Author Topic: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)  (Read 3996 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« on: September 06, 2009, 12:17:46 PM »
I have just discovered Boris Tchaikovsky (no relation to Peter). I find his music very rewarding.  I read that there were similarities between his Second Symphony and the later 15th by Shostakovich.  Not sure I agree but it made me search out a symphony that I have now listened to many times.  It is a powerful, searching, tonal work in an idiom which recalls Shostakovich and Shebalin - I enjoy it greatly. I have now bought Symphony No 1 (Naxos) which has similar qualities. This is darkly powerful music. If you like Shostakovich/Miaskovsky I'd recommend Boris Tchaikovsky.

Here's some more info (note my avatar photo in the biography section  ;D)

http://www.boris-tchaikovsky.com/english.htm


« Last Edit: September 06, 2009, 12:23:08 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

DavidW

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2009, 03:28:37 PM »
Oh forest murmurs!  I wonder if it sound Wagnerian? :)

Offline Guido

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2009, 03:59:12 PM »
Rostropovich always regarded his music very highly and thought him the finest of the Russian composers not known in the West. I like but don't love his cello works - striking in some regards, but ultimately a little unmemorable.
Geologist.

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snyprrr

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2009, 04:26:11 PM »
Someone around here has his SQs.

How does he compare with Tischenko?

Offline The new erato

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2009, 10:11:17 PM »
I have, and I have posted my impressions in the listening thread. Since I don't know Tischenko's SQs, I can't really compare.

There's a fine orchestral work as a coupling on the Profil/Kondrashin Shostakovich 15th disc as well.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2009, 02:52:15 AM by erato »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2009, 02:24:00 AM »
Thanks for replies.  I'm looking forward to hearing 'The Wind of Siberia' and the Chamber Symphony.  On balance I prefer his music to the Tischenko that I have heard.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2016, 05:25:49 PM »
Some older sources translated the Russian name as "Chaykovsky."
Does this matter much to our Russian friends here?
Your barricades lie broken ... your enemies lord.

snyprrr

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2016, 08:10:17 AM »
Some older sources translated the Russian name as "Chaykovsky."
Does this matter much to our Russian friends here?

AH HA!! Just athe I exthpected!! Here right here is proof that you work for Trump and are just a Republican Shill sent here to destabilize the Vote. For shaaame, scion, for shaaame!!!










 :laugh:

Offline Jo498

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2016, 09:43:03 AM »
The last name of Boris Alexandrovich and Pjotr Ilyich is the same in Cyrillic spelling. I am not sure about English but in German there have always been several ways to transcribe Cyrillic names and the pronunciation of "tch" or "ch" in English are usually almost identical so either could be used for that letter.
In fact, "Chaikovsky" would be more consistent because Alexandrovich or Ilyich end with the same letter and it is transcribed as "ch" there.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2016, 12:57:52 PM »
My favorite works of Boris Tchaikovsky's are the Sebastopol Symphony and The Wind of Siberia found on this excellent release:


“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2016, 07:12:17 PM »
.... incoherence-incoherence-psychotic episode

You've gone quite mad!  Me, take part in these shambolic American campaigns?  A crazed woman unfit to be president vs. a crazed man unfit to be president?  My dear snyprrr, I'm a Cromwellian.  The New Model Army would handle both Clinton and Trump in a most ... final ... manner.   :P

I'm also very curious how you lept to your rambling - unless it was a medication failure.
Does the music of B. Tchaikovsky always affect you this way?  ;D
He seems a pretty melodic chap.  If it was Reich or Cage, I could understand the mood swing to extremes - the feeling that music had stopped developing, and was going backwards towards pounding 2 rocks together while grunting tunelessly.  >:D
« Last Edit: August 15, 2016, 07:21:22 PM by Scion7 »
Your barricades lie broken ... your enemies lord.

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2016, 07:28:58 PM »
M.I. - I would go with the Violin Concerto (Boris's personal favorite), the Sinfonietta (Shostakovich was much impressed), along with the chamber pieces - Piano Quintet, Cello Sonata and Violin Sonata.

His string quartets are inventive, if not spectacularly so - sometimes showing a Beethoven influence, although Boris T. is lyrical rather than rhythmic - it's more of a feel towards some of the melodic ideas of late Beethoven.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2016, 07:31:06 PM by Scion7 »
Your barricades lie broken ... your enemies lord.

snyprrr

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2016, 05:02:24 AM »
You've gone quite mad!  Me, take part in these shambolic American campaigns?  A crazed woman unfit to be president vs. a crazed man unfit to be president?  My dear snyprrr, I'm a Cromwellian.  The New Model Army would handle both Clinton and Trump in a most ... final ... manner.   :P

I'm also very curious how you lept to your rambling - unless it was a medication failure.
Does the music of B. Tchaikovsky always affect you this way?  ;D
He seems a pretty melodic chap.  If it was Reich or Cage, I could understand the mood swing to extremes - the feeling that music had stopped developing, and was going backwards towards pounding 2 rocks together while grunting tunelessly.  >:D

mm... I guess timing is everything in comedy? Aaand... LocationLocationLocation!! I thought you knew everyone's invited to vote in this year's elections....??....

forgive me ;)

btw- I'M not the crazy one around here!!!!!!!!! :o :o :o

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2016, 07:41:04 AM »
I thought you knew everyone's invited to vote in this year's elections....??....

