Author Topic: John Joubert (1927-2019)  (Read 1639 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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John Joubert (1927-2019)
« on: January 11, 2019, 06:59:21 AM »
Sorry to hear of the death of John Joubert aged 91. He wrote the well known Christmas Carol 'Torches' and I really enjoyed his symphonies 1 and 3 on Lyrita.

There is a Joubert threat but I couldn't access it from work ( ::))
RIP

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/articles/2440--obituary-john-joubert-1927-2019
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 07:02:41 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2019, 07:49:29 AM »
Aww, that's a shame! His Symphony No. 1 is included in the British Symphonies box set I picked up less than a month ago, and is definitely one of my favourite works from that set. RIP.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2019, 03:27:40 PM »
Aww, that's a shame! His Symphony No. 1 is included in the British Symphonies box set I picked up less than a month ago, and is definitely one of my favourite works from that set. RIP.
It is a very fine symphony and one which I shall play 'In Memoriam' to a fine composer.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2019, 05:01:26 PM »
Sad anytime someone dies but he lived a very long life full of creating wonderful music and with full facilities up through the end and this does give me some solace.  RIP.

Offline kyjo

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2019, 06:54:13 PM »
Sad news; RIP. His 1st Symphony, especially, is a really fine work and a great recent discovery of mine.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2019, 12:15:40 AM »
Sad anytime someone dies but he lived a very long life full of creating wonderful music and with full facilities up through the end and this does give me some solace.  RIP.
Yes, that's very true. He has a long and productive life and left behind some great music.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2019, 12:17:19 AM »
Sad news; RIP. His 1st Symphony, especially, is a really fine work and a great recent discovery of mine.
You might like the newly released No.3 as well Kyle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2019, 04:48:56 AM »
I actually learnt yesterday that Dutton have a recording of Symphony No. 2 out. Idk how easy it is to get, but it's out there.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2019, 05:39:31 AM »
I actually learnt yesterday that Dutton have a recording of Symphony No. 2 out. Idk how easy it is to get, but it's out there.
You're quite right and I have a copy of it  ::).
I must obviously listen to it again but I have been most impressed by Symphony 1 and 3.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline kyjo

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2019, 09:37:21 PM »
You might like the newly released No.3 as well Kyle.

I'll give it a spin soon!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2019, 02:50:05 AM »
I actually learnt yesterday that Dutton have a recording of Symphony No. 2 out. Idk how easy it is to get, but it's out there.
Listening to it now. It commemorated those killed in the Sharpeville Massacre in South Africa in 1960.
It is darkly impressive and reminds me a bit of the darker Malcolm Arnold symphonies line nos. 6 and 7:

« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 02:52:25 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

cilgwyn

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2019, 04:59:00 AM »
I've got a new rule,to try and conserve my dwindling bank account,to resist any composer I haven't already got in my collection,or had on cd! :(  Fortunately,Joubert's First Symphony is paired with Mathias' First. I find myself,increasingly,impressed by the music of my Welsh compatriot (cue,male voice choir singing,"Land of my Fathers",in background) and I do like his First Symphony. This being a first recording,I just had to hear it! Also,reviews I had read suggesting that it was more vigorous (or something like that?) than the Nimbus recording. So,I bought it! Good! That boring intro' over! ::) ;D I think the earlier recording is now my favourite. More to the point,because it is a Joubert thread,not a Mathias thread (breaking off here to check) I have to say I was impressed by his symphony. Yes,there are influences,but he has a voice of his own,and I think it just proves how much,good quality music is still out there. How wrong the Hurwitz was to suggest that it had all been used up! The Ruth Gipps cd is another prime example! Anyway,I just had to hear his third symphony. I'm not into the Bronte's;but the 'program' (if that's the right word?) behind this symphony,and the landcape that inspired it,appealed to me. In fact,after repeat listens,I think this is now my favourite of the two. I'm not counting the Second,which I haven't heard! Listening to it,I kept thinking it reminded me of some other piece of music. I then realised what it was. (well,the review I read,helped!) The instrumental interludes in Britten's The Turn of the Screw. They are very haunting,and help give that opera an atmosphere all of it's own. Likewise,here. Again,Joubert has his own voice. I found some bits almost 'filmic'. I mean that in a good way,mind. I couldn't help being reminded of another Bronte opera;Wuthering Heights by Bernard Herrmann. I had the Lp set,for a while,and I quite enjoyed that one. It seems rather appropriate in this context. The Herrmann opera had some orchestral interludes which were redolent of his film scores. While Herrmann's opera meanders a little,I find Joubert's score concise and atmospherically scored. I loved it! The Piano concerto,that accompanies it,is an earlier work. Prokofiev is obviously an influence;but as such concertos go,it's a good one;which I really did begin to enjoy after multiple listens. There is an insistent note (or something,I'll have to listen again?) in the first movement,which really is quite arresting. An excellent cd. If I had enough spare dosh I might even be tempted by the complete opera. Unlike the Britten opera,however;the version recorded,doesn't include the interludes!

