Author Topic: Max Reger(1873-1916)  (Read 25256 times)

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snyprrr

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Reger is Da Man!
« Reply #40 on: February 22, 2010, 09:26:56 AM »
Still lovin these Reger SQs one week later.


Op.54 is just some of thee thee wildest Romantic Music, or any, I think, for that matter.

Op.74 is one of the great 1hr SQs.

Opp.108/121 get progressively more elusive...looking forward to cracking the last one.


Those organ recommends look really interesting, too, and I feel like I will soon need to come up for air. Reger is like whacking through the brambles, haha! Love it!


Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #41 on: February 22, 2010, 01:06:15 PM »
Well, that's the first time I've seen such excitement about Max Reger.

Er, Snips, I am assuming you mean Vogler Quartet when you're saying Volger? That Nimbus disc is pretty marvellous.

Back in the seventies (my Reger thing goes way back, though on the other hand it isn't really going anywhere, and why should it?) I used to have turnoubout LPs with a quartet which I believe was called the Reger Quartet.

However the current recommendation would arguably be the Mannheimer Quartet on MDG, which has issued the five quartets coupled with the piano quartets (nr 2, opus 133 is beautiful) and the piano trios.

In general I would say the later the better the music, due to the textures being lighter.

Music like this  -  longish and sometimes rather abstract  -  would benefit a lot from a hearing a live performance, but of course no one is ever going to play Reger on a concert. The violin sonata op 139 would be a great addition to the repertory of any violin soloist; drop the Beethoven for a year or two and play Reger in its stead, and people would be happily surprised, but I doubt many violinists know about Reger.

Recenty I listened to the solo sonatas (or suites?) for violin, and these are very nice pieces.

snyprrr

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2010, 10:10:16 PM »

Well, that's the first time I've seen such excitement about Max Reger.

 That Nimbus disc is pretty marvellous.

Back in the seventies (my Reger thing goes way back, though on the other hand it isn't really going anywhere, and why should it?) I used to have turnoubout LPs with a quartet which I believe was called the Reger Quartet.

However the current recommendation would arguably be the Mannheimer Quartet

Music like this  -  longish and sometimes rather abstract  -  would benefit a lot from a hearing a live performance,

The violin sonata op 139

Recenty I listened to the solo sonatas (or suites?) for violin, and these are very nice pieces.

Ah, thank's for noticing! ;)

That Nimbus disc's cover has a deep blue and black color scheme that perfectly matches the extraordinarily deep and rich up close recording that seems to squeeze out perfectly those thick fourths and fifths. The CPO recording is more of a pale, bay, blue, like a small tomb, but the highs are more contained (the Nimbus, by compare, gets a little bright in giant climaxes (though not unpleasantly so)). Playing wise there isn't that much to choose from between the two (the Berner may be the more rigorous).

I think the Reger Quartet shows up on that rogue disc with SQs by Reger, Busoni, and Pfitzner, each done by a different group (I have the exact Pfitzner on VoxBox w/Hartmann and Zimmermann (s. Lautenbacher)).



I had imagined what sitting through the last SQ would be like. The audience would be full of intent and furrowed brows, no doubt, haha!,... all leaning forward...



It is tough keeping up with Reger's output. Is it seven VSs? All I've heard so far are the Cello Suites, with Wispelway (Channel). I've gotten them regularly from the library for years, every time thinking I'm going to hear them differently, but I just can't get into them as solo cello pieces (I think I'm spoiled that way here). Nothing wrong with them for those inclined. Ha,... see?,... even I'm picky about my Reger, haha!! ::)

abidoful

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #43 on: February 24, 2010, 02:13:56 AM »
A strange composer, something about his music though that is haunting..(the Piano Concerto :)) Just that i usually find myself exhausted when listening to his music >:(

snyprrr

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #44 on: February 24, 2010, 09:48:00 PM »
I was just listening to the slow mvmt. of SQ Op.121, the big one. Reger's world reminds me of a field of scattered ruins on a Tragic Night that happened long ago. When I think of Gothic Poe, I thought I was thinking "creepy", but Reger's take on Decadence is of the highest refinement, so that any elegiac qualities transcend any real subjective take. Reger's Mastery exudes Serenity.

snyprrr

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #45 on: February 01, 2011, 08:17:21 AM »
I was just listening to the slow mvmt. of SQ Op.121, the big one. Reger's world reminds me of a field of scattered ruins on a Tragic Night that happened long ago. When I think of Gothic Poe, I thought I was thinking "creepy", but Reger's take on Decadence is of the highest refinement, so that any elegiac qualities transcend any real subjective take. Reger's Mastery exudes Serenity.

