Author Topic: New Releases  (Read 1240156 times)

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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #300 on: December 11, 2011, 04:57:39 AM »
Looks like Vasily Petrenko really has signed with EMI.


:o

Well, that looks great.... but, does anyone know why Petrenko felt the need to leave Naxos? It's a shame that Naxos now seem to be loosing one of their most consistently excellent artists....

I am looking forward to what Petrenko records with EMI, but share the hope of everyone here (it seems) that the Shostakovich Naxos cycle will not be abandoned....
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jlaurson

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #301 on: December 11, 2011, 06:21:29 AM »
:o

Well, that looks great.... but, does anyone know why Petrenko felt the need to leave Naxos? It's a shame that Naxos now seem to be loosing one of their most consistently excellent artists....

I am looking forward to what Petrenko records with EMI, but share the hope of everyone here (it seems) that the Shostakovich Naxos cycle will not be abandoned....

It's not a matter of losing, it's a matter of moving on. The two companies have completely different business models... and EMI can do so much more for an artist, beyond issuing CDs. And, not to be underestimated, the artist makes some money recording for EMI. Not so, for Naxos.

Baffling in what sense? I know nothing about the contract, so just not sure I understand without the context.

Oh, just because I think he is a barely-above-average conducting mediocrity... and he is feted all the same.

Offline Lethevich

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #302 on: December 11, 2011, 06:50:13 AM »
Edit: in the current climate of the recording industry, one would hope given how close the project is to a close, that Petrenko would've used his star power to argue a single exception-clause to the EMI contract to enable Naxos to finish the series with him - even if it involved several discs being recorded in quick succession (which I am sure the label would be willing to do to enable to them to finish the cycle).

For some reason I thought that Orchestra Mozart was Abbado's HIP project.

Claudio also probably thinks what he is doing is HIP, but M's description of him just "waving his arms" in front of a chamber ensemble is quite a good description of what I've heard so far from this group. The Brandenburgs are less interesting than, say, Chailly's non-concessionary approach.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 06:54:31 AM by Lethe Dmitriyevna Pettersson »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #303 on: December 11, 2011, 07:51:48 AM »
On the other hand it's nice to see EMI sign young conductors (first YNS, now Petrenko III) that are actually the bees' knees and musical. Now they won't have to rely on Sir Simon to do all the heavy lifting and we can ignore that baffling contract they have with Pappano. And "better served" is a complex concept. No doubt Naxos was very good for Petrenko, but it's not the kind of contract that is particularly attractive ad infinitum for an artist with greater ambitions... It's a stepping stone.  I haven't been a fan of EMI for many years... but intelligent signing-policy is the surest way back into my heart. :-)

This still doesn't change the fact that I hate EMI now does it? ;) I could careless what Petrenko's ambitions are. He could drop off the face of the earth and it wouldn't matter to me. What does matter to me, as a listener, however, is that he continues making good recordings of repertoire I enjoy. Now, that he signed with EMI. I seriously don't see this happening, especially given the current turbulent reputation of this label.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #304 on: December 11, 2011, 07:57:35 AM »


HIP Berg?

Do you have any idea when this is supposed to be released? It looks intriguing.
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Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #305 on: December 11, 2011, 08:04:43 AM »
He could drop off the face of the earth and it wouldn't matter to me. What does matter to me is that he continues making good recordings of repertoire I enjoy.

Does not compute. Those sentences are contradictory.

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #306 on: December 11, 2011, 08:10:30 AM »
Does not compute. Those sentences are contradictory.

Sarge

Well it pays to read the whole post. :D You're taking two sentences that have no relation to each other out-of-context. The fall off the face of the earth comment was in relation to Petrenko's ambitions.

By the way, you can take many posts out-of-context and make them sound contradictory.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 08:12:01 AM by Mirror Image »
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Offline Lethevich

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #307 on: December 11, 2011, 08:17:35 AM »
Does anyone else wish that the coupling on that disc was anything other than the Beethoven VC? :-X As interesting as the Berg looks, the bulk of that disc makes it an unneccessary buy* (especially as there was already at least one good recording of this coupling released recently - Steinbacher iirc).

Edit: *for me. Can't believe I forgot that ;D
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 08:21:01 AM by Lethe Dmitriyevna Pettersson »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #308 on: December 11, 2011, 08:31:56 AM »
Does anyone else wish that the coupling on that disc was anything other than the Beethoven VC? :-X As interesting as the Berg looks, the bulk of that disc makes it an unneccessary buy* (especially as there was already at least one good recording of this coupling released recently - Steinbacher iirc).

Edit: *for me. Can't believe I forgot that ;D

Yeah, I wish it was something else too, Sara. Since Abbado is the conductor, why not couple it with Schoenberg's VC or pair it with another Berg work like Three Pieces For Orchestra, Lulu Suite, or Seven Early Songs?

