Author Topic: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]  (Read 7797 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #40 on: December 09, 2018, 01:23:52 AM »
This new release will be another great hit by Chandos. Let's hope they will record the whole cycle, and why not, include others of his orchestral works that haven't seen the light of day.

I agree Cesar! Good point.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #41 on: December 09, 2018, 05:24:47 PM »
I agree Cesar! Good point.
 :)

According to Wikipedia, it lists the next works:

Orchestral

Fantastic March opus 3 (1920)
Overture on four Ukrainian Folk themes opus 20 (1927)
Suite from the Opera "The Golden Tire" opus 23 (1928)
Lyric Poem (1947)
Song of the reunification of Russia opus 49 (1949–1950)
Waltz (1951)
Suite from the Film music "Taras Shevchenko" opus 51 (1952)
Slavonic Concerto for piano and orchestra opus 54 (1953)
Suite from the Play "Romeo and Juliet" opus 56 (1955)
"On the Banks of Vistula", symphonic poem opus 59 (1958)
Orchestration of String Quartet No. 2 A major opus 4 (No. 2 Intermezzo) for orchestra (1960)
Polish Suite opus 60 (1961)
Slavonic Overture opus 61 (1961)
Lyric Poem "To the Memory of Gliere" opus 66 (1964)
Slavonic Suite opus 68 (1966)
Festive Overture opus 70 (1967)


Vocal/choral orchestral

Festive Cantata "To the 60th Anniversary of Stalin" after Rilskov for mixed chorus and orchestra (1938)
"Inheritance", cantata after Shevtchenko (1939)


Incidental and film music

Music to the Play "Optimistic Tragedy" (1932)
Music to the Film "Taras Shevtshenko" (1950)
Music to the Play "Romeo and Julia" (1954)
Music to the Film "The Hooked Pig's Snout" (1956)
Music to the Film "Ivan Franko" (1956)

Therefore there are no excuses from Chandos to record some of these works. They would be deserved fillers for the next CDs. Some of them are on Youtube, though, but the sound quality is not the best.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #42 on: December 09, 2018, 07:06:27 PM »
According to Wikipedia, it lists the next works:

Orchestral

Fantastic March opus 3 (1920)
Overture on four Ukrainian Folk themes opus 20 (1927)
Suite from the Opera "The Golden Tire" opus 23 (1928)
Lyric Poem (1947)
Song of the reunification of Russia opus 49 (1949–1950)
Waltz (1951)
Suite from the Film music "Taras Shevchenko" opus 51 (1952)
Slavonic Concerto for piano and orchestra opus 54 (1953)
Suite from the Play "Romeo and Juliet" opus 56 (1955)
"On the Banks of Vistula", symphonic poem opus 59 (1958)
Orchestration of String Quartet No. 2 A major opus 4 (No. 2 Intermezzo) for orchestra (1960)
Polish Suite opus 60 (1961)
Slavonic Overture opus 61 (1961)
Lyric Poem "To the Memory of Gliere" opus 66 (1964)
Slavonic Suite opus 68 (1966)
Festive Overture opus 70 (1967)


Vocal/choral orchestral

Festive Cantata "To the 60th Anniversary of Stalin" after Rilskov for mixed chorus and orchestra (1938)
"Inheritance", cantata after Shevtchenko (1939)


Incidental and film music

Music to the Play "Optimistic Tragedy" (1932)
Music to the Film "Taras Shevtshenko" (1950)
Music to the Play "Romeo and Julia" (1954)
Music to the Film "The Hooked Pig's Snout" (1956)
Music to the Film "Ivan Franko" (1956)

Therefore there are no excuses from Chandos to record some of these works. They would be deserved fillers for the next CDs. Some of them are on Youtube, though, but the sound quality is not the best.

I think that one or two were recorded by Russian Disc including 'On the Banks of the Vistula'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline André

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #43 on: December 10, 2018, 05:32:46 AM »
I think that one or two were recorded by Russian Disc including 'On the Banks of the Vistula'.

Banks of the Vistula is coupled with symphony no 4.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #44 on: December 10, 2018, 05:41:19 AM »
Banks of the Vistula is coupled with symphony no 4.

Yes, I have that CD.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Cato

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #45 on: December 14, 2018, 03:53:48 PM »
Today I heard for the first time the Lyatoshynsky Third Symphony...

...and several times in the opening 28 minutes or so, I was rather startled when I thought I was hearing music of...

