Author Topic: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]  (Read 7697 times)

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SymphonicAddict

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #60 on: February 06, 2019, 07:41:27 PM »
I was comparing the recordings of the Symphony No. 3 (Naxos and Chandos), likewise I did the same for Grazhyna and my conclusions point that the Naxos recordings are much more dramatic and intense, I was overwhelmed even more by them than those of Chandos. Nevertheless, it's good to have another recording in excellent sound quality.

In addition, I too played the Symphony No. 1 and wow wow! This is a bath of sensuality and lush harmonies, what stunning music! I'm very glad for having revisited it! There is an evident (?) influence of Glière in the use of the woodwinds (think of Ilya Murometz). I'm a sucker for the way they sound.

That Naxos (former Marco Polo) cycle is, for me, one of the greatest they've ever made.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #61 on: February 06, 2019, 11:34:12 PM »
I was comparing the recordings of the Symphony No. 3 (Naxos and Chandos), likewise I did the same for Grazhyna and my conclusions point that the Naxos recordings are much more dramatic and intense, I was overwhelmed even more by them than those of Chandos. Nevertheless, it's good to have another recording in excellent sound quality.

In addition, I too played the Symphony No. 1 and wow wow! This is a bath of sensuality and lush harmonies, what stunning music! I'm very glad for having revisited it! There is an evident (?) influence of Glière in the use of the woodwinds (think of Ilya Murometz). I'm a sucker for the way they sound.

That Naxos (former Marco Polo) cycle is, for me, one of the greatest they've ever made.
Interesting feedback Cesar. I recall the musicologist David Fanning stating that he thought that Symphony 1 was Lyatoshynsky's finest symphony. I know that some consider that the performance on Russian Disc is the finest of Symphony 3. Still, great that we have three recordings to compare now.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #62 on: February 07, 2019, 01:10:43 PM »
Interesting feedback Cesar. I recall the musicologist David Fanning stating that he thought that Symphony 1 was Lyatoshynsky's finest symphony. I know that some consider that the performance on Russian Disc is the finest of Symphony 3. Still, great that we have three recordings to compare now.

I never got any Russian Disc of those recordings  :(

Fanning is not far from truth, certainly the 1st is his most lyrical and resplendent, something for wallowing! The one I like the least is the 4th, yet I do find pleasure when hearing it.

Offline André

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #63 on: February 07, 2019, 01:33:55 PM »
I have the Russian Disc issues of symphonies 3 and 4. I like the soviet style of orchestral playing (fruity, braying brass) and air hangar engineering. Typical of its time and place.

I’ve decided to go for some more, so I ordered these from the market place today:




Maybe nos 4 and 5 from that series will follow.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #64 on: February 07, 2019, 03:44:09 PM »
I have the Russian Disc issues of symphonies 3 and 4. I like the soviet style of orchestral playing (fruity, braying brass) and air hangar engineering. Typical of its time and place.

I’ve decided to go for some more, so I ordered these from the market place today:




Maybe nos 4 and 5 from that series will follow.
A great series Andre. I like Grazhyna very much, especially the searching and poetic last few minutes.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #65 on: August 29, 2020, 07:09:59 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/IdUUO_AKNO8" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/IdUUO_AKNO8</a>

An epic work. Very in the vein of Soviet composers close to Khachaturian, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Kabalevsky, just that this sounds more like from Eastern Europe. The Slavonic element is more present.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #66 on: August 29, 2020, 11:50:51 PM »
By coincidence, I listened to the 3rd Symphony last night. I really like it, it's appropriately epic in places. My only real problem is how incessant the three-note motif in the second movement is. It's just constantly there, to the point of annoyance.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #67 on: August 30, 2020, 12:58:44 AM »
By coincidence, I listened to the 3rd Symphony last night. I really like it, it's appropriately epic in places. My only real problem is how incessant the three-note motif in the second movement is. It's just constantly there, to the point of annoyance.
Actually I don't mind that anymore than I mind the repeated three-note motif the second movement of Vaughan Williams's 6th Symphony and Glazunov's 8th Symphony. I quite like the ominous feel which is common to all three works. Coincidentally I just picked out Lyatoshynsky's 2nd and 3rd symphonies to play.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #68 on: August 30, 2020, 01:45:45 AM »
It's weird. The Lyatoshynsky motif feels particularly intrusive. I guess it can be seen as ominous, but it just didn't hit me right yesterday. Thankfully the rest of the symphony more than makes up for that personal grievance.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #69 on: August 30, 2020, 01:50:10 AM »
It's weird. The Lyatoshynsky motif feels particularly intrusive. I guess it can be seen as ominous, but it just didn't hit me right yesterday. Thankfully the rest of the symphony more than makes up for that personal grievance.
I totally understand that - I wonder if I'll find it annoying when I next listen to it!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #70 on: August 30, 2020, 05:13:21 AM »
Your mentioning of Glazunov 8 as far as incessant 3-note motifs goes made me revisit that, and I didn't even notice it at all, so if it was there (and I have no reason to doubt you at all), it was nowhere near intrusive, or maybe it was consonant with the rest of the music.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #71 on: August 30, 2020, 08:55:01 AM »
Your mentioning of Glazunov 8 as far as incessant 3-note motifs goes made me revisit that, and I didn't even notice it at all, so if it was there (and I have no reason to doubt you at all), it was nowhere near intrusive, or maybe it was consonant with the rest of the music.