This might be a recording that I, and I can't believe I'm saying this, download just for the Berg.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 08:33:50 AM by Mirror Image »
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Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #309 on: December 11, 2011, 08:37:18 AM »
On the other hand it's nice to see EMI sign young conductors (first YNS, now Petrenko III) that are actually the bees' knees and musical. Now they won't have to rely on Sir Simon to do all the heavy lifting and we can ignore that baffling contract they have with Pappano. And "better served" is a complex concept. No doubt Naxos was very good for Petrenko, but it's not the kind of contract that is particularly attractive ad infinitum for an artist with greater ambitions... It's a stepping stone.  I haven't been a fan of EMI for many years... but intelligent signing-policy is the surest way back into my heart. :-)

This is the first time I've seen YNS cited as "the bees' knees." He's undoubtedly musical, but on the two occasions I've seen him live (and on the disc or two I've heard) he conducted as if he liked the music but didn't have any ideas about how it should sound. The Franck D minor I saw him commit with the LPO was heavy, saggy, dull.

And yes, mahlermad, the pay Naxos gives its artists is near-minimal. For many Naxos artists, having CDs to promote yourself and add to your c.v. are the most valuable element in the process; the Shostakovich cycle (and the prize-winning Manfred) have enormously raised the profile of Petrenko and the RLPO, but these discs won't have paid for any holidays. What Jens said.

Oh, just because I think [Pappano] is a barely-above-average conducting mediocrity... and he is feted all the same.

Oh, so like YNS  ;D

Edit: in the current climate of the recording industry, one would hope given how close the project is to a close, that Petrenko would've used his star power to argue a single exception-clause to the EMI contract to enable Naxos to finish the series with him - even if it involved several discs being recorded in quick succession (which I am sure the label would be willing to do to enable to them to finish the cycle).

Yeah, I can't imagine Naxos would go down quietly. They have a Shosty Seventh by Yablonsky, but going with a hybrid cycle of other conductors and orchestras picking up the leftovers would be a huge letdown for them.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #310 on: December 11, 2011, 08:46:23 AM »
And yes, mahlermad, the pay Naxos gives its artists is near-minimal. For many Naxos artists, having CDs to promote yourself and add to your c.v. are the most valuable element in the process; the Shostakovich cycle (and the prize-winning Manfred) have enormously raised the profile of Petrenko and the RLPO, but these discs won't have paid for any holidays. What Jens said.

But what does he get paid as music director of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic? That is the question. If he's making recordings for artistic reasons then the return profit of those recordings would not be of much importance. A true musician doesn't make music for profit. If they're doing it for money, then there are other avenues to go for selling out. 8)
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Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #311 on: December 11, 2011, 08:50:34 AM »
A true musician doesn't make music for profit.

"No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money."
- Samuel Johnson

I see your point, but I don't think it's fair to define a "true musician" by profitability. And anybody takes any kind of occupation "for profit"; after all, just like I would, Petrenko wants a decent retirement savings and money to raise his son and a holiday in Spain and maybe some extra cash to put toward loss-making educational or charitable ventures.

I prefer several other labels to EMI, but for a high international profile they're hard to beat.

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #312 on: December 11, 2011, 09:05:42 AM »
You're taking two sentences that have no relation to each other out-of-context.

Then you should have started a second paragraph with the second sentence I quoted  $:)  Get thee to Cato's Grammar Grumble and confess your sin  ;D

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Antoine Marchand

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #313 on: December 11, 2011, 09:10:38 AM »
For some reason I thought that Orchestra Mozart was Abbado's HIP project. Probably on account of repertoire: Mozart, Pergolesi, Bach, as I never heard any of their discs. My mistake.

I'm not sure if you make a mistake at all, Drasko. That Orchestra Mozart is, indeed, Abbado's HIP project, at least during the last years (I think the Orchestra was founded in the middle of the last decade). I even think they play on period instruments in their recordings of Mozart (violin concertos and some symphonies) and Bach. That said, I will make clear that I don't have any of their recordings.


Bulldog

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #314 on: December 11, 2011, 10:55:49 AM »
Concerning Petrenko, Naxos and EMI, it's no surprise that a top-rate rising conductor would leave Naxos for a more profitable company; Petrenko is making the right decision, and I figure that Naxos isn't surprised at the move. 

Whether Petrenko will complete his Shostakovich series is evidently unknown at this time.  If he doesn't, that's okay; there are many great Shostakovich symphony recordings already.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #315 on: December 11, 2011, 12:41:48 PM »
That Orchestra Mozart is, indeed, Abbado's HIP project, at least during the last years (I think the Orchestra was founded in the middle of the last decade). I even think they play on period instruments in their recordings of Bach. That said, I will make clear that I don't have any of their recordings.

The wind instruments in their Brandenburgs (except the recorders) are modern instruments. I do not know about the strings and admit that concertos 3 and 6 sound as if period instruments are used.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MS7ImLrEqDE&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLsNzCx1ots&feature=related
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 12:47:36 PM by (: premont :) »
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Drasko

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #316 on: December 11, 2011, 12:51:00 PM »
Do you have any idea when this is supposed to be released? It looks intriguing.

