Author Topic: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach  (Read 4564 times)

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Offline milk

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Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« on: October 27, 2019, 03:25:22 PM »
Correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t think we have a thread on exactly this topic.





Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2019, 08:38:08 PM »


Offline Mandryka

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2019, 11:20:41 PM »
I think both of those are rather nice.
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Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2019, 12:13:24 AM »
I think both of those are rather nice.
And above, what do you think of Charlmeau? It got a bad review on music web but I like it.

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2019, 01:22:15 AM »
I didn't like this at first but I like it much better now. He takes his time with Tombeau De Monsieur De Blancrocher and makes a real journey of it.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2019, 01:51:58 AM »
Except for Bach and D. Scarlatti I am not too fond of baroque on the piano. I have the Byrd/Gibbons disc by Gould but don't remember much about it. I used to quite like Handel suites with Richter/Gavrilov have somewhat sunk in my favor and I never bothered to get another one on piano (like Schirmer or Ugorskaja (anthology)) although they do sound attractive in samples. (And the sound of the Richter is not great, so they might be better choices in this respect.) I have some F. Couperin and Rameau in the Marcelle Meyer box which is enjoyable but again also enough for me not to actively look for more as I seem to clearly prefer the harpsichord, especially for music earlier than late/high baroque. Not sure if one can get the Meyer Couperin/Rameau/Scarlatti separately.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2019, 02:35:54 AM »
Great idea of a thread!

I didn't like this at first



I didn't, either, but never had a second listen. Should I?
"I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.”  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Florestan

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2019, 02:38:11 AM »
I heartily recommend these:



"I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.”  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2019, 02:45:05 AM »
I heartily recommend these:


I do love this.

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2019, 03:43:07 AM »
I have enjoyed these discs a lot:



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Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2019, 04:39:48 AM »
3 volumes of these and I wonder if they're any good.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2019, 02:04:08 PM by Que »

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2019, 04:47:13 AM »
But I am much impressed with this one. I hated what he did with Bach but really enjoy this:

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2019, 05:02:43 AM »
another one I think Mandyrka turned me on to:


Truly weird stuff.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2019, 05:41:19 AM »
3 volumes of these and I wonder if they're any good.


I don't think so. It is dead straight, it's as if we're looking over the shoulder of a piano teacher just run through the scores for a student. The music, the poetry, has disappeared, and all we're left with is the notes.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2019, 02:06:55 PM by Que »
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Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2019, 09:08:56 PM »
I don't think so. It is dead straight, it's as if we're looking over the shoulder of a piano teacher just run through the scores for a student. The music, the poetry, has disappeared, and all we're left with is the notes.
It’s amazing someone could tackle all the books, such a big project, but not have more of a developed view of it. I’ve no idea but I’d like to think this repertoire would get you noticed. How do you feel about the two Louis Couperin recordings that came out?

Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2019, 06:04:04 AM »
Correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t think we have a thread on exactly this topic.


This is a pet interest of mine, so I started a thread on it years ago. Sadly it didn't get very far:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,13515.msg333498.html#msg333498

Today, I'll throw Tharaud's Couperin and Rameau into the mix.

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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2019, 05:05:29 PM »

This is a pet interest of mine, so I started a thread on it years ago. Sadly it didn't get very far:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,13515.msg333498.html#msg333498.

I admit that I don't know much about tuning systems, though I am aware there are differences. My problem is I'm just not crazy about the sound of the harpsichord. Last night I was listening to some Froberger played by Leonhardt, and thinking, This is good music, but I would like it better if it were played on an instrument I actually enjoy listening to.

The way I learned to love the harpsichord was by getting to love its music and then slowly realising that the instrument and its music constitute an organic entity because the music is designed in a harpsichord idiom, to some degree as to sound but even more as to instrumental technique.

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Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2019, 06:30:40 PM »
The way I learned to love the harpsichord was by getting to love its music and then slowly realising that the instrument and its music constitute an organic entity because the music is designed in a harpsichord idiom, to some degree as to sound but even more as to instrumental technique.

In the 10 years since I wrote that post, I have conquered my harpsichordophobia. But I did it by hearing some really well recorded harpsichords, and realizing thereby that a harpsichord could indeed sound good. Also I became aware that there existed big differences among harpsichords, and the range of sound among them was much greater than among pianos.
formerly VELIMIR (before that, Spitvalve)

"Who knows not strict counterpoint, lives and dies an ignoramus" - CPE Bach

Offline milk

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2019, 05:21:25 AM »


This is a pet interest of mine, so I started a thread on it years ago. Sadly it didn't get very far:

https://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,13515.msg333498.html#msg333498

Today, I'll throw Tharaud's Couperin and Rameau into the mix.
Ah! Well, I hope we can keep this, or that, alive. I love this music on period instruments but I also enjoy when it succeeds on piano. Maybe it's wishful thinking, but I can see this repertoire being taken up by more pianists.

Offline j winter

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Re: Baroque and early music on piano excluding Bach
« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2019, 12:55:03 PM »
For the Handel keyboard suites, the only version I have (and the only one I have ever heard) is Richter & Gavrilov.  It completely satisfies, though having hung around GMG again for a while I've lately thought that I might pick up a harpsichord version for comparison.   ;D



Another set of baroque works that I've always enjoyed on piano is Scarlatti.  Horowitz is justly famous here, but I most often pull one of the several Naxos discs, where they are doing all of the sonatas, each disc by a different pianist.  Good stuff, and an easy way to take one's Scarlatti in reasonable size doses, and check out different approaches at the same time.


The man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils.
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affections dark as Erebus.
Let no such man be trusted.

-- William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice