Volo di notte (1939)
Luigi Dallapiccola: Il prigioniero (1948)

More information is here (http://www.americansymphony.org/concert.php?id=26).

--Bruce
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Guido on February 19, 2009, 12:23:25 PM
Do tell us how it goes!

I must add that I absolutely agree with Luke's assessment of the Lyriche Greche - Nothing I could write would add to his beautiful appraisal of them, but I urge anyone with even the remotest interest in 20th century music to give them a listen.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: gomro on February 21, 2009, 06:09:09 PM
Thanks for creating this thread.  Although I don't seem to have much of his work in my collection (have to fix!), I can recommend this CD very highly.  Gianandrea Noseda (b. 1964) is a relatively young conductor who has made a big splash in Prokofiev and other composers, and he clearly likes Dallapiccola, too.  An Amazon comment is here (http://www.amazon.com/Dallapiccola-Tartiniana-Variazioni-Orchestra-Frammenti/dp/B000632POU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1223497891&sr=1-2).

Edit: If you like opera, I have also heard raves about this recording of Il Prigioniero, conducted by Salonen.

--Bruce

I'll second this, and go on to add that I'm no fan of opera, but Il Prigioniero overcame my aversions as few operas can.  I still prefer the other disc, though.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Chafing Dish on February 21, 2009, 08:35:33 PM
I'd like to put in a good word for Commiato, and for the Piccola Musica Notturna for small ensemble.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Sean on February 21, 2009, 08:45:19 PM
There's a CD of his and Petrassi's piano music, both rich and fascinating (much closer to Messiaenic modality than serialism), the Dallapiccola stuff being particularly persuasive. None of it great music but fills in the picture of mid century Italy.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: MDL on February 22, 2009, 02:41:44 AM
Thanks for creating this thread.  Although I don't seem to have much of his work in my collection (have to fix!), I can recommend this CD very highly.  Gianandrea Noseda (b. 1964) is a relatively young conductor who has made a big splash in Prokofiev and other composers, and he clearly likes Dallapiccola, too.  An Amazon comment is here (http://www.amazon.com/Dallapiccola-Tartiniana-Variazioni-Orchestra-Frammenti/dp/B000632POU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1223497891&sr=1-2).

Edit: If you like opera, I have also heard raves about this recording of Il Prigioniero, conducted by Salonen.

--Bruce

I wish Decca (or new label Explore, which has released a lot of old Decca Headline recordings) would reissue Dorati's Washington performance of Il Prigioniero, which has never been released on CD. I much prefer it to the Salonen.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: bwv 1080 on February 22, 2009, 05:53:07 AM

Dallapiccola wrote some great music

I have these two discs

Vocal music with  Pierre Boulez/Ensemble Contemporain

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MYSKCJQ6L._SL500_AA240_.jpg)

Quaderno musicale di Annalibera for solo piano is perhaps Dallapiccola's best known piece:


(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Z-TO8ijoL._SL500_AA240_.jpg)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: MDL on February 22, 2009, 01:23:55 PM
One of my I-remember-liking-that-but-I-haven't-played-it-for-yonks CDs: Radio France's recording of Ulisse, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, conducted by 20th-century music expert Ernest Bour, recorded in 1975 and released on CD by Naive. The orchestral writing is more avant-garde than The Prisoner, at times approaching a Die Soldaten -esque level of clatter and angst, which may not be to everyone's liking, but it floats my boat.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on February 22, 2009, 06:25:53 PM
i believe dallapiccola wrote the first dodecaphonic solo cello piece!

there is a great Stradivarious label cd of i believe, all his chamber music, plus annabella.

orchestrally, the 2 questions w/ answers is very stately 12 tone italian nobility.

and of course the erato cd.

also, check out GHEDINI!!!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Guido on March 01, 2009, 06:27:35 PM
Anyone know of a recording of the Dialoghi per violoncello e orchestra? I'd love to hear it.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Dundonnell on March 01, 2009, 06:34:03 PM
Anyone know of a recording of the Dialoghi per violoncello e orchestra? I'd love to hear it.

