Author Topic: Bruckner's Abbey  (Read 460764 times)

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M forever

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #680 on: April 13, 2008, 07:36:42 PM »
Indeed, and there is another concept that eldues a lot of people which Dutoit understands very well. It is called "style".

head-case

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #681 on: April 13, 2008, 09:06:47 PM »
Indeed, and there is another concept that eldues a lot of people which Dutoit understands very well. It is called "style".
Which is recordings of Suppe exhibit a total lack of.

head-case

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #682 on: April 13, 2008, 09:07:41 PM »
I was thinking more of the gorgeous Mehta VPO, Karajan, Paray..., all of whom show lots of verve and vigour. Excitement and energy are not synonymous with speed, a concept that still seems to elude some people...

The brilliance of Solti's recording of these pieces had very little to do with speed.

M forever

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #683 on: April 14, 2008, 03:52:25 AM »
Which is recordings of Suppe exhibit a total lack of.


Many of your postings here show clearly that you have no idea what musical style is (or rather, what musical styles are), when it comes to both compositions and performance styles, so but I will stick with Dutoit when it comes to that question. But thanks for your contribution anyway.

head-case

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #684 on: April 14, 2008, 04:37:01 AM »
Many of your postings here show clearly that you have no idea what musical style is (or rather, what musical styles are), when it comes to both compositions and performance styles, so but I will stick with Dutoit when it comes to that question. But thanks for your contribution anyway.

Most of your postings here show clearly that "doesn't agree with you" is equivalent to "doesn't know anything."  But thanks for your sarcastic remark.

Bonehelm

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #685 on: April 15, 2008, 06:04:34 PM »
Most of your postings here show clearly that "doesn't agree with you" is equivalent to "doesn't know anything."  But thanks for your sarcastic remark.


He's a hopeless case, head, save yourself some time and listen to some Bruckner instead!  ;) He might think we are worth his time (seeing as he makes sarcastic remarks to the posts of people who dont agree with him all the time), but he is definitely not worth our time!  :)

M forever

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #686 on: April 15, 2008, 07:50:04 PM »
Looks like you two found each other! Have fun in the kiddie corner! Perfect FIFTH, bring some cookies for your new friend.

Most of your postings here show clearly that "doesn't agree with you" is equivalent to "doesn't know anything."

Very true, that's because most people here - like you - really have nothing of interest to say. If you want to participate in a discussion, you have to have something to say, and you have to have to be able to back up your views and arguments. Some can do that, and they can be very interesting discussion partners - especially when they disagree with me but can make points -, but you are unfortunately not one of them. Sorry!

But you can play with Perfect FIFTH while the grownups have their discussions, so don't be sad, OK?

Bonehelm

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #687 on: April 15, 2008, 08:33:51 PM »
Looks like you two found each other! Have fun in the kiddie corner! Perfect FIFTH, bring some cookies for your new friend.

Very true, that's because most people here - like you - really have nothing of interest to say. If you want to participate in a discussion, you have to have something to say, and you have to have to be able to back up your views and arguments. Some can do that, and they can be very interesting discussion partners - especially when they disagree with me but can make points -, but you are unfortunately not one of them. Sorry!

But you can play with Perfect FIFTH while the grownups have their discussions, so don't be sad, OK?

Ooh look who's talking! That's right, he's responding to our posts again! See, head-case? He proved me right, he really wasn't going to give up any chance to waste his time on us.  :)

Offline rubio

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #688 on: April 15, 2008, 10:07:44 PM »
Is this Haitink's 1981 recording of the Bruckner 9th? What do you think about it? I have heard his reindition of the scherzo should be quite something.

http://www.amazon.com/Bruckner-Symphony-No-9-Haitink/dp/B00000E2LS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1208329382&sr=1-1

« Last Edit: April 15, 2008, 10:18:22 PM by rubio »
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #689 on: April 15, 2008, 10:29:11 PM »
Is this Haitink's 1981 recording of the Bruckner 9th? What do you think about it? I have heard his reindition of the scherzo should be quite something.

http://www.amazon.com/Bruckner-Symphony-No-9-Haitink/dp/B00000E2LS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1208329382&sr=1-1



Hm, I don't know, I don't know the cover. But what I DO know is that that second Haitink Ninth is one of my favourite performances - the Coda of the first movement is colossal, with two sets of timpani underpinning the iambic rhythm in the lower brass. We have had a discussion here already about which version Haitink was using, because he is not one to tamper with scores...
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #690 on: April 16, 2008, 04:39:12 AM »
Is this Haitink's 1981 recording of the Bruckner 9th? What do you think about it? I have heard his reindition of the scherzo should be quite something.

http://www.amazon.com/Bruckner-Symphony-No-9-Haitink/dp/B00000E2LS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1208329382&sr=1-1



Yes, that's the 1981 performance that Jezetha and I love so much.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

head-case

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #691 on: April 16, 2008, 04:46:39 AM »
Very true, that's because most people here - like you - really have nothing of interest to say.

