Author Topic: Gustave Samazeuillh  (Read 1907 times)

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Offline schweitzeralan

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Gustave Samazeuillh
« on: January 15, 2009, 06:37:00 AM »
This was an impressionistic find for me. I discovered uncompromising French musical affinities which bring to mind the panistic works of Debussy and Ravel, particularly the former. There are also soft reminders of Florent Schmitt and Cesar Franck, with occasional hints of Scriabin buried in the 1910 noctrne "Naides au Soir." The "Le Chant de la Mer," "Suite en Sol," "Esquisses" make for rewarding listening.  Samazeuillh was well known among his contemporaries and had a strong friendship with the likes of Franck, Duparc, D'Indy, and Dukas, among others. He was not a prolific composer, as I can only surmise; however, some of his works are gradually being revealed to the general public. Perhaps his works may not be conceived on the same level as those of  Debussy or Ravel; nevertheless I am pleased to find  recordings of impressionistic music when and where it is available.

karlhenning

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Re: Gustave Samazeuillh
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2009, 07:27:42 AM »
Just an inch and a half on him in the Harvard Biographical Dictionary of Music.

springrite

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Re: Gustave Samazeuillh
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2009, 07:31:02 AM »
I have a good feel for what kind of music you like now, considering Samazeuillh is for me quite similar (in spirit if not in sound) to Raitio.

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Gustave Samazeuillh
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2009, 09:42:15 AM »
I have a good feel for what kind of music you like now, considering Samazeuillh is for me quite similar (in spirit if not in sound) to Raitio.

A kindred spirit perhaps.  I don't know anyone personally who appreciates the specific composers I've listened to over thesr many years. I'm pleased to learn that this forum involves participants who share with others their considerable interest and knowledge of composers well recognized and established as well as of those composers whose works are not as well known or appreciated.

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Gustave Samazeuillh
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2009, 07:47:38 PM »
I have a good feel for what kind of music you like now, considering Samazeuillh is for me quite similar (in spirit if not in sound) to Raitio.

Rifht on.  What other composers' works interest you?

springrite

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Re: Gustave Samazeuillh
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2009, 07:58:50 PM »
Rifht on.  What other composers' works interest you?

I have a very wide range, almost too wide, from Bach to Carter, Raitio to Saariaho, Kurtag to Isang Yun. I do not go for unknown composers for the sake of it. If it is simply second-rate (to my ear), I'd move to others. (Some "minor composers" are "minor" and "neglected" for good reasons!) But some of the so-called minor composers have their distinct voice. That is what interests me.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2009, 08:01:55 PM by springrite »

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Gustave Samazeuillh
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2009, 02:18:36 PM »
I have a very wide range, almost too wide, from Bach to Carter, Raitio to Saariaho, Kurtag to Isang Yun. I do not go for unknown composers for the sake of it. If it is simply second-rate (to my ear), I'd move to others. (Some "minor composers" are "minor" and "neglected" for good reasons!) But some of the so-called minor composers have their distinct voice. That is what interests me.

Interesting.  When I was younger my interests in classical music were far more ecumenical.  I would listen to so many American and European composers, far too many to mention here.  I was "into" serial works, minimalism, neo-classicism; neo-primitivism; whatever.  A vast array.  Lately, however, for some reason, I tend to listen to works of far fewer composers, most notably those who were writing during the first three decades of the 20th century.  These things are just personal.  I'll still listen on occasion to Carter, a splended genius of a composer, or occasionally to Mennin, Bartok, Takemitsu, and to other modernist composers. Only occasionally. My primary loves are Sibelius; Scriabin ; Bax; Debussy; Ravel; Rachmaninof; plus other composers whose works are influeced by those mentioned above. Again, just personal.  Cheers.