Author Topic: I listen to Death Metal. I'd like to listen to classical, too. Where do I start?  (Read 20231 times)

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Offline MilesMetal

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Ideally, I'd like a list of the essential works by the most influential classical composers.

Would 'The History of Classical Music on 100 CDs' be a good place to start? How would you rate it? Is it missing anything?

This is what it includes:

'Medieval - Baroque' section
CD 1 Gregorian Chant - Feast Of Stephen / Marchaut: Chansons
CD 2 Dufay / Josquin Des Pres: Motets
CD 3 Wind Music From Renaissance Italy
CD 4 Tallis / Byrd / De Victoria / Palestrina / Allegri
CD 5 Monteverdi: Vespers (Highlights), Madrigals
CD 6 Schütz / Buxtehude / Pachelbel: Chamber Music
CD 7 Purcell: Dido And Aeneas (Highlights); The Fairy Queen (Highlights)
CD 8 Charpentier: Te Deum / Rameau: Une Symphonie Imaginaire
CD 9 Telemann: Concertos
CD 10 Vivaldi: The Four Seasons, Gloria in D Major
CD 11 Bach: Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 2 & 5, Orchestral Suite No.2
CD 12 Bach: Goldberg Variations, Fantasia in C Minor, Italian Concerto
CD 13 Bach: Organ Works
CD 14 Bach: St. Matthew Passion (Highlights)
CD 15 Bach: Magnificat, Cantatas BWV 63 & 65
CD 16 Handel: "Royal Fireworks" Music, Arrival Of The Queen Of Sheba
CD 17 Handel: Harp Concerto, Organ Concerto in F, Concerto No.3
CD 18 Handel: Messiah - Arias And Choruses
CD 19 D. Scarlatti: Sonatas
CD 20 C.P.E. Bach: Symphonies For Strings (1-6) / J.C. Bach: Quintet

'Classical' section
CD 21 Haydn: Symphonies No.45 "Farewell", No.88 & No.104 "London"
CD 22 Haydn: String Quartets Nos.3, 5, 63, 74, 77
CD 23 Haydn: The Creation (Highlights)
CD 24 Mozart: "Eine kleine Nachtmusik", Symphonies Nos.40 & 41
CD 25 Mozart: Piano Concerto Nos.20 & 21, Fantasia In D Minor
CD 26 Mozart: Clarinet Quintet, String Quintet In G Minor, K516
CD 27 Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro, K.492 (Highlights)
CD 28 Mozart: Requiem, Laudate Dominum, Exsultate, jubilate
CD 29 Beethoven: Symphonies Nos.5 & 6
CD 30 Beethoven: Symphony No.9 "Choral"
CD 31 Beethoven: Piano Concerto Nos 4 & 5
CD 32 Beethoven: Sonata For Violin And Piano No.9 "Kreutzer"
CD 33 Beethoven: Piano Sonata Nos.8, 23 & 31
CD 34 Weber: Der Freischütz (Highlights)

