Author Topic: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)  (Read 28449 times)

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Offline Grazioso

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #40 on: October 07, 2009, 03:26:19 AM »
So, this piece, which is not available on cd, definitely deserves to be heard by all. Here's your hidden minor masterpiece!

That seems to pretty much sum up the Novak situation. His well-crafted, tuneful work could easily appeal to a broad audience, but so little of it has been recorded or is in print :(
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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #41 on: October 07, 2009, 05:59:45 AM »
Say, Snyprrr, have the Vlach's recording? That's the one I've.
A magnificent work, and a splendid playing.

Offline The new erato

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #42 on: October 07, 2009, 09:06:34 AM »
Anybody know his Piano Quintet?

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #43 on: October 07, 2009, 09:12:12 AM »
Anybody know his Piano Quintet?

Yes, a beautiful work - especially the opening.  I wish that we had a new digital recording of 'The Storm' - one of my all-time favourite works.
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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #44 on: October 07, 2009, 10:09:39 AM »
Say, Snyprrr, have the Vlach's recording? That's the one I've.
A magnificent work, and a splendid playing.

Yes! I was just listening to it again. Yes, it has shot straight into my "winner's circle." From now on, when I think of the cream of this type of stuff, I will haaave to refer to Szymanowski, Janacek, AND Novak (of course, there's a healthy dose of Dvorak in there, too)! Why this SQ hasn't seen the light of day on cd is, as classical nerds like to say, astonishing (or, staggering, haha). It's such a perfect make-weight. I was just groovin on that "american indian" mvmt: it really is a perfect application of that old minor third "riff"... very meditative and compelling. The first mvmt., too, weaves all the best "fantasy" elements of the Szymanowski/Janacek/late Martinu sound into a typically beatiful Czech misterioso forest music.

What IS Novak's chamber masterpiece if not this instant classic?

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #45 on: February 13, 2010, 05:23:18 PM »
Just found this great old (1948) recording of Novak's 'South Bohemian Suite' - actually a work I prefer to the more highly regarded and better known 'Slovak Suite'. The South Bohemian Suite (1937) is a great work - an assertion of Czech national identity at a time when Czech independence was threatened by Nazi Germany (no idle threat as it turned out). Kubelik's wonderful performance is the best I know - although the recording is more than sixty years old.  The performance is from 1948 - the year of the communist coup in Czechoslovakia - perhaps Kubelik was making a point before his self-imposed exile from Czechoslovakia.  The third movement ('Once Upon a Time - March of the Taborites') is especially powerful and moving in this version - as is the short epilogue ('Good Health my Native Land), which quotes the Czech national anthem. In general, this is a performance of enormous integrity and conviction. I increasingly think that the South Bohemian Suite is, along with 'The Storm', Novak's greatest work - a true masterpiece. If you listen to only one work by Novak - this is the one.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2010, 05:33:43 PM by vandermolen »
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #46 on: December 18, 2011, 03:30:24 PM »
Listening to Lady Godiva at the moment - a work I have only known in full for around two days now. I have to thank I think it was Grazioso (forgive me if I'm wrong) for introducing me to Novak here on GMG, through a short excerpt of Lady Godiva on the 'name the piece' game.
This piece is absolutely beautiful - extremely poetic, romantic and magical. I have ordered the Chandos recording and am looking forward to exploring more of Novak's work. After this recording, where should I go? There are not many recordings of Novak's work available, as Sara and I were discussing on the Purchases thread.... I know there is a recording of 'Pan' which looks interesting, plus some of his other orchestral music (some at ridiculous prices) and a bit of piano/chamber music.

Good to see Novak has a thread here on GMG! :)
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Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #47 on: December 18, 2011, 07:01:17 PM »
I have sent you an offer via Facebook, Daniel :D :D

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #48 on: December 19, 2011, 01:51:11 AM »
Listening to Lady Godiva at the moment - a work I have only known in full for around two days now. I have to thank I think it was Grazioso (forgive me if I'm wrong) for introducing me to Novak here on GMG, through a short excerpt of Lady Godiva on the 'name the piece' game.
This piece is absolutely beautiful - extremely poetic, romantic and magical. I have ordered the Chandos recording and am looking forward to exploring more of Novak's work. After this recording, where should I go? There are not many recordings of Novak's work available, as Sara and I were discussing on the Purchases thread.... I know there is a recording of 'Pan' which looks interesting, plus some of his other orchestral music (some at ridiculous prices) and a bit of piano/chamber music.

Good to see Novak has a thread here on GMG! :)

My recommendation must include 'The Storm' - a masterpiece IMHO, the South Bohemian Suite, De Profundis (written during the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia), Pan in the piano and orchestral versions and the 'Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra', the last of which - 'Christchild's Lullaby' is one of the most beautiful pieces I know - deeply affecting - I play it over and over again. I'm pestering Alto (who recently issued a nice CD of Novak's piano music) to reissue the old Classico release with the Nocturnes on.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2011, 04:11:39 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #49 on: December 19, 2011, 03:47:29 AM »
I have sent you an offer via Facebook, Daniel :D :D

Yes, just recieved that. Thank you very much, Colin! :D

My recommendation must include 'The Storm' - a masterpiece IMHO, the South Bohemian Suite, De Profundis (written during the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia), Pan in the piano and orchestral versions and the 'Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra', the last of which - 'Christchild's Lullaby' is one of the most beautiful pieces I know n- deeply affecting - I play it over and over again. I'm pestering Alto (who recently issued a nice CD of Novak's piano music) to reissue the old Classico release with the Nocturnes on.

Thank you for the suggestions. I'll probably listen to De Profundis, and the South Bohemian Suite next. And then pick up 'The Storm' and 'Pan' a little later. Yes, continue pestering them! ;) There are too few recordings of Novak's music available. I might start requesting to labels such as Naxos that they record Novak's music. It really does deserve to be heard a lot more!
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #50 on: December 23, 2011, 10:49:10 AM »
Nice day of Novak listening today:



Lady Godiva (again)
Toman and the Wood Nymph


Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra

Well, I am sure I have made my love for the Lady Godiva clear in above posts. It was the first time I had listened to Toman and the Wood Nymph, what a brilliant piece it is! Absolutely thrilling! The Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra were absolutely beautiful, delightful pieces. The last two of the eight in particular, really stunning pieces. I am really fascinated by Novak's imaginative, excellent orchestration as well as the beautiful melodic sensitivity. A great composer who I am very quickly coming to admire a lot!
Tommorow, I imagine I will listen to De Profundis from the Chandos cd and South Bohemian Suite from the other disc for the first time.
"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #51 on: December 23, 2011, 03:51:00 PM »
Nice day of Novak listening today:



Lady Godiva (again)
Toman and the Wood Nymph


Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra

Well, I am sure I have made my love for the Lady Godiva clear in above posts. It was the first time I had listened to Toman and the Wood Nymph, what a brilliant piece it is! Absolutely thrilling! The Eight Nocturnes for Voice and Orchestra were absolutely beautiful, delightful pieces. The last two of the eight in particular, really stunning pieces. I am really fascinated by Novak's imaginative, excellent orchestration as well as the beautiful melodic sensitivity. A great composer who I am very quickly coming to admire a lot!
Tommorow, I imagine I will listen to De Profundis from the Chandos cd and South Bohemian Suite from the other disc for the first time.

I'm listening to Lady Godiva too (Chandos) I did not realise how good it is - so than's for the recommendation. Let us know what you make of the South Bohemian Suite, which I prefer to the better known Slovak Suite. I especially like the section involving the March of the Taborites (movement 3) and the ending 'Once Upon a Time' is moving too.
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #52 on: March 31, 2012, 07:12:47 AM »
I finally got around to listening to the South Bohemian Suite and De Profundis! I should have listened to them a lot earlier, both works are absolutely excellent.

The South Bohemian Suite is beautiful! A delightful work which I enjoyed very very much. Thank you again Jeffrey for sending me that cd, I loved both of the works. :)

De Profundis....  :o
These were my initial thoughts copied from the listening thread:
First Listen


Novak De Profundis

Listened to Lady Godiva and Toman and the Wood Nymph a few months ago, and have finally come to this work. De Profundis..............  :o Wow. What an absolutely amazing, deeply moving piece. Written in 1943 during the German occupation, you can just hear the anger and the sinister tension. And how that turns to absolute beautiful glory at the end, bringing so much hope, is extremely moving and, indeed, profound.

All three of the works on this disc have become absolute favourites of mine, and Novak a favourite composer of mine too now. He certainly deserves far more attention. A master!

So, De Profundis moved me deeply, at more than one point to tears! An extremely beautiful, powerful, amazing work.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2012, 07:48:09 AM by madaboutmahler »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #53 on: April 04, 2012, 02:15:57 AM »
I finally got around to listening to the South Bohemian Suite and De Profundis! I should have listened to them a lot earlier, both works are absolutely excellent.

The South Bohemian Suite is beautiful! A delightful work which I enjoyed very very much. Thank you again Jeffrey for sending me that cd, I loved both of the works. :)

De Profundis....  :o
These were my initial thoughts copied from the listening thread:
So, De Profundis moved me deeply, at more than one point to tears! An extremely beautiful, powerful, amazing work.

A great pleasure Daniel.  Delighted that you liked De Profundis and the South Bohemian Suite. Now you must listen to 'The Storm', Novak's masterpiece!
Jeffrey
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Offline madaboutmahler

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #54 on: April 04, 2012, 02:21:04 AM »
A great pleasure Daniel.  Delighted that you liked De Profundis and the South Bohemian Suite. Now you must listen to 'The Storm', Novak's masterpiece!
Jeffrey

:) Thank you, Jeffrey. Yes - I must! I am very keen to hear it, and much more of Novak's output. There has not been a single second of his music that I heard so far that I have not enjoyed. Such a great composer! :)
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #55 on: July 14, 2012, 01:22:55 AM »
I have just discovered 'In the Tatras' or 'In the Tatra Mountains', Symphonic Poem Op. 26 (1902/revised 1907) - a wonderful (IMHO) depiction of the Tatra Mountains before, during and after a storm and infused with Novak's characteristic depth of feeling.  I especially love the opening hymn-like section.  Can't understand why I didn't appreciate this work before as I'm a great fan on Novak.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJL0e71AwQs
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Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #56 on: July 14, 2012, 03:05:59 AM »
I have just discovered 'In the Tatras' or 'In the Tatra Mountains', Symphonic Poem Op. 26 (1902/revised 1907)

I ordered the Ančerl/Czech Phil performance (Supraphon Gold Edition coupled with two works by Klement Slavický...whoever he is  ;D ) I'll let you know what I think after it arrives.

Sarge
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #57 on: July 14, 2012, 03:46:09 AM »
I ordered the Ančerl/Czech Phil performance (Supraphon Gold Edition coupled with two works by Klement Slavický...whoever he is  ;D ) I'll let you know what I think after it arrives.

Sarge

Hi Sarge,

I have an Ancerl version on an EMI 'Great Conductors' double album - I have heard at leat three recordings of the work and the Ancerl is definitely the most compelling. Yes, let us know what you think.

« Last Edit: July 14, 2012, 03:50:14 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #58 on: September 30, 2012, 12:48:08 AM »
New release (actually a re-issue of material from two earlier ClassicO CDs).

The Christchild's Lullaby from the Eight Nocturnes (only recording available) is absolutely beautiful - ideal late night listening. I am biased towards this issue as I suggested it to Alto but am very happy to plug it - all three works are excellent IMHO. In the Tatras is a very powerful and moving monothematic work and the South Bohemian Suite, written in the shadow of the Nazi threat to Czechoslovakia has a great 'March of the Hussites' section - a little reminiscent of the Roman legions on the Appian Way from Respighi's 'Pines of Rome'. I don't know why it is being sold for £12 on Amazon UK - it should be about £5.

« Last Edit: September 30, 2012, 01:02:04 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vitezslaw Novak (1870-1949)
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2012, 09:36:20 AM »
New release (actually a re-issue of material from two earlier ClassicO CDs).

The Christchild's Lullaby from the Eight Nocturnes (only recording available) is absolutely beautiful - ideal late night listening. I am biased towards this issue as I suggested it to Alto but am very happy to plug it - all three works are excellent IMHO. In the Tatras is a very powerful and moving monothematic work and the South Bohemian Suite, written in the shadow of the Nazi threat to Czechoslovakia has a great 'March of the Hussites' section - a little reminiscent of the Roman legions on the Appian Way from Respighi's 'Pines of Rome'. I don't know why it is being sold for £12 on Amazon UK - it should be about £5.



Didn't know this recording existed, Jeffrey. Thanks for mentioning it! 8)
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