Wow, I'm quite the poof! ::) haha, that's some flowery language there, haha...


I've been listening to Reger's two Piano Quintets, very rare. They are both in c minor!, which makes comparing quite a game indeed! I found all the hair pin qualities that I find in MR's first two SQs: very busy, and exacting,... they do remind me of Brahms' SQs (Reger does remind me of Brahms' fiery younger cousin).

I've only listened once so far, so it's hard to pick out bits. Both are similar, though the latter does seem a bit more mature.

No.1, Op.21 (1897)

No.2, OP.64 (1903)

Is anyone else familiar with these pieces?


Which brings up: do we have a Reger Works List? I'd like to see what else we have. I hear the Sextet has the most wonderful slow mvmt. Will get back.

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #46 on: February 01, 2011, 08:33:32 AM »
Wow, I'm quite the poof! ::) haha, that's some flowery language there, haha...


I've been listening to Reger's two Piano Quintets, very rare. They are both in c minor!, which makes comparing quite a game indeed! I found all the hair pin qualities that I find in MR's first two SQs: very busy, and exacting,... they do remind me of Brahms' SQs (Reger does remind me of Brahms' fiery younger cousin).

I've only listened once so far, so it's hard to pick out bits. Both are similar, though the latter does seem a bit more mature.

No.1, Op.21 (1897)

No.2, OP.64 (1903)

Is anyone else familiar with these pieces?


Which brings up: do we have a Reger Works List? I'd like to see what else we have. I hear the Sextet has the most wonderful slow mvmt. Will get back.
Oi. That is a long list -exactly the sort of thing wikipedia is great at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Max_Reger
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snyprrr

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #47 on: February 02, 2011, 03:16:26 PM »
Oi. That is a long list -exactly the sort of thing wikipedia is great at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Max_Reger

That's a bracing list for sure! :o 8)

Those Piano Quartets look very interesting.


I see how close the Piano Quintet No.2 is to the two SQs Op.54. That explains the similarity. Yes, this PQ No.2 is one of Reger's most adventurous works.

Offline The new erato

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #48 on: February 04, 2011, 12:14:51 AM »
That's a bracing list for sure! :o 8)

Those Piano Quartets look very interesting.


I see how close the Piano Quintet No.2 is to the two SQs Op.54. That explains the similarity. Yes, this PQ No.2 is one of Reger's most adventurous works.
There's a complete chamber music on 23 CDs on the German da Camera Magna label, used to be available reasonably cheap on jpc. I have it; never less than eminently listenable.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2011, 01:27:31 AM by erato »

Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #49 on: February 04, 2011, 04:51:46 AM »
That's a bracing list for sure! :o 8)

Those Piano Quartets look very interesting.


I see how close the Piano Quintet No.2 is to the two SQs Op.54. That explains the similarity. Yes, this PQ No.2 is one of Reger's most adventurous works.

The Piano Quartets are interesting, as is the Piano Trio. I think Reger gets better as he matured; I rarely listen to double digit opus numbers.

snyprrr

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #50 on: February 04, 2011, 01:54:19 PM »
The Piano Quartets are interesting, as is the Piano Trio. I think Reger gets better as he matured; I rarely listen to double digit opus numbers.

Come to think of it, I do have a prejudice against double digit opus numbers! Just don't trust them,... though, with Reger, his middle stuff is his most adventurous (Op.54).

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #51 on: February 04, 2011, 05:12:24 PM »
Reger's Cello Works, i.e. Sonatas & Suites - any recommendations?

Recent good review of a 2-CD set on Hyperion (below, left), plus a few other considerations - any comments?  Thanks -  :D

   

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #52 on: February 04, 2011, 08:59:01 PM »
I have an ASV disc (which used to be super cheap) that I am content with although haven't compared it to any other. I'd like to throw this second disc into consideration (I am interested in recs for these works too), although it looks hard to find:

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #53 on: February 16, 2011, 01:49:50 PM »
Well, I picked up the Cello Suites w/ Guido Schiefen; and I had a CPO disc of the Cello Sonatas, which I prefer.  The solo suites are presumably a tribute to Bach, and often do sound similar but the melodious flow and well integrated polyphony are not as evident in Reger's compositions; but still like them - I have just several other discs w/ Schiefen - I could nickname him Gusto Guido - his playing is quite dramatic & dynamic and the recording sound is excellent on this label.