'Romantic' section
CD 34 Weber: Der Freischütz (Highlights)
CD 35 Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Highlights)
CD 36 Schubert: Symphony No.8 "Unfinished"; Symphony No.9 "The Great"
CD 37 Schubert: Piano Quintet in A "The Trout", String Quartet No.14 in D Minor "Death And The Maiden"
CD 38 Schubert: Piano Sonata No.21 in B Flat, 3 Impromptus; 2 Moments musicaux
CD 39 Schubert: Winterreise
CD 40 Paganini: Violin Concerto No.1; 10 Capricci
CD 41 Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Overtures: Benvenuto Cellini & Le Corsaire
CD 42 Chopin: Piano Concerto No.1 in E Minor, Préludes; Barcarolle in F Sharp Minor, Scherzo Nr. 3 in Sharp Minor
CD 43 Chopin: Nocturnes (Selection)
CD 44 Chopin: Ballade No.1 in G Minor, Berceuse in D Flat, Polonaise No.6 in A Flat-"Heroic, Excerpts From 12 Etudes, Op.10
CD 45 Liszt: Piano Concerto No.1 in E Flat, Piano Sonata in B Minor, Hungarian Rhapsody No.6 in D Flat, Années de pèlerinage,
CD 46 Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Symphony No.4 "Italian", "The Hebrids" Overture; Excerpts Of "A Midsummer Night's Dream
CD 47 Schumann: Symphony No.2, Symphony No.3 "Rhenish"
CD 48 Schumann: Piano Concerto in A Minor, "Kinderszenen", Carnaval
CD 49 Schumann: Dichterliebe, Frauenliebe und Leben
CD 50 Bizet: Carmen (Highlights)
CD 51 Brahms: Symphonies No.1 & No.4
CD 52 Brahms: Piano Concerto No.2 in B Flat, 7 Fantasias
CD 53 Brahms: Violin Concerto in D, Sonata For Piano And Violin No.1 in G "Regenlied-Sonate"
CD 54 Bruckner: Symphony No.4 in E Flat Major - "Romantic"; Psalm 150, for Soprano, Chorus And Orchestra
CD 55 Strauss, J.: Waltzes & Polkas
CD 56 Smetana: The Moldau, From Bohemia's Meadows And Woods / Dvorák: Symphony No.9, Op.95 "From The New World"
CD 57 Dvorák: Symphony No.8 in G Major, Cello Concerto in B Minor
CD 58 Grieg: Peer Gynt Suites Nos.1 & 2; Piano Concerto in A Minor
CD 59 Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6, Op.74 "Pathéthique"; Nutcracker Suite, Op.71a
CD 60 Tchaikovsky: Romeo And Julia - Fantasy Overture; Serenade For String Orchestra, Overture solenelle "1812" Op. 39
CD 61 Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1 Op.23; Violin Concerto Op.35
CD 62 Wagner: Overtures & Preludes
CD 63 Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen (Highlights)
CD 64 Wagner: Tristan und Isolde (Highlights)
CD 65 Verdi: Aida (Highlights)
CD 66 Verdi: Rigoletto (Highlights)
CD 67 Verdi: La Traviata (Highlights)
CD 68 Saint-Saëns: Symphony No.3 in C Minor, Op.78 - "Organ Symphony" / Franck: Symphony in D Minor
CD 69 Glinka: Ruslan And Ludmilla - Overture / Balakirev: Islamey / Borodin: Polovtsian Dances / Mussorgsky: Pictures At An Exhibition
CD 70 Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade, Capriccio Espagnole
CD 71 Mahler: Symphony No.1, Songs Of A Wayfarer
CD 72 Mahler: Symphony No. 5

'Modern' section
CD 73 Debussy: Nocturnes, Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, La Mer
CD 74 Debussy: Suite bergamasque, 12 Préludes
CD 75 Strauss, R.: Also sprach Zarathustra, Don Juan, Till Eulenspiegel
CD 76 Strauss, R.: Tod und Verklärung, Capriccio, Vier letzte Lieder
CD 77 Puccini: La Bohème - Highlights
CD 78 Puccini: Tosca - Highlights; "Nessun dorma"
CD 79 Elgar: Variations On An Original Theme / Holst: The Planets
CD 80 Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 in D Minor / Scriabin: Symphony No.4 "Le Poeme De L'Extase"
CD 81 Sibelius: Symphony No.5, Finlandia, Tapiola, Valse triste
CD 82 Ives: Piano Sonata No.2 "Concord, Mass., 1840-1860", Central Park In The Dark, Three Places In New England / Barber: Adagio For Strings
CD 83 Janácek: Taras Bulba; Concertino; Sinfonietta
CD 84 Ravel: Boléro, Piano Concerto in G, Pavane pour une infante défunte, Ma mère l'oye
CD 85 Schoenberg: Transfigured Night, Pierrot Lunaire / Webern: Six Pieces For Orchestra, Symphony
CD 86 Berg: 3 Pieces for Orchestra, Violin Concerto, Lyric Suite - 3 Pieces For String Orchestra
CD 87 Stravinsky: Petrouchka, Apollon Musagète (1947 Version), Circus Polka For A Young Elephant
CD 88 Stravinsky: Pulcinella, Le sacre du printemps
CD 89 Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No.1 in D, Piano Concerto No.3 in C, Lieutenant Kijé, Symphonic Suite
CD 90 Bartók: Music For Strings, Percussion & Celesta, Concerto For Orchestra
CD 91 Hindemith: Mathis Der Maler / Weill: The Threepenny Opera - Suite / Pfitzner: Palestrina - Preludes / Busoni: Doktor Faust - Intermezzo
CD 92 Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 5 in D Minor
CD 93 Britten: Serenade For Tenor, Horn And Strings / Delius: Two Pieces For Small Orchestra / Vaughan Williams: The Lark Ascending
CD 94 Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez / Falla: El amor brujo, Nights In Spanish Garden
CD 95 Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris / Bernstein: "Candide" Overture, Symphonic Dances From "West Side Story"
CD 96 Messiaen: Turangalîla Symphony
CD 97 Boulez: Le marteau sans maitre / Stockhausen: Gruppen
CD 98 Schnittke: Concerto Grosso No.1 / Lutoslawski: Chain 3; Novelette / Ligeti: Chamber Concerto
CD 99 Gorecki: Symphony No. 3 “Symphony Of Sorrowful Songs”
CD 100 Reich: Six Pianos / Adams: Shaker Loops / Glass: Violin Concerto

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Kudos to you for bravely embarking on this broad sea!

