Author Topic: Villa-Lobos Anyone?  (Read 41430 times)

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Offline bvy

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Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« on: March 01, 2008, 04:33:40 PM »
I picked this up recently and absolutely love it:


Any ideas where I should go next?

Offline Iconito

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2008, 05:05:46 PM »

Any ideas where I should go next?


I think you won’t regret trying his Chôros and his Bachianas Brasileiras next.

And you really should start the Villa-Lobos thread on the Composer Discussion board (or ask one of our kind moderators to move this thread there for you) I think you’ll get a lot more feedback there than here.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2008, 05:08:11 PM by Iconito »
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Teresa

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2008, 07:31:49 PM »
My favorite Villa-Lobos so far:
 
Bachianas Brasileiras No. 2: Toccata “Little Train Of The Caipira” (1930)
  Goosens, London Symphony Orchestra (Everest)
This is one of the coolest short classical pieces I have, and this version does sound like a train, though not a convincing as Honegger's Pacific 231.  In many lesser performances of the Little Train Of The Caipira there is less excitement and no feeling of the train.  This is the version to get.
 
Uirapuru: Ballet (1917)       
  Stokowski, Stadium Symphony Orchestra Of New York (Everest)
One of my favorite ballets, very modern and exciting, this is the only version I have heard but I love it nevertheless.

Can't comment on the Naxos recording you have as I am not a fan of chamber music, or percussion-poor music.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2008, 07:33:20 PM by Teresa »

Online SonicMan46

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2008, 07:58:19 PM »
Hello, and welcome to the GMG Forum - hope that you'll enjoy the people here & the threads -  :D

Villa-Lobos was an extremely prolific composer who wrote in many different genres, so I guess you might want to give the forum some idea of your 'classical music' preferences, e.g. chamber, orchestral, vocal, etc.?  Might help to make more specific suggestions - I did a search for some threads on V-L, but did not find much (probably a number were present on the 'old' forum?).

But just a general listing of some of the works of his that I own:  Bachianas, Choros, Chamber Works, Piano Music & Concertos, Guitar Music, & String Quartets - let us know 'what' you might prefer and more specific recommendations can be made -  :)

Offline Iconito

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2008, 12:17:54 AM »
My favorite Villa-Lobos so far:

Have you tried his Chôros #10, Teresa? I have the feeling that you’d love it.
It's your language. I'm just trying to use it --Victor Borge

Harry

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2008, 12:23:48 AM »
I picked this up recently and absolutely love it:


Any ideas where I should go next?


Try the beautiful symphony cycle on CPO. :)

lukeottevanger

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2008, 12:35:23 AM »
For the curious, there is a six disc box set on EMI of the man himself conducting his own music - it includes many of the most important works, and it's available at bargain prices, I think (it was when I bought it). Interesting listening, but you need to supplement it with other readings, as the performances and recordings leave a lot to be desired.

Yes, here it is - £11.10 in the Amazon marketplace at the moment


Offline 71 dB

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2008, 12:46:10 AM »
I picked this up recently and absolutely love it:


Any ideas where I should go next?


Definitely Bachianas Brasileiras , also available on Naxos (don't know how good performance it is, I have Bátiz on EMI).


Choros No. 11 is a wonderful work for piano and orchestra. This Finnish production on ONDINE is superb.
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Offline Brewski

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2008, 10:34:14 AM »
This CD has never been too far from my player in the last year.  I'm particularly fond of the Sinfonietta (1916), a fun bit of neoclassicism based on themes by Mozart, but the Symphony No. 7 (1945) is excellent, too.  Here's a pretty good review, although the writer focuses more on the symphony.



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Offline bvy

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2008, 05:47:33 PM »
Thanks for all the great responses. I'm checking out Bachianas Brasileiras 2-4 on Napster right now.

Hello, and welcome to the GMG Forum - hope that you'll enjoy the people here & the threads -  :D

Villa-Lobos was an extremely prolific composer who wrote in many different genres, so I guess you might want to give the forum some idea of your 'classical music' preferences, e.g. chamber, orchestral, vocal, etc.?  Might help to make more specific suggestions - I did a search for some threads on V-L, but did not find much (probably a number were present on the 'old' forum?).

