Author Topic: J.S. Bach on the Organ  (Read 550783 times)

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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3200 on: November 08, 2020, 12:55:53 PM »
I think what Rubsam does sounds really good though -- I'm  not saying it's the only way, but it is a good way.

Now you urge me to listen to it.
It's better to act today than to regret tomorrow.
(Mette Frederiksen)

Online Mandryka

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3201 on: November 08, 2020, 12:57:45 PM »
I don't think Rübsam changes tempo at that section, he just plays everything at a net slower pace. I like it - too many rushed 656's out there.


I agree. Another slow one, probably my favourite, is Koopman at Ottobeuren on Novalis. Even Don Satz, someone who used to post here and hated Koopman, liked that one!



I can't tell if your Halubek comments are an endorsement or not.

Nor can I, I need to give it more time. I know that I was immediately attracted to his CU3, less so to this, but nothing follows.

(Listening now to the organ music through smaller speakers than this morning - now Spendor SP1, this morning Quad ESL 63 - has made me see how essential big speakers are! )
« Last Edit: November 08, 2020, 01:01:57 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3202 on: November 08, 2020, 03:15:05 PM »
I know that I was immediately attracted to his CU3, less so to this, but nothing follows.

After a few listens, I find his playing a bit boring - fast, light and indifferent. But maybe I'll get over it, it's still a promising set.

I have a sense that the Waltershausen Trost organ is simply so eccentric and full of character that in most recordings of it I hear more organ than player. (I mean, take away the charming timbres of the instrument and you are left with a rather unremarkable performance)
I wonder what a really distinctive performer, Ton Koopman for instance, can do on it.

Online Mandryka

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3203 on: November 08, 2020, 08:14:14 PM »
After a few listens, I find his playing a bit boring - fast, light and indifferent. But maybe I'll get over it, it's still a promising set.



I can see that, but the sound is good and it was a pleasure to hear the music played in a pretty straightforward way. Weinberger recorded some of the Leipzig Chorales at Waltershausen, I must go back to that one, I remember feeling positive about what he did in one of his recordings of that music, but I can’t remember if it was Waltershausen or Feriberg.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2020, 08:21:47 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline milk

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3204 on: November 09, 2020, 10:20:36 PM »
Bach owned a pedal harpsichord, right? Do we know if it was mainly a practice instrument for organ works?

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3205 on: November 10, 2020, 01:35:58 AM »
Bach owned a pedal harpsichord, right? Do we know if it was mainly a practice instrument for organ works?

'3. Clavire nebst Pedal' given to JC Bach upon his death - likely a pedal clavichord with 2 manuals. (some also argue that it was a pedal harpsichord)

Usually organ builders, upon building a new organ, would also provide a set of pedal clavichords with the same console dimensions as the organ for practice. Pedal harpsichords were much rarer.

Offline milk

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3206 on: November 10, 2020, 03:12:24 PM »
'3. Clavire nebst Pedal' given to JC Bach upon his death - likely a pedal clavichord with 2 manuals. (some also argue that it was a pedal harpsichord)

Usually organ builders, upon building a new organ, would also provide a set of pedal clavichords with the same console dimensions as the organ for practice. Pedal harpsichords were much rarer.
wait a second. Pedal clavichord? How did I miss this? Has no one made a recording with this instrument?
ETA: Vogel, I see. But it’s V1 and not streaming.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2020, 03:16:51 PM by milk »

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: J.S. Bach on the Organ
« Reply #3207 on: November 10, 2020, 05:29:30 PM »
wait a second. Pedal clavichord? How did I miss this? Has no one made a recording with this instrument?
ETA: Vogel, I see. But it’s V1 and not streaming.

Vogel, and also Balint Karosi on Youtube with the trio sonatas. The pedal harpsichord has gotten more of the spotlight in the past (or I guess harpsichords in general) but pedal clavichords were definitely more common. Even Bruckner practiced on one in the early 19th century.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2020, 05:31:18 PM by bioluminescentsquid »