However, I may wait to see if that Hyperion 2-disc set shows up on BRO or might be released as a Dyad?  Both the Sonatas & Suites are included and are alternated - see the attachment (which includes 2 reviews from Fanfare - one from 2008 of the Hyperion recording, and another just released by Dubins of yet another offering of the Suites) - now the set listed by Sara above may be another consideration w/ all works included - there seems to be a plethora of Reger cello recordings!  :D



Offline Guido

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #54 on: February 18, 2011, 04:54:59 PM »
Just discovered Mariä Wiegenlied - a gorgeous miniature (soprano and orchestra).
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Offline Herman

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #55 on: June 29, 2011, 03:09:23 AM »
I have been saying for years Reger's Violin - Piano sonata op 139 is outrageously good, really a shame that it isn't part of the regular repertory.

So I thought I should give the previous one a shot, too: op 122 in e minor, from the year 1911.

First I tried the 1991 recording by Hansheinz Schneeberger and Jean-Jacques Dünki on Jecklin (which used to have a lot of Reger in the catalogue). This recording was touted by various critics over later recordings.

Naturally, it's not so good. Even the lyrical op 139 sounds labored and slow.

So I got the cpo issue with Ulf Wallin and Roland Pontinen, as I should have done right away (I have their 139, too).

The 122 is a more difficult sonata than the 139; it lasts 37 minutes in this version; particularly the first movement is pretty steep. However, the rest is beautiful: even the finale is lovely.

I believe I have the Wallin - Pontinen Reger survey complete now, but it would be a very good idea if cpo combined the 122 and 139 on one disc.

Offline Lethevich

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #56 on: August 15, 2011, 06:47:42 AM »
I've been playing Reger's various preludes and fugues for solo violin recently. On one side, they can feel academic and sometimes lacking in material, but on the other, hearing music mining the same vein Bach explored is a rewarding experience and I feel with more committed performances than my ones on Da Camera Magna these could come across better. The Op.117 and 131a have moments of great beauty, and are a testament to Reger's intriguing neo-baroque style which emerged before any other composer seems to have even thought about it, and more than any actually seems to resemble and understand the works of that period rather than simply rebelling against Romanticism with a sewing machine style of music.
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Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #57 on: August 15, 2011, 07:06:43 AM »
I believe I have the Wallin - Pontinen Reger survey complete now, but it would be a very good idea if cpo combined the 122 and 139 on one disc.

All the volumes are oop except #5 (op.22, op.103a). Maybe they plan to box them now...either that or we'll never see them again.

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Offline Martin Lind

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #58 on: January 29, 2012, 04:04:48 PM »
After my last contribution to this thread im am very much into Reger during the last time.  Some weeks ago I bought the string quartetts with the Bern quartett from CPO. This is very difficult music but highly rewarding. I especially love the 3rd quartett Opus 74. Difficult music but highly rewarding. It helped me when somebody told me the structure of the first set which is in sonata form but has a very long exposition which is alone over 10 minutes and lasts as long as the rest of the piece. So seeing the structure in this music helped me.

I also like Opus 109 although especially in the first set the music fells into little pieces and it is difficult to see the structure.

So during the last 3 or 4 weeks I develloped a strong interest into Reger and bought - apart of the string quartetts the Cello sonatas 1 and 4 from CPO and the box of the symphonic pieces from Berlin classics and the piano concerto with Korstick. I hope we can revive this interesting thread ( I have read it with much interest again!) and can talk again.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Max Reger(1873-1916)
« Reply #59 on: October 22, 2012, 07:18:03 AM »
It's a shame Reger didn't live longer. I think his music would have gone on to become quite possibly more chromatic/atonal, but this is just speculation. We really don't know. He was admired by many during his time even getting a nod from Schoenberg. I would liked to have heard more concerti from him. After listening to his Piano Concerto last night and his Violin Concerto just awhile ago, I thought there were so many directions he could have gone in. I think he's a good composer, but I'm still trying to get a firmer grasp of his music.
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