Author Topic: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)  (Read 41125 times)

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Offline kyjo

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #140 on: July 26, 2020, 06:29:25 PM »


I stumbled upon this rarity, and a good rarity it is. Nikotina is a ballet whose music is highly imaginative, quirky, frolicsome, and I could say it's significantly tuneful too. It's been a pretty agreeable discovery. Something bad about it is the only track for the 52 minutes of this work. Not very helpful actually. Toman and the Wood Nymph is the another work, and I think it's a better performance than that on Chandos. This may not be the most memorable stuff out there, but I do find it voluptuous, dramatic, atmospheric with a rich orchestration and that's enough to enjoy it very much, for me anyway.

I haven't heard Nikotina yet, but I have heard his other ballet-pantomime Signorina Gioventu which was an absolutely stunning discovery of mine about a month ago:



All the adjectives you used to describe Nikotina could easily be used to describe Signorina Gioventu; this is enormously colorful, inventive, tuneful, and engrossing music. I loved every minute of it! I thought it was more melodically distinctive than, say, his tone poems, much as I enjoy those.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #141 on: July 26, 2020, 09:15:15 PM »
I haven't heard Nikotina yet, but I have heard his other ballet-pantomime Signorina Gioventu which was an absolutely stunning discovery of mine about a month ago:



All the adjectives you used to describe Nikotina could easily be used to describe Signorina Gioventu; this is enormously colorful, inventive, tuneful, and engrossing music. I loved every minute of it! I thought it was more melodically distinctive than, say, his tone poems, much as I enjoy those.
Two more on my discovery list!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #142 on: August 02, 2020, 08:21:59 PM »
A new release on Supraphon featuring his Piano Concerto in E minor. I'm not aware of another recording of it.

«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #143 on: August 02, 2020, 09:54:17 PM »
A new release on Supraphon featuring his Piano Concerto in E minor. I'm not aware of another recording of it.


Oh wow! Have to have this one. Hopefully someone will record his 'Autumn Symphony' and the 'May Symphony' one day. I notice though that the PC is an early work (1896) and my favourites are works like De Profundis and the South Bohemian Suite written later on in his career. Having said that, his masterpiece 'The Storm' and 'Pan' we're both from 1910.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2020, 10:04:18 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #144 on: August 03, 2020, 01:45:13 AM »
I've been wanting to acquire more of Novak's music.  Believe that all that I have of his music is:  Sonata for Cello and Piano (on a mostly Kodaly CD with Jiri Barta) and one song on a disc of Magdalena Kozena's entitled "Songs My Mother Taught Me".

On my wish list for a while:  In the Tatra Mountains.

Any other truly mosts that you would suggest for me for now?

PD

Offline relm1

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #145 on: August 03, 2020, 04:35:55 AM »
Oh wow! Have to have this one. Hopefully someone will record his 'Autumn Symphony' and the 'May Symphony' one day. I notice though that the PC is an early work (1896) and my favourites are works like De Profundis and the South Bohemian Suite written later on in his career. Having said that, his masterpiece 'The Storm' and 'Pan' we're both from 1910.

Are the May and Autumn Symphonies any good?  Like you, my favorite of his is The Storm but I also like De Profundis so pretty much his mid to late period but haven't heard anything chronologically after De Profundis.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #146 on: August 03, 2020, 05:07:59 AM »
Are the May and Autumn Symphonies any good?  Like you, my favorite of his is The Storm but I also like De Profundis so pretty much his mid to late period but haven't heard anything chronologically after De Profundis.
Never heard them so I don't know. The South Bohemian Suite and the 8 Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra are other favourites as well as 'In the Tatras' and 'Pan' (both piano and orchestral versions).
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #147 on: August 03, 2020, 05:09:02 AM »
I've been wanting to acquire more of Novak's music.  Believe that all that I have of his music is:  Sonata for Cello and Piano (on a mostly Kodaly CD with Jiri Barta) and one song on a disc of Magdalena Kozena's entitled "Songs My Mother Taught Me".

On my wish list for a while:  In the Tatra Mountains.

Any other truly mosts that you would suggest for me for now?

PD

See last couple of messages PD. 'The Storm' is an absolute must.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #148 on: August 03, 2020, 05:56:38 AM »
Will go back through!  :)

PD

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #149 on: August 03, 2020, 06:13:15 AM »
great cd and piano version too
Any idea what CD this was?  No picture showing at my end...only a box with a question mark.

PD

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #150 on: August 03, 2020, 01:01:38 PM »
Any idea what CD this was?  No picture showing at my end...only a box with a question mark.

PD
Hi PD, I can't find my original post and wonder if it disappeared during 'The Great GMG Forum Meltdown'. I think that I may have meant Novak's 'Pan' so maybe it was these two CDs which I like very much:
[/img]
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #151 on: August 03, 2020, 01:07:58 PM »
Thanks Jeffrey...I've been making a list (with photos too) to remind me of various people's likes.   :)

PD

Offline J

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #152 on: August 03, 2020, 04:41:27 PM »
Are the May and Autumn Symphonies any good?

No, would be my short answer, - not at all.  Lower drawer Novak in my estimation, and almost entirely forgettable.  You can hear the existing recordings on YT.

The YT commenters radically disagree with me, however, and seem to believe these are masterpieces.  I myself am indifferent, and done forever with them.

Worse music has been recorded, but that Novak's Symphonies have been passed over should not be a mystery.

« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 05:15:52 PM by J »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #153 on: August 03, 2020, 08:18:30 PM »
No, would be my short answer, - not at all.  Lower drawer Novak in my estimation, and almost entirely forgettable.  You can hear the existing recordings on YT.

The YT commenters radically disagree with me, however, and seem to believe these are masterpieces.  I myself am indifferent, and done forever with them.

Worse music has been recorded, but that Novak's Symphonies have been passed over should not be a mystery.
Thanks Greg for alerting us to their existence on You Tube. I listened to most of the Autumn Symphony and sampled the May Symphony last night and have to reluctantly agree with you. Having said that, I preferred the Autumn Symphony which had some inspired passages. They both involve a chorus and I need to listen to them both again. Maybe the new Supraphon CD featuring the Piano Concerto will be my next port of call for Novak.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #154 on: August 03, 2020, 09:54:30 PM »
Independently if both May and Autumn symphonies are or not top-drawer Novák I do want to hear them on performances and recordings that do do justice to them. What we have on YouTube regarding sound quality is frankly unbearable IMO. I prefer to wait the proper recordings to come, hopefully sooner than later (hey Naxos, Supraphon, Chandos, CPO, read this!) 🙏
«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #155 on: August 06, 2020, 10:51:13 PM »
Independently if both May and Autumn symphonies are or not top-drawer Novák I do want to hear them on performances and recordings that do do justice to them. What we have on YouTube regarding sound quality is frankly unbearable IMO. I prefer to wait the proper recordings to come, hopefully sooner than later (hey Naxos, Supraphon, Chandos, CPO, read this!) 🙏
Yes, that would be good.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #156 on: January 12, 2021, 08:41:21 AM »
From another age but this transmission on Czech television from 1966 is an aid to the appreciation of Novak's music.

https://youtu.be/siQuYu6VnOk?t=4
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline relm1

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #157 on: January 12, 2021, 05:21:29 PM »
From another age but this transmission on Czech television from 1966 is an aid to the appreciation of Novak's music.

https://youtu.be/siQuYu6VnOk?t=4

Thanks for posting, I loved it!

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #158 on: January 12, 2021, 11:13:32 PM »
Thanks for posting, I loved it!

+1

Although I prefer the South Bohemian Suite and am currently enjoying the new Naxos recording:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #159 on: January 15, 2021, 01:11:38 AM »
+1

Although I prefer the South Bohemian Suite and am currently enjoying the new Naxos recording:


Expected arrival today.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.