Author Topic: Parry  (Read 14458 times)

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tjguitar

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Parry
« on: May 18, 2007, 05:45:20 PM »
I read on the older forum that he is similar to Stanford and I like Stanford...but Chandos has the 3 disc set of the complete Parry Symphonies for a hefty retail price of $50, which is just as much as the Stanford which is 4 discs...I got the Stanford set fairly discounted, but the cheapest I see the Parry is around $40 at overstock.


Is it recommended?  Or nothing special?  Of course if Chandos were to reissue it at midprice or budget, that would be ideal....


TJ

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Parry
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2007, 02:55:09 AM »
The Chandos set is fine but maybe worth waiting until it is available at a cheaper price. I would not, however, be without Boult's Lyrita and EMI recordings of Parry's "Symphonic Variations" and Symphony 5 (EMI). I actually prefer the Parry Variations to those of Elgar. More concise,but just as moving in its understated way.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline sound67

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Re: Parry
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2007, 06:01:06 AM »
The Chandos set is fine but maybe worth waiting until it is available at a cheaper price. I would not, however, be without Boult's Lyrita and EMI recordings of Parry's "Symphonic Variations" and Symphony 5 (EMI).

The "Symphonic Variations" may be Parry's orchestral masterpiece. It can hold its own against Brahms's Haydn Variations. The Boult CD mentioned is just great:


http://www.lyrita.co.uk/cgi-bin/lyrita_build.pl?filename=SRCD0220.txt

Thomas
"Vivaldi didn't compose 500 concertos. He composed the same concerto 500 times" - Igor Stravinsky

"Mozart is a menace to musical progress, a relic of rituals that were losing relevance in his own time and are meaningless to ours." - Norman Lebrecht

tjguitar

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Re: Parry
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2007, 08:07:21 AM »
Quote
would not, however, be without Boult's Lyrita and EMI recordings of Parry's "Symphonic Variations" and Symphony 5 (EMI).

Is the symphony out of print?

Anyways, I forgot to mention that I do have the following CD which has Bamert's recording of the Symphonic Variations:


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Parry
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2007, 07:13:32 AM »
The Lyrita was recently reissued (£10 from MDT in UK)

The Bamert is good but the Boult is better.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Harry

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Re: Parry
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2007, 03:46:21 AM »
I have this one, and think it good!

PerfectWagnerite

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Re: Parry
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2007, 06:42:27 AM »
I have Symphony No. 5; Elegy for Brahms; From Death to Life from the complete Chandos set. I think the music is horribly boring, certainly nothing special. I haven't heard Stanford so I can't comment on whether Parry and Stanford are similar or not.



Offline sound67

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Re: Parry
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2007, 12:01:18 AM »
Wagner fans tend to find music written by composers leaning towards Brahms boring. However, it is not. From Death to Life is a fine tone poem, and No.5 a highly concentrated, eloquent symphony.

Thomas
"Vivaldi didn't compose 500 concertos. He composed the same concerto 500 times" - Igor Stravinsky

"Mozart is a menace to musical progress, a relic of rituals that were losing relevance in his own time and are meaningless to ours." - Norman Lebrecht

PerfectWagnerite

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Re: Parry
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2007, 05:30:43 AM »
Wagner fans tend to find music written by composers leaning towards Brahms boring. However, it is not. From Death to Life is a fine tone poem, and No.5 a highly concentrated, eloquent symphony.

Thomas

I love Brahms though.

In any case I much prefer other British composers like VW and Bax. Is the music of Parry pleasant, certainly, but I wouldn't drop a tear if I never get to know it though.

Scarpia

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Re: Parry
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2010, 11:09:36 PM »
Parry doesn't come up often around here.

Listened to the Elegy for Brahms and Symphonic Variations on Bamert's odds and ends disc (shown above) and I'd say the music is well crafted but strikingly derivative of Brahms' style.  There is the major/minor chiaroscuro, and certain traits of orchestration which really bear Brahms' imprint.  But I do like the sound of it and am tempted to seek out at least some of the symphony recordings.  Does Parry show originality in his proper symphonies?

