Author Topic: Mozart piano sonatas  (Read 150861 times)

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Mark

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Mozart piano sonatas
« on: September 20, 2007, 04:16:34 AM »
I have Wurtz. Need I bother with others?

longears

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2007, 04:22:01 AM »
No.  But there are others worth hearing.  I'm one of those heathens ('round here) who likes Uchida.  I rather like what I've heard of Brendel's latest recordings.  Soon there'll be posts glorifying Klien, et al.  Listen to what you like.  And listen to others to broaden your tastes.

Mark

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2007, 04:25:13 AM »
No.  But there are others worth hearing.  I'm one of those heathens ('round here) who likes Uchida.  I rather like what I've heard of Brendel's latest recordings.  Soon there'll be posts glorifying Klien, et al.  Listen to what you like.  And listen to others to broaden your tastes.

Yes, we've had the Uchida vs Wurtz argument round here before. I wonder what interpretive differences distinguish the two?

longears

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2007, 04:31:53 AM »
I like them both, but note that I rarely listen to these workks.  In general I'd say Würtz is more matter-of-fact and a touch heavy-handed, Uchida lighter and more lyrical.  No doubt my betters will soon correct this simple, non-technical description.

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2007, 04:33:09 AM »
I have Wurtz. Need I bother with others?

Haven't heard Wurtz, so I can't answer the question.

Do you feel like you need more?

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2007, 04:34:15 AM »
Yes, we've had the Uchida vs Wurtz argument round here before. I wonder what interpretive differences distinguish the two?

What's are your favorite movements in the sonatas?

Mark

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2007, 04:40:27 AM »
Do you feel like you need more?

Not necessarily. Just wondered if I might be missing something.

What's are your favorite movements in the sonatas?

I'm rather fond of Nos. 5, 6 and ... 11, I think? Don't recall, exactly. Been a while since I played them, so I'm spinning a few now.

Larry Rinkel

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2007, 04:40:32 AM »
I prefer Wurtz. Uchida is too prissy, teasing phrases out of shape and holding back too much on accents. Unfortunately Wurtz leaves out the magnificent C minor Fantasy as a prelude to the C minor sonata, the most dramatic and Beethovenian of them all. And Uchida's small-scale approach to the Fantasy strikes me as the least satisfactory thing she does. I still am looking for a really good 475/457.

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2007, 04:57:37 AM »
Not necessarily. Just wondered if I might be missing something.

I'm rather fond of Nos. 5, 6 and ... 11, I think? Don't recall, exactly. Been a while since I played them, so I'm spinning a few now.

Since I have four versions of K 457, I have decided to upload the finales and will soon post the link here.

The four pianists are Richter, Klein, Eschenbach and Uchida.  8)

Offline Todd

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2007, 04:59:49 AM »
Wurtz is very fine, but other pianists offer different takes, so of course your should hear more.  I’ll be one of the people mentioning Walter Klien’s set on Vox, which is superb in every way except sonically.  Lili Kraus’ first cycle (now on M&A) is also superb, and more flowing than her CBS remake.  A recent acquisition for me is Michael Endres’ set on Oehms.  Superb, nuanced playing and excellent sound. 
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Larry Rinkel

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2007, 05:04:52 AM »
Since I have four versions of K 457, I have decided to upload the finales and will soon post the link here.

The four pianists are Richter, Klein, Eschenbach and Uchida.  8)

Richter sounds intruiging. I have to admit, though, that with a few exceptions I find the Mozart piano sonatas among his least interesting works (totally unlike the concertos), and on the few occasions I want to encounter many of them, I'd just as soon play them myself.

Mark

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2007, 05:07:36 AM »
It's criminal, I know, but I do like these works on in the background while I'm writing. They help me stay focused.

dtwilbanks

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2007, 05:09:19 AM »
It's criminal, I know, but I do like these works on in the background while I'm writing. They help me stay focused.

Most of my classical listening is in the background.   :o

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2007, 05:14:37 AM »
Richter sounds intruiging. I have to admit, though, that with a few exceptions I find the Mozart piano sonatas among his least interesting works (totally unlike the concertos), and on the few occasions I want to encounter many of them, I'd just as soon play them myself.

These are actually among my least favorite Richter interpretations, but I decided to include them so that we could broaden the discussion. Plus, his take is so different than the others (he takes almost a minute longer than the rest) that I had to put him in.

OK, here's the link:

http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=45732805cf458166e26b141119a8bc9433597decc1fe3f47

In order, the pianists are Eschenbach, Klien, Richter and Uchida.

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2007, 05:15:45 AM »
It's criminal, I know, but I do like these works on in the background while I'm writing. They help me stay focused.

Music Therapists recommend them (and most of Mozart's music, for that matter, due to his strict use of form) for that very purpose.  8)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2007, 05:16:23 AM »
Wurtz & Uchida were my initial sets - favor Wurtz, also - just a fine performance and a great value; I see no problem in just owning that one for a complete set.

But if you want to hear another 'take', you might try listening to some on the fortepiano w/ Ronald Brautigam:)

Addition - here's an interesting comparison of Brautigam & Levin in these works from MusicWeb - Dave

« Last Edit: September 20, 2007, 05:21:56 AM by SonicMan »

dtwilbanks

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2007, 05:19:24 AM »
There's nothing in the Mozart sonatas that makes me want to run out and buy more. Of course, I don't listen to them very often. Not when I have Alkan, Field, Chopin, Schumann and Beethoven around. :)

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2007, 05:22:28 AM »
There's nothing in the Mozart sonatas that makes me want to run out and buy more. Of course, I don't listen to them very often. Not when I have Alkan, Field, Chopin, Schumann and Beethoven around. :)

I can say that Mozart fills a spot in my listening that no other composer can fill. For that reason, I like to have a number of interpretations of the works that I like. The Sonatas (and the violin sonatas) are among these works.  :)

dtwilbanks

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2007, 05:25:46 AM »
I can say that Mozart fills a spot in my listening that no other composer can fill. For that reason, I like to have a number of interpretations of the works that I like. The Sonatas (and the violin sonatas) are among these works.  :)

I must not have that particular spot. Bach fills my spot. Uh...

George

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Re: Mozart piano sonatas
« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2007, 05:33:45 AM »
I must not have that particular spot. Bach fills my spot. Uh...

Funny, I was going to say that in a similar way, Bach fills another spot. As does Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Debussy and Beethoven. To clarify, this spot just means that there are times when only Mozart (or Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Debussy or Beethoven) will do.