Author Topic: John Joubert (1927-2019)  (Read 865 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
John Joubert (1927-2019)
« on: January 11, 2019, 06:59:21 AM »
Sorry to hear of the death of John Joubert aged 91. He wrote the well known Christmas Carol 'Torches' and I really enjoyed his symphonies 1 and 3 on Lyrita.

There is a Joubert threat but I couldn't access it from work ( ::))
RIP

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/articles/2440--obituary-john-joubert-1927-2019
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 07:02:41 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1650
  • Location: Wales
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2019, 07:49:29 AM »
Aww, that's a shame! His Symphony No. 1 is included in the British Symphonies box set I picked up less than a month ago, and is definitely one of my favourite works from that set. RIP.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2019, 03:27:40 PM »
Aww, that's a shame! His Symphony No. 1 is included in the British Symphonies box set I picked up less than a month ago, and is definitely one of my favourite works from that set. RIP.
It is a very fine symphony and one which I shall play 'In Memoriam' to a fine composer.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline relm1

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 920
  • Location: California
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2019, 05:01:26 PM »
Sad anytime someone dies but he lived a very long life full of creating wonderful music and with full facilities up through the end and this does give me some solace.  RIP.

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1920
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2019, 06:54:13 PM »
Sad news; RIP. His 1st Symphony, especially, is a really fine work and a great recent discovery of mine.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2019, 12:15:40 AM »
Sad anytime someone dies but he lived a very long life full of creating wonderful music and with full facilities up through the end and this does give me some solace.  RIP.
Yes, that's very true. He has a long and productive life and left behind some great music.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2019, 12:17:19 AM »
Sad news; RIP. His 1st Symphony, especially, is a really fine work and a great recent discovery of mine.
You might like the newly released No.3 as well Kyle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1650
  • Location: Wales
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2019, 04:48:56 AM »
I actually learnt yesterday that Dutton have a recording of Symphony No. 2 out. Idk how easy it is to get, but it's out there.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2019, 05:39:31 AM »
I actually learnt yesterday that Dutton have a recording of Symphony No. 2 out. Idk how easy it is to get, but it's out there.
You're quite right and I have a copy of it  ::).
I must obviously listen to it again but I have been most impressed by Symphony 1 and 3.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1920
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2019, 09:37:21 PM »
You might like the newly released No.3 as well Kyle.

I'll give it a spin soon!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2019, 02:50:05 AM »
I actually learnt yesterday that Dutton have a recording of Symphony No. 2 out. Idk how easy it is to get, but it's out there.
Listening to it now. It commemorated those killed in the Sharpeville Massacre in South Africa in 1960.
It is darkly impressive and reminds me a bit of the darker Malcolm Arnold symphonies line nos. 6 and 7:

« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 02:52:25 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

cilgwyn

  • Guest
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2019, 04:59:00 AM »
I've got a new rule,to try and conserve my dwindling bank account,to resist any composer I haven't already got in my collection,or had on cd! :(  Fortunately,Joubert's First Symphony is paired with Mathias' First. I find myself,increasingly,impressed by the music of my Welsh compatriot (cue,male voice choir singing,"Land of my Fathers",in background) and I do like his First Symphony. This being a first recording,I just had to hear it! Also,reviews I had read suggesting that it was more vigorous (or something like that?) than the Nimbus recording. So,I bought it! Good! That boring intro' over! ::) ;D I think the earlier recording is now my favourite. More to the point,because it is a Joubert thread,not a Mathias thread (breaking off here to check) I have to say I was impressed by his symphony. Yes,there are influences,but he has a voice of his own,and I think it just proves how much,good quality music is still out there. How wrong the Hurwitz was to suggest that it had all been used up! The Ruth Gipps cd is another prime example! Anyway,I just had to hear his third symphony. I'm not into the Bronte's;but the 'program' (if that's the right word?) behind this symphony,and the landcape that inspired it,appealed to me. In fact,after repeat listens,I think this is now my favourite of the two. I'm not counting the Second,which I haven't heard! Listening to it,I kept thinking it reminded me of some other piece of music. I then realised what it was. (well,the review I read,helped!) The instrumental interludes in Britten's The Turn of the Screw. They are very haunting,and help give that opera an atmosphere all of it's own. Likewise,here. Again,Joubert has his own voice. I found some bits almost 'filmic'. I mean that in a good way,mind. I couldn't help being reminded of another Bronte opera;Wuthering Heights by Bernard Herrmann. I had the Lp set,for a while,and I quite enjoyed that one. It seems rather appropriate in this context. The Herrmann opera had some orchestral interludes which were redolent of his film scores. While Herrmann's opera meanders a little,I find Joubert's score concise and atmospherically scored. I loved it! The Piano concerto,that accompanies it,is an earlier work. Prokofiev is obviously an influence;but as such concertos go,it's a good one;which I really did begin to enjoy after multiple listens. There is an insistent note (or something,I'll have to listen again?) in the first movement,which really is quite arresting. An excellent cd. If I had enough spare dosh I might even be tempted by the complete opera. Unlike the Britten opera,however;the version recorded,doesn't include the interludes!