Bernard Herrmann.  I wish I had a copy of the score, so that I could pinpoint the sections which (to my ear) resembled Herrmann's music.  I will listen to the performance again (it was on YouTube), and will find the timings.

Has anyone else had a similar impression?  I am sure it is purely coincidental: I doubt that Herrmann ever heard Lyatoshynsky's music, or vice-versa.
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #46 on: December 14, 2018, 11:24:49 PM »
Today I heard for the first time the Lyatoshynsky Third Symphony...

...and several times in the opening 28 minutes or so, I was rather startled when I thought I was hearing music of...

Bernard Herrmann.  I wish I had a copy of the score, so that I could pinpoint the sections which (to my ear) resembled Herrmann's music.  I will listen to the performance again (it was on YouTube), and will find the timings.

Has anyone else had a similar impression?  I am sure it is purely coincidental: I doubt that Herrmann ever heard Lyatoshynsky's music, or vice-versa.

Interesting although it hadn't occurred to me. The other one that comes to mind is the link between Franz Waxman's score for 'A Place in the Sun' and a passage in Shostakovich's 11th Symphony. The Waxman was written first and Dmitri is unlikely to have seen the film. Oddly enough Waxman conducted the West Coast premiere of Shostakovich's 11th Symphony! There's a video about it which I'll try to post here if I can find it. There has been some discussion about it here before.

Here it is:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Tzti-u2yd3o

I hope you enjoyed the Lyatoshynsky.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 11:26:39 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Cato

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #47 on: December 15, 2018, 03:11:55 AM »
Interesting although it hadn't occurred to me. The other one that comes to mind is the link between Franz Waxman's score for 'A Place in the Sun' and a passage in Shostakovich's 11th Symphony. The Waxman was written first and Dmitri is unlikely to have seen the film. Oddly enough Waxman conducted the West Coast premiere of Shostakovich's 11th Symphony! There's a video about it which I'll try to post here if I can find it. There has been some discussion about it here before.

Here it is:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Tzti-u2yd3o

I hope you enjoyed the Lyatoshynsky.

A big O-hi-o YES to that!   8)   Lyatoshynsky is a new fave!  ;)

In Thomas Mann's Doctor Faust the devil discusses music with the composer/main character, and comments that composing has become so difficult without sounding like someone else: you think you have something original, but then realize it sounds too much like Rimsky-Korsakov.
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #48 on: January 05, 2019, 02:26:07 AM »
Just to say that the CD below fully surpassed expectations. It's a wonderful performance and recording of perhaps Lyatoshynsk's/Lyatoshinsky's two greatest work and includes, for the first time, the composer's original last movement of the Symphony 3, complete with pealing bell conclusion. I wrote a bit more on the 'what are you listening to now?' thread.

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Cato

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #49 on: January 05, 2019, 05:03:16 PM »
Just to say that the CD below fully surpassed expectations. It's a wonderful performance and recording of perhaps Lyatoshynsk's/Lyatoshinsky's two greatest work and includes, for the first time, the composer's original last movement of the Symphony 3, complete with pealing bell conclusion. I wrote a bit more on the 'what are you listening to now?' thread.



Time to use that gift card!   8)
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #50 on: January 06, 2019, 12:26:19 AM »
Time to use that gift card!   8)
Yes, it is Leo  ;)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #51 on: January 06, 2019, 07:45:51 AM »
Just to say that the CD below fully surpassed expectations. It's a wonderful performance and recording of perhaps Lyatoshynsk's/Lyatoshinsky's two greatest work and includes, for the first time, the composer's original last movement of the Symphony 3, complete with pealing bell conclusion. I wrote a bit more on the 'what are you listening to now?' thread.



How interesting! It prompts me to listen to it with more desire.

Offline André

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #52 on: January 06, 2019, 06:46:01 PM »


Listened to twice this afternoon. At first hearing some things register, others don’t. On second hearing the symphony makes more sense structurally and thematically. Compared to the third symphony, the fourth is still rather extravagantly scored, the rich textures much more delicate and contributing  impressively to the late-romantic, almost deliquescent atmosphere. Cast in 3 movements, the symphony’s kernel is the gloomy, gothic central Lento tenebroso based on the famous novel Bruges la morte (1892) by belgian symbolist writer Georges Rodenbach (also set to music by Korngold). Much use is made of spooky harp runs and saxophone colourings. The finale is also quite impressive in its sullenness and contained vehemence. It ends softly. Very impressive and altogether more successful as "pure music" than the more overtly dramatic 3rd symphony. Lyatoshynsky sounds like a more direct and expressive version of Myaskovsky and a not too distant predecessor of Schnittke (the very early symphonic works).

