Author Topic: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)  (Read 28450 times)

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Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2009, 05:05:29 PM »
I can't find Novak's SQ No.3 anywhere. Who, what, where, when, and how???

Novak, Suk, Dohnanyi, Fibich, Bella, Seiber,...I just can't keep 'em straight.

Is there a "Bohemian composers" thread...Dun?...hint hint...

I have no wish to appear rude but you really do need some geography lessons ;D Not so long ago it was the Netherlands and Belgium which seemed to be confusing you and now this. Why don't you invest in an atlas?

Bohemia was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until 1918 when the Empire collapsed at the end of the First World War. It then became part of Czechoslovakia until 1992 and of the Czech Republic since 1993. The capital of Bohemia is Prague but the city is, obviously, better known as the capital of first Czechoslovakia and now the Czech republic.

Most well-known Czech composers were born in Bohemia, eg Dvorak, Fibich, Foerster, Suk, Novak, Martinu. Janacek is an exception however. He was born in Moravia, capital Brno. When Czechoslovakia was created in 1919 the new country was made up of Bohemia and Moravia(both Czech-speaking), Slovakia(Slovak speaking) and one or two other areas where there were substantial minorities(Germans for example). Slovakia has been an independent country since 1993.

Dohnanyi, Seiber, Bela Bartok, Kodaly were all Hungarians. Completely different nationality, different country etc, etc.

Hope this is of some help to you, friend :)

snyprrr

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2009, 09:18:01 PM »
Yes, professor. :-[ :-X ;D

snyprrr

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2009, 09:20:56 PM »
No.1 op.22, No.2 op.35 and No.3 op.66. I've the last 2, the third by
the old Vlach SQ. A marvelous version.Copied from an old Supraphon LP.

LP...ahhh...is the 3rd (30 years later) more advanced, or more conservative?

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2009, 03:29:09 AM »
I have no wish to appear rude but you really do need some geography lessons ;D Not so long ago it was the Netherlands and Belgium which seemed to be confusing you and now this. Why don't you invest in an atlas?

Bohemia was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until 1918 when the Empire collapsed at the end of the First World War. It then became part of Czechoslovakia until 1992 and of the Czech Republic since 1993. The capital of Bohemia is Prague but the city is, obviously, better known as the capital of first Czechoslovakia and now the Czech republic.

Most well-known Czech composers were born in Bohemia, eg Dvorak, Fibich, Foerster, Suk, Novak, Martinu. Janacek is an exception however. He was born in Moravia, capital Brno. When Czechoslovakia was created in 1919 the new country was made up of Bohemia and Moravia(both Czech-speaking), Slovakia(Slovak speaking) and one or two other areas where there were substantial minorities(Germans for example). Slovakia has been an independent country since 1993.

Dohnanyi, Seiber, Bela Bartok, Kodaly were all Hungarians. Completely different nationality, different country etc, etc.

Hope this is of some help to you, friend :)

All those Czech composers you mentioned are superb.  The Czechs (as well as other countries, to be sure) have a wonderful musical tradition.  To me, those early 20th century Czech composers are very special.

DFO

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2009, 04:22:51 AM »
LP...ahhh...is the 3rd (30 years later) more advanced, or more conservative?
IMO it's a fine mixture of both, with a strong czech flavor. And yes, LP.
I've on CD more that 200 copies of LPs, with composers, works and players never published on CD. Remember that the vynyl was the king for nearly 40 years, and there were dozen of thousends of them.

Offline Superhorn

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2009, 05:53:55 AM »
  I have the Krombholc/Czech Phil. recording of the Storm, coupled with
 Dvorak's The Spectre's Bride on Supraphon.
 I woudn't call the Storm a "potboiler"; it's a work of real substance,and I would like to hear more of this composer.
 Unfortunately, we're not likely to hear performances of this work because it's in Czech, although non-czech opera companies do perform
 Janacek and Dvorak operas in the original language. But I suppose if
 the text of the Storm could be translated, it might achieve some success outside the Czech republic.
  Dvorak's Spectre's bride is also a marvelous work, spooky and atmosheric , and also something audiences would really enjoy.
  I agree that we could use a first-rate modern recording of the Storm.
 

Offline Daverz

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2009, 08:59:08 PM »
I'm always scared of Czech composers known for their tone poems... scared of ZZZZzzzzz...seriously!

I guess everyone else is practiced at ignoring your silliness.

Most of the great Czech composers were known for their tone poems.  Dvorak for his "Nature, Life, and Love" and Garland cycles,  Smetana for Ma Vlast, Janacek for Taras Bulba.

Offline Daverz

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2009, 09:12:55 PM »
I've been having a little Novak festival.  First with Sejna conducting Eternal Longing, In The Tatras, and the Moravian-Slovak Suite, then Vogel conducting the South Bohemian Suite.  Though it's nice performance,  there seem to have been some problems with the tape in the transferring of the Vogel recording.  I wonder how Vajnar on Suprahpon is in this.  There's a Kubelik recording, which I assume is from the 40s.  There's also a recording conducted by Bostock.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2009, 10:22:38 PM »
I've been having a little Novak festival.  First with Sejna conducting Eternal Longing, In The Tatras, and the Moravian-Slovak Suite, then Vogel conducting the South Bohemian Suite.  Though it's nice performance,  there seem to have been some problems with the tape in the transferring of the Vogel recording.  I wonder how Vajnar on Suprahpon is in this.  There's a Kubelik recording, which I assume is from the 40s.  There's also a recording conducted by Bostock.

The great thing about the Bostock recording, if you can find it, is that it also features the Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra. The Christchild's Lullaby from this is absolutely beautiful - one of the most beautiful and consoling pieces I know. Do try to hear it.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #29 on: June 02, 2009, 03:50:04 AM »
The great thing about the Bostock recording, if you can find it, is that it also features the Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra. The Christchild's Lullaby from this is absolutely beautiful - one of the most beautiful and consoling pieces I know. Do try to hear it.

Finally getting to know "Pan." Fine work ideed.  Quite romantic work  interlaced with impressionistic color. Gives or suggests an ongoing drama of sorts.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #30 on: June 02, 2009, 04:37:59 AM »
Finally getting to know "Pan." Fine work ideed.  Quite romantic work  interlaced with impressionistic color. Gives or suggests an ongoing drama of sorts.

There is a good piano version (Chandos) as well as the orchestral version on Marco Polo.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2009, 04:54:08 AM »
Hi Robert,

Thanks for the interesting articles.  I would love to hear the 'Autumn Symphony' (unrecorded I think). I like the CD below. The wartime De Profundis written during the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia is a deeply moving work (+interesting cover art  :o). You must hear Novak's cantata 'The Storm' at some point - his greatest achivement in my opinion.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

robnewman

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #32 on: June 02, 2009, 04:59:42 AM »

Thank you for this Vandermolen,

I will make a point of hearing these works. The fact that Novak was deeply interested in music of Moravia is itself very interesting.

Regards




robnewman

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #33 on: June 02, 2009, 05:06:21 AM »

My first hearing of Novak ! Remarkable !!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcuV1KDe_sE&feature=related


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #34 on: June 02, 2009, 06:43:39 AM »
My first hearing of Novak ! Remarkable !!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcuV1KDe_sE&feature=related



Robert,  I just got a blank Youtube screen.

The Slovak Suite is one of Novak's best known (or least unknown!) pieces.  Oddly enough I prefer the less highly regarded South Bohemian Suite and would stronly recommend that - the Piano Quintet is a lovely work.  I feel that Novak was a genuinely great composer.

Jeffrey
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #35 on: June 02, 2009, 07:46:50 AM »
There is a good piano version (Chandos) as well as the orchestral version on Marco Polo.

What do you think of any piano works by Novak?  I'll check online.  I've always appreciated his varied orchestral works, of which I own several.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2009, 05:19:29 PM by schweitzeralan »

robnewman

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2009, 10:55:42 AM »
Thanks, here's the Cantata 'The Storm'. A really remarkable composer, for sure !!

Parts 1-3

1. Tempesto, ma non troppo allegro
2. Andante rubato, com molta passione
3. Piu mosso

Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Zdeněk Košler

Czech Philharmonic Chorus
Chorus master: Josef Veselka
Soprano: Jarmila Žilková

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zv1EUNdibVs



Offline Daverz

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #37 on: June 02, 2009, 11:53:09 AM »
Thanks, here's the Cantata 'The Storm'. A really remarkable composer, for sure !!

Giving the Kosler CD its first outing in many years.   It's a fine recording.  After the description of the text given below, do I really want to know what they are singing?

I think my "potboiler" description came from memories of just the "Tempestoso" sections.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 12:10:30 PM by Daverz »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #38 on: June 02, 2009, 02:52:32 PM »
Thanks, here's the Cantata 'The Storm'. A really remarkable composer, for sure !!

Parts 1-3

1. Tempesto, ma non troppo allegro
2. Andante rubato, com molta passione
3. Piu mosso

Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Zdeněk Košler

Czech Philharmonic Chorus
Chorus master: Josef Veselka
Soprano: Jarmila Žilková

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zv1EUNdibVs




Thanks for the great link.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

snyprrr

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #39 on: October 05, 2009, 10:58:32 AM »
I can't find Novak's SQ No.3 anywhere. Who, what, where, when, and how???

Novak, Suk, Dohnanyi, Fibich, Bella, Seiber,...I just can't keep 'em straight.

Is there a "Bohemian composers" thread...Dun?...hint hint...

Well, my friend here sent me a copy of Novak's SQ No.3 (from LP, I believe), and, ha, it's quite the winner. From the first notes we are in Janacek/Szymanowski territory (with a slab of that ole Martinu mystery music a la SymNo.6). Really, it just sounds a lot like what you would want it to sound like, very earthy and mysterious and scurrying and melodic.

Apparently, it is cast in two mvmts. (like his earlier No.2?). The second mvmt, haha, begins with yer typical minor third AmericanIndian sound, very obvious, and continues for the mvmt. It's not cheesy, though, and Novak works through it very interestingly. Still, there's no getting over that NativeAmerican sound... straight out of Dvorak!

So, this piece, which is not available on cd, definitely deserves to be heard by all. Here's your hidden minor masterpiece!