John Ireland (1879-1962)

Started by tjguitar, May 07, 2007, 01:50:39 PM

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tjguitar

Wanting to buy his Piano Concerto...should I go for the Parkin w/Thomson on Chandos, or Parkin w/Boult on Lyrita?

vandermolen

#1
Both are good but I'd opt for the Lyrita as the CD contains a fine performance of Ireland's "These things shall be", one of his finest works and a beautiful performance of "Legend" (superior to the Chandos recording)

Ireland was a very fine composer. The emotion is understated which, paradoxically, makes it more poignant. My favourite works are:

"These things shall be"

Mai Dun

The Forgotten Rite

Legend for Piano and Orchestra

Piano Concerto

Epic March

London Overture

This is the best Ireland disc known to me:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/conducts-Ireland-London-Philharmonic-Orchestra/dp/B000N8UVRG/ref=pd_bowtega_1/202-7235464-3664651?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1178994274&sr=1-1
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

tjguitar

Quote from: Captain Haddock on May 12, 2007, 10:24:05 AM
Both are good but I'd opt for the Lyrita as the CD contains a fine performance of Ireland's "These things shall be", one of his finest works and a beautiful performance of "Legend" (superior to the Chandos recording)

Ireland was a very fine composer. The emotion is understated which, paradoxically, makes it more poignant. My favourite works are:

"These things shall be"

Mai Dun

The Forgotten Rite

Legend for Piano and Orchestra

Piano Concerto

Epic March

London Overture

This is the best Ireland disc known to me:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/conducts-Ireland-London-Philharmonic-Orchestra/dp/B000N8UVRG/ref=pd_bowtega_1/202-7235464-3664651?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1178994274&sr=1-1


Thanks for the link, seems to have been released here in the US (according to amazon.com) just last week. 

vandermolen

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

vandermolen

#4
I like Ireland's music, especially the beautifully atmospheric "Legend" for Piano and Orchestra.  His Piano Concerto is highly regarded though rarely performed and, for me, other highlights include; The Forgotten Rite, Mai-Dun, "These Things Shall Be" (an oratorio from the 1930s calling for peace) and there are fine solo piano compositions and songs.  The emotion in Ireland's music is understated and all the more moving for that.  He didn't write that much for orchestra but all that exists is of very fine quality (including the jaunty "London Overture" and film music for "The Overlanders")

Lyrita have recently issued two fine discs of orchestral/choral music and Barbirolli's unrivalled version of the London Overture has just been restored to the catalogue by EMI as a "Great Recording of the Century".

http://www.lyrita.co.uk/
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

lukeottevanger

#5
Thanks for starting this - I agree completely. Legend and the Piano Concerto, it seems to me, are really very fine and moving pieces indeed, and for my money Ireland's greatest orchestral works. Other than them, the solo piano music, especially Sarnia and the Sonatina, contain some of Ireland's very best, and are probably, taken as a whole, the finest set of British piano miniatures of this type, subtle and allusive, very detailed and polished works but often with Ireland's very personal ruggedness (his strongly imprinted personality, a mix of typical rhythmic, melodic and harmonic fingerprints, makes him one of the most interesting, attractive and easily identifiable composers of his time). I regret to say I don't know the songs.

One tidbit I always like to trot out on Ireland threads - JI was the examiner for one of my grandmothers' ABRSM Grade 5 exam!  8)

We had an interesting discussion about Ireland on a thread on the old board IIRC. Let me try to find a link....

Brewski

Ireland is a big gap in my collection.  I have heard the London Overture -- and liked it a lot -- but can't recall anything else.  Have you heard this CD, of the violin sonatas? 



--Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

lukeottevanger

Here we are. A page or so from this post on.

Bruce - get the Chandos twofer, which has the violin sonatas but also all the piano trios and, finest of all, the greater, later chamber music - the gorgeous cello sonata (a wonderful piece) and the late Fantasy Sonata for clarinet, which is just such a lucid little work. You will love it.

Brewski

Thanks, Luke!  All the items you mention sound right up my alley.  (As do all the others mentioned earlier by you and vandermolen.)

--Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."

- Alfred Schnittke

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Bonehelm

This composer certainly has an interesting last name...

Lethevich

Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

tjguitar

There's a sports reporter out here in Los Angeles with the same last name....same first name too.

Bonehelm

Quote from: Lethe on July 07, 2007, 01:08:11 PM
Why?
Hmm...let me think about it for a sec....OH YES! Maybe there's a place on Earth with the same name?

SonicMan46

Quote from: lukeottevanger on July 06, 2007, 09:55:05 AM
Here we are. A page or so from this post on.

Luke - thanks for the link - I forgot 'how much' we have already discussed Ireland - I must 're-visit' my current collection & look forward to more comments & recommendations - Dave  :D

Lethevich

Quote from: Bonehelm on July 07, 2007, 07:11:41 PM
Hmm...let me think about it for a sec....OH YES! Maybe there's a place on Earth with the same name?

Benjamin Britten, Einar Englund, more... What's so special about it? Elliot Carter is also named after a medieval profession, as are many people...
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

Bonehelm

Quote from: Lethe on July 07, 2007, 07:33:17 PM
Benjamin Britten, Einar Englund, more... What's so special about it? Elliot Carter is also named after a medieval profession, as are many people...

Britten =/= Britain
Englund =/= England
Ireland = Ireland

Is it just me or does anyone else notice something special about the spelling?

Lethevich

Quote from: Bonehelm on July 07, 2007, 09:17:32 PM
Britten =/= Britain
Englund =/= England
Ireland = Ireland

Is it just me or does anyone else notice something special about the spelling?

There is no need to be pedantic about spellings which originate before English spelling was codified. They mean identical things. It is a normal name, period. "My family originates from here". Like Woods, Hill, etc but less specific...

If you want odd names, check out some US athletes. One of them is called LaTasha Colander.

Anyway, can anybody recommend a leading performance of the Legend and Piano Concerto?
Peanut butter, flour and sugar do not make cookies. They make FIRE.

vandermolen

Thanks for the replies. I don't know the Violin sonatas and must investigate. Perhaps the Legend is my favourite of Ireland's work (especially in the Lyrita Version)

Ireland lived, with his cat, in a windmill near the Sussex Downs. I was delighted to see it during a country walk some time back. I think that Ireland was quite an endearing, unassuming individual.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Mark

Has anyone here heard his String Quartets? Downloaded them recently - very lovely indeed.

vandermolen

Quote from: Mark on July 10, 2007, 01:18:43 AM
Has anyone here heard his String Quartets? Downloaded them recently - very lovely indeed.

I must investigate.Thanks Mark.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).