Author Topic: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues  (Read 22159 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Steve

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2007, 01:59:57 PM »
Sorry, for being late to this thread  ;)

I'd easily recommend this recording,


The Mad Hatter

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2007, 02:31:11 PM »
Sorry, for being late to this thread  ;)

I'd easily recommend this recording,



Heh, that's the one I pointed out in my first post - don't really like it. Too blurry a tone for my tastes, for one thing, and too much pedal - I like clarity, especially in polyphonic music.

I wonder if people who own all three could describe the strengths and weaknesses of the Scherbakov, Nikolayeva and Ashkenazy? Personally I don't think I'll go for the Richter, as I want a full set.

BorisG

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2007, 05:02:48 PM »
Scherbakov. Mustonen for op. 34.

George

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #23 on: June 07, 2007, 05:49:03 PM »
That bloody Richter! Seem's to have a monopoly on everything, he can't have been that good.... :-\ ;)

Your right, he can't. Yet, somehow, he is.  ::)

sidoze

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2007, 12:52:37 AM »
You can hear Richter playing Shostakovich here. Someone set it over the start of Tarr's Damnation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AR-A32mEZk

Offline BachQ

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5798
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #25 on: June 08, 2007, 03:18:27 AM »
Zimerman  :D 

Steve

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2007, 11:05:33 AM »
Heh, that's the one I pointed out in my first post - don't really like it. Too blurry a tone for my tastes, for one thing, and too much pedal - I like clarity, especially in polyphonic music.

I wonder if people who own all three could describe the strengths and weaknesses of the Scherbakov, Nikolayeva and Ashkenazy? Personally I don't think I'll go for the Richter, as I want a full set.

With the Jarett edition, whatever sonic-related issues are present, I consider his interpretation to a very welcome contribution to this work. I really didn't find the tone problematic, but then again, it's a recent purchase. I'll have to look into this some more. I'll be happy to dig up my other recordings of this piece for a comparison. Something tells me that my Ashkenazy would be a good place to start.

The Mad Hatter

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #27 on: June 08, 2007, 12:25:03 PM »
With the Jarett edition, whatever sonic-related issues are present, I consider his interpretation to a very welcome contribution to this work. I really didn't find the tone problematic, but then again, it's a recent purchase. I'll have to look into this some more. I'll be happy to dig up my other recordings of this piece for a comparison. Something tells me that my Ashkenazy would be a good place to start.

I ended up going with the Naxos. I think I'm in love.

Thank you, Harry, I am in your debt.
As for the Jarrett, it's technically accomplished, but it just...doesn't really grab me the way I hope a new piece of music will.

Offline carlos

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 286
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #28 on: June 08, 2007, 12:27:26 PM »
I've a complete old version by Roger Woodward
(1975),which I like very much.
Also, 6 by Shosta himself. He was a fine pianist
(at least on his works).
Piantale a la leche hermano, que eso arruina el corazón! (from a tango's letter)

Offline XB-70 Valkyrie

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1912
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #29 on: November 12, 2007, 03:50:47 AM »
We had a thread about this not too long ago, but my search yielded nothing. Anyway, I've been very much drawn to these by Richter's Decca 2CD set of Scriabin, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich. I bought Konstantin Scherbakov's set on Naxos, and while he is obviously a fine pianist, I find I prefer Richter's more somber, and perhaps more romantic interpreations. (In any case, I am still interested in Scherbakov's other recordings!) I really relate to this music, however, and I need to find more recordings. I know they were written for Tatiana Nikolayeva, but there are at least three sets (Hyperion, Regis, and another Regis), and several single CDs of her playing these on the market. Which is to be preferred? Shostakovich himself recorded at least some of these, but I have not found these at either Arkiv or Amazon. What about Jarrett? What about Ashkenazy? (Is that 5 CD set of his, incl. the piano quinetet and other works any good??) I don't know how many Richter recorded, but I only have six on my Decca set. I wish I could find more. Who else is worthwhile in this repertoire?

 
If you really dislike Bach you keep quiet about it! - Andras Schiff

Don

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #30 on: November 12, 2007, 11:52:58 AM »
I've always found Nikolaeyeva's sets the best - either Hyperion or Regis or Melodiya, take your pick.  Concerning other complete sets, none of them holds up well to Nikolayeva.  Ashkenazy and Scherbakov are nothing special, and Jarrett sometimes sounds like the lounge player at the local Holiday Inn.

Leaving Nikolayeva aside, I'd opt for Petrushansky (Dynamic) and Rubackyte (Brilliant Classics).  If you were to subscribe to the Naxos Music Library, you could listen to the entire Petrushansky - I was impressed.

Offline ragman1970

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 143
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2007, 12:43:08 PM »
I've always found Nikolaeyeva's sets the best - either Hyperion or Regis or Melodiya, take your pick.  Concerning other complete sets, none of them holds up well to Nikolayeva.  Ashkenazy and Scherbakov are nothing special, and Jarrett sometimes sounds like the lounge player at the local Holiday Inn.

Sherbakov doesn't come close to Nikplaeyeva!

Offline XB-70 Valkyrie

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1912
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2007, 03:48:36 PM »
... Jarrett sometimes sounds like the lounge player at the local Holiday Inn.


Murph and the MagicTones--in those candy-ass monkey suits?

If you really dislike Bach you keep quiet about it! - Andras Schiff

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5981
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2007, 05:49:24 PM »
Nikolayeva (Regis) and Ashkenazy each have unique insights. Nikolayeva perhaps being more deadpan (which I enjoy).

I haven't heard Nikolayeva's Hyperion set from a couple years after the Regis/Melodiya but it's purportedly recorded in an overly resonant acoustic. Just a heads-up as that kind of thing can drive me batty (Regis is fine).

Richter recorded a fair number of these works but they are scattered around several labels (and time periods) and are not always easy to find.

You can find bits on Philips (newly reissued on Decca) from 1963, Doremi from 1974, London/Decca from 1989 (in very poor sound), Pyramid from 1973, and Supraphon (Ultraphon) from 1956 (below). The latter three are long OOP.

« Last Edit: November 13, 2007, 04:34:41 PM by donwyn »
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5981
  • Posts: who's counting?
  • Currently Listening to:
    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #34 on: November 12, 2007, 09:36:10 PM »
In case anyone's interested, just ran across the above Ultraphon disc at Academy Records.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

BorisG

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #35 on: November 12, 2007, 09:56:35 PM »
I am shocked at the slighting of Scherbakov on this thread. Gentlemen, you need a good thrashing. >:(

johnQpublic

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #36 on: November 13, 2007, 12:26:19 PM »
you need a good thrashing.

Yes I do, but only from a sexy, nubile girl. Not from some guy named Boris....hehe

BorisG

  • Guest
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #37 on: November 13, 2007, 02:08:56 PM »
Yes I do, but only from a sexy, nubile girl. Not from some guy named Boris....hehe

 :-*

Offline Daverz

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5615
  • You can't fool me, it's turtles all the way down!
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #38 on: November 14, 2007, 12:07:07 AM »
I have the Nikolayeva on Melodiya/RCA, which is the same as the Regis.  I haven't heard the her Hyperion, but this Melodiya one is very fine.  I've hardly made a survey of these works, but Nikolayeva is very involving. 

Still, Scherbakov is a very fine Shostakovich player.  I highly recommend his Sonata No. 1 on Naxos.

I haven't heard Jarret, but I found his Bach very dull.

Richter recorded a few more of these, by the way, on Supraphon.



Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 12974
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues
« Reply #39 on: March 14, 2009, 09:27:50 AM »
Boy, a thread on some great piano works laying dormant for nearly 2 years - guess I'll 'bump' it TTT!  :D

I still have the same 2 sets w/ Keith Jarrett & Konstantin Scherbakov; still like Scherbakov in these works, but was listening to Jarrett this morning (been a while) and find a lot of enjoyment (still have not done any 'back-to-back' comparisons of these two performers); of course, Tatiana Nikolayeva's name still seems to be a favorite for many here!

But, just wondering if any newer releases have appeared and have been well received?  Thanks -  :)