2nd movement I think.

From about 45 seconds in:
https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=glazunov+symphony+8&&view=detail&mid=0BBD5B87EC482DD1178D0BBD5B87EC482DD1178D&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dglazunov%2Bsymphony%2B8%26FORM%3DHDRSC4
« Last Edit: August 30, 2020, 08:57:42 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #72 on: September 17, 2020, 07:05:18 AM »
My memory recalled the 2nd Symphony as a nightmarish, cataclysmic work; and certainly upon revisiting the work last night, I had remembered correctly! One can see why, as with Shostakovich’s 4th and Popov’s 1st, the symphony landed the composer in some serious trouble with the Soviet authorities. This music rises to truly terrifying climaxes rife with dissonance, but there are also moments of sinuous, “exotic” lyricism (esp. in the slow mvt.) that perhaps recall Glière. Lyatoshynsky’s writing for the low brass and harp is particularly arresting. Some passages even recall the more chromatic moments in John Williams’ film scores! The Kuchar performance on Naxos is quite good (though the sound is a bit congested); it would be nice to hear Karabits tackle this symphony as well, aided of course by Chandos’ superior sound.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #73 on: September 17, 2020, 09:07:32 AM »
My memory recalled the 2nd Symphony as a nightmarish, cataclysmic work; and certainly upon revisiting the work last night, I had remembered correctly! One can see why, as with Shostakovich’s 4th and Popov’s 1st, the symphony landed the composer in some serious trouble with the Soviet authorities. This music rises to truly terrifying climaxes rife with dissonance, but there are also moments of sinuous, “exotic” lyricism (esp. in the slow mvt.) that perhaps recall Glière. Lyatoshynsky’s writing for the low brass and harp is particularly arresting. Some passages even recall the more chromatic moments in John Williams’ film scores! The Kuchar performance on Naxos is quite good (though the sound is a bit congested); it would be nice to hear Karabits tackle this symphony as well, aided of course by Chandos’ superior sound.
Yes, I'd love to see a new recording of the work.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #74 on: October 16, 2020, 04:58:50 PM »
A live performance of Symphony No. 3:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/c3abzxh_1hU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/c3abzxh_1hU</a>

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #75 on: October 16, 2020, 05:17:50 PM »
" love-in "???
Did I already gripe about this one?  Ugh.   :-X
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 12:25:04 AM by Scion7 »
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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #76 on: October 17, 2020, 06:09:12 AM »
We've all done embarrassing things in our youth, don't worry.

Tbh...I just assumed it was a snyprrr title... /shrug

Offline relm1

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky's love-in [1895-1968]
« Reply #77 on: October 17, 2020, 06:12:37 AM »
My memory recalled the 2nd Symphony as a nightmarish, cataclysmic work; and certainly upon revisiting the work last night, I had remembered correctly! One can see why, as with Shostakovich’s 4th and Popov’s 1st, the symphony landed the composer in some serious trouble with the Soviet authorities. This music rises to truly terrifying climaxes rife with dissonance, but there are also moments of sinuous, “exotic” lyricism (esp. in the slow mvt.) that perhaps recall Glière. Lyatoshynsky’s writing for the low brass and harp is particularly arresting. Some passages even recall the more chromatic moments in John Williams’ film scores! The Kuchar performance on Naxos is quite good (though the sound is a bit congested); it would be nice to hear Karabits tackle this symphony as well, aided of course by Chandos’ superior sound.

Your description uses all the words needed for me to salivate.  Must seek this out!

Offline Scion7

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #78 on: October 18, 2020, 10:57:49 PM »
Tbh...I just assumed it was a snyprrr title... /shrug

No, the thread got 'moved' way back, and the 'love in' thing was added when it re-appeared.  >:D  I  finally removed it from my posts in the thread Friday.  The whole 'hippie' thing was detestable from the standpoint of those of us who were rooted in Ludwig Van, Coltrane, The Who, and Free back then.  Those chaps didn't wash!  Why punish the father of Ukrainian music for that?!?  :P
Your barricades lie broken ... your enemies lord.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Boris Lyatoshynsky [1895-1968]
« Reply #79 on: October 19, 2020, 11:13:31 PM »
So I've just started watching that performance of No. 3 on Youtube posted above, and...I think that repeating motif in the second movement is the same as the first three notes of the entire symphony.