Author Topic: Stockhausen's Spaceship  (Read 349780 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #600 on: June 29, 2013, 10:34:13 AM »
Stockhausen has lots of favored instruments! basset horn, trumpet,...

snyprrr

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #601 on: June 29, 2013, 07:41:35 PM »
True .. winds, percussion, keyboard, harp, voice etc  .. in fact, one could easily write on the innumerable expansions he made in music throughout his work, in all areas really. And many have. But I've always felt that the association he had with his son was very interesting and fruitful. Even this thing on the trumpet I posted above isn't completely comprehensive ..  it doesn't go into some of the strong extensive later pieces from LICHT featuring the trumpet like Bassetsu-Trio (Mittwoch) and the truly amazing Licht-Bilder (Sonntag) etc. Or KLANG trumpet stuff ..  i.e. solo Harmonien, trios .. Schonheit, Erwachen.

I'd like to hear the Trumpet Quartet.

snyprrr

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #602 on: July 04, 2013, 06:23:42 AM »
What other Luciferiaen Composers do we have? Scriabin? Ravel?...

Offline San Antone

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #603 on: July 12, 2013, 04:39:15 AM »
James, you had asked about the Licht recordings that I had - and after checking, it seems like I don't have all of them.  I am missing Day 4 entirely, and of the rest some have 70 or so tracks and the others have one or two long tracks, lasting about 70 minutes of music.  I have a total of 13 discs.

Offline San Antone

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #604 on: July 12, 2013, 04:49:59 AM »
Yea .. you're a bit short of having it all as there are a little over 70 discs worth of the LICHTWERKE. When you say 4th Day do you mean Thursday (Donnerstag) ? or the 4th day he composed chronologically which would be Tuesday (Dienstag) ?

I have some two "discs" (how I've got them sequenced in my library) from Dienstag with a total of 135 tracks; so by "Day 4" I mean Donnerstag.  But since these are files and not physical discs I don' know how they would really appear in the proper format.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2013, 04:52:09 AM by sanantonio »

Offline deafeninglysilent_1.61...

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #605 on: July 21, 2013, 09:11:36 AM »


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EgG_feXOQM0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EgG_feXOQM0</a>

Published on Jul 20, 2013
via YouTube Capture


Marvelous piece! One of my favorites.
avatar photo of Stockhausen from Inori lecture taken by Kathinka Pasveer in 2005

"All sounds can make meaningful language." - Karlheinz Stockhausen

snyprrr

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #606 on: September 19, 2013, 07:06:19 AM »
Nicholas Isherwood Sings Stockhausen in Los Angeles



September 9, 2013
Posted by Paul Muller in Concert review
Contemporary Classical, Electro-Acoustic, Experimental Music, Los Angeles

On a hot September 7th Saturday night, People Inside Electronics and LA Sonic Odyssey presented bass-baritone Nicholas Isherwood in a concert of electronic and vocal music given at the Moryork Gallery in Highland Park. This was the Los Angeles appearance for Isherwood’s world tour that will also take him to New Zealand, Portugal and France. The evening included works by Michael Norris, Jean-Claude Risset, Lissa Meridan, Isaac Shankler and featured an adaptation of Karlheintz Stockhausen’s powerful Capricorn.

The interior walls were lined with all sorts of exotic items and the acoustics were carefully engineered with several good speakers placed around the perimeter of the audience. A table with a soundboard and several computers completed the electronic setup.

After an intermission Capricorn, by Karlheinz Stockhausen was performed. This was perhaps the most conventionally structured piece of the evening, almost operatic in form. In this adaptation an alien being from the dogstar appears and sings the music of sphere Sirius to the audience. Nicholas Isherwood made his entrance accompanied by loud electronic sounds simulating the roar of an arriving spaceship. He was dressed head to toe in a silver body suit and silver makeup – a heroic feat in itself considering the heat – and climbed up to a raised platform, facing the audience. The program notes state that “The work is based on simple melodies from Stockhausen’s piece ZODIAC, which are sometimes slowed down so much that the melody is no longer recognizable.”

The electronics in this piece provided a mysterious, but never menacing, ambiance suited to the alien presence. The singing was strong but controlled, and Isherwood stood rooted to the same place on his platform, changing his pose as the music required. And it was all very convincing – you could actually believe that you were hearing an alien bringing his message through song. As the piece progressed, empathy for the alien increased as the warmth of his message took hold, winning over the audience. A beautiful ending vocal preceded the rush of sound as his spaceship departed, closing the work. This performance by Nicholas Isherwood was greeted with enthusiastic applause for what was clearly a powerful reading of a landmark work.