NB: Listening to the third symphony reminded me of vandermolen saying,"I can't stop playing it!",when he enjoys a cd. This must be terrible;particularly at bedtime!! I think an elastic band might help! You pull it back & snap it against the flesh,every time you get to the end of the cd. After a while the brain associates the music with pain and you will grimace at the thought of it;maybe even shoot out of your chair! Unless you've got one of those seat belts like Victor Borge?!

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14523
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2019, 05:54:23 AM »
I've got a new rule,to try and conserve my dwindling bank account,to resist any composer I haven't already got in my collection,or had on cd! :(  Fortunately,Joubert's First Symphony is paired with Mathias' First. I find myself,increasingly,impressed by the music of my Welsh compatriot (cue,male voice choir singing,"Land of my Fathers",in background) and I do like his First Symphony. This being a first recording,I just had to hear it! Also,reviews I had read suggesting that it was more vigorous (or something like that?) than the Nimbus recording. So,I bought it! Good! That boring intro' over! ::) ;D I think the earlier recording is now my favourite. More to the point,because it is a Joubert thread,not a Mathias thread (breaking off here to check) I have to say I was impressed by his symphony. Yes,there are influences,but he has a voice of his own,and I think it just proves how much,good quality music is still out there. How wrong the Hurwitz was to suggest that it had all been used up! The Ruth Gipps cd is another prime example! Anyway,I just had to hear his third symphony. I'm not into the Bronte's;but the 'program' (if that's the right word?) behind this symphony,and the landcape that inspired it,appealed to me. In fact,after repeat listens,I think this is now my favourite of the two. I'm not counting the Second,which I haven't heard! Listening to it,I kept thinking it reminded me of some other piece of music. I then realised what it was. (well,the review I read,helped!) The instrumental interludes in Britten's The Turn of the Screw. They are very haunting,and help give that opera an atmosphere all of it's own. Likewise,here. Again,Joubert has his own voice. I found some bits almost 'filmic'. I mean that in a good way,mind. I couldn't help being reminded of another Bronte opera;Wuthering Heights by Bernard Herrmann. I had the Lp set,for a while,and I quite enjoyed that one. It seems rather appropriate in this context. The Herrmann opera had some orchestral interludes which were redolent of his film scores. While Herrmann's opera meanders a little,I find Joubert's score concise and atmospherically scored. I loved it! The Piano concerto,that accompanies it,is an earlier work. Prokofiev is obviously an influence;but as such concertos go,it's a good one;which I really did begin to enjoy after multiple listens. There is an insistent note (or something,I'll have to listen again?) in the first movement,which really is quite arresting. An excellent cd. If I had enough spare dosh I might even be tempted by the complete opera. Unlike the Britten opera,however;the version recorded,doesn't include the interludes!

NB: Listening to the third symphony reminded me of vandermolen saying,"I can't stop playing it!",when he enjoys a cd. This must be terrible;particularly at bedtime!! I think an elastic band might help! You pull it back & snap it against the flesh,every time you get to the end of the cd. After a while the brain associates the music with pain and you will grimace at the thought of it;maybe even shoot out of your chair! Unless you've got one of those seat belts like Victor Borge?!
Yes cilgwyn, you may recall that, some time back, I became a bit obsessed (can one be 'a bit' obsessed?) with the soundtrack to 'Noah'. I like that Joubert/Mathias Lyrita CD very much (I owned the Joubert 'single' on Lyrita as well  ::))
On the subject of Welsh composers I wonder if you know Alun Hoddinott's setting of 'Fair Lisa'. It was on Radio 3 a few weeks ago and I thought it very moving and would never have associated with Alun Hoddinott. Anyway, you probably know it but, if not, here it is:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JeDcQEG1Hi4
I sent it to my brother who replied 'Alun Vaughan Hoddinott'. Anyway, it is such a beautiful work. My brother added that Welsh hymns have a unique emotional power. In the last week I've been enjoying Daniel Jones's Symphony 4 which I like very much and have had Grace Williams's powerful Second Symphony running through my head. I think that Bernard Herrmann used some of his film score to 'Jane Eyre' in his opera 'Wuthering Heights'. Not being a great fan of opera, with a few exceptions, I think I'll stick with the Jane Eyre film score!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2019, 05:58:01 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

cilgwyn

  • Guest
Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2019, 09:35:38 AM »
Yes,some of Herrmann's opera is very filmic. Some orchestral passages are;how can I put it? Very widescreen! Quite enjoyable if you like that sort of thing;but even I can see why it hasn't entered the repertoire! Listening to Joubert's third,I agree with one reviewer,who felt the opera would have been better with the interludes left in. I think I'll resist the opera,though! The symphony does the same job,really,without the warbly bits!! All the reviews I saw were good,though! Joubert's Second sounds a bit tougher on the old ear 'oles. I might resist that one,too?!!