NB: Listening to the third symphony reminded me of vandermolen saying,"I can't stop playing it!",when he enjoys a cd. This must be terrible;particularly at bedtime!! I think an elastic band might help! You pull it back & snap it against the flesh,every time you get to the end of the cd. After a while the brain associates the music with pain and you will grimace at the thought of it;maybe even shoot out of your chair! Unless you've got one of those seat belts like Victor Borge?!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2019, 05:54:23 AM »
I've got a new rule,to try and conserve my dwindling bank account,to resist any composer I haven't already got in my collection,or had on cd! :(  Fortunately,Joubert's First Symphony is paired with Mathias' First. I find myself,increasingly,impressed by the music of my Welsh compatriot (cue,male voice choir singing,"Land of my Fathers",in background) and I do like his First Symphony. This being a first recording,I just had to hear it! Also,reviews I had read suggesting that it was more vigorous (or something like that?) than the Nimbus recording. So,I bought it! Good! That boring intro' over! ::) ;D I think the earlier recording is now my favourite. More to the point,because it is a Joubert thread,not a Mathias thread (breaking off here to check) I have to say I was impressed by his symphony. Yes,there are influences,but he has a voice of his own,and I think it just proves how much,good quality music is still out there. How wrong the Hurwitz was to suggest that it had all been used up! The Ruth Gipps cd is another prime example! Anyway,I just had to hear his third symphony. I'm not into the Bronte's;but the 'program' (if that's the right word?) behind this symphony,and the landcape that inspired it,appealed to me. In fact,after repeat listens,I think this is now my favourite of the two. I'm not counting the Second,which I haven't heard! Listening to it,I kept thinking it reminded me of some other piece of music. I then realised what it was. (well,the review I read,helped!) The instrumental interludes in Britten's The Turn of the Screw. They are very haunting,and help give that opera an atmosphere all of it's own. Likewise,here. Again,Joubert has his own voice. I found some bits almost 'filmic'. I mean that in a good way,mind. I couldn't help being reminded of another Bronte opera;Wuthering Heights by Bernard Herrmann. I had the Lp set,for a while,and I quite enjoyed that one. It seems rather appropriate in this context. The Herrmann opera had some orchestral interludes which were redolent of his film scores. While Herrmann's opera meanders a little,I find Joubert's score concise and atmospherically scored. I loved it! The Piano concerto,that accompanies it,is an earlier work. Prokofiev is obviously an influence;but as such concertos go,it's a good one;which I really did begin to enjoy after multiple listens. There is an insistent note (or something,I'll have to listen again?) in the first movement,which really is quite arresting. An excellent cd. If I had enough spare dosh I might even be tempted by the complete opera. Unlike the Britten opera,however;the version recorded,doesn't include the interludes!

NB: Listening to the third symphony reminded me of vandermolen saying,"I can't stop playing it!",when he enjoys a cd. This must be terrible;particularly at bedtime!! I think an elastic band might help! You pull it back & snap it against the flesh,every time you get to the end of the cd. After a while the brain associates the music with pain and you will grimace at the thought of it;maybe even shoot out of your chair! Unless you've got one of those seat belts like Victor Borge?!
Yes cilgwyn, you may recall that, some time back, I became a bit obsessed (can one be 'a bit' obsessed?) with the soundtrack to 'Noah'. I like that Joubert/Mathias Lyrita CD very much (I owned the Joubert 'single' on Lyrita as well  ::))
On the subject of Welsh composers I wonder if you know Alun Hoddinott's setting of 'Fair Lisa'. It was on Radio 3 a few weeks ago and I thought it very moving and would never have associated with Alun Hoddinott. Anyway, you probably know it but, if not, here it is:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JeDcQEG1Hi4
I sent it to my brother who replied 'Alun Vaughan Hoddinott'. Anyway, it is such a beautiful work. My brother added that Welsh hymns have a unique emotional power. In the last week I've been enjoying Daniel Jones's Symphony 4 which I like very much and have had Grace Williams's powerful Second Symphony running through my head. I think that Bernard Herrmann used some of his film score to 'Jane Eyre' in his opera 'Wuthering Heights'. Not being a great fan of opera, with a few exceptions, I think I'll stick with the Jane Eyre film score!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2019, 05:58:01 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

cilgwyn

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2019, 09:35:38 AM »
Yes,some of Herrmann's opera is very filmic. Some orchestral passages are;how can I put it? Very widescreen! Quite enjoyable if you like that sort of thing;but even I can see why it hasn't entered the repertoire! Listening to Joubert's third,I agree with one reviewer,who felt the opera would have been better with the interludes left in. I think I'll resist the opera,though! The symphony does the same job,really,without the warbly bits!! All the reviews I saw were good,though! Joubert's Second sounds a bit tougher on the old ear 'oles. I might resist that one,too?!!