Here you go, Guido :)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Luigi-Dallapiccola-Variazioni-Dialoghi-Questions/dp/B0009JBAQA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1235961145&sr=1-2
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Guido on March 01, 2009, 06:45:50 PM
Cheers! That's another one I can cross of the list! Next is Blacher's cello concerto... I know a recording exists but it is currently out of print...
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Dundonnell on March 01, 2009, 06:52:57 PM
Cheers! That's another one I can cross of the list! Next is Blacher's cello concerto... I know a recording exists but it is currently out of print...

Oh no it's not!!!!!

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Drilldown?name_id1=1149&name_role1=1&bcorder=1&comp_id=68895
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Guido on March 02, 2009, 08:28:59 AM
I am a wee bit wary as I have tried ordering a special order item from them twice before, and neither time have they been able to deliver it... maybe I'll give it a try. I have tried ordering it off Amazon too, but they also were not able to deliver it, despite still listing it...
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Dundonnell on March 02, 2009, 08:35:38 AM
Ah!

Worth trying though :)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Guido on March 02, 2009, 09:31:15 AM
I should say thankyou though - I will report back if and when I get either of these CDs!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Dundonnell on May 06, 2009, 03:34:25 PM
Chandos is advertising the fact that they will shortly be recording Dallapiccola's "Cello Concerto" with Paul Watkins as soloist.

I did not know that Dallapiccola had composed a Cello Concerto! Is this the same work as the Dialoghi for Cello and Orchestra?

Guido?
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on May 30, 2009, 02:36:41 PM
No contest - his Lyriche Greche, which is made up of three smaller groups of settings of ancient Greek poetry. Utterly superb, and by the by possibly the single best advertisment for the 12 tone technique (without Bergian tonal references to muddy the waters  ;D ). It's a cliche, but Dallapiccola like some of his Italian contemporaries had a true lyric gift, and in these exquisite, delicate songs it's evident in abundance. One of the most striking of these songs is about a seashell, and like a seashell all the songs are delicate, irridescent - and yet incredibly strong, because of Dallapiccola's intensely contrapuntal writing.*  As the cycle progresses the strongly contrapuntal nature of the songs becomes more and more apparent, and instead of being named after their tempi, they become 'Canoni', 'Variazione', 'Canon perpetuus', 'Canones diversi', 'Canon contrario motu' and so on. All very consciously Bachian, specifically very Musical Offering-y - and of course Dallapiccola has his own Musical Offering in the gorgeous Quaderno Musicale per Annalibera - but the Mediterranean warmth of the sound isn't Bachian!

One of the most beautiful experiences of my life was sitting in a cold, grey lecture room at Cambridge listening to Hugh Wood talk about Dallapiccola's life, and then put on an LP of these songs. It had me spellbound. Later, I found the score in the college music library - the strong canonic threads of the music were clearly there to see, but so was the delicacy. One of my favourite, touchstone 20th century works without a doubt, as you can see!

*This combination of vulnerablity and contrapuntal strength reminds me of late Brahms, such as op 119/1, which I think is the one Clara Schumann (no, maybe it was Brahms himself) described as a 'grey pearl', which brings us back to things marine and nacreous!.

TTT, because this is such an evocative post.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on January 12, 2010, 07:10:00 AM
Did we know of this imminent Chandos release?
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on January 12, 2010, 07:11:51 AM
(Well, Jens knew, I see . . . .)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Mirror Image on May 16, 2011, 11:29:20 AM
Is it fair to say that Dallapiccola is like an Italian version of Berg? I know both composers are quite different, but it seems that he took the model of Berg, which encompasses lyrical beauty, and ran with it.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on May 16, 2011, 11:36:46 AM
Is it far to say that Dallapiccola is like an Italian version of Berg? I know both composers are quite different, but it seems that he took the model of Berg, which encompasses lyrical beauty, and ran with it.

But,... he's Italian!! ::) Aren't they known for their melodies?

I was just listening to the Question/Answer piece: it's the most granite facade of any music I know, but, at the same time, not brutal,... it is as if depicting ancient ruins,... I'd say it sounds a little like something Late Late Chavez might sound like, if he wrote more ancient sounding stuff.

I also have the Chamber Music disc on Stradivarius, which seems to lean more of in an 'Advanced Malipiero' sound, to my experience.

As to the vocal stuff,... isn't that more like Serial Stravinsky?
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Mirror Image on May 16, 2011, 11:52:28 AM
But,... he's Italian!! ::) Aren't they known for their melodies?

I was just listening to the Question/Answer piece: it's the most granite facade of any music I know, but, at the same time, not brutal,... it is as if depicting ancient ruins,... I'd say it sounds a little like something Late Late Chavez might sound like, if he wrote more ancient sounding stuff.

I also have the Chamber Music disc on Stradivarius, which seems to lean more of in an 'Advanced Malipiero' sound, to my experience.

As to the vocal stuff,... isn't that more like Serial Stravinsky?

Not all Italian composers cared about expressing melody. You should know this. I mean look at Nono or Berio. Do you think they sat down trying to create a beautiful melody or even had one in mind?
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on May 16, 2011, 04:22:23 PM
Not all Italian composers cared about expressing melody. You should know this. I mean look at Nono or Berio. Do you think they sat down trying to create a beautiful melody or even had one in mind?

But,... look atta their names,... Berio,... Nono,... small, penne sized names,....

Now,... Dalla-pic-cola,... now thatsa a gooda Italian name, lika linguine,... he'sa more melodically minded,...a....
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Mirror Image on May 16, 2011, 04:53:55 PM
But,... look atta their names,... Berio,... Nono,... small, penne sized names,....

Now,... Dalla-pic-cola,... now thatsa a gooda Italian name, lika linguine,... he'sa more melodically minded,...a....

Your logic never fails but to make me laugh and confuse me at the same time. :)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Coco on May 16, 2011, 05:55:08 PM
I've enjoyed exploring his work lately. He seems to be somewhat of a minor figure, but not a minor composer. Very elegant music.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on May 17, 2011, 01:09:20 AM
Looking forward to the arrival of that disc which Luke recommended . . . .
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Luke on May 17, 2011, 01:47:33 AM
You will not be disappointed, Karl, I can promise you that. Those Greek Lyrics are absolute jewels, tiny, perfect, delicate and yet super-strong - like late Webern in these respects and others, but gorgeously lyrical and seductively shaded in the Italian way... By their nature they are self-effacing and therefore not very well-known, but they're one of the great hidden masterpieces of the 20th century.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Luke on May 17, 2011, 01:48:34 AM
Ha - I hadn't even seen that you'd TTT-ed one of my old posts on those songs until I posted that! Makes me feel old, that I keep on saying the same things! Even the TTT-ing was two years ago  :o
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Luke on May 17, 2011, 01:58:24 AM
As to the vocal stuff,... isn't that more like Serial Stravinsky?

If so, then really only in very specific cases - there are some similarities between some of the Dallapiccola lyrics and something like the gorgeous Surge Aquilo from the Canticum Sacrum...it's the combination of rigour with fecundity, these proliferating melismatic lines full of ancient Mediterranean, sun-filled warmth which are all nevertheless under a beautifully calm, controlling hand. Another work which falls into the same bracket, surprisingly, is the Sappho Fragments by John Taverner, in his earlier Stravinskian-serial days. That's a really beautiful work, too, showing Tavener's later sense of the seductive combined, still, with a slightly astringent harmonic palette that only increases and intenifies the beauty, IMO. No coincidence that, when Tavener rejected the bulk of post-Baroque music, he excepted from that rejection precisely such late Stravinsky pieces as the Canticum Sacrum.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on May 17, 2011, 02:59:36 AM
Ha - I hadn't even seen that you'd TTT-ed one of my old posts on those songs until I posted that! Makes me feel old, that I keep on saying the same things!

Not old, just the good sort of consistent : )
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on May 17, 2011, 04:44:31 AM
I really like the Italians, Dallapiccola, Nono, Maderna - and I don't think this is some kind of tribal thing (I'm Sicilian) - but there's hardly any Italian composer from the 20th century that I don't enjoy.  Sciarrino, is another composer whose work thrills me.  I should revisit them all and have a kind of festival.

Metoo!!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: MDL on May 19, 2011, 12:03:20 AM
I really like the Italians, Dallapiccola, Nono, Maderna - and I don't think this is some kind of tribal thing (I'm Sicilian) - but there's hardly any Italian composer from the 20th century that I don't enjoy.  Sciarrino, is another composer whose work thrills me.  I should revisit them all and have a kind of festival.

No mention of Berio?   :o
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: klingsor on May 20, 2011, 03:14:17 AM
No mention of Berio?   :o

Or Donatoni? or Scelsi?

The Partita by Dallapiccola is a thing of true beauty. It was played at the BBC Proms last year and it blew my mind
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on May 20, 2011, 03:17:21 AM
The Partita by Dallapiccola is a thing of true beauty. It was played at the BBC Proms last year and it blew my mind

Sweet!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: karlhenning on May 20, 2011, 03:31:41 AM
Not always, to be sure . . . but there are weeks when I feel I could listen to nothing but Scelsi.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Coco on May 20, 2011, 10:20:37 AM
Hear, hear!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Amfortas on July 21, 2011, 02:52:30 AM
I just upped a live perf of Dallapiccola's 'Marsia' ballet (1943) in good audio, BBC Phil and Noseda from this year:

http://www.4shared.com/file/-Js3TP8q/Dallapiccola_-_Marsia__complet.html
 (http://www.4shared.com/file/-Js3TP8q/Dallapiccola_-_Marsia__complet.html)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on July 22, 2011, 07:38:24 AM
Would anyone like to Totally Convince Me concerning that Erato (Apex)/Zender disc? It's aaaalways been on the radar.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Luke on July 23, 2011, 05:04:45 AM
Would anyone like to Totally Convince Me concerning that Erato (Apex)/Zender disc? It's aaaalways been on the radar.

Be Totally Convinced. It contains Dallapiccola's greatest pieces (IMO - the Greek Lyrics) and the couplings are marvellous. It is by far my favourite Dallapiccola disc; in fact, it is one of my favourite discs of anything.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on July 23, 2011, 06:03:50 AM
Be Totally Convinced. It contains Dallapiccola's greatest pieces (IMO - the Greek Lyrics) and the couplings are marvellous. It is by far my favourite Dallapiccola disc; in fact, it is one of my favourite discs of anything.

Uncle,... Uncle!! I surrender!!

The only problem I'm having is that I'm addicted to original issues, and this one is currently more expensive than the Apex re-issue. Ahh,... you should all have my problems, haha!!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: mjwal on July 23, 2011, 06:18:54 AM
For those wonderful Greek Lyrics there's a beautiful alternative version by Elisabeth Söderström here, among a lot more vintage Dallapiccola:
http://highponytail.blogspot.com/search/label/Dallapiccola
Thanks a lot for the Marsia link, Amfortas.
Apart from warmly endorsing all these Dallapiccola recommendations, I'd like to plug the most insightful book on opera I have ever read:
Dallapiccola On Opera Toccata press. You can find this at a low price secondhand on Amazon.
 
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on July 23, 2011, 07:41:16 PM
For those wonderful Greek Lyrics there's a beautiful alternative version by Elisabeth Söderström here, among a lot more vintage Dallapiccola:
http://highponytail.blogspot.com/search/label/Dallapiccola
Thanks a lot for the Marsia link, Amfortas.
Apart from warmly endorsing all these Dallapiccola recommendations, I'd like to plug the most insightful book on opera I have ever read:
Dallapiccola On Opera Toccata press. You can find this at a low price secondhand on Amazon.

I hear they make good pasta too!! ;) ;D Huh!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Amfortas on July 24, 2011, 05:44:18 AM

Thanks a lot for the Marsia link, Amfortas.
 

You're welcome  :)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on November 22, 2011, 07:30:56 AM
Be Totally Convinced. It contains Dallapiccola's greatest pieces (IMO - the Greek Lyrics) and the couplings are marvellous. It is by far my favourite Dallapiccola disc; in fact, it is one of my favourite discs of anything.

Finally got that Zender/Erato=Apex disc!

I REALLY liked the Canti di Prigionia, just perfect, austere music. The rest of the cd seems to go by pretty quickly. Some definitely reminds me of Xenakis in Greek-mode (Tempus destruendi-). There is a very 'clean' feeling here, very white and pure.

I'm putting it next to the Stravinsky 'Sacred Works' 2cd/Sony. Along with recent Penderecki acquisitions, I've satisfied my thoroughly-uninterested-in-choir-music itch, with choices that I can actually perhaps grow with. I'm still having difficulty with the classical world's interpretation of vibrato (bass solos and such), but I try to imagine the works as sung by angels.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: springrite on November 22, 2011, 07:50:25 AM
Here is the track listing forthe Zender CD:

1. Canti Di Prigionia 
2. Cinque Frammenti Di Saffo 
3. Due Liriche Di Anacreonte 
4. Sex Carmina Alcaei 
5. Tempus Destruendi - Tempus Aedificandi 
6. Due Cori Di Michelangelo Buonarroti Il Giovane 

Which one is the Greek Lyrics? Track 2-6?
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on November 22, 2011, 07:40:54 PM
Here is the track listing forthe Zender CD:

1. Canti Di Prigionia 
2. Cinque Frammenti Di Saffo 
3. Due Liriche Di Anacreonte 
4. Sex Carmina Alcaei 
5. Tempus Destruendi - Tempus Aedificandi 
6. Due Cori Di Michelangelo Buonarroti Il Giovane 

Which one is the Greek Lyrics? Track 2-6?

No.5 there is the one I thought sounded like Xenakis. 5-6 are solo choir. 2-4 went by so quick, and I haven't listened again yet, but... what were you asking? :-[ ;D
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Luke on November 23, 2011, 10:12:23 AM
Here is the track listing forthe Zender CD:

1. Canti Di Prigionia 
2. Cinque Frammenti Di Saffo 
3. Due Liriche Di Anacreonte 
4. Sex Carmina Alcaei 
5. Tempus Destruendi - Tempus Aedificandi 
6. Due Cori Di Michelangelo Buonarroti Il Giovane 

Which one is the Greek Lyrics? Track 2-6?

Almost - tracks 2-4. Incredible stuff.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Dundonnell on November 23, 2011, 04:17:46 PM
No one apears to have mentioned Dallapiccola's major choral work-

Canti di Liberazione(1951-55) for chorus and orchestra

I believe that it is currently unavailable on cd?

I would appear to have a recording with the Swedish Radio Symphony Chorus and Orchestra conducted by Sixten Ehrling.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: not edward on November 24, 2011, 04:03:08 PM
No one apears to have mentioned Dallapiccola's major choral work-

Canti di Liberazione(1951-55) for chorus and orchestra

I believe that it is currently unavailable on cd?

I would appear to have a recording with the Swedish Radio Symphony Chorus and Orchestra conducted by Sixten Ehrling.
There used to be an EMI recording with Ingo Metzmacher, coupled with Karl Amadeus Hartmann's Miserae and Gesangszene, but I imagine it's disappeared into the black void of the deletion list by now.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: PaulSC on November 24, 2011, 09:38:36 PM
There used to be an EMI recording with Ingo Metzmacher, coupled with Karl Amadeus Hartmann's Miserae and Gesangszene, but I imagine it's disappeared into the black void of the deletion list by now.
A live recording with Leon Botstein directing the American Symphony Orchestra and Concert Chorale of New York is available in MP3 format at Amazon:

http://amzn.com/B004TQ05S8

(I don't know the recording — or the piece, for that matter.)
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on June 26, 2013, 12:30:56 PM
I can't believe none of these Threads have been active. :o
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on June 26, 2013, 12:32:39 PM
Here is the track listing forthe Zender CD:

1. Canti Di Prigionia 
2. Cinque Frammenti Di Saffo 
3. Due Liriche Di Anacreonte 
4. Sex Carmina Alcaei 
5. Tempus Destruendi - Tempus Aedificandi 
6. Due Cori Di Michelangelo Buonarroti Il Giovane 

Which one is the Greek Lyrics? Track 2-6?

Again, a great disc.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 27, 2013, 02:57:13 AM
Agreed. Time I revisited it . . . .
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on June 27, 2013, 06:09:39 PM
Agreed. Time I revisited it . . . .

Do you have any other Orchestral Dallapiccola (Chandos)? Haven't heard them, but all Dallapiccola has a nobility to it. Question with 2 Answers fits the bill, granitic nobility, spare.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 28, 2013, 01:17:31 AM
Two volumes, including the one with that very piece; I do remember thinking highly of it.

It's in my queue to-day!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: springrite on June 28, 2013, 01:28:00 AM
Three Questions with Two Answers. Yes, I remember that works well and remember clearly how, upon first hearing, I was confused since I thought I heard 2 questions and three answers!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on June 28, 2013, 06:03:25 AM
Two volumes, including the one with that very piece; I do remember thinking highly of it.

It's in my queue to-day!


I'll take the Apex with me... report on Chandos please!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Mirror Image on June 28, 2013, 06:08:56 AM
Really have enjoyed Noseda's orchestral recordings of Dallapiccola. Great stuff.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 28, 2013, 06:28:45 AM
I'll take the Apex with me... report on Chandos please!

I have two volumes of the Chandos . . . and in keeping with First-Listen Fridays, I've listened to pieces on both the CDs to which (I am fairly certain) I hadn't listened earlier, the Variazioni per orchestra and the Quattro liriche di Antonio Machado.  I love this stuff, and Noseda leads it with both affection and strength. The Machado songs are brief, but sweet and tasty.

If I say, think Schoenberg and add [even more] lyricism, I think one is tempted to think Berg-ward, but Dallapiccola's sound is elsewhere.  Berg's lyricism (not saying a word against it!) tends to be breathless, a little labored; Dallapiccola's, easy, affable, frequently delicate.  The Variazioni are a bit like the Schoenberg Op.33, in their abstraction and apparent "let's get on with it" pace . . . but nothing irascible.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: North Star on June 28, 2013, 06:46:28 AM
I have two volumes of the Chandos . . . and in keeping with First-Listen Fridays, I've listened to pieces on both the CDs to which (I am fairly certain) I hadn't listened earlier, the Variazioni per orchestra and the Quattro liriche di Antonio Machado.  I love this stuff, and Noseda leads it with both affection and strength. The Machado songs are brief, but sweet and tasty.

If I say, think Schoenberg and add [even more] lyricism, I think one is tempted to think Berg-ward, but Dallapiccola's sound is elsewhere.  Berg's lyricism (not saying a word against it!) tends to be breathless, a little labored; Dallapiccola's, easy, affable, frequently delicate.  The Variazioni are a bit like the Schoenberg Op.33, in their abstraction and apparent "let's get on with it" pace . . . but nothing irascible.

OK, I need to hear some Dallapiccola soon!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on June 29, 2013, 06:59:27 AM
I have two volumes of the Chandos . . . and in keeping with First-Listen Fridays, I've listened to pieces on both the CDs to which (I am fairly certain) I hadn't listened earlier, the Variazioni per orchestra and the Quattro liriche di Antonio Machado.  I love this stuff, and Noseda leads it with both affection and strength. The Machado songs are brief, but sweet and tasty.

If I say, think Schoenberg and add [even more] lyricism, I think one is tempted to think Berg-ward, but Dallapiccola's sound is elsewhere.  Berg's lyricism (not saying a word against it!) tends to be breathless, a little labored; Dallapiccola's, easy, affable, frequently delicate.  The Variazioni are a bit like the Schoenberg Op.33, in their abstraction and apparent "let's get on with it" pace . . . but nothing irascible.


Go Dallapiccola!!! Maybe 12-tone needed the Italian touch, mm??? Like I said before, Leave Art to the Italians!!
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Octave on July 01, 2013, 01:29:45 AM
Like I said before, Leave Art to the Italians!!

I owe you an apology for misunderstanding yr previous use of this expression.  I think it now comes into focus for me.
Looking ffwd very much to the Noseda/Chandos discs, and also to LD's writings on opera, on their way to me now.  I can only echo the praise for the Apex/Warner disc.  He was his own man, 12 tones and all! Exciting music with mystery to burn.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Rons_talking on May 24, 2016, 07:55:41 PM
Dallapiccola's music on the Modern Times recording is something of a new find (and a great one at that) for me.




He has so often been described as a 12-tone composer who influenced the same sort of people who were attracted to Berg. I really like the sound world of Variations. The Three Questions and Two Answers is a dreamy sort of work that, to me, sounds the most like the 2nd Vieneese school. Partita is pretty much everything I could ask for from a work of the era. I hve read that LD was a close friend of Roger Sessions and one of the latter's favorite living composers--I can see why. What other works should i seek out. I love the way Dallapiccola uses line and phrasing in the italian manner in both the earlier works and the 12-tone (which sound like he doesn't always use the full aggragate...all the better).
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: snyprrr on May 25, 2016, 06:09:25 AM
Dallapiccola's music on the Modern Times recording is something of a new find (and a great one at that) for me.




He has so often been described as a 12-tone composer who influenced the same sort of people who were attracted to Berg. I really like the sound world of Variations. The Three Questions and Two Answers is a dreamy sort of work that, to me, sounds the most like the 2nd Vieneese school. Partita is pretty much everything I could ask for from a work of the era. I hve read that LD was a close friend of Roger Sessions and one of the latter's favorite living composers--I can see why. What other works should i seek out. I love the way Dallapiccola uses line and phrasing in the italian manner in both the earlier works and the 12-tone (which sound like he doesn't always use the full aggragate...all the better).

I've always enjoyed Pesko's '...Questions/Answers...'

Does this Capriccio CD have (seems to) all his main Modernist works for orchestra? There's a companion disc for BAZ, too.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: ritter on May 25, 2016, 06:20:10 AM
Dallapiccola's music on the Modern Times recording is something of a new find (and a great one at that) for me.




He has so often been described as a 12-tone composer who influenced the same sort of people who were attracted to Berg. I really like the sound world of Variations. The Three Questions and Two Answers is a dreamy sort of work that, to me, sounds the most like the 2nd Vieneese school. Partita is pretty much everything I could ask for from a work of the era. I hve read that LD was a close friend of Roger Sessions and one of the latter's favorite living composers--I can see why. What other works should i seek out. I love the way Dallapiccola uses line and phrasing in the italian manner in both the earlier works and the 12-tone (which sound like he doesn't always use the full aggragate...all the better).
Great to read you're enjoying Dallapiccola, Rons! Wonderful composer indeed... I don't know that Steffens CD, but the prgramming is excellent, and the same forces' CD of Ginastera works is fantastic.

As for further works to explore, may I suggest the following:

Canti di prigionia and Due Cori di Michelangelo Buonarroti il giovane
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/416D405BTPL.jpg)

Canti de liberazione (a personal favourite of mine)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vV-RptMWL.jpg)

And the quite wonderful opera Il Prigioniero



Unfortunatly, the frsrt two CDs I mention are long OOP  :(

Regards,

Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: Klaze on May 25, 2016, 01:26:34 PM
I have to explore this one further as well, so I'm taking notes from this thread.
For what it's worth I really enjoy the Liriche Greche (Greek Lyrics), which has been mentioned in the first few pages of this thread.
Can't personally recommend recordings for that, since I just have the one that's available on one of the Royal Concertgebouw Anthologies.
Title: Re: Luigi Dallapiccola
Post by: ritter on September 05, 2016, 04:23:41 AM
This rather interesting new release seems to have been oveRlooked:



An Mathilde (on a text by Heinrich Heine) is a major, 15 minute cantata for soprano and orchestra. AFAIK, it was only available previously on a (magnificent) set by DG (5 LPs plus a lavishly illustrated book) in honour of Heinrich Strobel (who led the music division of the Southwest German Radio, starting just after WW2, and was one of tyhe forces behind the revival of the Donaueschingen Festival). The soprano on that occasion was Magda László, under the baton of Hans Rosbaud.

One of the few remaining large pieces by Dallapiccola that was not available on CD, I recall it as being rather stark, but do look forward to reacquaint myself with it.

I am much less familiar with the work of Camillo Togni (except for some of the piano pieces).