Author Topic: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)  (Read 9890 times)

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Greta

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Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« on: September 08, 2007, 12:36:35 PM »
Listening to the digital cable classical channel today, I heard Herzogenberg's Piano Quartet (Frolich/Belcanto Strings), and it captured my attention, I had never heard of this composer before. Very much a Romantic, gorgeous stuff, also something forward looking there too.

Wikipedia entry, which interests me even more:
Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)

It was programmed today after Brahms (Sereande No. 2), apt given their large connections, has anyone read Brahms' correspondences with this composer and his wife?

I see Herzogenberg wrote 8 symphonies and many chamber, choral, and piano works so hopefully a few can chime in with a little info on this interesting name! :)

Harry

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2007, 12:51:38 PM »
I agree with you Greta, and have the following recordings, not much, but I am in the process of finding suitable ones.

Offline sTisTi

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2008, 09:55:29 AM »
I recently heard a live performance of one of his String Quartets by the Carcassi Quartet. Apparently the university professor who organized the concert is a keen supporter of Herzogenberg and persuaded the CQ to play one of his quartets  >:D. It was a great performance and the audience liked it very much. Really marvelous stuff, worthy of being explored!

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2008, 10:12:14 AM »
Greta - thanks for mentioning this composer - as usual, Harry is already ahead of us all!  I've never heard of this composer (and of course have none of his music); but the chamber pieces in particular interest me - just looked on Amazon, about three pages of offerings (his choral music seems to recieve some excellent comments) - the disc below is also of interest to me (review by Scott) - apparently his wife & he were good friends of Brahms (wife a former pupil) - just wanted to get into this thread to see 'what' recommendations might be offered!  :D


johnQpublic

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2008, 03:01:31 PM »
I have two cpo's of Herzogs' String Trios plus a 2-disc recording of his Christmas (hmmm.. is it an oratorio or a cantata?...hmmm) "The Birth of Christ".

The cpo's reveal his Brahmsian influence big time. The Xmas choral piece harkens back to Renaissance & Baroque harmonic and part-writing influences. 

Offline hautbois

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2008, 08:55:56 AM »
There is a disc of Herzogenberg's Horn trio for oboe horn and piano on Naxos. Beautiful music and very well performed and recorded. Quite a curiosity as well for its unusual combination. (Reinecke has a piece for such a combination as well.)

Howard

Harry

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2008, 09:01:33 AM »
I am glad that this thread is in working order again.
Cd's of this composer trickle in at a very slow rate, certainly if you want to have good and well recorded performances.
So far the CPO discs did well, and I hope CPO will release more, for the music is quite beautiful.

Offline Guido

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2008, 08:15:31 AM »
I just received the CD of this composer's three cello sonatas - what amazing pieces! These are works of real quality that need to be played far more often. What other works by this composer do people recommend? I rarely like non-famous romantic composers (I'm a 20th century man usually), but Herzogenberg has really piqued my interest.

His idol was Brahms, whom he sent all his compositions seeking approval, but Brahms always rejected the pieces; most scholars suspect this was because Herzogenberg had married a woman named Elisabet who Brahms had himself been very fond of. Who knows how his popularity might have differed had Brahms become an advocate rather than an obstacle?

The CD of cello sonatas is on the CPO label (rapidly becoming one of my favourite labels), with Claudius Herrmann on cello and Saiko Sasaki playing piano. I had not heard of either of these artists before, but they are both superb. I have attached below the opening of the first movement of the first sonata. Quite extraordinary.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2008, 08:34:42 AM by Guido »
Geologist.

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Harry

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2008, 08:22:06 AM »
 :)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2008, 08:27:38 AM »
Yes, below is part of a posting I made in the Listening Thread in early February - the only disc that I own by this composer @ the moment, but certainly would like to explore his other works!  :D


Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900) - Piano Works, mostly duets w/ the husband-wife team, Goldstone & Clemmow; a completely new composer to me (believe his chamber works had been recommended) - he loved Bach & was a good friend of Brahms & Clara Schumann, so the influences on his piano composing are easily understood.  I don't have many 'piano duo' recordings, but these are thoroughy enjoyable & recommended; CLICK on the image for an excellent review by Scott Morrison!  :D




Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2008, 04:26:02 PM »
I know Herzogenberg's Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2(CPO 777 122-2) which are pleasant enough, worthy compositions clearly influenced by Schumann and Brahms, and his Oratorio 'Die Geburt Christi' (CPO 777 211-2) which is another solid piece of Romantic German choral music-although it is, perhaps, overly long at 79 minutes!

I cannot say that I have found anything particularly distinctive or memorable on these two CDs. It is probably very unfair to compare composers like Herzogenberg or Felix Draeseke(1835-1913) to a genius like Brahms but even 5 minutes of a Brahms symphony make one realize his stature in contrast to that of his contemporaries.

Herzogenberg was the teacher of that redoubtable British composer, Dame Ethel Smyth!

Offline Guido

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2008, 05:27:40 PM »
It said in the liner notes that his strength lay in chamber music. I will make a note of these recommednations (and anti-recommendations!)... an exciting find.
Geologist.

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Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2008, 01:21:25 PM »
It said in the liner notes that his strength lay in chamber music.

I agree. I've recently become acquainted with his G minor string quartet:




The Mandelring Quartet's Brahms cycle is excellent and made even more interesting by the inclusion of a quartet by one of Brahms' contemporaries on each disc.

Sarge
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Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2008, 02:34:29 PM »
Well, stimulated by this thread & the 'chamber' recommendations, just place an order today @ the Amazon Marketplace, which included the 2 discs below - looking forward to their arrival!

 

Offline Guido

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2008, 03:39:03 PM »
I think I'll ge that piano trio CD too. Do tell us how you get on with them.
Geologist.

The large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

Hector

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2008, 06:12:52 AM »
I know Herzogenberg's Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2(CPO 777 122-2) which are pleasant enough, worthy compositions clearly influenced by Schumann and Brahms, and his Oratorio 'Die Geburt Christi' (CPO 777 211-2) which is another solid piece of Romantic German choral music-although it is, perhaps, overly long at 79 minutes!

I cannot say that I have found anything particularly distinctive or memorable on these two CDs. It is probably very unfair to compare composers like Herzogenberg or Felix Draeseke(1835-1913) to a genius like Brahms but even 5 minutes of a Brahms symphony make one realize his stature in contrast to that of his contemporaries.

Herzogenberg was the teacher of that redoubtable British composer, Dame Ethel Smyth!

I have the first and tend to share your point of view.

I think that if the disc had been but one pound more I would have given it a miss.

I must try Draeseke as his music gets such poor reviews it is, probably, an absolute hoot. Something to try out on one's friends!

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2008, 07:19:33 AM »
I have the first and tend to share your point of view.

I think that if the disc had been but one pound more I would have given it a miss.

I must try Draeseke as his music gets such poor reviews it is, probably, an absolute hoot. Something to try out on one's friends!

Draeseke is not a bad composer but of the four symphonies only No. 4, the Symphonia Comedia, struck me as having much individuality. The others are well-drilled but ultimately unmemorable exercises in the received Mendelssohn, Schumann, Liszt, Brahms, Wagner sort of mould.

The three Oratorio set "Christus" runs to 5 CDs! I think that I can probably live without it!

Offline JoshLilly

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2008, 08:09:51 AM »
You can download free clips of his music, courtesy of the International Draeseke Society:

http://www.draeseke.org/mp3clips.htm

This includes his complete Symphony #3, the Sinfonia tragica.

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2008, 09:25:06 AM »
You can download free clips of his music, courtesy of the International Draeseke Society:

http://www.draeseke.org/mp3clips.htm

This includes his complete Symphony #3, the Sinfonia tragica.

As someone who tends to collect the music of obscure composers I always get a bit worried when I find that there are obviously a number of people who see much more in a composer's work than I thought existed! The website of the International Draeseke Society is impressive(and well-organised!).

Maybe I really should go back and re-evaluate his music again!

Hector

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Re: Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900)
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2008, 04:16:58 AM »
You can download free clips of his music, courtesy of the International Draeseke Society:

http://www.draeseke.org/mp3clips.htm

This includes his complete Symphony #3, the Sinfonia tragica.

That's the one that received all the plaudits when he was alive, I believe, and gets all the disparagement, now.

Not Universal, I notice, but merely International Draeseke Society. Clearly, an organisation with a sense of humour ;)