It may seem ironic to consider a 100-CD anthology a start . . . but, well, it is  ;)  There is no easy way to condense the whole of the classical literature down to (let's call it) 125 hours of music;  inevitably there's only room for one piece by Elgar (e.g.), which means we can only manage the "Enigma" Variations . . . just an example.  But that anthology does hit a great many of the "obligatory" lit (which is music deserving of its popularity), while giving you some good glimpses at the "lesser lights" who are sometimes too readily overshadowed by the musical giants.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline mc ukrneal

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It's surprisingly not bad at all. And as it is a DG release, the performers are generally quite good as well.  One could quibble - no Bruckner, not enough classical period, could have more second half of the 20th century - but on the whole it is a pretty broad collection. It certainly will give you an idea of what is out there and you can then narrow your pursuit accordingly.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline Sergeant Rock

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One could quibble - no Bruckner...

CD 54 Bruckner: Symphony No.4 in E Flat Major - "Romantic"; Psalm 150, for Soprano, Chorus And Orchestra

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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If you must keep to only one Britten work, the Serenade is a great pick.

The Prokofiev CD really does smack of Greatest-Hits!-ism.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline ChamberNut

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Welcome to GMG, Miles:)

I use to listen to metal in my teens and 20s, and found the transition to classical music quite natural.

You might really enjoy Bach's Solo Cello Suites 1-6 and Solo Violin Partitas 1-3 and Sonatas 1-3.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2015, 05:50:36 AM by ChamberNut »
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Online North Star

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Hello, Miles!


Kudos to you for bravely embarking on this broad sea!

It may seem ironic to consider a 100-CD anthology a start . . . but, well, it is  ;)  There is no easy way to condense the whole of the classical literature down to (let's call it) 125 hours of music;  inevitably there's only room for one piece by Elgar (e.g.), which means we can only manage the "Enigma" Variations . . . just an example.  But that anthology does hit a great many of the "obligatory" lit (which is music deserving of its popularity), while giving you some good glimpses at the "lesser lights" who are sometimes too readily overshadowed by the musical giants.
I was counting on you to shout 'What?! No Nielsen?!', Karl.   :(  0:)
Copland and Pärt would seem to belong there too (and Schumann's Piano Quintet instead of all those symphonies & the PC)

If you must keep to only one Britten work, the Serenade is a great pick.
Agreed.
Quote
The Prokofiev CD really does smack of Greatest-Hits!-ism.
Yeah, we both would prefer the f minor Violin Sonata instead.  ;)


The selection looks quite decent overall, though.


E: And the only string quartets are on one CD of Haydn, plus Schubert's no. 14. And other chamber music is rather scarce, too. Hmph!
« Last Edit: September 09, 2015, 05:52:44 AM by North Star »
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I listen to Death Metal. I'd like to listen to classical, too. Where do I start?
Xenakis.

Offline MilesMetal

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Kudos to you for bravely embarking on this broad sea!

It may seem ironic to consider a 100-CD anthology a start . . . but, well, it is  ;)  There is no easy way to condense the whole of the classical literature down to (let's call it) 125 hours of music;  inevitably there's only room for one piece by Elgar (e.g.), which means we can only manage the "Enigma" Variations . . . just an example.  But that anthology does hit a great many of the "obligatory" lit (which is music deserving of its popularity), while giving you some good glimpses at the "lesser lights" who are sometimes too readily overshadowed by the musical giants.

Thanks for the reply. I'm glad I found this resource. I'd very much like to listen to some pieces that aren't on the list after I've made some headway with it. A few pieces by Wagner (namely Faust Overture) are on my list so far.

Offline MilesMetal

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It's surprisingly not bad at all. And as it is a DG release, the performers are generally quite good as well.  One could quibble - no Bruckner, not enough classical period, could have more second half of the 20th century - but on the whole it is a pretty broad collection. It certainly will give you an idea of what is out there and you can then narrow your pursuit accordingly.

Thanks for the reply, that's exactly what I intend to do. :)

Offline MilesMetal

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If you must keep to only one Britten work, the Serenade is a great pick.

The Prokofiev CD really does smack of Greatest-Hits!-ism.

I've had Prokofiev recommended a couple of times, I've made it a priority.

Offline MilesMetal

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Welcome to GMG, Miles:)

I use to listen to metal in my teens and 20s, and found the transition to classical music quite natural.

You might really enjoy Bach's Solo Cello Suites 1-6 and Solo Violin Partitas 1-3 and Sonatas 1-3.

Thanks for the recommendation. I'm feeling the same way, actually. The first piece that really hit me was Toccata and Fugue in D Minor.

Offline ChamberNut

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Thanks for the recommendation. I'm feeling the same way, actually. The first piece that really hit me was Toccata and Fugue in D Minor.

A tremendous piece, indeed!   :)  I am a fan of solo strings or grouped chamber works for string instruments.  One thing that isn't on that list are Beethoven's string quartets.  Definitely check those out.  In particular, you might really dig Beethoven's Grosse Fugue for String Quartet.

No piece stands out for me as 'Heavy Metal' more than Wagner's Prelude to Die Walkure, Act I!
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Offline 71 dB

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Ideally, I'd like a list of the essential works by the most influential classical composers.
"most influencial" isn't necessorily what YOU would enjoy the most. Some composers are "too" talked about while many great composer don't get the fame they deserve for various historical reasons.

Would 'The History of Classical Music on 100 CDs' be a good place to start? How would you rate it? Is it missing anything?
Depends on what you pay for it. It can be a great way to get a lot of classical music to explore and decide what kind of classical music you enjoy the most. However, 100 CD can't cover classical music well. It's cratch on the surface, but that's something! Much better than nothing.

There is no one "correct" way to explore classical music. Find YOUR own way. The more exciting, enjoyable and fun it is to explore, the better you are doing it, aren't you?

Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

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Offline MilesMetal

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A tremendous piece, indeed!   :)  I am a fan of solo strings or grouped chamber works for string instruments.  One thing that isn't on that list are Beethoven's string quartets.  Definitely check those out.  In particular, you might really dig Beethoven's Grosse Fugue for String Quartet.

No piece stands out for me as 'Heavy Metal' more than Wagner's Prelude to Die Walkure, Act I!

I'll definitely make it a priority listen. Thanks.

Offline MilesMetal

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"most influencial" isn't necessorily what YOU would enjoy the most. Some composers are "too" talked about while many great composer don't get the fame they deserve for various historical reasons.
Depends on what you pay for it. It can be a great way to get a lot of classical music to explore and decide what kind of classical music you enjoy the most. However, 100 CD can't cover classical music well. It's cratch on the surface, but that's something! Much better than nothing.

There is no one "correct" way to explore classical music. Find YOUR own way. The more exciting, enjoyable and fun it is to explore, the better you are doing it, aren't you?

That's a fair point. I'm not sure how far into it I will go, although I am interested enough to not only listen to the music but also learn about it in general. Getting to know it's history, context, influence and legacy will make it easier to understand exactly what I'm hearing. I know for sure that I won't be blown away on every first listen. With also music I know it takes time to appreciate these things. It was the same when I was originally getting into death metal.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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I've had Prokofiev recommended a couple of times, I've made it a priority.

I'm a great fan — as are Karlo (North Star) & Ray (Chamber Nut) — of Prokofiev . . . that one CD only scratches the surface  :)

I was counting on you to shout 'What?! No Nielsen?!', Karl.   :(  0:)

I know, dear chap:  I am in disgrace, I've let you down . . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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That's a fair point. I'm not sure how far into it I will go, although I am interested enough to not only listen to the music but also learn about it in general. Getting to know it's history, context, influence and legacy will make it easier to understand exactly what I'm hearing. I know for sure that I won't be blown away on every first listen. With also music I know it takes time to appreciate these things. It was the same when I was originally getting into death metal.

I think you've got a great attitude.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline San Antone

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I'd be interested in some Death Metal recommendations.

 ;)

That DG box would be a great (although expensive) place to start.

Offline Brewski

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I agree with comments from others: for 100 CDs - assuming the price is right - that's not a bad start at all. There's plenty there to help you decide what you might go for.

However, that said, you might want to supplement the set with more works by living composers, some of whom have been influenced by other types of music, including metal. Here's the SoundCloud link to Mario Diaz de Leon, a composer who used to play guitar in punk rock bands, then went to Oberlin, and later received his doctorate in composition at Columbia University. Earlier this year I heard Luciform played by the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), quite interesting.

https://soundcloud.com/mariodiazdeleon

Oh and sorry, forgot the most important part: welcome!  8)

--Bruce
« Last Edit: September 09, 2015, 07:25:07 AM by Brewski »
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