Author Topic: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works  (Read 3832 times)

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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #20 on: August 29, 2021, 03:49:15 PM »
Previously I had heard Gubaidulina Fachwerk and Alleluja as recommended by MI (John). These works could perfectly be here in my list now. The title Alleluja is misleading. It's not a celebratory religious prayer, but quite the opposite. It's like sounds from souls from purgatory. It's really dark, and I quite enjoyed. it. Almost the same goes for Fachwerk for bayan, percussion and strings. The bayan is like an accordion, and how impressive sonorities it can provide! Another quite somber and spectral (not related to the musical -ism) piece. Thanks John for mentioning these pieces!
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2021, 03:52:25 PM »
I'm making sure of compilating a good bunch of their recordings. I know I want to get deeper in Sibelius's soul.

This particular period of Sibelius’ life was certainly filled of worry, doubt, fear and uncertainty. A little bit before writing this symphony he had survived a throat cancer operation and this gave him a new perspective for life in general and the result was his 4th. It’s not an ‘easy’ symphony or, at least, easy in terms of his other symphonies, but I think it rewards the listener tremendously.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline relm1

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2021, 04:38:44 AM »

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2021, 08:33:03 PM »
Iannis Xenakis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37ajOyhcl_c

This is probably more tortured than dark:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZ5771zMOeE

Jonchaies is terrific. To me sounds like a more modern Le sacre!
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #24 on: August 31, 2021, 06:16:22 AM »
Jonchaies is terrific. To me sounds like a more modern Le sacre!

This is what I thought when I first heard it, too. A thrilling piece.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline André

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #25 on: August 31, 2021, 08:24:32 AM »
Beethoven - Symphony No. 3, Marcia funèbre
Dvorák - The Water Goblin
Górecki - Symphony No. 3
Kabelac - Mystery of Time
Liszt - Funerailles and late piano miniatures
Poulenc - Organ Concerto
Ravel - Scarbo
Schubert - Fantasie D. 940
Scriabin - Sonata No. 9
Sibelius - Symphony No. 4

Bonus excerpts from bigger works: the final nightfall of Eine Alpensinfonie and the "migraine" in Elgar 2

Edit: just remembered "Memorial to Lidice"

This could very well be my own list - except for the Scriabin sonata, which I don’t know.

Add to that the complete works of Pettersson (or just his ‘Mesto’ for strings if it’s one work per composer), Shostakovich’s 8th and Mahler’s 6th.

Offline steve ridgway

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2021, 08:52:58 AM »
I’m giving this some thought as I’ve accumulated a pile of works now that I don’t yet know very well. A few that leap out immediately that haven’t already been mentioned are -

Luigi Nono - Ricorda Cosa Ti Hanno Fatto In Auschwitz
Herbert Eimert - Epitaph Für Aikichi Kuboyama
Toru Takemitsu - Kwaidan
Giacinto Scelsi - Uaxuctum - The Legend Of The Mayan City Which They Themselves Destroyed For Religious Reasons

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2021, 10:38:08 AM »
Previously I had heard Gubaidulina Fachwerk and Alleluja as recommended by MI (John). These works could perfectly be here in my list now. The title Alleluja is misleading. It's not a celebratory religious prayer, but quite the opposite. It's like sounds from souls from purgatory. It's really dark, and I quite enjoyed. it. Almost the same goes for Fachwerk for bayan, percussion and strings. The bayan is like an accordion, and how impressive sonorities it can provide! Another quite somber and spectral (not related to the musical -ism) piece. Thanks John for mentioning these pieces!

Somehow I missed this post. Glad to read you enjoyed both of those Gubaidulina works! 8)
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #28 on: September 15, 2021, 07:57:02 PM »
I've come to think that Bacewicz's late style features some nightmarish and dark works like the last string quartets and Piano Quintet No. 2. Granted, they could be tough nuts to crack, but ones that leave a powerful impression.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #29 on: September 15, 2021, 08:27:56 PM »
I've come to think that Bacewicz's late style features some nightmarish and dark works like the last string quartets and Piano Quintet No. 2. Granted, they could be tough nuts to crack, but ones that leave a powerful impression.

These Polish composers really know how to conjure up these types of sound-worlds. The Russians and Germans/Austrians do a pretty good job of it, too. ;)
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline The new erato

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #30 on: September 16, 2021, 01:44:10 AM »
These Polish composers really know how to conjure up these types of sound-worlds. The Russians and Germans/Austrians do a pretty good job of it, too. ;)
Could very well be a result of Poland being squeezed between Germany and Russia/Soviet.

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #31 on: September 16, 2021, 05:17:13 AM »
Could very well be a result of Poland being squeezed between Germany and Russia/Soviet.

This certainly attributed to it for sure.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #32 on: September 16, 2021, 05:19:53 PM »
These Polish composers really know how to conjure up these types of sound-worlds. The Russians and Germans/Austrians do a pretty good job of it, too. ;)

Indeed. Bacewicz, Lutoslawski and Penderecki are fascinating and notable instances of that. They did it effortlessly.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2021, 06:15:10 PM »
Indeed. Bacewicz, Lutoslawski and Penderecki are fascinating and notable instances of that. They did it effortlessly.

Panufnik also has some darker works as does Górecki.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline DaveF

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Re: Your 10 favorite 'dark' works
« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2021, 09:27:50 AM »
Not too many vocal works so far, so here goes:

Tallis         In jejunio et fletu
Byrd         Plorans plorabit
Purcell      Funeral sentences
Bach         BWV 103, Ihr werdet Weinen und Heulen
Mozart      "Great" G minor
Nielsen      Afflictus sum
Dvořák      Othello
Janáček      String quartet no.1
Shostakovich   Cello concerto no.2 "in G major"
Schnittke      Concerto for piano and strings

It's arguable whether the Janáček is really "dark", or whether it's just filled with his usual crazy over-the-topness.  I read somewhere a very penetrating remark (said by whom I can't remember) to the effect that his music (especially his conclusions) succeeds in being dazzlingly triumphant and deeply desparing at the same time.  Dark enough for me, anyway.
"All the world is birthday cake" - George Harrison