Should come out January.

Does anyone else wish that the coupling on that disc was anything other than the Beethoven VC? :-X As interesting as the Berg looks, the bulk of that disc makes it an unneccessary buy* (especially as there was already at least one good recording of this coupling released recently - Steinbacher iirc).

Edit: *for me. Can't believe I forgot that ;D

Especially since Isabelle Faust already recorded Beethoven concerto with Belohlavek for Harmonia Mundi few years ago.

Antoine Marchand

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #317 on: December 11, 2011, 01:05:15 PM »
The wind instruments in their Brandenburgs (except the recorders) are modern instruments. I do not know about the strings and admit that concertos 3 and 6 sound as if period instruments are used.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MS7ImLrEqDE&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLsNzCx1ots&feature=related

It's apparently a mix:

Quote
“Here Claudio Abbado is gambolling among the Brandenburg Concertos in this straightforward TV-style concert film, recorded in the classic 19th-century opera house at Reggio Emilia during an Italian tour in spring 2007. The orchestra is at first glance a curious gathering, mixing 'Baroque' players such as violinist Giuliano Carmignola and harpsichordist Ottavio Dantone with 'modern' names such as trumpeter Reinhold Friedrich and 'un-Baroque' recorder-player Michala Petri. Furthermore, a look round the instruments reveals mostly modern models, some hybrids (for instance Jacques Zoon's wooden, multi-keyed flute) and a sprinkling of Baroque bows. Mind you, most younger players these days are well versed in Baroque style whatever they play on, and the tenor of these performances is firmly consistent with current ideas of what Baroque music ought to sound like.” Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

Additionally, the Deutsche Gramophon webpage quotes at least two reviews saying that the Orchestra Mozart play period instruments:

http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/artist/product-quotes?PRODUCT_NR=4777371&ART_ID=ABBCL

The mixing is confirmed by this review of the recording of the symphonies:

Quote
Claudio Abbado's ever greater immersion in Mozart has been one of the musical glories of recent years. If everything Abbado conducts seems to aspire to the naturalness and intimacy of chamber music, that quality is nowhere more obvious than in his approach to Mozart. This pair of releases features the conductor with an ensemble that was founded four years ago in Bologna almost, it seems, as an attempt to create an Italian counterpart to the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, with which Abbado has worked so regularly over the past decade. There's one significant difference between the two groups, though; where the Mahler CO plays exclusively on modern instruments, the Orchestra Mozart appears to use either modern or period instruments as required. These two sets illustrate that flexibility. The symphonies, taken from concerts in Italy in 2005 and 2006, appear to be played on modern instruments at standard concert pitch (A = 440Hz), while the recordings of the violin concertos with Giuliano Carmignola, on the other hand, sound as if they use period instruments tuned at the slightly lower A = 430Hz.

What remains constant between the two collections, though, is the almost miraculous conducting, with its exuberant, lively tempi, perfectly balanced lighter-than-air textures, and exquisite attention to the smallest details of phrasing and articulation. The sense of the players listening as intently to each other as they do to following Abbado's directions is obvious in every bar. The symphonies are an unalloyed joy - with gloriously natural phrasing and a palpable delight in the music's deftness and the fertility of its invention. Here the brisk tempi are no problem at all - quite the opposite when that energy and joie de vivre can be channelled to such exhilarating effect, in the Jupiter Symphony above all. But there are a few moments in the violin concertos, and especially in the Sinfonia Concertante (in which Carmignola is joined by viola player Danusha Waskiewicz), when the music could benefit from a little more room to breathe, though Abbado and his soloists do show that the slow movement of the Sinfonia doesn't need to be taken as an indulgent adagio to weave its magical spell.




Offline (: premont :)

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #318 on: December 11, 2011, 01:50:24 PM »
It's apparently a mix:

Intense study of the videos - most of them available at youtube tells me, that the musicians use modern bows and certainly modern string instruments in Brandenburg concertos 1 and 2, whereas they use baroque bows and most certainly period instruments in Brandenburg concertos 3,4,5 & 6. This seems logical and consequential, the only weak point being the multikeyed traverse flute.
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #319 on: December 12, 2011, 09:12:12 AM »
And yes, mahlermad, the pay Naxos gives its artists is near-minimal. For many Naxos artists, having CDs to promote yourself and add to your c.v. are the most valuable element in the process; the Shostakovich cycle (and the prize-winning Manfred) have enormously raised the profile of Petrenko and the RLPO, but these discs won't have paid for any holidays. What Jens said.


Ah, I see.... well, it's a bit of a shame, especially for Naxos, who have now lost who had seemed to be their greatest artist. Naxos served him well I think! I certainly do look forward to seeing what Petrenko records on EMI.... a Prokofiev R+J would be good, Stravinsky ballets, Ravel Daphnis et Chloe perhaps...
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