The two symphonic poems that follow are good but sound rather less inspired.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #53 on: January 06, 2019, 11:05:26 PM »


Listened to twice this afternoon. At first hearing some things register, others don’t. On second hearing the symphony makes more sense structurally and thematically. Compared to the third symphony, the fourth is still rather extravagantly scored, the rich textures much more delicate and contributing  impressively to the late-romantic, almost deliquescent atmosphere. Cast in 3 movements, the symphony’s kernel is the gloomy, gothic central Lento tenebroso based on the famous novel Bruges la morte (1892) by belgian symbolist writer Georges Rodenbach (also set to music by Korngold). Much use is made of spooky harp runs and saxophone colourings. The finale is also quite impressive in its sullenness and contained vehemence. It ends softly. Very impressive and altogether more successful as "pure music" than the more overtly dramatic 3rd symphony. Lyatoshynsky sounds like a more direct and expressive version of Myaskovsky and a not too distant predecessor of Schnittke (the very early symphonic works).

The two symphonic poems that follow are good but sound rather less inspired.
Very interesting analysis Andre which encourages me to listen to it again. I have the CPO recording as well.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Cato

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #54 on: January 07, 2019, 10:18:10 AM »
Just to say that the CD below fully surpassed expectations. It's a wonderful performance and recording of perhaps Lyatoshynsk's/Lyatoshinsky's two greatest work and includes, for the first time, the composer's original last movement of the Symphony 3, complete with pealing bell conclusion. I wrote a bit more on the 'what are you listening to now?' thread.



This performance also uses the bells, but they seem somewhat drowned out, or was I expecting too much?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/c3abzxh_1hU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/c3abzxh_1hU</a>

The Lviv Philharmonic (Lvov, Lwow, Lemberg) conducted by Myron Yusypovych
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 10:27:10 AM by Cato »
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline vandermolen

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"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #56 on: January 12, 2019, 01:10:04 AM »
Just to say that the CD below fully surpassed expectations. It's a wonderful performance and recording of perhaps Lyatoshynsk's/Lyatoshinsky's two greatest work and includes, for the first time, the composer's original last movement of the Symphony 3, complete with pealing bell conclusion. I wrote a bit more on the 'what are you listening to now?' thread.



The Scherzo on the radio - BBC Radio 3 Record Review NOW!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

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Offline André

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #58 on: January 12, 2019, 06:01:36 AM »
It gets trashed in the "Second Thoughts" survey (PDF):

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2019/Jan/Winter_2019_1.pdf

Today I had a look at one of those silly sponsored links of the « 10 foods you should avoid » type. This one was the 10 ugliest cars ever made. Surprise: I liked most of them, even owned one for years with much satisfaction - including aesthetic. It seems that originality and a taste for the unusual are cardinal sins to some people  ::).

There’s no accounting for particular tastes. It seems to me that the second Musicweb reviewer has a particular distaste for soviet era symphonies. I don’t buy them (figuratively) automatically, but they are often very original and eloquent within their specific genre. That’s certainly the case for Lyatoshynsky. The first reviewer is certainly more objective and less prone to misleading metaphors. Their respective views are on pages 16-17 of the pdf document.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 06:03:08 AM by André »

Offline Cato

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #59 on: January 12, 2019, 06:48:28 AM »
Today I had a look at one of those silly sponsored links of the « 10 foods you should avoid » type. This one was the 10 ugliest cars ever made. Surprise: I liked most of them, even owned one for years with much satisfaction - including aesthetic. It seems that originality and a taste for the unusual are cardinal sins to some people  ::).

There’s no accounting for particular tastes. It seems to me that the second Musicweb reviewer has a particular distaste for soviet era symphonies. I don’t buy them (figuratively) automatically, but they are often very original and eloquent within their specific genre. That’s certainly the case for Lyatoshynsky. The first reviewer is certainly more objective and less prone to misleading metaphors. Their respective views are on pages 16-17 of the pdf document.

Given the censorship and the threat of Siberia - or worse! - hanging over every head under Communism in Russia, it is amazing that artists of any kind could create anything but the most timid treacle.  It seems that any work daring to push a boundary - which is the essence of The New - was a risk.  Recall that Shostakovich kept a suitcase ready for "internal exile" to the GULAG.

Lyatoshynsky was certainly pushing as much as he could!  Nobody in Russia at the time, however, could dare to be the Russian Charles Ives and keep an intact life.
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)