Author Topic: Bruckner's Abbey  (Read 516566 times)

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Offline Biffo

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3500 on: January 09, 2021, 09:15:21 AM »
In various places I have noticed an increase in interest in the Symphony #1, which I have always found a wonderful work.  Some reviewers and Brucknerians throughout the years have sniffed at it somewhat, which I have never understood.  Eugen Jochum's DGG recording brings out the energy and ebullience in the work.


Anyway, this CD came out about a year ago.




I am not sure whether it is a newer performance, or a re-issue from 2012, which also offered the Symphonies II and III.





See also:

https://www.abruckner.com/store/abrucknercomexclus/exclusiveandhardto/symphony-no-1-vienna-version-of-1891-gerd-schaller/

This was the first Bruckner symphony I heard and I have loved it ever since - I still have the LP

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3501 on: January 09, 2021, 10:11:08 AM »
# 1 is a cracking work, bursting with energy. My first version and, TBH still my favourite, is Haitink’s RCOA.

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3502 on: January 10, 2021, 05:16:44 AM »
In various places I have noticed an increase in interest in the Symphony #1, which I have always found a wonderful work.  Some reviewers and Brucknerians throughout the years have sniffed at it somewhat, which I have never understood.  Eugen Jochum's DGG recording brings out the energy and ebullience in the work.


Anyway, this CD came out about a year ago.




I am not sure whether it is a newer performance, or a re-issue from 2012, which also offered the Symphonies II and III.





See also:

https://www.abruckner.com/store/abrucknercomexclus/exclusiveandhardto/symphony-no-1-vienna-version-of-1891-gerd-schaller/

Leo, it is a newer recording, I believe. The one from 2012 is the early Linz version of 1866.  That's the one that is included in the Schaller box set.
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Offline krummholz

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3503 on: January 10, 2021, 07:06:47 AM »
Which reminds me, Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony No. 2 is in E-flat minor (six flats!).

And his Chamber Symphony No. 1 ends in E major, I believe.

My ranking of the Bruckner symphonies:

#8 (superb through and through - can't point to a favorite movement)
#9 (second only because he didn't live to finish it - all signs are that the finished work would have deserved the #1 spot)
#6 (I disagree that the finale is weak... and the slow movement is one of his best IMO)
#7 (and the Adagio is my favorite movement... but I agree that the last two movements are too short)
#3 (contains IMO his first great slow movement)
#5 (I love the Adagio but have some reservations about the Finale's length)
#1 (agree that it's full of energy and life... but it is relatively early and IMO not quite mature)
#4 (I like the Finale best of all the movements)
#2 (this one has always struck me as rambling and weak... but it could just be me)

Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3504 on: January 10, 2021, 07:10:46 AM »
Love your list ! The only change I’d make is to elevate #5 to the third rank. I especially like that lengthy finale  :P

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3505 on: January 10, 2021, 07:36:26 AM »

# 1 is a cracking work, bursting with energy. My first version and, TBH still my favourite, is Haitink’s RCOA.



Amen, Andre' !





Anyway, this CD came out about a year ago.




I am not sure whether it is a newer performance, or a re-issue from 2012, which also offered the Symphonies II and III.





See also:

https://www.abruckner.com/store/abrucknercomexclus/exclusiveandhardto/symphony-no-1-vienna-version-of-1891-gerd-schaller/








Leo, it is a newer recording, I believe. The one from 2012 is the early Linz version of 1866.  That's the one that is included in the Schaller box set.



Many thanks for the information!
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Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3506 on: January 13, 2021, 03:23:58 PM »
Here is an interesting mix:




Quote


We announce the upcoming release of Andris Nelsons and the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig’s performance of Bruckner’s Symphonies Nos. 2 & 8, coupled with Wagner’s Meistersinger Prelude. The Orchestra and the Latvian Maestro recently announced the extension of their acclaimed partnership until 2027.
“In this symphony, Bruckner has formulated everything very clearly: the wonderful themes are clearly separated from each other by general pauses, and yet the result is a great whole. It is astonishing that this work is so rarely performed – in fact it is an ideal introduction to the cosmos of Bruckner’s Symphony”, says Gewandhaus Kapellmeister Andris Nelsons about the second symphony. Bruckner himself called his Eighth a “mystery”. Andris Nelsons has much to gain from this: “Bruckner penetrated here, especially in the slow movement, into regions that were beyond the reach of other composers. The unity of the enormous work is also a miracle. The magnificent final set – the last that Bruckner was able to complete – contributes to this”.