Thanks for the welcome, and, yes, all those are my preference. Seriously, I'm leaning more toward chamber music lately, but I love vocal, symphonic and keyboard music as well. I guess I'm still exploring too much to be too exclusive of any composer, period, or instrumentation. Along the other axis, though, I love early and Baroque music, and the late Romantic period into 20th Century music. I guess I'm not leaving out much there either -- the Classical period maybe (rumor has it that there really is more to the Classical period than Haydn and Mozart).

I'm liking what I hear while I type -- no. 2 of the aforementioned piece. Somewhat surprised (in a good way!) to hear a saxophone...

Drasko

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2008, 06:02:56 PM »

Teresa

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2008, 08:15:31 PM »
Have you tried his Chôros #10, Teresa? I have the feeling that you’d love it.

Thanks I played a streaming audio clip at Amazon sounds like it is a very exciting piece. :D 

I also found these Villa-Lobos links as well:

The Villa Lobos website http://www.villalobos.ca/

The Villa-Lobos Magazine http://villa-lobos.blogspot.com/




Offline Montpellier

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2008, 11:36:02 AM »
I happened on Villa-Lobos on an LP in the remaindering rack of The Quintette en forme de Choros performed by the New York Wind Quintet, an adaptation of the original that was for Fl Ob CA (Eng Horn) Cl and Bn, substituting the CA with a horn.  It grabbed me.   (It's since been reissued by Boston Skyline.  In spite of its age it holds out well.)   

I've heard many other recorded performances of this Quintette but none has the atmosphere of the NY Wind Quintet.   The William Bennett and Friends CD (Hyperion) is the next closest (retaining the original scoring).  That CD also includes the best recording I've heard of his Trio for Oboe Clarinet and Bassoon.   Like most of his work, these pieces must be exhausting to play.  If anything characterises Villa-Lobos' music, it's difficult.

Another interesting one is the Fantasia Concertante for 32 cellos.  It seems to have received only one performance by the New York Cello Society.  The recording was poor and the playing a bit off in places.  Originally on an Everest LP it was transcribed to CD on a Brazillian label. 

But all his work, weak or strong holds some interest for me except, ironically, his guitar music. 

« Last Edit: March 15, 2008, 11:39:01 AM by Anacho »

Offline bvy

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2008, 04:20:33 PM »
Like most of his work, these pieces must be exhausting to play.  If anything characterises Villa-Lobos' music, it's difficult.

Certainly you mean difficult to play. The chamber music collection I mentioned when I opened this thread is one of the most calming yet engaging pieces of music I've heard recently -- i.e. very easy to listen to.

Another interesting one is the Fantasia Concertante for 32 cellos.

Now that sounds difficult!

I wonder if Villa-Lobos wrote much vocal music...

Offline Montpellier

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2008, 09:07:38 AM »
I wonder if Villa-Lobos wrote much vocal music...

He used voices in different contexts.  In that of 'calming chamber music' there's the Quartet for Flute Saxophone Harp Celeste and (wordless) female chorus - dreamy and somewhat Debussian.  I think he also uses voices in the Nonette.   

He wrote some part-songs and ecclesiastical stuff - Hyperion CDA66638 has a representative selection including Bedita Sabedoria, a Magnificat and his Missa Sao Sebastiao.   

Many songs with various accompaniments including orchestra.  Some of the best are found in the 'Forest of the Amazon' suite - the version originally recorded with Villa-Lobos conducting and Bidu Sayao is the one to look out for.  It's one of few satisfactory performances under his own baton and it's excellent.  Another is his large scale 'Cancao des Aguas Claras. 
But the most well-known is the Bachianas Brasileiras No 5.  The first part sounds a little Bach-like (as was the intention with this series) though it's written in 5/4.  Part 2 is livelier in the manner of Brazil.  You'll probably have heard this work by now.

A few of his works include choir(s) - the Choros No 10, the Discovery of Brazil Suite (Part 4), his 10th Symphony (the version recently released by Carl St Clair with the Stuttgard SO is definitely the best).

There's just a few.  Villa-Lobos eventually won a government post thanks to a revolution and wrote music for educational purposes - the Guia Practica (I think).  The few pieces I've heard in this line haven't really snared me but you may like some of the songs.

cheers.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 09:36:22 AM by Anacho »

Offline Montpellier

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2008, 09:33:10 AM »
Villa-Lobos was a cellist and wrote  a few pieces for groups of cellos.  The most famous are the "Bachianas Brasileiras" Nos 1 and 5, using an octet of cellos, the 5th with a soprano, of course.   

If you'd like an intro to his "Choros", there's an excellent CD of Nos 1 - 7 - including an 8th "Introduction to the Choros" (1929).  ASV CD DCA1150 - Orquesta Filharmonica de Gran Canaria / Adrian Leaper.  A little misleading because the Choros range from solo guitar (No 1) to huge orchestral pieces.  The "Introduction", and the 6th are the orchestral pieces here and I must confess, IMHO this recording of the 6th is one of the better ones - not too hurried and allowing the long cantilena in Part 2 time to make itself felt.   I'm not grabbed by all the Choros but they do demonstrate his range of technique during his most creative period.  And the performances here are well-enough polished. 

I see that BIS has just started a multi-volume series of the Choros and I'll be looking at them.

Offline Christo

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2008, 03:41:13 AM »
Any ideas where I should go next?

Schermerhorn's last recordings, a complete set of the nine Bachianas Brasileiras, is totally enjoyable. Last year, they made me discover that I always overlooked some of the finest, as they tend to be the lesser well-known. My favourite Bachianas Brasileiras now being, thanks to this set: nos. 4, 7, 8. Highly recommended!
             
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Christo

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2008, 12:40:26 AM »
I see that BIS has just started a multi-volume series of the Choros and I'll be looking at them.

If the BIS series, with the São Paulo Symphony Orchestra under John Neschling, is just as good as their Guarnieri cycle with the same forces, it will be something special indeed. I ordered for the first one and hope to play them all, in time. The series is in three volumes:

CD1 with Chôros No. 6 for orchestra, Chôros No. 1 for guitar, Chôros No. 8 for large orchestra and two pianos, Chôros No. 4 for three horns and trombone, Chôros No. 9 for orchestra.

CD2 with Chôros No.11 for piano and orchestra, Chôros No. 5 ‘Alma Brasileira’ for piano, Chôros No. 7 ‘Settimino’ for winds, violin and cello.

CD3 with Introduction to the Chôros for guitar, Two Chôros bis for violin and cello, Chôros No. 2 for flute and clarinet, Chôros No. 3, "Pica-Pau" for orchestra, Chôros No. 10 `Rasga o coração' for chorus and orchestra, Chôros No. 12 for orchestra. 

Villa-Lobos was an extremely prolific composer who wrote in many different genres, so I guess you might want to give the forum some idea of your 'classical music' preferences, e.g. chamber, orchestral, vocal, etc.?  Might help to make more specific suggestions - I did a search for some threads on V-L, but did not find much (probably a number were present on the 'old' forum?).

Villa-Lobos was a cellist and wrote  a few pieces for groups of cellos.  The most famous are the "Bachianas Brasileiras" Nos 1 and 5, using an octet of cellos, the 5th with a soprano, of course. 

The best starter available IMO - and one that may be rather inexpensive - is Michael Tilson Thomas conducting the very best Bachianas Brasileiras, namely Nos. 4, 5 (with Renée Fleming, soprano, and the octet of celloos mentioned by Anacho) 7, 9 and the glorious Chôros No. 10, 'Rasga o coração' (with choir).

             
« Last Edit: December 26, 2008, 02:48:38 AM by Christo »
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline donaldopato

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2008, 06:29:17 AM »
The Symphonies did not make a great impression on me. But the Chôros series on BIS is wonderful. Well worth checking out. # 1, which  is a huge sprawling yet always interesting piano concerto, is definitely one of his best works.
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DarkAngel

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Re: Villa-Lobos Anyone?
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2009, 08:26:51 AM »
Schermerhorn's last recordings, a complete set of the nine Bachianas Brasileiras, is totally enjoyable. Last year, they made me discover that I always overlooked some of the finest, as they tend to be the lesser well-known. My favourite Bachianas Brasileiras now being, thanks to this set: nos. 4, 7, 8. Highly recommended!
            

I have been getting into Villa-Lobos with the ultra cheap Naxos series also......I am just now "discovering" the world of Villa-Lobos
There is a whole series of solo piano works Cds on Naxos that I have been buying up:




Also looks like CPO will release 7CD boxset of symphonies later this month, I will be a buyer

« Last Edit: November 02, 2009, 05:22:10 PM by DarkAngel »