Always a pleasure.

Lilas Pastia

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #692 on: April 16, 2008, 05:09:24 AM »
I haven't heard that Haitink recording for decades, and it was on cassette. I do recall it being recorded in a much darker acoustic than the usual COA sound, which - to my ears at least - cast a gloomy atmosphere on the proceedings. It is much slower than Haitink's 1963 recording - which in turn could be described as too lightweight...  A similar evolution can be heard in his 1969 and 1981 eight. I love both, but tend to return to the dynamic, volatile first recording more often.

My Bruckner listening has come to a generalpause lately. Too much stuff to listen to, and too little time on my hands. Next in line are the Thielemann 7th and a 2002 Haitink SD 8th.

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #693 on: April 16, 2008, 05:18:54 AM »
I haven't heard that Haitink recording for decades, and it was on cassette. I do recall it being recorded in a much darker acoustic than the usual COA sound, which - to my ears at least - cast a gloomy atmosphere on the proceedings. It is much slower than Haitink's 1963 recording - which in turn could be described as too lightweight...

Your memory is in perfect shape, LP - the sound of this recording is indeed dark and heavy, but I don't think that contradicts the spirit of Bruckner's Ninth. (I don't know Haitink's first foray, btw, so I can't compare.) I also agree that the sound in this recording is different from the usual COA sound - I know the Concertgebouw acoustics from experience, and this recording surprised me too when I first heard it. I like it this way (but not for all pieces, mind you!).
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline rubio

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #694 on: April 16, 2008, 05:56:52 AM »
Hm, I don't know, I don't know the cover. But what I DO know is that that second Haitink Ninth is one of my favourite performances - the Coda of the first movement is colossal, with two sets of timpani underpinning the iambic rhythm in the lower brass. We have had a discussion here already about which version Haitink was using, because he is not one to tamper with scores...

Are there other conductors whom use two sets of timpani in the first movement?
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #695 on: April 16, 2008, 06:29:32 AM »
Are there other conductors whom use two sets of timpani in the first movement?

This is the only performance I know where that iambic rhythm I mentioned is reinforced by the timpani (it ought to be just a drum-roll, IIRC). M forever may correct me, but this use of the timpani is sui generis, and I don't know which version Haitink has used. The effect, by the way, is monumental.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 06:32:26 AM by Jezetha »
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline rubio

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #696 on: April 16, 2008, 07:26:43 AM »
This is the only performance I know where that iambic rhythm I mentioned is reinforced by the timpani (it ought to be just a drum-roll, IIRC). M forever may correct me, but this use of the timpani is sui generis, and I don't know which version Haitink has used. The effect, by the way, is monumental.

Thank you very much for your comments. I really look forward to hear it now (as I pushed the buy button... :)).
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #697 on: April 16, 2008, 07:37:51 AM »
Thank you very much for your comments. I really look forward to hear it now (as I pushed the buy button... :)).

You won't regret your purchase, Rubio!
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Lilas Pastia

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #698 on: April 16, 2008, 12:14:29 PM »
This is the only performance I know where that iambic rhythm I mentioned is reinforced by the timpani (it ought to be just a drum-roll, IIRC). M forever may correct me, but this use of the timpani is sui generis, and I don't know which version Haitink has used. The effect, by the way, is monumental.

  ??? Do yo mean it goes tu-DUM, tu-DUM instead of just rolling ? If that's the case, he's not alone, I've heard it elsewhere too. I'd have to check...

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #699 on: April 16, 2008, 12:24:11 PM »
  ??? Do yo mean it goes tu-DUM, tu-DUM instead of just rolling ? If that's the case, he's not alone, I've heard it elsewhere too. I'd have to check...

Please do (tu-DUM is an iamb, indeed)! If you can find another performance with this same effect, that would be great.
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato