Cato's Grammar Grumble

Started by Cato, February 08, 2009, 05:00:18 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Cato

Quote from: Mandryka on December 02, 2021, 12:54:21 AM
Is the above post punctuated correctly? Especially the second sentence

Does it mean that they'll have sufficient test data by then to say to the relevant bodies "We're ready to roll it out to the general public?"

The problem I have is that the vaccine companies are not asking a question
, so it bugs me that I've put a question mark inside the quotation mark. I also am not sure if there ought to be a comma after bodies. I'm pretty sure that the capital W in we're is OK.

Greetings Mandryka!

You are right to be "bugged" about the sentence.  ;)

One way to solve it is through re-phrasing and not using an imaginary question: e.g. 

Does it mean they will have sufficient test data by then, and can say to the relevant bodies that their company is ready to roll out their product to the general public?

If you want to keep (most) of your original sentence, I would suggest this:


Does it mean that they'll have sufficient test data by then and can say to the relevant bodies: "We're ready to roll it out to the general public" ?

Quote from: JBS on December 02, 2021, 04:04:37 AM
Speaking of correct punctuation
https://twitter.com/RamsesThePigeon/status/1466168057676578818

FUN WITH PUNCTUATION!!!
  8)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Cato

There is a fast-food restaurant in America called "Arby's" (a joke on Roast  Beef), which I do not order, preferring instead fish or turkey.

Anyway, I noticed on the side of their ice machine a sign warning employees: "Water in drains must be ran slow."   ??? ??? ??? :( :( :(

The machine was "Made in America."  Certainly such grammar comes from Planet Duhhh!   0:)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

k a rl h e nn i ng

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Mandryka

#4803
Quote from: Cato on December 07, 2021, 02:57:04 PM


Does it mean that they'll have sufficient test data by then and can say to the relevant bodies: "We're ready to roll it out to the general public" ?

FUN WITH PUNCTUATION!!!
  8)

It looks so strange to me to have no punctuation between public and the final quotation mark. I've got Hart's Rules somewhere I think, it may say something about this.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

steve ridgway

This sign in a local Chinese restaurant has afforded me much amusement over the last few years. ::)


k a rl h e nn i ng

Quote from: steve ridgway on December 09, 2021, 10:12:45 AM
This sign in a local Chinese restaurant has afforded me much amusement over the last few years. ::)



Nice!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

Quote from: Mandryka on December 08, 2021, 10:33:45 AM

It looks so strange to me to have no punctuation between public and the final quotation mark. I've got Hart's Rules somewhere I think, it may say something about this.



Cato is quite flexible on this question!   :D


Feel free to do the following, if you insist on keeping it a direct statement rather than rephrasing it into an indirect clause...


"Does it mean that they'll have sufficient test data by then and can say to the relevant bodies: "We're ready to roll it out to the general public," ?



"Does it mean that they'll have sufficient test data by then and can say to the relevant bodies: "We're ready to roll it out to the general public." ?


"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Cato

I was reminded of a pronunciation grumble recently.

The nasalized and highly annoying pronunciation by (especially) young women on television of the (usually) simple word "Food."

The double "o" is beaten and smeared through their noses, as if they had smelled a skunk: "EWWW!"  It also sounds similar - but not quite - to the o-umlaut in German.

It is not quite a rhyme with "feud," as it lacks a "y" sound.  I suspect this is a descendant of the "Valley-Girl" accent from the 1980's.

"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

k a rl h e nn i ng

Quote from: Cato on December 15, 2021, 01:47:37 PM
I was reminded of a pronunciation grumble recently.

The nasalized and highly annoying pronunciation by (especially) young women on television of the (usually) simple word "Food."

The double "o" is beaten and smeared through their noses, as if they had smelled a skunk: "EWWW!"  It also sounds similar - but not quite - to the o-umlaut in German.

It is not quite a rhyme with "feud," as it lacks a "y" sound.  I suspect this is a descendant of the "Valley-Girl" accent from the 1980's.



Grody to the max!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

k a rl h e nn i ng

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot


k a rl h e nn i ng

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

In an Ohio newspaper article about a local "chicken factory" applying for a renewal of its permit to operate with "2.2 million laying hens," also known these days as "hens a-laying," we find the following very interesting information and euphemism:

"Each year the facility produces 18,633 tons of solid poultry manure and 48 tons of composted mortality material."

So, I am wondering: Can we assume the existence of "liquid" poultry manure?   ???

And "mortality material" - composted or otherwise - is a fascinating euphemism for "entrails, beaks, feet, and bones."  0:)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

k a rl h e nn i ng

Could almost make me a vegetarian.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

steve ridgway

I saw this and thought of you Cato. ;D


Cato

Quote from: steve ridgway on May 11, 2022, 10:29:11 PM
I saw this and thought of you Cato. ;D

Thank you!

What's next?  Grammar Crackers?   8)

Mrs. Cato and I have recently been noticing advertisements for new drugs which use a "Q" in the name...but without a "u" following, and therefore without the "kw" sound.

Why not use a "K" therefore?

e.g. A medicine whose chemical name is tramadol hydrochloride somehow has a brand name of Qdolo   ??? ??? :o.

(I have not heard the seemingly unpronounceable name spoken, but assume it might be "Cue-dolo" (?).   Otherwise "Kwadolo" or "Ka-dolo" ?)

Then we have "Collagenase clostridium histolyticum" sold under the inscrutable name of "Qwo."   ::)   "Cue-wo"?  or is it the same as Latin's "Quo" ?  And if the latter, why not just call the drug Quo?

Not to be forgotten: Rinvoq where the "q" makes no sense, since it is a "K" sound.  Why not "Rinvoak" or "Rinvoke"?
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

JBS

Quote from: Cato on June 13, 2022, 06:10:39 PM
Thank you!

What's next?  Grammar Crackers?   8)

Mrs. Cato and I have recently been noticing advertisements for new drugs which use a "Q" in the name...but without a "u" following, and therefore without the "kw" sound.

Why not use a "K" therefore?

e.g. A medicine whose chemical name is tramadol hydrochloride somehow has a brand name of Qdolo   ??? ??? :o.

(I have not heard the seemingly unpronounceable name spoken, but assume it might be "Cue-dolo" (?).   Otherwise "Kwadolo" or "Ka-dolo" ?)

Then we have "Collagenase clostridium histolyticum" sold under the inscrutable name of "Qwo."   ::)   "Cue-wo"?  or is it the same as Latin's "Quo" ?  And if the latter, why not just call the drug Quo?

Not to be forgotten: Rinvoq where the "q" makes no sense, since it is a "K" sound.  Why not "Rinvoak" or "Rinvoke"?

Most likely a ploy to increase name recognition and memorability.

Hollywood Beach Broadwalk

k a rl h e nn i ng

I guess Geo. Eastman shoulda gone with Qodaq 8)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

Quote from: k a rl h e nn i ng on June 13, 2022, 06:15:03 PM

I guess Geo. Eastman shoulda gone with Qodaq 8)


8) :D ;) ;D

Yes, think of the possibilities for new states or cities!  Qansas, Qentuqy,  Qoqomo (Indiana), and my favorite: Qanqaqee, Illinois!   0:)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)