Nicholas Isherwood worked with Karlheinz Stockhausen from 1983 to 2007 in addition to an international career in opera and commercial recordings. He has taught at the Paris Conseratorie and the Salzburg Mozarteum and has also held a number of visiting professorships in both Europe and North America.

The next concert from People in Electronics will be October 8th, 2013 at the Monk Space in Los Angeles and will feature the Lyris Quartet.


Isherwood's got THAT voice, love it!!

btw James- your Thread hear is starting to get kinda spacey in how it comes and goes, always with a long update, and I start to think of you as Bruce Dern in Silent Running.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #607 on: October 16, 2013, 10:11:54 AM »
Recently discovered Stockhausen manuscript long thought lost!  Space-Wank for nose-flute, mandocello, ring modulator and amplified tweezers.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline Cato

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #608 on: October 16, 2013, 10:24:15 AM »
Recently discovered Stockhausen manuscript long thought lost!  Space-Wank for nose-flute, mandocello, ring modulator and amplified tweezers.

Would that be part of this family of modulators?


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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #609 on: October 16, 2013, 10:26:21 AM »
It was so explosive, my mind was blown, cats.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #610 on: October 16, 2013, 10:28:47 AM »
James, have you heard any Stockhausen in live performance? When was the last time you attended a concert? Just curious.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #611 on: October 16, 2013, 11:00:58 AM »
a) Yea .. I have. b) This past summer.

Thanks.

a) Which pieces? b) What were the programs you heard live this summer? Just curious.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline HenselFlaeder

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #612 on: October 17, 2013, 10:19:18 AM »
Cool thread James!

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #613 on: October 17, 2013, 11:49:12 AM »
After dinner yesterday, there was a knock on the door. I answered, and found two well-dressed young men in their 20s, one holding a tape reel, and the other a model helicopter.

"Oh, you boys must be Stockhausen's Witnesses."
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #614 on: October 17, 2013, 11:59:52 AM »
8)

Don't feel too smug, James. The dude's a newbie. Just wait till he gets to know you  :D ;)

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Offline San Antone

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #615 on: October 24, 2013, 06:57:44 AM »
Since we're talkin' pupils, for consideration of further exploration .. some of these pupils went on to write some absolutely vast, incredibly inventive jawdropping choral edifices. See KS's Invisible Choirs, Welt-parlament or Angel Processions for instance. Clear examples of a pupil far surpassing not only all the other pupils but also the teacher!

Which made wonder, did Stockhausen have any pupils?  Formal students, that is, as opposed to those who say they were influenced by his work.

Offline CRCulver

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #616 on: October 24, 2013, 07:30:35 AM »
Which made wonder, did Stockhausen have any pupils?  Formal students, that is, as opposed to those who say they were influenced by his work.

Yes, Stockhausen had quite the formal teaching career.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #617 on: October 24, 2013, 07:33:18 AM »
Fantastic! And he taught, too! Was there anything the man could not do?  And he was clearly in a class apart even from his teachers, for whom the act of teaching Stockhausen had to have been a transfigurational experience, truly, how could their drab lives have possibly been the same after touching that incredible soul of genius?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline San Antone

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #618 on: October 24, 2013, 07:48:41 AM »
Yes, Stockhausen had quite the formal teaching career.

The article does not list any students who came out of these teaching activities, and who might have gone on to notable composing careers of their own.  Do you know of any composers from the second half of the 20th century who acknowledge studying with Stockhausen?

Offline CRCulver

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Re: Stockhausen's Spaceship
« Reply #619 on: October 24, 2013, 07:52:54 AM »
The article does not list any students who came out of these teaching activities, and who might have gone on to notable composing careers of their own.  Do you know of any composers from the second half of the 20th century who acknowledge studying with Stockhausen?

Here you go. You'll have to click through to find those who studied under him at the Hochschule, as opposed to those who just had a single summer course with him. However, Claude Vivier and Wolfgang Rihm are two formal students I can name off the top of my head. (On the documentary on the Claude Vivier Reves d'un Marco Polo DVD set, one of Stockhausen's students that is less well known and whose name I forget, recounts a little of his and Vivier's days under the maestro.)
« Last Edit: October 24, 2013, 07:55:17 AM by CRCulver »