Author Topic: George Lloyd  (Read 49655 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #360 on: August 18, 2020, 05:25:29 AM »
After some posts in the "Blown away" thread, I'm revisiting the Seventh Symphony, and I have some observations:

1. Is the first movement a rare example of a symphony opening with a Scherzo? It certainly feels light and dancey for a lot of its duration.

2. With each listen, I realize more and more just how gorgeous the slow movement is.

Offline relm1

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #361 on: August 18, 2020, 05:57:20 AM »
After some posts in the "Blown away" thread, I'm revisiting the Seventh Symphony, and I have some observations:

1. Is the first movement a rare example of a symphony opening with a Scherzo? It certainly feels light and dancey for a lot of its duration.

2. With each listen, I realize more and more just how gorgeous the slow movement is.

It's fine music.  It's not a scherzo but is a waltz so does feel like a ballet as the second subject.  Yes, this is gorgeous!

Offline kyjo

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #362 on: August 18, 2020, 12:05:14 PM »
After some posts in the "Blown away" thread, I'm revisiting the Seventh Symphony, and I have some observations:

1. Is the first movement a rare example of a symphony opening with a Scherzo? It certainly feels light and dancey for a lot of its duration.

2. With each listen, I realize more and more just how gorgeous the slow movement is.

1. Interesting point. The fact that it’s in quick triple time (most likely 3/8 or 6/8, I haven’t seen the score) probably contributes to this, and I agree about its balletic nature. Of course, it certainly carries the requisite weight, argument, and drama of a truly symphonic opening movement.

2. And yes, when the music “blossoms” halfway through the slow movement with the tune in the celli, it’s certainly a glorious moment! Lloyd does a similar thing in the slow movement of the 4th Symphony where the music eventually “opens up” gloriously after a rather austere opening.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline relm1

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #363 on: November 20, 2020, 07:49:26 AM »
Some of you might enjoy this musical analysis of George Lloyd's Symphony No. 7
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/Nov/Lloyd-symphony7-analysis.htm

Offline kyjo

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #364 on: November 20, 2020, 08:16:32 AM »
Some of you might enjoy this musical analysis of George Lloyd's Symphony No. 7
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/Nov/Lloyd-symphony7-analysis.htm

Thanks very much for sharing, Karim! This masterpiece certainly deserves the in-depth analysis you’ve given it.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #365 on: November 21, 2020, 07:13:22 AM »
Thanks very much for sharing, Karim! This masterpiece certainly deserves the in-depth analysis you’ve given it.
+1
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #366 on: November 22, 2020, 05:10:08 PM »
Thank you!  I hope it helps expose this unjustly neglected composer to more audiences. 

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #367 on: June 11, 2021, 11:26:00 AM »
Some of you might enjoy this musical analysis of George Lloyd's Symphony No. 7
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2020/Nov/Lloyd-symphony7-analysis.htm

This is excellent. I've heard Symphony #7 three times in the last couple of days, with this as a plumbline. Thank you for a readable and informative guide to this very enjoyable work. I'm planning to acquaint myself with as many of Lloyd's symphonies as I can, and this is a super starting point. As a programmatic work to the story of Proserpine, there's lots to enjoy. The slow movement is a work of art.
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
John Waters

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #368 on: June 13, 2021, 04:02:56 AM »
Thank you for this thread. I've really enjoyed reading the discussion of the actual works that I've been hearing and found them valuable and illuminating.
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
John Waters

Offline Maestro267

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #369 on: June 13, 2021, 07:14:21 AM »
It's funny. The recording I have doesn't make as big a deal of the Proserpine thing so I've never seen it as a programmatic symphony.

Offline foxandpeng

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Re: George Lloyd
« Reply #370 on: June 13, 2021, 07:42:01 AM »
It's funny. The recording I have doesn't make as big a deal of the Proserpine thing so I've never seen it as a programmatic symphony.

I may be over-egging it to suggest programmatic, but I can see how the story of Proserpine could be tracked through the movements in the way the music progresses. It's been quite a discovery for me.
"Without obsession, life is nothing"
John Waters