Elgarian

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Re: Parry
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2010, 12:56:00 AM »
But I do like the sound of it and am tempted to seek out at least some of the symphony recordings.  Does Parry show originality in his proper symphonies?

I don't think I know enough to comment on his originality, except by observing that with Parry there's always some Brahms in the background. But even so, Parry does have a distinctive voice in his symphonies, and it's possible to listen to certain passages and think 'that's pure Parry'.

His second (Cambridge) symphony, while not profound, and perhaps a little sweet for some tastes, is actually one of my personal favourite symphonies - full of melody; and the slow movement (one of those 'pure Parry' episodes, has a yearning, romantic quality to it that I like very much, but which won't be everyone's cup of tea.

The third (English) and fourth symphonies are a distinct step forward, and there are passages in them that are so reminiscent of Elgar that one realises that the Elgar 'sound' didn't by any means just appear from nowhere. But the overall tone remains 'Parry', not 'proto-Elgar' (Brahms influence invariably not far away of course). The third and fourth symphonies are both substantial works, and shouldn't have been dismissed from the repertoire in the way they were, and are. I've never quite clicked with the 5th symphony myself, but perhaps I'll warm to it one of these days. The 'Symphonic Variations' (which someone mentioned earlier in this thread) are great fun of course, though I find I exhaust it quickly.

snyprrr

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Re: Parry
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2010, 09:20:53 AM »
What? Parry is so great that he gets a one word Title? :o :P ::) ;D

What if I started a "Jones" thread?

Elgarian

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Re: Parry
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2010, 12:54:03 PM »
What if I started a "Jones" thread?
I'm afraid Jones's symphonies are very derivative of Smith's.

eyeresist

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Re: Parry
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2010, 04:17:11 PM »
I'm afraid Jones's symphonies are very derivative of Smith's.
Also Jo(hn) Blow.

Scarpia

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Re: Parry
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2010, 04:14:04 PM »
Listened to Parry's "From Life to Death" (or is it the other way around?).  A very nice piece.  Built from interesting, recognizable themes, which are developed in an interesting way harmonically, and with some moments of true drama and depth.  Based on the date of composition it is clear he was a bit old-fashioned in his day, but wrote with skill and feeling.  I'd say he is a first-rate second-rate composer.  I have his symphony set on order now and have no regrets, after listening to this piece.
 

Elgarian

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Re: Parry
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2010, 10:02:50 PM »
I'd say he is a first-rate second-rate composer.
That's a pretty fair description, I'd say. (He was also, by all accounts, a very nice chap.)

secondwind

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Re: Parry
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2010, 10:05:15 PM »
All in all, there are much worse things to be than a first-rate second-rate composer and a very nice chap.  I'll have to listen to some Parry to make his acquaintance! ;D

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Parry
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2010, 06:56:07 AM »
All in all, there are much worse things to be than a first-rate second-rate composer and a very nice chap.  I'll have to listen to some Parry to make his acquaintance! ;D

The Symphonic Variations are first rate IMHO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Elgarian

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Re: Parry
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2010, 08:26:31 AM »
All in all, there are much worse things to be than a first-rate second-rate composer and a very nice chap.  I'll have to listen to some Parry to make his acquaintance! ;D

There certainly are. Among guests at my imaginary artists' dinner, where I'm allowed to invite any composers, painters, and writers from any time, anywhere, Parry is near the top of the list.

If you get the Chandos recording of the second symphony, you also get the Symphonic Variations which, as Vandermolen says, represent Parry in tiptop form.

http://www.amazon.com/Parry-Symphony-Cambridge-Symphonic-Variations/dp/B000000AMY/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267374279&sr=1-10

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Parry
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2010, 09:17:13 AM »


If you get the Chandos recording of the second symphony, you also get the Symphonic Variations which, as Vandermolen says, represent Parry in tiptop form.

http://www.amazon.com/Parry-Symphony-Cambridge-Symphonic-Variations/dp/B000000AMY/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1267374279&sr=1-10

I actually prefer them to the Elgar Enigma Variations - but maybe that is because I am over-familiar with the Elgar. They are more concise too - but still moving in an understated kind of way. Boult's Lyrita recording is best I think, but you wont go wrong with the Chandos version.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).