The album is set to be released 5 February 2021 and is available for pre-order now. Listen to the first pre-release track Bruckner: Symphony No. 2: 3. Scherzo. Mäßig schnell – Trio. Gleiches Tempo now!



For that taste of the performance....


See:

https://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/catalogue/products/bruckner-symphonies-nos-2-8-nelsons-12212?utm_source=andere&utm_medium=organischer-post&utm_content=Nelsons+Bruckner+Symphonies+2+8&utm_campaign=Nelsons+Bruckner+Symphonies+2+8
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3507 on: January 14, 2021, 06:32:38 AM »

My ranking of the Bruckner symphonies:

#8 (superb through and through - can't point to a favorite movement)
#9 (second only because he didn't live to finish it - all signs are that the finished work would have deserved the #1 spot)
#6 (I disagree that the finale is weak... and the slow movement is one of his best IMO)
#7 (and the Adagio is my favorite movement... but I agree that the last two movements are too short)
#3 (contains IMO his first great slow movement)
#5 (I love the Adagio but have some reservations about the Finale's length)
#1 (agree that it's full of energy and life... but it is relatively early and IMO not quite mature)
#4 (I like the Finale best of all the movements)
#2 (this one has always struck me as rambling and weak... but it could just be me)

Well, I really do listen to 3-9 on a frequent basis, and lately it is 4 and 8 on a very frequent basis.

I listen much less frequently to 1 and 2, but particularly less to number 2.
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Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3508 on: January 14, 2021, 09:04:18 AM »


Well, speaking of the 2nd symphony......WOW!  This made a tremendously positive impression on me.  I had never heard the (much longer) 1872 First version, here edited by William Carragan.  I had only ever heard the revised (much shorter) 1877 version. 

For me, 100% prefer the 1872 version, which is longer, but also has the Scherzo as the second movement.  It seemed more cohesive than the highly revised and cut 1877 version.

Has anyone else heard the 1872 version?  Any thoughts?

« Last Edit: January 14, 2021, 09:05:54 AM by OrchestralNut »
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Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3509 on: January 14, 2021, 12:39:14 PM »


Well, speaking of the 2nd symphony......WOW!  This made a tremendously positive impression on me.  I had never heard the (much longer) 1872 First version, here edited by William Carragan.  I had only ever heard the revised (much shorter) 1877 version. 

For me, 100% prefer the 1872 version, which is longer, but also has the Scherzo as the second movement.  It seemed more cohesive than the highly revised and cut 1877 version.

Has anyone else heard the 1872 version?  Any thoughts?

+ 1 for me, the Tinter recording of #2 is almost the only one I listen to. Recently I listened to recording of the 1877 version and was genuinely shocked by the ineptness of the cut in the finale.

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3510 on: January 16, 2021, 07:10:16 PM »
+ 1 for me, the Tinter recording of #2 is almost the only one I listen to. Recently I listened to recording of the 1877 version and was genuinely shocked by the ineptness of the cut in the finale.

In general, "cutting" a Bruckner symphony is a bad idea, but from what I recall from biographical stories, almost every conductor back then told Bruckner that yes, he liked Symphony # X very much, "but, of course, there would have to be cuts."
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3511 on: January 16, 2021, 09:00:57 PM »
In general, "cutting" a Bruckner symphony is a bad idea, but from what I recall from biographical stories, almost every conductor back then told Bruckner that yes, he liked Symphony # X very much, "but, of course, there would have to be cuts."

Argh!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3512 on: January 17, 2021, 05:56:39 AM »
Well I bought Tintner's recording of the 2nd on the praise of some here, but unfortunately the disc does not play for some unknown reason. A shame. In any case, I will soon be revisiting the one recording of the symphony that I have: Barenboim with the Berlin Philharmonic. It's probably the Bruckner symphony I'm least familiar with, excepting the "disowned" symphonies, which I have only recently begun spending time with.

I'm listening now to the Marriner/Stuttgart recording of "Die Nullte". So far, I like it. I guess I must be really in a Bruckner mood lately because everything is clicking with me, even these supposedly minor early works.

Any general thoughts here on No.0 and No.00? Do you like them as much as the others, or was Bruckner right to have disowned them?

On an unrelated note, I saw this at the record store yesterday...:



Thoughts on this recording? I wasn't aware that Kubelik had recorded any Bruckner.

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3513 on: January 17, 2021, 06:06:18 AM »

Any general thoughts here on No.0 and No.00? Do you like them as much as the others, or was Bruckner right to have disowned them?


I myself have only recently started to get familiarized with the two zero numbered symphonies.

I find the early study symphony in F minor to be charming. It was Bruckner's first attempt at writing a symphony. It lacks some Brucknerian characteristics, but at the same time shows a lot of promise. I particularly love the scherzo.

For the other symphony, in D minor, this is a full blown mature work, in fact, written after Symphony number one. I think it is of a high quality, equal to Symphony number one and two!
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Offline André

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3514 on: January 17, 2021, 06:22:08 AM »
Well I bought Tintner's recording of the 2nd on the praise of some here, but unfortunately the disc does not play for some unknown reason. A shame. In any case, I will soon be revisiting the one recording of the symphony that I have: Barenboim with the Berlin Philharmonic. It's probably the Bruckner symphony I'm least familiar with, excepting the "disowned" symphonies, which I have only recently begun spending time with.

I'm listening now to the Marriner/Stuttgart recording of "Die Nullte". So far, I like it. I guess I must be really in a Bruckner mood lately because everything is clicking with me, even these supposedly minor early works.

Any general thoughts here on No.0 and No.00? Do you like them as much as the others, or was Bruckner right to have disowned them?

On an unrelated note, I saw this at the record store yesterday...:



Thoughts on this recording? I wasn't aware that Kubelik had recorded any Bruckner.

It’s my favourite performance of my preferrered version (1877). Also available in this fine, inexpensive box:

« Last Edit: January 17, 2021, 06:24:29 AM by André »

Offline Que

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3515 on: January 17, 2021, 07:00:22 AM »
On an unrelated note, I saw this at the record store yesterday...:



Thoughts on this recording? I wasn't aware that Kubelik had recorded any Bruckner.

I wouldn't call myself a true Brucknerian, but just want to echo André's response: amazing recording - get it!  :)

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3516 on: January 17, 2021, 03:04:52 PM »
I myself have only recently started to get familiarized with the two zero numbered symphonies.

I find the early study symphony in F minor to be charming. It was Bruckner's first attempt at writing a symphony. It lacks some Brucknerian characteristics, but at the same time shows a lot of promise. I particularly love the scherzo.


For the other symphony, in D minor, this is a full blown mature work, in fact, written after Symphony number one. I think it is of a high quality, equal to Symphony number one and two!



I wish it had been recorded:

A few years ago I heard The Toledo Symphony under Stefan Sanderling  perform Die Nullte in the Catholic cathedral there!  Sanderling and the orchestra proved that this was no beginner's work!

"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3517 on: February 02, 2021, 02:36:13 PM »
From the Anton Bruckner website:

Quote


One of the first things you learn in Psychology "101" is the concept of "Intermittent reinforcement." An occasional reward can keep someone coming back for more and more. The perfect real-world example of this concept is gambling. But this works with collecting as well. This month's download is a perfect example. I keep searching and searching for out-of-the-way Bruckner recordings and here is this one. It is a CD released in 2010 of a performance of the Youth Orchestra of Bremen. The orchestra is still in existence and the conductor, Stefan Geiger is active in Germany and he is still leading these talented young musicians. Here is a chance for all of us to hear their good work from over a decade ago. And I'll keep searching...


The download has 4 FLAC tracks.


https://www.abruckner.com//downloads/downloadofthemonth/february21/
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3518 on: February 02, 2021, 02:47:45 PM »
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Cato

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Re: Bruckner's Abbey
« Reply #3519 on: February 05, 2021, 04:41:26 AM »
A television performance from Spain of the Psalm 150 was sent to me recently by an Internet acquaintance:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/nmx0yRQhe78&amp;list=RDnmx0yRQhe78&amp;start_radio=1&amp;t=170" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/nmx0yRQhe78&amp;list=RDnmx0yRQhe78&amp;start_radio=1&amp;t=170</a>
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)