Offline Scion7

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2020, 10:17:59 AM »
Sad that the chap shared a name from some American serial-killer of small boys that they offed.  Makes searches on him become somewhat tiring - "no, not him ... no, wrong bloke ... "

.

Came upon his music via an oboe concerto. Later, the 2nd symphony.

Of Dutch and Huguenot French descent, Joubert was born in Cape Town, South Africa, on March 20, 1927. He attended Anglican schools in the area, at first intending to study art, but switched to music in his teens. Joubert graduated from the South African College of Music, part of the University of Cape Town, in 1944, and went on to study with a local composition teacher, but moved to London for further study, partly because he felt that South Africa could not match London's rich orchestral and choral music scene.
Joubert's reputation was quickly established after he won the Novello anthem competition in 1952 with O Lorde, the Maker of Al Thing, which like the carols Torches and There is no Rose, was soon added to the repertory of cathedral and other choirs. Joubert has since fulfilled many commissions for the Anglican church and his contribution to the British choral tradition has proved central to his achievement.

--selective Works--

Orchestral:
 Violin Conc., op.13, 1954
 Symphony no.1, op.20, 1956
 Piano Conc., op.25, 1958
 A North Country Overture, op.28, 1958
 Sinfonietta, op.38, 1962
 In memoriam 1820, op.39, 1962
 Symphony no.2, op.68, 1971
 Bassoon Conc., op.77, 1973
 Threnos, op.78, hpd, 12 str, 1974
 Déploration, op.92, 1978
 Temps perdu, op.99, str, 1987
 Concerto for oboe and strings, Op. 160
 Symphony No.3 on themes from the opera "Jane Eyre" (Op. 178, 2014–17)

Chamber:
 String Quartet no.1, op.1, 1950
 Sonata, op.6, viola, piano, 1951
 String Trio, op.30, 1960
 Octet, op.33, clarinet, bassoon, horn, string quartet, double-bass, 1961
 Duo, op.65, violin, cello, 1970
 Kontakion, op.69, cello, piano, 1971
 String Quartet no.2, op.91, 1977
 Chamber Music, op.104, brass quintet, 1985
 String Quartet no.3, op.112, 1987
 Piano Trio, op.113, 1987
 String Quartet no.4, op.121, 1988
 6 Miniatures after Kilvert, op.140, violin, viola, 1997

Keyboards:
 Divertimento, op.2, piano duet, 1950
 Dance Suite, op.21, pf (1958)
 piano sonata, op.24, 1957,
 piano sonata,op.72, 1972
 Passacaglia and Fugue, c, op.35, 1963
 6 Short Preludes on English Hymn Tunes, op.125, chbr org, 1990
 Reflections on a Martyrdom, op.141, org, 1997

although known primarily as a composer for vocal works ---

Vocal: 5 Songs (G. Chapman, J. Donne, 17th-century Eng.), op.5, T, pf, 1951; 2 Invocations (W. Blake), op.26, T, pf, 1960; 6 Poems of Emily Brontë, op.63, S, pf, 1970; Dialogue (A. Marvell), op.64, S, Ct, vc, hpd, 1970; African Sketchbook (Hottentot poems), op.66, S, A, T, B, wind qnt, 1970; Crabbed Age and Youth, op.82, Ct, rec, hpd, b viol, 1974; The Turning Wheel (R. Dallas), op.95, S, pf, 1979–80; The Phoenix and the Turtle (W. Shakespeare), op.100, 2 S, str trio, hpd, 1984; The Hour Hand (E. Lowbury), op.101, S, rec, 1984; The Instant Moment (song cycle, D.H. Lawrence), op.110, Bar, str, 1987; Tristia (O. Mandelstaum), op.118, S, Bar, cl, pf, 1988; Landscapes, song cycle (E. Thomas, S. Spnder, F.L. Lucas, W. de la Mare, Hardy), op.129, S, pf trio, 1992; The Secret Muse (O. Gogarty, Lowbury, W.H. Auden, W.B. Yeats, R. Graves), op.130, Bar, fl, cl, hp, str qt, 1992; Three Faces of Love (J. Rochester), op.138, S, Bar, chbr org, hpd, lute, 1997

operas
Antigone (radio op, 4 scenes, R. Trickett, after Sophocles), op.11, 1954, BBC, 21 July 1954
In the Drought (op, 1, A. Wood), op.17, 1955, Johannesburg, 26 Oct 1956; London, Sadler's Wells Theatre, 13 Dec 1959
Silas Marner (op, 3, Trickett, after G. Eliot), op.31, 1961, Cape Town, Little Theatre, 20 May 1961
The Quarry (op for young players, 1, D. Holbrook), op.50, 1964, London, Copland School, 25 March 1965
Under Western Eyes (op, 3, C. Cliffe, after J. Conrad), op.51, 1968, London, St Pancras Town Hall, 29 May 1969
The Prisoner (children's op, 2, S. Tunnicliffe, after L. Tolstoy: Dorogo stoit), op.76, 1973, Barnet, 16 March 1973
The Wayfarers (op for young people, 2, Tunnicliffe, after G. Chaucer), op.98, 1983, Huntingdon, St Peter's School, 4 April 1984
Jane Eyre (op, 3, K. Birkin, after C. Brontë), op. 134, 1987–98

choral
With orch: The Burghers of Calais (G.K. Hunter), op.12, cant., S, Ct, 2 T, Bar, B, SATB, chbr orch, 1954; Urbs beata (Bible), op.42, cant., T, Bar, SATB, orch, 1963; The Choir Invisible (Apocrypha: Ecclesiasticus, S. Spender, G. Eliot), op.54, choral sym., Bar, SATB, orch, 1968; The Martyrdom of St Alban (Tunnicliffe), op.59, cant, spkr, T, B, SATB, chbr orch, 1969; The Raising of Lazarus (Tunnicliffe), op.67, orat, Mez, T, SATB, orch, 1971; The Magus (Tunnicliffe), op.83, T, 2 Bar, SATB, orch, 1976; Herefordshire Canticles (Vulgate, G.M. Hopkins, T.S. Eliot), op.93, S, Bar, boys' chorus, mixed chorus, orch, 1979; Gong-Tormented Sea (choral sym., W. Whitman, R. Campbell, W.B. Yeats), op.96, Bar, SATB, orch, 1982; Missa brevis, op.122, S A T B, chorus, chbr orch, 1988; For the Beauty of the Earth (choral sym., Bible: Psalms, G.M. Hopkins, F.S. Pierpoint), op.124, S, Bar, SATB, orch, 1989; Rochester Triptych, op.139, SATB, orch, 1997 [orch of opp.126, 132, 133]
Sacred: Torches, op.7a, SATB/unison vv, org, 1952; O Lorde, the Maker of Al Thing, op.7b, SATB, org, 1952; There is no Rose, op.14, SATB, 1954; Pro pace, opp.19, 29, 32, SATB, 1956–9; Missa Beata Ioannis, op.37, SATB, org, 1962; The Holy Mountain, op.44, SATB, 2 pf, 1964; Communion Service, op.46, SATB, org, 1962; The Beatitudes, op.47, SATB, 1964; TeD, op.49, SATB, org, 1965; O Praise God in his Holiness, op.52, SATB, org, 1966; Lord, thou hast been our Refuge, op.53, SATB, org, 1967; Let there be Light, op.56, SSSAAATTTBBB, 1969; Mag and Nunc, A, op.57, SATB, org, 1969; 3 Hymns to St Oswald, op.74, SATB, org, 1972; 5 Carols, op.78, 5vv, 1973; Sleep Canticle, op.81, unacc., 1974; Four Motets, op.89, unacc., 1976; 3 Carols, op.102, SATB, 1984; Mag and Nunc, C, op.103, SATB, org, 1985; Rorate coeli, op.107, SATB, 1985; Vision and Prayer, op.111, SATB, pf 4 hands, 1986
Secular: Leaves of Life, op.41, ballad cantata, solo vv, chorus, pf, 1963; Four Stations on the Road to Freedom, op.73, SSAATTBB, 1972; Lines from The Youth of Man, op.90, unacc., 1976; Three Portraits (J. Skelton), op.97, SATB, 1983; South of the Line (T. Hardy), op.109, cant., S, Bar, 2 pf, perc, 1985; Rochester Triptych (J. Wilmot), opp.126, 132, 133, SATB, org, 1994
« Last Edit: October 10, 2020, 10:28:42 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Daverz

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Re: John Joubert (1927-2019)
« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2020, 05:25:23 PM »
Sad that the chap shared a name from some American serial-killer of small boys that they offed.  Makes searches on him become somewhat tiring - "no, not him ... no, wrong bloke ... "

And some piker with only 3 kills, how insulting!  I've gotten into the habit of adding "composer" (or pianist or violinist, etc) to my searches.