Although I joined the American navy (as a nuclear engineer, USS Tennessee SSBN) after university, and am an American citizen, I don't vote in the elections.  My personal philosophy is that one should only vote in the country of one's birth.  And while this is the Colonies, after 1812, we sort of buried the hatchet on independence.   8)

  I'm not the crazy one here!  I'm not!  I'M NOT!  Who told you that? It was Zeus, wasn't it!  By Jove, he'll pay for that remark!

We know!  You're completely normal!   $:)
Your barricades lie broken ... your enemies lord.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2016, 06:26:06 PM »
M.I. - I would go with the Violin Concerto (Boris's personal favorite), the Sinfonietta (Shostakovich was much impressed), along with the chamber pieces - Piano Quintet, Cello Sonata and Violin Sonata.

His string quartets are inventive, if not spectacularly so - sometimes showing a Beethoven influence, although Boris T. is lyrical rather than rhythmic - it's more of a feel towards some of the melodic ideas of late Beethoven.

Thanks for the recs, I'll check these out. I do believe I already own the Sinfonietta, but I'll have to double check. Since I really enjoy chamber music, I'll check those works out, especially the sonatas for cello and violin.
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2020, 05:56:36 PM »
Few activity on this thread. Listening to his Piano Trio in B minor from the disc below is an excellent reason to bring this thread to life again.



What an impressive work! The 1st movement Toccata features some of the most stirring pages for this ensemble I've ever heard, absolutely rousing! The 2nd movement is a heartfelt and poignant Aria which makes counterweight to the ultra energetic 1st movement. Lastly, the final Variations display some fine counterpoint, reaching important intensity throughout. I wouldn't hesitate to call this work a masterpiece. A supremely tremendous find.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2020, 07:54:38 AM »
Few activity on this thread. Listening to his Piano Trio in B minor from the disc below is an excellent reason to bring this thread to life again.



What an impressive work! The 1st movement Toccata features some of the most stirring pages for this ensemble I've ever heard, absolutely rousing! The 2nd movement is a heartfelt and poignant Aria which makes counterweight to the ultra energetic 1st movement. Lastly, the final Variations display some fine counterpoint, reaching important intensity throughout. I wouldn't hesitate to call this work a masterpiece. A supremely tremendous find.

Very nice, Cesar. I wouldn’t mind exploring more of Tchaikovsky’s music. I recall being thoroughly impressed with the Sebastopol Symphony. In fact, this recording contained all superb works:



I seem to also have been impressed with these recordings:







I need to get around to this 2-CD set at some point:



« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 07:56:14 AM by Mirror Image »
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2020, 08:07:53 AM »
Very nice, Cesar. I wouldn’t mind exploring more of Tchaikovsky’s music. I recall being thoroughly impressed with the Sebastopol Symphony. In fact, this recording contained all superb works:



I seem to also have been impressed with these recordings:







I need to get around to this 2-CD set at some point:



I did remember you liked the Sebastopol Symphony, John. A quite special piece. In fact, the whole Chandos CD of orchestral works is mandatory for any B. Tchaikovsky fan. It's truly superb. From the other CDs I know the one with the Piano Quintet. Rather good. The rest of them are waiting for me in the near future.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2020, 08:17:53 AM »
I did remember you liked the Sebastopol Symphony, John. A quite special piece. In fact, the whole Chandos CD of orchestral works is mandatory for any B. Tchaikovsky fan. It's truly superb. From the other CDs I know the one with the Piano Quintet. Rather good. The rest of them are waiting for me in the near future.

Indeed, Cesar. The Chandos recording is a fine disc. I’d say the next work you should hear is the Chamber Symphony. I rather like this work (or, at least, I remember liking it --- I don’t know how I feel about it nowadays ;)).
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996)
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2020, 07:58:35 PM »
Thought I would revive this thread since there was some talk between Cesar and I on the ‘Listening’ thread and I believe another member had been listening to the Cello Concerto (the recording with Rostropovich). Anyway, I’d say one of the more remarkable qualities of B. Tchaikovsky’s music is its lyricism and ability to draw a listener in with some fascinating harmonic/melodic ideas. To my knowledge, there is another known Tchaikovsky: Alexander. Anyway, I think the reason why Boris isn’t well-known isn’t the fact that he shares a name with one of the biggest Russian composers ever, but the fact that it seems he was a rather modest man and didn’t really know too much about how to promote his music. Of course, this didn’t stop conductors like Kondrashin, Fedoseyev, Alexander Gauk, amongst others from performing his music and recording it. I think he comes across as someone like Weinberg who didn’t care much about the marketing side of music and just wanted to continue to hone their craft and, hopefully, write good music that people will enjoy. Of course, both of these composers’ ideals are different and the circumstances they wrote under were also rather different. It seems that Boris found his compositional voice around the time of the Sebastopol Symphony or, at least, this is what I recall reading. Some interesting little trivia: Boris was a student of Shostakovich’s. 8)

To those who haven’t heard of this composer and are the least bit curious about his music, I’d point to the Sebastopol Symphony as a good introduction, but I’d say the chamber works like the Piano Trio, Piano Quintet and the SQs would also make for good introductions.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2020, 08:01:03 PM by Mirror Image »
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy