Author Topic: EJ Moeran  (Read 20398 times)

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tjguitar

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EJ Moeran
« on: April 15, 2007, 04:18:53 PM »
In my quest of branching out to more of Vernon Handley's conducted recordings (after enjoying his Bax, Bliss and Stanford on Chandos, Bantock & Simpson on Hyperion, Arnold on Conifer/DECCA; and Vaughan Williams & Elgar on EMI)

Next up was EJ Moeran.

What does everyone think of Moeran?

I recently got these chandos CDs:





I think my favorite piece is the "Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra" on the CD with the symphony.

I also got this CD of chamber music, but have not had a chance to listen to it yet:


I'm generally more a fan of big orchestral works than the chamber music, but I do like some of Bax's and Arnold's compositions for smaller ensembles.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2007, 05:23:39 PM by tjguitar »

Harry

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Re: EJ Moeran
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2007, 10:04:32 PM »
Moeran is  a excellent composer, which I almost bought the moment these recordings you listed were released.
I was amazed by the powerful language Moeran is using, so different from his fellow composers, and yet so alike.
The violin concerto is awesome, and so is his Symphony in G minor. Some works are also recorded on Naxos but not that good as the Chandos recordings. Would like to see some more chamberworks recorded. For the chandos recording you have there is a fine example of his craft in this micro world of his.
Enjoy, and thank you for bringing him to the fore!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: EJ Moeran
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2007, 01:43:51 AM »
The best ever Moeran record has just been released on CD by Lyrita.  It is Sir Adrian Boult conducting the Symphony and the Sinfonietta.  If you like the Symphony you have to hear this one. It is by far the best performance of this work, head and shoulders above all the others (although I like the historic Heward and EMI Dilkes versions too).
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Catison

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Re: EJ Moeran
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2007, 06:45:35 AM »
I like the Naxos CD.  In particular, I get a thrill out of the last movement of his Sinfonietta.  For some reason it reminds me of Carter's Holiday Overture, a favorite of mine.

But looking through his recordings, I can't help but think, "Did this guy only take one photo?"
-Brett

tjguitar

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Re: EJ Moeran
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2007, 08:38:18 AM »
I wonder why Chandos didn't include Del Mar's recording of the Sinfonietta in their reissues, I guess there just wasn't room.

Offline Robert

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Re: EJ Moeran
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2007, 11:29:31 AM »
I wonder why Chandos didn't include Del Mar's recording of the Sinfonietta in their reissues, I guess there just wasn't room.

Count me in on the sinfonietta but I also like his cello concerto.....

Offline vandermolen

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E J Moeran
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2007, 07:13:06 AM »
E J Moeran's great Symphony in G minor has just won the Gramophone Magazine Award for best historic reissue and I don't think that there has been a Moeran thread here yet:

http://www.lyrita.co.uk/

Moeran is one of my very favourite composers; especially the Symphony, Cello Concerto, Violin Sonata and Sinfonietta.  The Symphony, which I have never seen performed, should be up there with the much better known Walton Symphony 1 and Vaughan Williams Symphony 4, also from the 1930s.

He had quite a sad life, injured in the First World War, a piece of shrapnel lodged in his head may have encouraged a propensity for over-indulgence in alcohol (although I manage this perfectly well without any such historical trauma ;D) He was found dead (from heart failure) in the River Kenmare in 1950.

Any views on Moeran?
« Last Edit: October 24, 2007, 08:06:57 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Harry

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2007, 08:01:30 AM »
Nonother than that I bought his recordings on Chandos when they were released on LP.
Later on I replaced them by cd's. Why?
Because I think his compositions marvelous, and whatever I bought all impressed me mightily, and still does.

head-case

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2007, 09:24:58 AM »
Moeran is one of my very favourite composers; especially the Symphony, Cello Concerto, Violin Sonata and Sinfonietta. 

It is actually hard for me to believe that anyone could consider Moeran to be one of his or her favorite composers!  :o

Harry

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2007, 09:27:15 AM »
Well I am pleased to meet you.
I am a Moeran admirer thank you! :)

Offline Montpellier

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2007, 10:53:47 AM »
I wouldn't claim that Moeran is my favourite but his music is certainly engaging and that Lyrita release is a winner.  About time I bought it.  I've got by with a transfer from the LP as, well, a couple years ago, I never believed it would see the light of day on CD while Richard Itter held that catalogue so close to his chest.
 
« Last Edit: October 24, 2007, 10:55:55 AM by Anancho »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2007, 11:32:53 AM »
It is actually hard for me to believe that anyone could consider Moeran to be one of his or her favorite composers!  :o

Really? Why?
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Mark

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2007, 11:44:05 AM »
vandermolen, you are the listener I want to be ... if I wasn't so obsessed with music of the Austro-German school, and much more willing to devote greater time to exploring British 20th century composers, that is. ;D

Offline vandermolen

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2007, 11:59:50 AM »
vandermolen, you are the listener I want to be ... if I wasn't so obsessed with music of the Austro-German school, and much more willing to devote greater time to exploring British 20th century composers, that is. ;D

Thanks Mark, but I am a great fan of Bruckner and Mahler too!

Now get back to that baby ;D
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Mark

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2007, 12:30:56 PM »
Now get back to that baby ;D

Just been feeding her. ;D


Now, when can we expect a thread from you on Rutland Boughton?

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2007, 03:33:16 PM »
Another Moeran admirer here too! I would not claim that Moeran was a great composer but he did write some extremely attractive music in a romantic style which was soon to be deemed 'out of date'. He was obviously influenced by Sibelius in the symphony and by the folk music he collected as a young man. I love the symphony and greatly like the violin concerto too. I do think that the cello concerto-while pleasant enough-is a weaker work.

Anyone who likes Bax or John Ireland would probably like Moeran too. I certainly don't think that Moeran is in any way a lesser composer than Ireland and I-infinitely-prefer him to Delius. (Oh no, I am doing it again...comparing composers to the detriment of one!)

I wish that I could afford to collect multiple copies of works! I do have the Moeran symphony on both Chandos(Handley) and Naxos(Lloyd-Jones). I really don't think that I should buy the Lyrita as well-great though the performance is. (Anyway-I've just remembered that I have the Boult version on LP!! Hurrah!)

Maybe someone could explain why certain people-of whom I am certainly one(and there are others on this site :) have such an interest in and love of 20th century British music? It certainly isn't in any way an overtly nationalist thing(I am Scottish anyway) but the quintessentially British/English music of the first half of the 20th century has an appeal which must in some way strike the correct receptive chords in evoking emotions linked to our perceptions of landscape, mood etc related to our native country.

Oh... I had better stop before I get in over my head and out of my depth! It is too late at night here for such cod philosophising!!

Mark

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2007, 10:00:29 PM »
Maybe someone could explain why certain people-of whom I am certainly one(and there are others on this site :) have such an interest in and love of 20th century British music? It certainly isn't in any way an overtly nationalist thing(I am Scottish anyway) but the quintessentially British/English music of the first half of the 20th century has an appeal which must in some way strike the correct receptive chords in evoking emotions linked to our perceptions of landscape, mood etc related to our native country.

My interest in British 20th century music has grown steadily since discovering Gerald Finzi about four years ago. I've since explored Boughton, Moeran, Bax, Bliss, Britten, Warlock and the wonderful Rebecca Clark, as well as the 'big guns' like Elgar, Holst and Vaughan Williams. It's really only the 'lack' (relatively speaking) of so much 'core repertoire' in my collection that currently keeps me from making a more in-depth exploration of the works of British composers from the last century.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2007, 02:37:41 AM »
Just been feeding her. ;D


Now, when can we expect a thread from you on Rutland Boughton?

I like "The Immortal Hour" very much and there is a charming Oboe Concerto (written for his daughter I think). However, I have been less impressed with RB's symphonies. On a recent Dutton CD I was disappointed with Boughton's "Cromwell Symphony" and much preferred its companion on disc; Edgar Bainton's valedictory Third Symphony. Maybe I'll do a Bainton thread instead!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Mark

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2007, 02:40:31 AM »
I like "The Immortal Hour" very much and there is a charming Oboe Concerto (written for his daughter I think). However, I have been less impressed with RB's symphonies. On a recent Dutton CD I was disappointed with Boughton's "Cromwell Symphony" and much preferred its companion on disc; Edgar Bainton's valedictory Third Symphony. Maybe I'll do a Bainton thread instead!

Try Boughton's String Quartet, 'From The Welsh Hills'. Terrific stuff. :)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: E J Moeran
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2007, 02:47:09 AM »


Maybe someone could explain why certain people-of whom I am certainly one(and there are others on this site :) have such an interest in and love of 20th century British music? It certainly isn't in any way an overtly nationalist thing(I am Scottish anyway) but the quintessentially British/English music of the first half of the 20th century has an appeal which must in some way strike the correct receptive chords in evoking emotions linked to our perceptions of landscape, mood etc related to our native country.

Oh... I had better stop before I get in over my head and out of my depth! It is too late at night here for such cod philosophising!!

I think that you have explained the appeal of much early/mid 20th century music above. Like you, I am no nationalist but the music of VW, Moeran, Bax, Finzi, Ireland, Rubbra etc has a unique appeal for me. I think that it has something to do with the English (sorry British!) landscape. I love walking in the countryside and invariably have some music by those composers running through my head.  Being interested in history also has something to do with it and I wonder what those Henry Wood Proms were like in the inter-war period when the music of those composers featured regularly. I guess it's a bit of a wistful nostalgia trip but VW, Bax etc do provide something of an antidote to a society whose heroes are the likes of "Ant and Dec" and Chantelle from "Big Brother" (not that I watch such tripe you understand!)

I have rambled incoherently, so enough for now ;D




"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).