Author Topic: Diepenbrock's Hymne  (Read 3786 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Diepenbrock's Hymne
« on: September 05, 2012, 11:09:05 AM »


Biography:

Alphons Diepenbrock was the leading Dutch composer of his era, an extraordinary achievement for a man whose formal training was in classical languages and Greek and Roman literature. His official musical education ended with the lessons he received as a boy, from which he demonstrated prodigious skills at the keyboard and on the violin. While studying classics, he learned music theory on his own and led a choir. He was drawn to the work of Palestrina and Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, and also to the music of Wagner. He began composing music in his teens, which included songs and choral works as well as the Academische feestmarsch for winds. He spent the 1880s working on his doctorate and later became an instructor in classics, keeping his hand in composition with such choral works as Les Elfes (1887).

In the 1890s Diepenbrock taught Greek and Latin and wrote articles on a multitude of philosophical, literary, and musical subjects. It was in the course of these activities that Diepenbrock began writing the choral works for which he became best known, including the Missa in die festo. His two Hymnen an die Nacht received their first performances under Willem Mengelberg and the Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra, which marked his breakthrough to mainstream acceptance in Holland. Two years later, his Te Deum was premiered in similarly august circumstances. Diepenbrock found himself the most popular serious composer in Holland during the first decade of the twentieth century. He was championed by such figures as Mengelberg and Gustav Mahler. Diepenbrock and Mahler also became friends and the two men conducted each other's works, Diepenbrock using his occasions as a guest conductor at the Concertgebouw to lead performances of Mahler's symphonies, as well as the works of Debussy.

From 1905 until the outbreak of World War I, Diepenbrock was a prolific composer, principally of symphonic songs and ambitious choral works, among them Die Nacht (1911) (from Holderlin) for mezzo-soprano and orchestra, Im grossen Schweigen (1906) (from Nietzsche) for baritone and orchestra, and Marsayas or The Enchanted Well (1910), the latter a "mythical comedy" derived from classical literature. Diepenbrock took his patriotic role as a composer during the war very seriously, authoring topical songs expressing opposition to Germany. His final years saw Diepenbrock turn his musical activities back toward classical literature, including incidental music for Aristophanes' The Birds (1917) and Sophocles' Elektra (1920), as well as music for Goethe's Faust (1918).

[Biography taken from All Music Guide]

I didn't see any thread dedicated to this great composer. What a wonderful lyrical gift Diepenbrock had. You can go to YouTube and checkout his music. I recently bought the 150th Anniversary Edition box set released on Etcetera Records. Looking forward to hearing this music on a stereo system.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Henk

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2012, 11:45:49 AM »
Thanks, John. Interesting.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2012, 11:48:35 AM »
My pleasure, Henk. Check his music out.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2012, 12:04:37 PM »
Diepenbrock falls somewhere between R. Strauss and Debussy. Listen to this:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ol4yR5Sth-U&amp;" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ol4yR5Sth-U&amp;</a>
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2012, 12:26:59 PM »
Diepenbrock falls somewhere between R. Strauss and Debussy. Listen to this:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ol4yR5Sth-U&amp;" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ol4yR5Sth-U&amp;</a>
That is wonderful music. It's interesting how the Debussy influence seems to be more noticeable in the middle of the piece. I noticed the same thing with some of his other pieces like De Vogels (around the 3-4 min mark). I have wishlisted that set you posted not so long ago. One day...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/nQEkPYGNWqg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/nQEkPYGNWqg</a>
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2012, 12:36:42 PM »
Diepenbrock falls somewhere between R. Strauss and Debussy.

Sounds like music I would be very interested in! Shall take a listen to this tommorow, thanks, John. :)
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Offline Lisztianwagner

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2012, 01:52:26 PM »
Diepenbrock falls somewhere between R. Strauss and Debussy. Listen to this:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ol4yR5Sth-U&amp;" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ol4yR5Sth-U&amp;</a>

This is definitely stunning, what a powerful, beautifully atmospheric work! As Diepenbrock became friend of him, was he influenced by Mahler? I perceive some reminiscences of his music. The chromaticism also reminds me Wagner, absolutely brilliant.
"Music is the electrical soil in which the spirit lives, thinks and invents." - Ludwig van Beethoven

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2012, 02:23:51 PM »
Sounds like music I would be very interested in! Shall take a listen to this tommorow, thanks, John. :)

Yes, try to listen to some of the music on YouTube, Daniel. You will enjoy it.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2012, 02:25:32 PM »
That is wonderful music. It's interesting how the Debussy influence seems to be more noticeable in the middle of the piece. I noticed the same thing with some of his other pieces like De Vogels (around the 3-4 min mark). I have wishlisted that set you posted not so long ago. One day...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/nQEkPYGNWqg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/nQEkPYGNWqg</a>

Yeah, it is most certainly wonderful music. Looks like here's yet another underrated composer in dire need of a revival.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2012, 02:27:15 PM »
This is definitely stunning, what a powerful, beautifully atmospheric work! As Diepenbrock became friend of him, was he influenced by Mahler? I perceive some reminiscences of his music. The chromaticism also reminds me Wagner, absolutely brilliant.

He was friends with Mahler, but I think the Mahler influence is only slight. Diepenbrock's music owes much more to Wagner and Debussy than Mahler, so this should be right up your alley, Ilaria.  8)
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline Lisztianwagner

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2012, 02:35:55 PM »
He was friends with Mahler, but I think the Mahler influence is only slight. Diepenbrock's music owes much more to Wagner and Debussy than Mahler, so this should be right up your alley, Ilaria.  8)

I understand; maybe I was still under the spell of the 6th symphony, and I heard Mahler everywhere. ;) Haha, I suppose so! ;D
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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2012, 03:02:38 PM »
Since Neal mentioned De Vogels Overture, here it is:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/nQEkPYGNWqg" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/nQEkPYGNWqg</a>

Again, a curious mixture of R. Strauss and Debussy. Great stuff.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2012, 09:17:47 AM »
Just listened to Hymne an die Nacht No. 2, my first introduction to the music of Diepenbrock. The first two movements were quite beautiful, but it was the last movement that impressed me the most. This was incredibly wonderful, enchanting music. I loved Diepenbrock's orchestral writing here, very clear, luxurious orchestral textures. Very charming melody too. I listened to this movement quite a few times! :)  0:)

I very much enjoyed my first encounter with the music of this composer! Thanks, John, for introducing me to this composer. :)
« Last Edit: September 06, 2012, 09:21:31 AM by madaboutmahler »
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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2012, 04:41:23 PM »
Just listened to Hymne an die Nacht No. 2, my first introduction to the music of Diepenbrock. The first two movements were quite beautiful, but it was the last movement that impressed me the most. This was incredibly wonderful, enchanting music. I loved Diepenbrock's orchestral writing here, very clear, luxurious orchestral textures. Very charming melody too. I listened to this movement quite a few times! :)  0:)

I very much enjoyed my first encounter with the music of this composer! Thanks, John, for introducing me to this composer. :)

It's good to hear you enjoy Diepenbrock's music, Daniel. I figured he would be right up your alley. ;) I know you have a lot of music you want to buy, but you should keep this box set in mind for a purchase somewhere down the road:

"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Diepenbrock's Hymne
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2012, 07:55:10 AM »
Thanks, John. I shall certainly do so! I need to start earning some more money! :)
"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
— Ludwig van Beethoven